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Wenbo Peng

Biography

Dr Wenbo Peng is a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney, and a registered Chinese herbal medicine practitioner, acupuncturist, and Chinese herbal dispenser in Australia. In addition, Dr Peng was a lecturer and registered practitioner in Chinese medicine in China.

Dr Peng collaborates with Chinese medicine practitioners in China focusing upon the research of “Chinese Medicine surgery”. She is a current council member of the specialty committee of anal & intestinal disease of World Federation of Chinese Medicine Societies and a member of the Sydney Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine Research Committee.

Dr Peng received the 2014 Barbara Gross Award at the 18th Congress of the Australasian Menopause Society. She is the reviewer of some peer-reviewed journals, including Menopause, International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, European Journal of Integrative medicine, Advances in Integrative Medicine, Contemporary Nurse, and BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Her research interests involve public health and health services research, pain management, practice-based research networks, and women's health.

Professional

  • Australian registered Chinese herbal medicine practitioner, acupuncturist, and Chinese herbal dispenser
  • Council Member, Specialty Committee of Anal & Intestinal Disease of World Federation of Chinese Medicine Societies
  • Member, Sydney Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine Research Committee
  • Member, Australasian Epidemiological Association
  • Member, Public Health Association of Australia
Image of Wenbo Peng
Postdoctoral Research Associate, Faculty of Health
Western medicine & Chinese medicine, Bachelor of Medicine, Master of Medicine, Doctor of Philosophy
 
Phone
+61 2 9514 8045

Research Interests

  • Public health and health services research
  • Practice-based research networks (PBRN)
  • Complementary and traditional medicine
  • Pain management
  • Women's health
Can supervise: Yes

Public health;

Chinese medicine

Chapters

Peng, W., Sibbritt, D., Steel, A. & Adams, J. 2017, 'Women's Health and Complementary and Integrative Medicine' in Women's Health and Complementary and Integrative Medicine, Routledge.

Conferences

Peng, W., Sibbritt, D. & Adams, J. 2015, 'The use of complementary and alternative medicine amongst postmenopausal women experiencing vasomotor symptoms', Integrative Medicine Research, 10th International congress on complementary medicine research, Korea, pp. 36-37.
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Peng, W., Sibbritt, D. & Adams, J. 2014, '1. Utilisation of self-prescribed complementary and alternative medicine in current hormone replacement therapy users, 2007-2010;2. Hormone replacement therapy use in menopausal women with palpitations, 2004-2010', 18th Congress of the Australasian Menopause Society.
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Journal articles

Adams, J., Lauche, R., Peng, W., Steel, A., Moore, C., Amorin-Woods, L.G. & Sibbritt, D. 2017, 'A workforce survey of Australian chiropractic: the profile and practice features of a nationally representative sample of 2,005 chiropractors.', BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 1-8.
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BACKGROUND: This paper reports the profile of the Australian chiropractic workforce and characteristics of chiropractic care from a large nationally-representative sample of practitioners. METHODS: A 21-item questionnaire examining practitioner, practice and clinical management characteristics was distributed to all registered chiropractors (n=4,684) in Australia in 2015 via both online and hard copy mail out. RESULTS: The survey attracted a response rate of 43% (n=2,005), and the sample is largely representative of the national chiropractic workforce on a number of key indicators. The average age of the chiropractors was 42.1 years, nearly two-thirds are male, and the vast majority hold a bachelor degree or higher qualification. Australian chiropractors are focused upon treating people across a wide age range who mainly present with musculoskeletal conditions. Australian chiropractors have referral relationships with a range of conventional, allied health and complementary medicine (CAM) providers. CONCLUSION: The chiropractic profession represents a substantial component of the contemporary Australian health care system with chiropractors managing an estimated 21.3 million patient visits per year. While the Australian chiropractic workforce is well educated, research engagement and research capacity remains sub-optimal and there is much room for further capacity building to help chiropractic reach full potential as a key integrated profession within an evidence-based health care system. Further rich, in-depth research is warranted to improve our understanding of the role of chiropractic within the Australian health care system.
Adams, J., Peng, W., Cramer, H., Sundberg, T., Moore, C., Amorin-Woods, L., Sibbritt, D., Lauche, R. & Masters of Clinical Trials Research 2017, 'The prevalence, patterns, and predictors of chiropractic use among US adults: Results from the 2012 National Health Interview Survey.', Spine (Phila Pa 1976).
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STUDY DESIGN: Secondary analysis of a national survey. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence, patterns, and predictors of chiropractic utilization in the US general population. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Chiropractic is one of the largest manual therapy professions in the US and internationally. Very few details have been reported about the use of chiropractic care in the US in recent years. METHODS: Cross-sectional data from the 2012 National Health Interview Survey (n=34,525) were analyzed to examine the lifetime and 12-month prevalence and utilization patterns of chiropractic use, profile of chiropractic users and health-related predictors of chiropractic consultations. RESULTS: Lifetime and 12-month prevalence of chiropractic use were 24.0% and 8.4%, respectively. There is a growing trend of chiropractic use amongst US adults from 2002 to 2012. Back pain (63.0%) and neck pain (30.2%) were the most prevalent health problems for chiropractic consultations and the majority of users reported chiropractic helping a great deal with their health problem and improving overall health or well-being. A substantial number of chiropractic users had received prescription (23.0%) and/or over-the-counter medications (35.0%) for the same health problem for which chiropractic was sought and 63.8% reported chiropractic care combined with medical treatment as helpful. Both adults older than 30 years (compared to younger adults), and those diagnosed with spinal pain (compared to those without spinal pain) were more likely to have consulted a chiropractor in the past 12 months. CONCLUSIONS: A substantial proportion of US adults utilized chiropractic services over the past 12 months and reported associated positive outcomes for overall well-being and/or specific health problems for which concurrent conventional care was common. Studies on the current patient integration of chiropractic and conventional health services are warranted. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 3.
Peng, W., Adams, J., Hickman, L. & Sibbritt, D.W. 2016, 'Longitudinal analysis of associations between women's consultations with complementary and alternative medicine practitioners/use of self-prescribed complementary and alternative medicine and menopause-related symptoms, 2007-2010.', Menopause, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 74-80.
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This study aims to determine associations between consultations with complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioners/use of self-prescribed CAM and menopause-related symptoms.Data were obtained from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. Generalized estimating equations were used to conduct longitudinal data analyses, which were restricted to women born in 1946-1951 who were surveyed in 2007 (survey 5; n=10,638) and 2010 (survey 6; n=10,011).Women with menopause-related symptoms were more likely to use self-prescribed CAM but were not more likely to consult a CAM practitioner. Overall, CAM use was lower among women who had undergone hysterectomy or women who had undergone oophorectomy, compared with naturally postmenopausal women, and decreased with increasing age of postmenopausal women. Weak associations between CAM use and hot flashes were observed. Women experiencing hot flashes were more likely to consult a massage therapist (odds ratio, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.00-1.20) and/or use self-prescribed herbal medicines (odds ratio, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.03-1.23) than women not experiencing hot flashes.Consultations with CAM practitioners and use of self-prescribed CAM among naturally or surgically postmenopausal women are associated with menopause-related symptoms. Our study findings should prompt healthcare providers, in particular family medicine practitioners, to be cognizant of clinical evidence for CAM typically used for the management of common menopause-related symptoms in their aim to provide safe, effective, and coordinated care for women.
Jiang, J., Peng, W., Gu, T., King, C. & Yin, J.K. 2016, 'Critical review of data evaluation in teaching Clinics of traditional Chinese medicine outside China: Implications for education', Explore: the Journal of Science and Healing, vol. 12, no. 3, pp. 188-195.
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Objectives The increasing acceptance of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) worldwide has highlighted the importance of ensuring the provision of high-quality TCM clinical education. This clinical training should be partly guided by a robust assessment of patient data outcomes in TCM teaching clinics. We undertook a comprehensive literature review to examine the data evaluation in TCM teaching clinics outside China and its implications for TCM education. Methods Literature was retrieved via MEDLINE (from 1946 to January 2015), EMBASE (from 1980 to February 2015), and Google Scholar for studies conducted outside China. The search was restricted to English articles reporting empirical findings related to the assessments of patient data in TCM teaching clinics, with implications for TCM education in countries other than China. Results Only seven articles from six studies met the inclusion criteria. The characteristics and main symptoms of patients who received any TCM treatment in the context of teaching clinics among all included studies were similar. Symptom relief as well as a high level of patient satisfaction with TCM treatment were found in TCM teaching clinics. Conventional healthcare providers and other complementary practitioners were not the main source of referral to TCM practitioners but rather patients friends/relatives. Patients received acupuncture treatment more frequently than treatments utilizing Chinese herbal medicine in teaching clinics. A standardized and consistent framework for patient records within TCM teaching clinics is currently lacking. There was no robust study which 'translated TCM clinic data evaluation findings into implications for TCM education and clinical training. Conclusions Recognizing that TCM evolves over time and its practice varies in different settings, there is an urgent need to conduct large-scale, rigorous evaluations of TCM clinic data to address the findings of our review, with the purpose of better informing...
Frawley, J., Peng, W., Sibbritt, D., Ward, L., Lauche, R., Zhang, Y. & Adams, J. 2016, 'Is there an association between women's consultations with a massage therapist and health-related quality of life? Analyses of 1800 women aged 56-61 years.', J Bodyw Mov Ther, vol. 20, no. 4, pp. 734-739.
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BACKGROUND: The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is commonplace in Australia with massage being a popular CAM modality. METHODS: This is a sub-study from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH). A total of 2120 mid-age (56-61 year old) women who consulted a CAM practitioner were invited to participate in this study. The Short-Form (SF-36) questionnaire was used to measure women's health-related quality of life. RESULTS: A total of 1800 women returned the questionnaire generating a response rate of 85.0%. Overall, 912 (50.7%) women visited a massage therapist in the previous 12 months. Women with lower quality of life scores in terms of bodily pain (p = 0.012) and/or emotional health (p = 0.029) were more likely to consult a massage therapist than those with higher scores. CONCLUSION: The implications of these associations are important for informing healthcare providers in providing effective and coordinated care for patients with pain and mood symptoms.
Sibbritt, D., Davidson, P., Peng, W.B., Adams, J. & Hickman, L. 2016, 'Hypertension: What are the self-care and health-care-seeking behaviours in women over time?', Journal of human hypertension, vol. 30, pp. 783-787.
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The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence and incidence of hypertension in women, and describe their self-care and health-seeking behaviours. This research was conducted as part of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health, a study comprising a nationally representative sample of Australian women in three age groups. The focus of this research is 14099 women born in 1946-1951, who have been surveyed six times (1996-2010). Student t-tests were used to compare women who did or did not have hypertension by their health-care utilization. Longitudinal analyses were conducted using a Poisson generalized estimating equation model. The incidence of hypertension among this cohort during 1996 to 2010 ranged from 400 to 597 participants per survey, resulting in an increase in prevalence of hypertension from 20.9% in 1996 to 41.3% in 2010. For all survey periods, women with hypertension had a significantly higher average number of visits to doctors and allied health practitioners compared with women without hypertension (P<0.005). The use of complementary medicine (practitioners and self-prescribed treatments) by women with hypertension was significantly lower compared to women without hypertension (P<0.005). Over time, conventional health-care utilization was higher for women with hypertension compared with women without hypertension (adjusted RR=1.18; 95% CI: 1.14, 1.22; P<0.0001). Our findings show that women with hypertension are using a range of conventional and complementary and alternative medicine: with hypertensive women using more conventional medicine and less complementary and alternative medicine than non-hypertensive women. As such, health-care providers should communicate with their patients regarding their use of complementary and alternative medicine in their efforts to provide safe, effective and coordinate care.Journal of Human Hypertension advance online publication, 28 April 2016; doi:10.1038/jhh.2016.20.
Peng, W., Liang, H., Sibbritt, D. & Adams, J. 2016, 'Complementary and alternative medicine use for constipation: a critical review focusing upon prevalence, type, cost, and users' profile, perception and motivations', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PRACTICE, vol. 70, no. 9, pp. 712-722.
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Sibbritt, D., Peng, W., Chang, S., Liang, H. & Adams, J. 2016, 'The use of conventional and complementary health services and self-prescribed treatments amongst young women with constipation: A national cohort study.', Digestive and liver disease : official journal of the Italian Society of Gastroenterology and the Italian Association for the Study of the Liver, vol. 48, no. 11, pp. 1308-1313.
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Little research has been conducted regarding the comprehensive health service utilisation in constipation care. This study investigates the comprehensive health service utilisation amongst Australian women with constipation.This study draws upon data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. A total of 8074 young women were asked about their frequency of constipation, measures of quality of life, and use of a range of health services and self-prescribed treatments via two postal surveys conducted in 2006 and 2009, respectively.The prevalence of constipation was 18.5% amongst women in 2009. Constipated women had poorer quality of health than women without constipation. Women who sought help for constipation were more likely to visit multiple groups of conventional and complementary health practitioners compared to women who did not experience constipation (p<0.005). However, women were less likely to visit a specialist for the management of constipation over time (2006 to 2009). There was an increase in the proportion of women with constipation who self-prescribed vitamins/minerals over time (p<0.001).Although only 4.5% of women sought help for their constipation, given the increasing use of multiple health services across time, more studies are required regarding the optimal treatment in constipation care.
Sibbritt, D., Lauche, R., Sundberg, T., Peng, W., Moore, C., Broom, A., Kirby, E. & Adams, J. 2016, 'Severity of back pain may influence choice and order of practitioner consultations across conventional, allied and complementary health care: a cross-sectional study of 1851 mid-age Australian women', BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, vol. 17, no. 1.
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BACKGROUND: Back pain is a common, disabling and costly disorder for which patients often consult with a wide range of health practitioners. Unfortunately, no research to date has directly examined the association between the severity of back pain and back pain sufferers' choice of whom and in what order to consult different health practitioners. METHODS: This is a sub-study of the large nationally representative Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH). The mid-age cohort women (born 1946-51, n=13,715) of the ALSWH were recruited from the Australian national Medicare database in 1996. These women have been surveyed six time, with survey 6 being conducted in 2010 (n=10,011). Mid-age women (n=1851) who in 2010 had sought help from a health care practitioner for their back pain were mailed a self-report questionnaire targeting their previous 12 months of health services utilisation, health status and their levels of back pain intensity. RESULTS: A total of 1620 women were deemed eligible and 1310 (80.9 %) returned completed questionnaires. Mid-age women with back pain visited various conventional, allied health and CAM practitioners for care: 75.6 % consulted a CAM practitioner; 58.4 % consulted a medical doctor; and 54.2 % consulted an allied health practitioner. Women with the most severe back pain sought conventional care from a general practitioner, and those who consulted a general practitioner first had more severe back pain than those who consulted another practitioner first. Following the general practitioner visit, the women with more severe back pain were more likely to be referred to a conventional specialist, and those with less severe back pain were more likely to be referred to a physiotherapist. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that women with more severe back pain are likely to visit a conventional practitioner first, whereas women with less severe back pain are likely to explore a range of treatment options including CA...
Peng, W. 2016, 'Concurrent use of self-prescribed complementary and alternative medicine, and hormone replacement therapy in menopause: possible side effects', Australian Journal of Herbal Medicine, vol. 28, no. 3.
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Wardle, J. & Peng, W. 2016, 'Integrative clinical care practice models: Sharing innovation for better patient outcomes', Advances in Integrative Medicine, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 73-75.
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Peng, W., Adams, J., Hickman, L. & Sibbritt, D.W. 2015, 'Association between consultations with complementary/alternative medicine practitioners and menopause-related symptoms: a cross-sectional study', Climacteric, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 551-558.
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Peng, W., Sibbritt, D.W., Hickman, L. & Adams, J. 2015, 'Association between use of self-prescribed complementary and alternative medicine and menopause-related symptoms: a cross-sectional study.', Complementary Therapies in Medicine, vol. 23, no. 5, pp. 666-673.
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To examine the association between self-prescribed complementary and alternative medicine use and menopause-related symptoms, stratified by menopausal status.Data were obtained from a cross-sectional survey of a nationally representative sample of 10,011 menopausal women from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health, conducted in 2010. Multivariable logistic regression models were applied to identify if the use of selected self-prescribed complementary and alternative medicine was significantly associated with a range of menopause-related symptoms.Vitamins/minerals were more likely to be used by natural menopausal women experiencing anxiety (adjusted OR=1.20) and/or stiff/painful joints (adjusted OR=1.16). Yoga/meditation was more likely to be used by women with hysterectomy (adjusted OR=1.76) or natural menopausal women (adjusted OR=1.38) experiencing anxiety. Herbal medicines were more likely to be used by natural menopausal women experiencing anxiety (adjusted OR=1.22), tiredness (adjusted OR=1.20), and/or stiff/painful joints (adjusted OR=1.17), and by women with oophorectomy experiencing tiredness (adjusted OR=1.45). Aromatherapy oils were more likely to be used by natural menopausal women experiencing night sweats (adjusted OR=1.25) and by women with hysterectomy experiencing anxiety (adjusted OR=2.02). Chinese medicines were more likely to be used by women with oophorectomy experiencing stiff/painful joints (adjusted OR=4.06) and/or palpitations (adjusted OR=3.06).Our study will help improve the patient-provider communication regarding complementary and alternative medicine use for menopause, and we conclude that menopausal status should be taken into account by providers for menopause care. The women's experience and motivations of such use warrant further research.
Peng, W., Sibbritt, D., Hickman, L., Kong, X., Yang, L. & Adams, J. 2014, 'A critical review of traditional Chinese medicine use amongst women with menopausal symptoms', Climacteric, vol. 17, no. 6, pp. 635-644.
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Objectives To provide the first critical review of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) use amongst symptomatic menopausal women, drawing upon work examining the perspectives of both TCM users and TCM practitioners. Methods A search was conducted in three English-language databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL and AMED) and three Chinese-language databases (CNKI, VIP and CBM Disc) for 2002-2013 international peer-reviewed articles reporting empirical findings of TCM use in menopause. Results A total of 25 journal articles reporting 22 studies were identified as meeting the review inclusion criteria. Chinese herbal medicine appears to be the most common therapy amongst symptomatic menopausal women, and vasomotor symptoms and emotional changes are the most frequent symptoms for which TCM is sought. However, evidence regarding the prevalence of TCM use and users' profile in menopause is limited. Existing studies are of varied methodological quality, often reporting low response rate, extensive recall bias and a lack of syndrome differentiation. Conclusions This review provides insights for practitioners and health policy-makers regarding TCM care to symptomatic menopausal women. More nationally representative studies are required to rigorously examine TCM use for the management of menopausal symptoms. Syndrome differentiation of menopausal women is an area which also warrants further attention.
Peng, W., Adams, J., Sibbritt, D.W. & Frawley, J.E. 2014, 'Critical review of complementary and alternative medicine use in menopause: focus on prevalence, motivation, decision-making, and communication', Menopause, vol. 21, no. 5, pp. 536-548.
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This article presents the first critical review of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among menopausal women (a term here used to include premenopausal, perimenopausal and postmenopausal women) by focusing on the prevalence of CAM use and CAM users' characteristics, motivation, decision-making, and communication with healthcare providers.
Peng, W., Adams, J., Hickman, L. & Sibbritt, D.W. 2014, 'Complementary/alternative and conventional medicine use amongst menopausal women: Results from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', Maturitas, vol. 79, no. 3, pp. 340-342.
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Bussing, A., Zhai, X., Peng, W. & Ling, C. 2013, 'Psychosocial and spiritual needs of patients with chronic diseases: validation of the Chinese version of the Spiritual Needs Questionnaire', Journal of integrative medicine, vol. 11, no. 2, pp. 106-115.
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OBJECTIVE: Even in secular societies, a small portion of patients find their spirituality to help cope with illness. But for the majority of patients, psychosocial and spiritual needs are neither addressed nor even considered a relevant factor by health care professionals. To measure such specific needs, the Spiritual Needs Questionnaire (SpNQ) was developed. The aim of this study was to validate the Chinese version of the SpNQ (SpNQ-Ch) and thus to measure psychosocial and spiritual needs of Chinese patients. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study among 168 patients with chronic diseases who were recruited in the Changhai Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, China using standardized questionnaires. We performed reliability and factor analyses, as well as analyses of variance, first order correlations and regression analyses. RESULTS: The 17-item SpNQ-Ch had a similar factorial structure as the original version with two main and three minor factors which accounted for 64% of variance, and internal consistency estimates (Cronbach's a) ranging from 0.51 to 0.81. Included were the 4-item scale Inner Peace Needs, the 5-item scale Giving/Generativity Needs, the 5-item scale Religious Needs (with 2 sub-constructs, Praying and Sources), and a 3-item scale Reflection/Release Needs. In Chinese patients with cancer (63%), pain affections (10%), or other chronic conditions (23%), the needs for Giving/Generativity (which refer to categories of Connectedness and Meaning) and Inner Peace Needs scored highest, while Religious Needs and the Reflection/Release Needs scored lower
Yang, X., Kong, X., Peng, W., Yue, X. & Wang, L. 2011, 'Experience in the teaching of Shang Han Lun', Chinese Journal of Information on Traditional Chinese Medicine (Chinese), vol. 8, no. 4, pp. 97-98.
Yang, X., Peng, W.-.B. & Yue, X.-.Q. 2009, '[Syndrome differentiation and treatment of Taiyang disease in Shanghan Lun].', Zhong xi yi jie he xue bao = Journal of Chinese integrative medicine, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 171-174.
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OBJECTIVE: To explore the laws in syndrome differentiation of Taiyang disease and the prescriptions and herbs used in its treatment in Shanghan Lun (Treatise on Febrile Diseases). METHODS: The occurrence rates of main syndromes of Taiyang disease, and the usage frequency of the prescriptions and herbs in its treatment were calculated, and the laws in syndrome differentiation and herbal medication were analyzed by hierarchical clustering analysis. RESULTS: Fever and aversion to cold were found to be the main symptoms of Taiyang disease and usually accompanied with headache, absent sweating, neck stiff, floating and tight pulse, and body ache. The accompanying or aggravated symptoms could be classified into lung system syndrome with the manifestations of sweating and asthma, spleen-deficiency syndrome with the manifestations of gastric fullness and diarrhea, stomach syndrome with vomit and constipation. Guizhi decoction was the main prescription used in the treatment of Taiyang disease. Mahuang (Herba Ephedrae) matching Xingren (Semen Armeniacae), Dahuang (Radix et Rhizoma Rhei) matching Mangxiao (Natrii Sulfas), Baizhu (Rhizoma Atractylodes Macrocephalae) matching Fuling (Poria), Fuzi (Radix Aconiti Lateralis) matching Ganjiang (Rhizoma Zingiberis), Chaihu (Radix Bupleuri) matching Huangqin (Radix Scutellariae), Banxia (Rhizoma Pinelliae), and Renshen (Radix Ginseng) as the main compatibilities were used in treating lung diseases, stomach diseases, spleen-deficiency diseases, kidney-deficiency diseases and Shaoyang diseases respectively. CONCLUSION: Exterior syndrome, as a common syndrome in Taiyang disease, is usually treated with Guizhi decoction. The change in syndromes from upper-energizer to lower-energizer in exterior disease can be found from the change of symptoms and the use of herbs. And the development from defending stage to qi stage in exterior disease can be found in the use of prescriptions in Shanghan Lun.

Other

Peng, W., 'Women's use of complementary and alternative medicine for the treatment of menopause-related symptoms: A health services research study'.
Department of Anorectal Surgery, Shanghai Longhua Hospital, China