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Suzy Ladanyi

Biography

Suzy Ladanyi is a Lecturer and Course Coordinator for postgraduate and undergraduate Critical Care Nursing in the Faculty of Health at UTS.

Suzy is the National Secretary for the Australian College of Critical Care Nurses (ACCCN) and a member of the Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM) where she is currently a PhD candidate.

Suzy’s clinical and research interests are primarily in Critical and Intensive Care Nursing (Traumatic Brain Injury, Functional Neuro-Anatomy, Multiple Trauma, Mechanical Ventilation and Holistic Care of critically ill patients and their families) and Complementary and Alternative Therapy (Massage, Nutrition and Naturopathy). Her clinical experience and expertise is in Intensive and Critical Care Nursing and Neurological / Multiple Trauma. She has worked in Intensive Care, High-Dependency Neuro-Trauma, High-Dependency Surgical, and a variety of other hospital ward environments.

Professional

Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM) – Member
Australian College of Critical Care Nurses – National Secretary & NSW National Representative
Australian Register of Naturopaths and Herbalists (ARONAH) – Community Board Member

Image of Suzy Ladanyi
Lecturer, Faculty of Health
Associate Member, Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM)
Core Member, CHSP - Health Services and Practice
BN, GradCertHEd, MN (Critical Care)
Member, Australian College of Critical Care Nurses
 
Phone
+61 2 9514 4804

Research Interests

Research expertise

  • Complementary and alternative therapies
  • Critical care nursing
  • Complementary and alternative therapies in intensive care nursing

Primary Teaching Role
Post Graduate Critical Care
Subject Coordinator
Fundamentals of Critical Care
Complex Critical Care

Clinical Subjects
Undergraduate Critical Care
Acute Care / Simulation
Holistic and Multidimensional Care
Medical / Surgical Nursing
Neuro Endocrinology
Cellular Alterations
Renal / Urology

Theoretical Subjects
Life Span Development / Psychology
Leadership and Management
Transition to Graduate Practice
Practice Readiness
Health and Society
Primary Health Care
Nursing Relationships
Discipline of Nursing

Law and Ethics

Journal articles

Sibbritt, D., Ladanyi, S. & Adams, J. 2016, 'Healthcare practitioner utilisation for back pain, neck pain and/or pelvic pain during pregnancy: an analysis of 1835 pregnant women in Australia.', International journal of clinical practice, vol. 70, no. 10, pp. 825-831.
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Back, neck and/or pelvic pain are common symptoms experienced by pregnant women. Although pregnant women are known to use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) frequently, no research to date has provided in-depth examination of healthcare practitioner utilisation of pregnant women who experience back, neck and/or pelvic pain.A sub-study of 1835 pregnant women from the nationally representative Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH). Demographics, health status and healthcare utilisation measures were analysed for symptoms of back, neck and/or pelvic pain during pregnancy, using regression models.During their pregnancy, 39.5% women experienced back pain, 12.4% experienced neck pain and 16.3% women experienced pelvic pain. Pregnant women were more likely to consult a massage therapist for their back pain (32.3%) and neck pain (39.9%), and another alternative practitioner (27.3%) or obstetrician (22.1%) for pelvic pain, while some women did not seek treatment (<30%). Women who sought help for each symptom reported significantly worse levels of mental and physical health across most SF-36 domains (P<.05). Women without health insurance, or pregnancy-related healthcare insurance were less likely to seek treatment.Pregnant women experiencing back, neck and/or pelvic pain frequently consult CAM practitioners, particularly if they have healthcare insurance. There is a need for all healthcare practitioners providing maternity care to enquire about possible back, neck and pelvic pain amongst women in their care and be cognisant of possible corresponding CAM use for such symptoms.
Chua, H.-.R., Venkatesh, B., Stachowski, E., Schneider, A.G., Perkins, K., Ladanyi, S., Kruger, P. & Bellomo, R. 2012, 'Plasma-Lyte 148 vs 0.9% saline for fluid resuscitation in diabetic ketoacidosis', JOURNAL OF CRITICAL CARE, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 138-145.
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Ladanyi, S. & Elliott, D. 2008, 'Traumatic brain injury: An integrated clinical case presentation and literature review Part I: Assessment and initial management', Australian critical care, vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 86-95.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Holistic nursing care of critically ill patients continues to be a challenge for all levels of critical care clinicians. Patients with multi-system dysfunction in particular, present complicated clinical challenges that demand care based on sound knowledge and understanding of physiological, psychosocial and spiritual needs. Experiential learning through exposure to a range of patient presentations enables incremental development of professional practice and excellence in nursing care. Case study learning enhances understanding through application of theory to practice in complex clinical presentations. This two-part paper outlines the assessment, interventions and outcome of a person who sustained multiple trauma including severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Part I explores assessment and initial management from pre-hospital care through to the Emergency Department (ED) and operating theatre. Part II describes the intensive care period as an integral component of the continuum of care. Key issues in the case are presented sequentially with relevant literature integrated and applied to clinical progress, focussing on the complex physiological, psychosocial, spiritual and environmental needs of the patient and his family. The purpose of the paper is to therefore provide a comprehensive learning resource for critical care nurses, particularly for those beginning their practice.
Ladanyi, S. & Elliott, D. 2008, 'Traumatic brain injury: An integrated clinical case presentation and literature review Part II: The continuum of care', Australian Critical Care, vol. 21, no. 3, pp. 141-153.
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The following paper continues the presentation of a case scenario outlining the assessment, interventions and outcome of a person who sustained multiple trauma with a focus on traumatic brain injury (TBI). Part I explored assessment and initial management of the patient from pre-hospital care through to the emergency department and operating theatre. Part II describes the intensive care period as an integral component of the continuum of care. Key issues in the case are presented sequentially with relevant theory integrated and applied to the clinical case throughout the discussion with a focus on the complex physiological, psychological, and spiritual needs of the patient and their family.
Ladanyi, S. & Elliott, D. 2007, 'Experiences of uncertainty for relatives in ICU: A review of a qualitative Danish study', Australian Critical Care, vol. 20, no. 4, pp. 146-148.
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