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Associate Professor Roger Dunston

Biography

Associate Professor Roger Dunston is not currently avilable to supervise doctoral degrees - September 2016.

Image of Roger Dunston
Associate Professor, Public Communication Program
Acting Director, Centre for Research in Learning and Change
PhD (USyd)
 
Phone
+61 2 9514 4628
Can supervise: Yes

Books

Slade, D.M., Manidis, M., McGregor, J., Scheeres, H., Chandler, E., Stein-Parbury, J., Dunston, R., Herke, M. & Matthiessen, C.M. 2015, Communicating in Hospital Emergency Departments, Springer, Heidelberg New York Dordrecht London.
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Chapters

Adams, J., Sibbritt, D., Broom, A., Kroll, T., Prior, J., Dunston, R., Leung, B., Davidson, P. & Andrews, G. 2017, 'Traditional, complementary and integrative medicine as self-care in chronic illness' in Adams, J. & et al (eds), Public Health and Health Services Research in Traditional, Complementary and Integrative Medicine: International Perspectives, Imperial College Press, London.
Prior, J., Dunston, R., Kroll, T., Adams, J. & Steel, A. 2017, 'Traditional, complementary and integrative medicine and global health challenges' in Adams, J. & et al (eds), Public Health and Health Services Research in Traditional, Complementary and Integrative Medicine: International Perspectives, Imperial College Press, London.
Dunston, R., Forman, D., Matthews, L., Nicol, P., Pockett, R., Rogers, G., Steketee, C. & Thistlethwaite, J. 2015, 'Utilizing Curriculum Renewal as a Way of Leading Cultural Change in Australian Health Professional Education' in Forman, D., Jones, M. & Thistlethwaite, J. (eds), Leadership and Collaboration: Further Developments for Interprofessional Education, Palgrave MacMillan, UK, pp. 121-134.
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Health systems globally are engaged with major reforms focused on the need to deliver more responsive, effective and sustainable health services. Interprofessional practice (IPP), and the development of interprofessional educational (IPE) targeted at enabling IPP, sit at the heart of many of these reforms. IPP enabled by IPE could be argued as the practice foundation for achieving new and more effective forms of health service provision and health professional practice (World Health Organization, 2010; Gittell et al., 2013).
Dunston, R., Forman, D., Matthews, L., Nicol, P., Pockett, R., Rogers, G., Steketee, C. & Thistlethwaite, J. 2015, 'Utilizing Curriculum Renewal as a Way of Leading Cultural Change in Australian Health Professional Education' in Leadership and Collaboration: Further Developments for Interprofessional Education, Palgrave MacMillan, UK, pp. 121-134.
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Health systems globally are engaged with major reforms focused on the need to deliver more responsive, effective and sustainable health services. Interprofessional practice (IPP), and the development of interprofessional educational (IPE) targeted at enabling IPP, sit at the heart of many of these reforms. IPP enabled by IPE could be argued as the practice foundation for achieving new and more effective forms of health service provision and health professional practice (World Health Organization, 2010; Gittell et al., 2013).
Dunston, R. 2014, 'Arrangements of co-production in healthcare: Partnership modes of interprofessional practice' in Fenwick, T. & Nerland, M. (eds), Reconceptualising Professional Learning, Routledge, London, New York, pp. 140-154.
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Lee, A., Dunston, R. & Fowler, C.M. 2012, 'Seeing is Believing: An Embodied Pedagogy of 'Doing Partnership' in Child and Family Health' in Hager, P., Lee, A. & Reich, A. (eds), Practice, Learning and Change: Practice-Theory Perspectives on Professinal Learning, Springer, Dordrecht, pp. 267-276.
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This chapter examines practices of 'doing partnership' between health professionals and users or clients of a health service. The move from expert-client modes of practice to partnership modes raises an important set of questions concerning the changing nature of professional practice to more specifically include the 'other' in the defining of the key activities and enactments of practices. Partnership practice is an example of a broad set of moves within the human service sector to shift the balance of power, capacity and responsibility from a provider-consumer relationship to one of co-production (Dunston et al. 2009; Brodie et al. 2009). These moves are complex mixes of neoliberal cost-cutting efficiency measures and redesigning of relationships between citizens and government in terms of active citizenship, civic participation and entitlement in relation to services. They are widespread across the human services, from health to social care, education, housing and local govemment and are increasingly finding their way into business and management: human resource management, marketing and so on.
Lee, A. & Dunston, R. 2010, ''Working in the spaces between': co-production and changing professional practice in health' in Higgs, J., Fish, D., Goulter, I., Loftus, S., Reid, J.A. & Trede, F. (eds), Education for Future Practice, Sense Publishers, Rotterdam, pp. 61-74.

Conferences

Dunston, R. 2015, 'Interprofessional Global Collaboration for Compassionate Healthcare: Mobilizing Values to Action', 2015 International Conference on Communication in Healthcare, New Orleans, Louisiana.

Journal articles

Thistlethwaite, J., Dallest, K., Moran, M., Dunston, R., Roberts, C., Eley, D., Bogossian, F., Forman, D., Bainbridge, L., Dryan, D. & Fyfe, S. 2016, 'Introducing the individual Teamwork Observation and Feedback Tool (iTOFT): Development and description of a new interprofessional teamwork measure', Journal of Interprofessional Care, vol. 30, no. 4, pp. 526-528.
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The individual Teamwork Observation and Feedback Tool (iTOFT) was devised by a consortium of seven universities in recognition of the need for a means of observing and giving feedback to individual learners undertaking an interprofessional teamwork task. It was developed through a literature review of the existing teamwork assessment tools, a discussion of accreditation standards for the health professions, Delphi consultation and field-testing with an emphasis on its feasibility and acceptability for formative assessment. There are two versions: the Basic tool is for use with students who have little clinical teamwork experience and lists 11 observable behaviours under two headings: 'shared decision making' and 'working in a team'. The Advanced version is for senior students and junior health professionals and has 10 observable behaviours under four headings: 'shared decision making', 'working in a team', 'leadership', and 'patient safety'. Both versions include a comprehensive scale and item descriptors. Further testing is required to focus on its validity and educational impact.
Rule, J., Dunston, R. & Solomon, N. 2016, 'Learning and change in the redesign of a primary health care initiative', Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 28, no. 7, pp. 451-467.
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This research paper provides an account of learning and change in the redesign of a primary health care initiative in a large metropolitan city in Australia.
Moran, M., Steketee, C., Forman, D. & Dunston, R. 2015, 'Using a research-informed interprofessional curriculum framework to guide reflection and future planning of interprofessional education in a multi-site context', Journal of Research in Interprofessional Practice and Education, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 1-13.
Dunston, R., Steketee, C., Forman, D., Yassine, T., Matthews, L., Saunders, R., Nicol, P. & Alliex, S. 2014, 'Interprofessional health education in Australia: Three research projects informing curriculum renewal and development', Applied Nursing Research, vol. 27, pp. 115-120.
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Fowler, C.M., Dunston, R., Lee, A., Rossiter, C. & McKenzie, J.A. 2012, 'Reciprocal learning in partnership practice: an exploratory study of a home visiting program for mothers with depression', Studies in Continuing Education, vol. 34, no. 2, pp. 99-112.
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This paper reports on a small exploratory study that investigates the place and role of reciprocal learning within a partnership-based home visiting program for mothers experiencing depression. The study is one important example of an increased focus on reciprocal learning within practice that has significant implications for the development of professional education and, more generally, for workplace learning and ongoing professional development. The study addresses two major gaps in the research literature: a lack of detailed accounts of how partnership based approaches are taken up and developed in Australian health care; and a lack of attention to learning as a focus and outcome of artnership- based practice. Using information from in-depth interviews with nurses and mothers we describe and analyse the experience of participants, their learning and knowledge development, the techniques used to facilitate learning, and the development of a relationship between mother and nurse, and mother and child.
Fowler, C.M., Lee, A., Dunston, R., Chiarella, M. & Rossiter, C. 2012, 'Co-producing parenting practice: learning how to do child and family health nursing differently', Australian Journal of Child and Family Heath Nursing, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 7-11.
Child and family health nurses are increasingly required to examine the way in which they work with parents, in order to achieve more effective parenting outcomes and more sustainable health services. New approaches to working successfully with parents require acknowledgement that parents are competent, knowledgeable, resourceful and uniquely experienced with their child/ren. This calls for an approach to practice that enables ongoing parental learning and capability development, in contrast to more traditional practices. This article discusses the implications of these new approaches with reference to the idea of co-production, a concept that sits at the heart of recent initiatives in public sector and health service reform. Co-production extends previous thining about the nature and scope of parent participation, locating parents as equal partners and producers alongside health professionals.
Fowler, C.M., Rossiter, C., Bigsby, M., Hopwood, N., Lee, A. & Dunston, R. 2012, 'Working in partnership with parents: the experience and challenge of practice innovation in child and family health nursing', Journal of Clinical Nursing, vol. 21, no. 21-22, pp. 3306-3314.
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Aims and objectives. This study investigated what Family Partnership Model practice means in the day-to-day practice of child and family health nurses working with parents. Background. The Family Partnership Model has been widely implemented in child and family health services in Australia and New Zealand, with limited understanding of the implications for nursing practice. Design. A qualitative interpretive study design was used. Method. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 22 nurse participants, who had completed the Family Partnership Model training programme. Subsequent focus groups enabled these participants to validate the themes identified in the initial analysis and to confirm that the nurses concurred with the issues raised. Thematic content analysis produced rich descriptions and explanation of nurses' experiences and perspectives. Results. Four themes emerged from the analysis: experience of changing practices, exploring with parents, challenging unhelpful constructions and a commitment to examining practice. Conclusion. Overall, the participants embraced the use of the Family Partnership Model, providing examples of change and increasing confidence in their approach to working with parents. Relevance to clinical practice. This study demonstrates that the effective utilisation of the Family Partnership Model in nursing practice is a more complex and dynamic process than simply embracing the model. There are significant challenges to be negotiated when implementing new ways of working with parents, particularly questioning existing dominant forms of practice for nurses, managers and wider health organisations, and their clients. This paper also raises issues about sustaining practice innovation, which extends beyond the best intent of individual nurses, requiring receptive organisational conditions and leadership.
Matthews, L., Pockett, R., Nisbet, G., Thistlethwaite, J., Dunston, R., Lee, A. & White, J.F. 2011, 'Building Capacity In Australian Interprofessional Health Education: Perspectives From Key Health And Higher Education Stakeholders', Australian Health Review, vol. 35, no. 2, pp. 136-140.
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Abstract Objective. A substantial literature engaging with the directions and experiences of stakeholders involved in interprofessional health education exists at the international level, yet almost nothing has been published that documents and analyses the Australian experience. Accordingly, this study aimed to scope the experiences of key stakeholders in health and higher education in relation to the development of interprofessional practice capabilities in health graduates in Australia. Methods. Twenty-seven semi-structured interviews and two focus groups of key stakeholders involved in the development and delivery of interprofessional health education in Australian higher education were undertaken. Interview data were coded to identify categories that were organised into key themes, according to principles of thematic analysis. Results. Three themes were identified: the need for common ground between health and higher education, constraints and enablers in current practice, and the need for research to establish an evidence base. Five directions for national development were also identified. Conclusions. The study identified a range of interconnected changes that will be required to successfully mainstream interprofessional education within Australia, in particular, the importance of addressing issues of culture change and the need for a nationally coordinated and research informed approach. These findings reiterate those found in the international literature.
Rossiter, C., Fowler, C.M., Hopwood, N., Lee, A. & Dunston, R. 2011, 'Working in partnership with vulnerable families: the experience of child and family health practitioners', Australian Journal of Primary Health, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 378-383.
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Abstract.Family circumstances in infancy are persistent and powerful determinants of childrenâs physical and mental health, influencing inequalities that trace from childhood through to adulthood. While the social factors that perpetuate patterns of inequality are more complex than can be addressed through single interventions, child and family health (CFH) services represent crucial sites where trajectories of inequality can be disrupted. In particular, approaches that foster opportunities for practitionerâparent engagement that challenge traditional hierarchical health care practice, such as the Family Partnership Model (FPM), are recommended as ways of addressing disadvantage. Little is known about how practitioners implement models of working in partnership with families and, consequently, there is a gap in understanding how best to develop and sustain these new CFH practices. This paper reports a research project that investigated the experiences of 25 health professionals working within a FPM framework with vulnerable families. Through discussion of four key themes â redefining expertise, changing practices, establishing new relationships with parents and the complexities of partnership practice â the paper offers first-hand accounts of reframing practices that recognise the needs, skills and expertise of parents and thus contribute to empowerment of families.
Lee, A. & Dunston, R. 2011, 'Practice, Learning And Change: Towards A Re Theorisation Of Professional Education', Teaching in Higher Education, vol. 16, no. 5, pp. 483-494.
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This article addresses the question of the implications for professional education of economic, social and political changes that are transforming the boundaries, accountabilities and governance of professional practice. We argue that approaches to profe
Dunston, R., Lee, A., Boud, D.J., Brodie, P.M. & Chiarella, M. 2009, 'Co-Production and Health System Reform - From Re-Imagining To Re-Making', Australian Journal of Public Administration, vol. 68, no. 1, pp. 39-52.
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There is growing interest in the application of citizen participation within all areas of public sector service development, where it is increasingly promoted as a significant strand of post-neoliberal policy concerned with re-imagining citizenship and more participatory forms of citizen/consumer engagement. The application of such a perspective within health services, via co-production, has both beneficial, but also problematic implications for the organisation of such services, for professional practice and education. Given the disappointing results in increasing consumer involvement in health services via 'choice' and 'voice' participation strategies, the question of how the more challenging approach of co-production will fare needs to be addressed. The article discusses the possibilities and challenges of system-wide co-production for health. It identifies the discourse and practice contours of co-production, differentiating co-production from other health consumer-led approaches. Finally, it identifies issues critically related to the successful implementation of co-production where additional theorisation and research are required.
Thistlethwaite, J., Lee, A., Dunston, R., Nisbet, G., Matthews, L. & Pockett, R. 2009, 'Interprofessional developments in Australia - L-TIPP (Aus) and the Way Forward', JOURNAL OF INTERPROFESSIONAL CARE, vol. 23, no. 4, pp. 315-317.
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Scheeres, H., Slade, D., Manidis, M., McGregor, J., Matthiessen, C. & others 2008, 'Communicating in hospital emergency departments'.
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Slade, D., Scheeres, H., Manidis, M., Iedema, R., Dunston, R., Stein-Parbury, J., Matthiessen, C., Herke, M. & McGregor, J. 2008, 'Emergency communication: the discursive challenges facing emergency clinicians and patients in hospital emergency departments', Discourse & Communication, vol. 2, pp. 271-298.
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GUILE, L., HORNE, M. & DUNSTON, R. 1978, 'ANOREXIA-NERVOSA, SEXUAL-BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION AS AN ADJUNCT TO AN INTEGRATED TREATMENT PROGRAM - CASE-REPORT', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY, vol. 12, no. 3, pp. 165-167.
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Reports

Dunston, R., Forman, D., Moran, M., Rogers, G., Thistlethwaite, J. & Steketee, C. Commonwealth of Australia 2015, Curriculum Renewal in Interprofessional Education in Health: Establishing Leadership and Capacity, Report to the Office of Learning and Teaching, Office for Learning and Teaching, Sydney.
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Dunston, R., Forman, D., Hager, J., Manidis, M., Rogers, G., Rossiter, C., Thistlethwaite, J. & Yassine, T. Commonwealth of Australia 2014, Curriculum Renewal for Interprofessional Education in Health, Final Report for Office for Learning and Teaching, Sydney.
Rossiter, C., Fowler, C.M., Dunston, R., Sherwood, J. & Day, C. Centre for Research in Learning & Change UTS 2013, Integrating parenting support in alcohol and drug treatment program for mothers and their children: a study of practice innovation, pp. 1-45, Sydney.
Dunston, R., Forman, D., Manidis, M., Rogers, G., Rossiter, C., Thistlethwaite, J. & Yassine, T. Centre for Research in Learning and Change, University of Technology Sydney 2013, Interprofessional Education: a National Audit. Report to Health Workforce Australia, Sydney.
Rossiter, C., Hopwood, N., Dunston, R., Fowler, C.M., Bigsby, M. & Lee, A. Centre for Research in Learning and Change, FASS, UTS 2011, Sustaining Practice Innovation in Child and Family Health: report to partners, pp. 1-38, Sydney.
The publication reports on the findings of a UTS Partnership Grant-funded project, a collaboration between the Centre for Learning & Change FASS and FNMH, Tresillian Family Care Centres, Kaleidoscope Hunter Children's Health Network and the Royal New Zealand Plunket Society. The study explored the implementation of the Family Partnership Model (FPM, Davis, Day and Bidmead 2002) in three child and family health nursing services in Australia and New Zealand. The FPM is an internationally-recognised exemplar of co-productive partnership practice, and has been adopted by all Australian states as the preferred model for providing universal child health services. Unlike previous studies of the FPM that assess its impact on individuals and families, this case study used in-depth qualitative methods to investigate the complex process in which nurses learn about a new way of working with families and how they incorporate new insights into their practice. They study also considers how innovative models of service delivery are implemented within health systems and how they are sustained over time.
Slade, D.M., Manidis, M., McGregor, J., Scheeres, H., Stein-Parbury, J., Dunston, R., Stanton, N., Chandler, E., Matthiessen, C. & Herke, M. University of Technology, Sydney 2011, Communicating in hospital emergency departments, Volume 1: Final report, Sydney.
Slade, D.M., Manidis, M., McGregor, J., Scheeres, H., Stein-Parbury, J., Dunston, R., Stanton, N., Chandler, N., Matthiessen, C. & Herke, M. University of Technology Sydney 2011, Communicating in hospital emergency departments, Volume 2: Executive Summary, Sydney.
Owen, A., Thompson, C., Dunston, R. & Eagar, C. Centre for Health Service Development, University of Wollongong 2009, Cancer Australia: the first phase October 2006 to December 2008, Wollongong.
Dunston, R., Lee, A., Lee, A., Matthews, L., Nisbet, G., Pockett, R., Thistlethwaite, J. & White, J. University of Technology Sydney & The University of Sydney 2009, Interprofessional Health Education in Australia: The Way Forward, Sydney.
Brodie, P., Lee, A., Fox, L., Ripper, C., Dunston, R., Brown, T. & Hill, J. University of Technology Sydney 2009, Birra-Li Birthing Service Case Study of Co-Productive Practice, Sydney.
Dunston, R., Masso, M. & Eagar, K. Centre for Health Service Development, University of Wollongong 2008, Cancer Australia Evaluation Framework, Wollongong.
Dunston, R., Owen, A., Thompson, C. & Eagar, K. Centre for Health Service Development, University of Wollongong 2008, The Establishment of Cancer Australia: an historical perspective, Wollongong.
Bell, C., Dunston, R., Fitzgerald, T., Hawke, G., Lee, A., Lee, A., Matthews, L., Nisbet, G., Pockett, R., Slade, D., White, J. & et al Centre for Research in Learning and Change 2008, Interprofessional health education in Australia: A proposal for future research and development, no. L-TIPP, Sydney.