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Michel De La Villefromoy

Biography

Michel is currently the UTSremotelabs manager. The UTS Remote Laboratory facility is the largest of its kind worldwide. It enables students to remotely control laboratory equipment and to perform experiments – similar to what they would do in a classroom setting, but over the internet.

Students can access the laboratory online from anywhere and at any time of the day or week, giving them much more flexibility in their studies. Unlike simulations, the UTS Remote Laboratory uses real, physical equipment that has been instrumented with cameras and connected to the internet.

The experiments vibrate, move around and make noise, exposing students to a real-world learning experience in their own time and as often as they want. In addition to traditional, hands-on facilities, the UTS Remote Laboratories give science and engineering students a safe, flexible, high-tech approach to gaining practical experience. Over 1,500 UTS students use the facility every semester.

Image of Michel De La Villefromoy
Manager, Remote Laboratory and Strategic Projects, Associate Dean (Teaching & Learning)
Grad Cert, MEM (UTS)
 
Phone
+61 2 9514 2406

Research Interests

Remote Labs, Socio Technical Systems.

Chapters

Lowe, D.B., Conlon, S., Murray, S.J., Weber, L., Nageswaran, W., De La Villefromoy, M.J., Lindsay, E., Nafalski, A. & Tang, T. 2012, 'LabShare: Towards Cross-Institutional Laboratory Sharing' in Azad, A., Auer, M. & Harward, J. (eds), Internet Accessible Remote Laboratories: Scalable E-Learning Tools for Engineering and Science Disciplines, IGI Global, Hershey PA, USA, pp. 453-467.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Conventional undergraduate teaching laboratories are valuable in terms of their contributions to students learning but are generally costly to develop and maintain and often have extremely low overall utilization rates. These issues can be addressed through cross-institutional sharing of laboratories. This is, however, limited by the overarching requirement that students are physically co-located with the laboratory apparatus. In this chapter we will describe the nature of the challenges with regard to cross-institutional sharing and the potential benefits that can be achieved if a solution can be found. A possible solution is the use of remote laboratories that can be accessed across the internet with a suitable model for laboratory sharing that promotes both institutional and individual engagement. We describe the characteristics that such a model should have and show how the Labshare project is providing a nation-wide model within the Australian Higher Education context.

Conferences

Tawfik, M., Lowe, D.B., Murray, S.J., De, L.V.M.J., M, D., M, S., E, A., Mj, D. & G, C. 2013, 'Grid remote laboratory management system', 2013 10th International Conference on Remote Engineering and Virtual Instrumentation, REV 2013, International Conference on Remote Engineering and Virtual Instrumentation, IEEE, Sydney, Australia, pp. 0-0.
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Remote laboratories have become a useful educational tool. There is a common, though often not well-articulated, distinction between the remote laboratory that provides the experimental experience for students, and the supporting Remote Laboratory Manage
Kodagoda, S., Alempijevic, A., Huang, S., De La Villefromoy, M.J., Diponio, M. & Cogar, L.J. 2013, 'Moving Away from Simulations: Innovative Assessment of Mechatronic Subjects Using Remote Laboratories', 2013 International Conference on Information Technology Based Higher Education and Training, International Conference on Information Technology Based Higher Education and Training, IEEE, Antalya, Turkey, pp. 1-5.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
In response to the rapid growth of online teaching and learning, University of Technology, Sydney (UTS) has been developing a number of remotely accessible laboratories. In this paper, we present our newly developed remote lab robotic rig that uniquely addresses challenges in Mechatronic courses. The rig contains a mobile robotic platform equipped with various sensory modules placed in a maze with a pantograph power system enabling continuous use of the platform. The software architecture employed allows users to develop their simulations using the Player/Stage simulator and subsequently upload the code in the robotic rig for real-time testing. This paper presents the motivation, design concepts and analysis of students' feedback responses to their use of the remote lab robotics rig. Survey results of a pilot study shows the participants highly agreeing that the remote lab contributes to, deeper understanding of the subject matter, flexible learning process and inspire research in robotics
Kodagoda, S., Alempijevic, A., Huang, S., De La Villefromoy, M.J., Diponio, M. & Cogar, L.J. 2013, 'Innovative Assessment of Mechatronic Subjects Using Remote Laboratories', International Conference on Information Technology Based Higher Education and Training, IEEE, Antalya, Turkey, pp. 1-5.
In response to the rapid growth of online teaching and learning, University of Technology, Sydney (UTS) has been developing a number of remotely accessible laboratories. In this paper, we present our newly developed remote lab robotic rig that uniquely addresses challenges in Mechatronic courses. The rig contains a mobile robotic platform equipped with various sensory modules placed in a maze with a pantograph power system enabling continuous use of the platform. The software architecture employed allows users to develop their simulations using the Player/Stage simulator and subsequently upload the code in the robotic rig for real-time testing. This paper presents the motivation, design concepts and analysis of students' feedback responses to their use of the remote lab robotics rig. Survey results of a pilot study shows the participants highly agreeing that the remote lab contributes to, deeper understanding of the subject matter, flexible learning process and inspire research in robotics.
Lowe, D.B., De La Villefromoy, M.J., jona, K. & Yeoh, L.A. 2012, 'Remote Laboratories: Uncovering the true costs', International Conference Remote Engineering & Virtual Instumentation, International Conference on Remote Engineering and Virtual Instrumentation (REV), IEEE, Bilbao, Spain, pp. 1-6.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Remote laboratories have been the subject of both technical development and pedagogic analysis. Much of the associated literature uses arguments regarding the relative value of these laboratories to justify the work in this area. Whilst many of these arguments are focused on pedagogic opportunity or logistical flexibility, they often also argue for the financial benefits that accrue from the ability to share laboratory resources. In this paper we consider the prevalence of these arguments and the extent to which they are (or are not) underpinned by research-based evidence.
Tuttle, S.W., Lowe, D.B., Murray, S.J. & De La Villefromoy, M.J. 2010, 'Towards a Framework for Supporting Remote Laboratory Adoption Decisions by Teacher-Academics', REV 2010: 7th International Conference on Remote Engineering and Virtual Instrumentation, Remote Engineering and Virtual Instrumentation, Kassel University Press, Stockholm, Sweden, pp. 218-224.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Remote laboratories (RL) have existed for over a decade. They have shown great promise in the delivery of science and engineering education with the potential for providing enhanced flexibility and exposing many more students to a greater diversity of practical laboratory experimentation. This promise is clearly reflected in the number of new RL initiatives across the world and the growing research literature which examines aspects of remote laboratory based pedagogy and its accompanying technology. However for the maximum benefit to be realized Remote Laboratories must be accepted and then adopted by a significant percentage of the world½s science and engineering educators and this means making a case for change from existing hands-on-only delivery of the laboratory experience. In order to support this change we need to understand the factors that drive adoption of new technology like Remote Laboratories, and the factors that militate against adoption. This paper examines the human factors surrounding the adoption of any new technology using UTAUT (Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology) and then examines the specific case of Remote Laboratory adoption and what can be done to facilitate adoption.
Selected Peer-Assessed Projects