UTS site search

Dr Mario Fiorini

Biography

Mario has joined the School in August 2007 after completing his PhD in Economics at University College London "The Role of Cognitive Skills on Educational and Labour Market Outcomes". In February 2010 he was granted tenure. His main research and teaching interests lie in the area of Labour Economics, Public Economics and Applied Econometrics.
Mario has published his work in international refereed journals, including the Journal of Labor Economics, Journal of Applied Econometrics and the Economics of Education review. At UTS, Mario has been teaching Economics for Business, Principles of Microeconomics, Intermediate Microeconomics and Public Economics.
To visit Mario's personal web page click here.

Image of Mario Fiorini
Senior Lecturer, Economics Discipline Group
Associate Member, CENSOC
NA, PhD (UCL)
Download CV  (PDF 151 Kb, 3 pages)
Phone
+61 2 9514 3339

Research Interests

Labor Economics, Public Economics and Applied Econometrics.

Can supervise: Yes

At UTS, Mario has been teaching Economics for Business, Principles of Microeconomics, Intermediate Microeconomics and Public Economics.

Conferences

Fiorini, M. 2016, 'International Association for Applied Econometrics', International Association for Applied Econometrics, Milan.
Fiorini, M. & Keane, M. 2010, 'How the allocation of children's time affects cognitive and non-cognitive development', NBER Summer Institute, Boston, USA.
Fiorini, M. 2009, 'The effect of home computer use on children's cognitive and non-cognitive skills', 4th Annual Society for Labor Economics Meetings, Boston, USA.
Fiorini, M. 2009, 'How the allocation of children's time affects cognitive and non-cognitive development', 2nd LSAC Research Conference, Melbourne, Australia.
Fiorini, M. & Keane, M. 2009, 'How the allocation of children's time affects cognitive and non-cognitive development', Seminar Presentation, University of NSW, Sydney, Australia.
Fiorini, M. & Keane, M. 2009, 'How the allocation of children's time affects cognitive and non-cognitive development', Seminar Presentation, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
Fiorini, M. & Keane, M. 2009, 'How the allocation of children's time affects cognitive and non-cognitive development', Seminar Presentation, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, Australia.
Fiorini, M. 2008, 'The effect of home computer use on children's cognitive and non-cognitive skills', Australasian Meeting of the Econometric Society, Wellington, New Zealand.
Fiorini, M. 2008, 'The effect of home computer use on children's cognitive and non-cognitive skills', Seminar Presentation, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia.
Fiorini, M. 2008, 'The effect of home computer use on children's cognitive and non-cognitive skills', Seminar Presentation, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
Fiorini, M. 2008, 'The effect of home computer use on children's cognitive and non-cognitive skills', Seminar Paper, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia.
Fiorini, M. 2008, 'The effect of home computer use on children's cognitive and non-cognitive skills', European Meetings of the Econometric Society, Milan, Italy.

Journal articles

Fiorini, M. & Keane, M. 2014, 'How the allocation of children's time affects cognitive and non-cognitive development', Journal of Labor Economics, vol. 32, no. 4.
View/Download from: Publisher's site
The allocation of children's time among different activities may be important for cognitive and noncognitive development. Here, we exploit time use diaries from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children to study the effects of time allocation. By doing so, we characterize the trade-off between different activities to which a child is exposed. On the one hand, our results suggest that time spent in educational activities, particularly with parents, is the most productive input for cognitive skill development. On the other hand, noncognitive skills appear insensitive to alternative time allocations. Instead, they are greatly affected by the mother's parenting style.
Fiorini, M. 2012, 'Fostering educational enrolment through subsidies: The issue of timing', Journal of Applied Econometrics, vol. 27, no. 5, pp. 741-772.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
The purpose of this paper is to build a dynamic structural model of educational choices in which cognitive skills shape decisions. The model is estimated by maximum likelihood using cohort data where individuals are observed from birth to the middle of their working life. These data are unique in that they include cognitive skills test scores collected as early as age 7. We then investigate how alternative policies foster educational enrolment. In particular, we simulate the effect of two subsidies different in the timing of disbursement. The first consists of grants assigned directly to individuals aged between 16 and 18. The second is assigned to the parents earlier on, when the cohort is still in its childhood. The latter subsidy affects cognitive skills accumulation and in turn educational choices. Our results suggest that a grant fosters enrolment at the lowest cost but the parental income subsidy generates more welfare as measured by a class of social welfare functions. Nevertheless, these differences in costs and welfare are small. Overall, the results reinforce the view that government investments in cognitive skill accumulation during childhood are worthwhile. However, the results also indicate that such investments should be well structured to ensure a high return.
Dardanoni, V., Fiorini, M. & Forcina, A. 2012, 'Stochastic monotonicity in intergenerational mobility tables', Journal of Applied Econometrics, vol. 27, no. 1, pp. 85-107.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
The aim of this paper is to test for stochastic monotonicity in intergenerational socio-economic mobility tables. In other words, we question whether having a parent from a high socio-economic status is never worse than having one with a lower status. Using existing inferential procedures for testing unconditional stochastic monotonicity, we first test a set of 149 intergenerational mobility tables in 35 different countries and find that monotonicity cannot be rejected in hardly any table. In addition, we propose new testing procedures for testing conditional stochastic monotonicity and investigate whether monotonicity still holds after conditioning on a number of covariates such as education, cognitive and non-cognitive skills. Based on the NCDS cohort data from the UK, our results provide evidence that monotonicity holds, even conditionally. Moreover, we do not find large differences in our results when comparing social class and wage class mobility.
Edwards, B., Taylor, M. & Fiorini, M. 2011, 'Who gets the 'gift of time' in Australia? Exploring delayed primary school entry', Australian Review of Public Affairs, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 41-60.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Fiorini, M. 2010, 'The effect of home computer use on children's cognitive and non-cognitive skills', Economics of Education Review, vol. 29, no. 1, pp. 55-72.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
In this paper we investigate the effect of using a home computer on childrens development. In most OECD countries 70% or more of the households have a computer at home and children use computers quite extensively, even at very young ages. We use data from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC), which follows an Australian cohort born in 1999/2000. Skills and computer usage information is collected when children are approximately 5 and 7 years old. For cognitive skills, our results indicate that computer time has a positive effect. For non-cognitive skills the evidence is mixed, the effect depending on the score and the age of the children. We test the robustness of our results by comparing OLS, IV and Value Added estimators. Generally, the IV estimates are larger and the Value Added estimates lower than the OLS ones. However the pattern of the results is quite consistent

Other

Edwards, B., Fiorini, M., Stevens, K. & Taylor, M. 2013, 'Is Monotonicity in an IV and RD Design Testable? No, But You Can Still Check on it'.
Whenever treatment effects are heterogeneous and there is sorting into treatment based on the gain, monotonicity is a condition that both Instrumental Variable and fuzzy Regression Discontinuity designs have to satisfy for their estimand to be interpretable as a LATE. Angrist and Imbens (1995) argue that the monotonicity assumption is testable whenever the treatment is multivalued. We show that their test is informative if counterfactuals are observed. Yet applying the test without observing counterfactuals, as it is generally done, is not. Nevertheless, we argue that monotonicity can and should be investigated using a mix of economic intuition and data patterns, just like other untestable assumptions in an IV or RD design. We provide examples in a variety of settings as a guide to practice.
Fiorini, M. 2012, 'Fostering educational enrolment through subsidies: The issue of timing'.
The purpose of this paper is to build a dynamic structural model of educational choices in which cognitive skills shape decisions. The model is estimated by maximum likelihood using cohort data where individuals are observed from birth to the middle of their working life. These data are unique in that they include cognitive skills test scores collected as early as age 7. We then investigate how alternative policies foster educational enrolment. In particular, we simulate the effect of two subsidies different in the timing of disbursement. The first consists of grants assigned directly to individuals aged between 16 and 18. The second is assigned to the parents earlier on, when the cohort is still in its childhood. The latter subsidy affects cognitive skills accumulation and in turn educational choices. Our results suggest that a grant fosters enrolment at the lowest cost but the parental income subsidy generates more welfare as measured by a class of social welfare functions. Nevertheless, these differences in costs and welfare are small. Overall, the results reinforce the view that government investments in cognitive skill accumulation during childhood are worthwhile. However, the results also indicate that such investments should be well structured to ensure a high return. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Keane, M. & Fiorini, M. 2010, 'The effect of daily time allocation to child cognitive outcomes'.
Dardanoni, V., Fiorini, M. & Forcina, A. 2008, 'Stochastic Monotonicity in Intergenerational Mobility Tables', Working Paper Series.
The aim of this paper is to test for stochastic monotonicity in intergenerational socio-economic mobility tables. In other words we question whether having a parent from a high socio-economic status is never worse than having one with a lower status. We ?rst test a set of 149 intergenerational mobility tables in 35 different countries and ?nd that monotonicity cannot be rejected in hardly any table. We then explain how a number of covariates such as education, cognitive and non-cognitive skills can be used to investigate whether monotonicity still holds after conditioning on these variables. Based on the NCDS cohort data from the UK, our results provide evidence that monotonicity holds even conditionally.
Fiorini, M. 2008, 'Fostering Educational Enrolment Through Subsidies: The Issue of Timing', Working Paper Series.
In this paper we build a dynamic structural model of educational choices in which cognitive skills shape decisions. The model is estimated by maximum likelihood using cohort data where individuals are observed from birth onwards. These data are unique in that they include cognitive skills test scores collected as early as age 7. We then simulate the effect of two educational subsidies equal in cost but different in the timing of disbursement. The first consists of grants assigned directly to individuals aged between 16 and 18. The second is assigned to the parents earlier on, when the cohort is still in its childhood. The latter subsidy affects cognitive skills accumulation and in turn educational choices. Our results suggest that a direct grant in the form of a tuition subsidy might be more efficient even in the absence of short term financial constraints. Although cognitive skills accumulated during childhood play a key role in the educational decisions, an unconditional financial subsidy to parents is not the best policy. The results do not call a halt to investments in cognitive skill accumulation during childhood, but recommend that such investments should be well structured and ensure a high return.