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Dr Louise Hickman

Biography

Dr Louise Hickman expertise is in both quantitative, qualitative and mixed methods research which is grounded in her qualifications in Nursing, Masters of Public Health and a PhD. Dr Hickman primary research focus and current research projects are in chronic and complex disease, palliative care; improving care for the older person, women’s health, translational research that bridges the gaps between the acute care sector, community and residential aged care.

Dr Louise Hickman is Director of Postgraduate Nursing at UTS, this leadership role includes designing curriculum, quality management; curriculum renewal and reaccreditation. Dr Louise Hickman has been appointed and invited to sit on a number of internal and external industry committees and reference groups for clinical research and curricula.

Dr Hickman is facilitating and building a postgraduate curricula underpinned by a pedagogical approach grounded in sound research. The postgraduate learning experience should encourage nurses to improve utilisation and translation of knowledge into their practice, broader health care environments and to lead to better health outcomes.

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Associate Professor, Faculty of Health
Course Coordinator, Faculty of Health
Core Member, Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM)
Core Member, CHSP - Health Services and Practice
Doctor of Philosophy
 
Phone
+61 2 9514 4577

Research Interests

Dr Louise Hickman expertise is in both quantitative, qualitative and mixed methods research which is grounded in her qualifications in Nursing, Masters of Public Health and a PhD. Dr Hickman primary research focus and current research projects are in chronic and complex disease, palliative care; improving care for the older person, women’s health, translational research that bridges the gaps between the acute care sector, community and residential aged care.

Can supervise: Yes

Chapters

Hickman, L.D. 2017, 'Coordinating care and teamwork' in Crisp, J., Douglas, C., Reberio, G. & Waters, D. (eds), Potter and Perry's Fundamentals of Nursing 5e, Elsevier, pp. 120-134.
Hickman, L. & Disler, R. 2015, 'Quantitative Research' in Navigating the Maze of Research Enhancing Nursing and Midwifery Practice, Elsevier.
Davidson, P.M. & Hickman, L. 2012, 'Managing client care' in Crisp, J., Taylor, C., Douglas, C. & Rebeiro, G. (eds), Potter and Perry's Fundamentals of Nursing 4th edition, Mosby Elsevier, Chatswood, Sydney, NSW, pp. 121-136.
Davidson, P.M. & Hickman, L. 2009, 'Managing client care' in Crisp, J. & Taylor, K. (eds), Potter and Perry's Fundamentals of Nursing, 3rd Edition, Elsevier, Sydney, Australia, pp. 318-330.
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Conferences

Rao, A., DiGiacomo, M., Newton, P., Phillips, J., Davidson, P.M. & Hickman, L. 2016, 'Meditation as a secondary prevention strategy for heart disease: a systematic review', Australian Cardiac Rehabilitation Association Conference, Adelaide.
Hickman, L., Phillips, J.L., Newton, P. & Davidson, P.M. 2015, 'Montreal cognitive assessment tool: feasibility in a heart failure population group', Australian Cardiac Nurses Conference, Sydney.
Phillips, J.L., Heneka, N. & Hickman, L. 2014, 'Impact of a Qstream online learning module on palliative care nurses' pain assessment competencies and patients' report on pain: Results from a quasi-experimental pilot study', Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, Wiley: 12 months.
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Al Abed, N., Davidson, P.M., Hickman, L., DiGiacomo, M. & Jackson, D. 2013, 'Older Arab Migrants: Between the Hammer of Prejudice and the Anvil of Social Isolation', 2nd International Conference on Ageing in a Foreign Land, Adelaide, Australia.
Phillips, J.L., Heneka, N., Hickman, L., Lam, L. & Shaw, T. 2013, 'The impact of a novel, online learning module on specialist palliative care nurses' pain assessment knowledge and practices', European Journal of Palliative Care, European Palliative Care Association Conference, Prague.
Phillips, J.L., Heneka, N., Hickman, L., Lam, L. & Shaw, T. 2013, 'Can a novel on-line pain assessment learning module improve specialist palliative care nurse's pain assessment knowledge?: Results from a pilot Spaced Education initiative', 16th CNSA Winter Congress, Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre, Queensland.
Anuruang, S., Davidson, P.M., Hickman, L. & Jackson, D. 2013, 'Integrative Review of Community Based Interventions to Promote Self-care/management for older people in Thailand', Sigma Theta Tau International's 24th International Nursing Research Congress, Prague, Czech Republic.
Phillips, J.L., Heneka, N., Hickman, L., Lam, L. & Shaw, T. 2012, 'Spaced Education in the Specialist Palliative Care Setting: exploring it's potential to improve pain management', 4th Biennial Palliative Care Nurses Australia Conference, Melbourne.
Phillips, J.L., Andrews, L. & Hickman, L. 2012, 'Factors predicting stays of over 30 days in patients dying in a specialist palliative care unit', 19th International Congress on Women's Health, Mahidol University Bangkok, Thailand.
Phillips, J.L., Hickman, L., Heneka, N. & Shaw, T. 2012, 'Can a novel on-line CPD program increase specialist palliative care nurses pain assessment capabilities and reduce patients' reported pain scores?', WA Palliative Care Conference, Perth, WA.
Phillips, J.L., Heneka, N., Hickman, L., Lam, L. & Shaw, T. 2012, 'Enhancing interdisciplinary team pain assessment communication: Can Spaced Education improve comprehensive pain assessment practices in the specialist palliative care setting?', Palliative Care NSW State Conference, Dubbo.
Hickman, L., Kelly, H. & Phillips, J.L. 2012, 'EVITECH: a pilot study exploring ways to optimise the uptake of evidence-based practice to undergraduate nurses', 23rd Research Conference, Sigma, Theta Tau International, Brisbane, QLD.
Phillips, J.L., Hickman, L., Heneka, N. & Shaw, T. 2012, 'Assessing specialist palliative care nurses pain assessment capabilities: identifying opportunities to improve patient outcomes', 16th Cancer Nurses Society Australia Conference, Hobart.

Journal articles

Ferguson, C., DiGiacomo, M., Gholizadeh, L., Ferguson, L.E. & Hickman, L.D. 2017, 'The integration and evaluation of a social-media facilitated journal club to enhance the student learning experience of evidence based practice', Nurse Education Today, vol. 48, pp. 123-128.
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Rao, A., Newton, P., DiGiacomo, M., Hickman, L., Hwang, C. & Davidson, P. 2017, 'Optimal gender specific strategies for the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease in women: a systematic review', Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention.
Peng, W., Adams, J., Hickman, L. & Sibbritt, D.W. 2016, 'Longitudinal analysis of associations between women's consultations with complementary and alternative medicine practitioners/use of self-prescribed complementary and alternative medicine and menopause-related symptoms, 2007-2010.', Menopause, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 74-80.
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This study aims to determine associations between consultations with complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioners/use of self-prescribed CAM and menopause-related symptoms.Data were obtained from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. Generalized estimating equations were used to conduct longitudinal data analyses, which were restricted to women born in 1946-1951 who were surveyed in 2007 (survey 5; n=10,638) and 2010 (survey 6; n=10,011).Women with menopause-related symptoms were more likely to use self-prescribed CAM but were not more likely to consult a CAM practitioner. Overall, CAM use was lower among women who had undergone hysterectomy or women who had undergone oophorectomy, compared with naturally postmenopausal women, and decreased with increasing age of postmenopausal women. Weak associations between CAM use and hot flashes were observed. Women experiencing hot flashes were more likely to consult a massage therapist (odds ratio, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.00-1.20) and/or use self-prescribed herbal medicines (odds ratio, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.03-1.23) than women not experiencing hot flashes.Consultations with CAM practitioners and use of self-prescribed CAM among naturally or surgically postmenopausal women are associated with menopause-related symptoms. Our study findings should prompt healthcare providers, in particular family medicine practitioners, to be cognizant of clinical evidence for CAM typically used for the management of common menopause-related symptoms in their aim to provide safe, effective, and coordinated care for women.
Vongmany, J., Hickman, L.D., Lewis, J., Newton, P.J. & Phillips, J.L. 2016, 'Anxiety in chronic heart failure and the risk of increased hospitalisations and mortality: A systematic review.', European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing.
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Anxiety is a serious affective mood disorder that affects many chronic heart failure patients. While there is ample evidence that depression increases hospitalisations and mortality in chronic heart failure patients, it is unclear whether this association also exists for anxiety.The purpose of this study was to report on prospective cohort studies investigating anxiety in chronic heart failure patients and its association with hospitalisations and mortality rates. This systematic review aims to improve the current knowledge of anxiety as a potential prognostic predictor in chronic heart failure populations.This systematic review adheres to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. Studies were identified by accessing electronic databases Embase, Medline, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature and PsycINFO. Studies were included if they: employed a prospective cohort study design, included chronic heart failure participants with a confirmed clinical diagnosis plus anxiety confirmed by a validated anxiety assessment tool and/or clinical diagnosis and reported longitudinal hospitalisation rates and mortality data in chronic heart failure.Six studies were identified for inclusion. A study investigating hospitalisations and mortality rates found a significant (p<0.05) association solely between hospitalisation and anxiety. Of four studies reporting on hospitalisations alone, only two reported significant associations with anxiety. One study reported rates of mortality alone and identified no significant associations between mortality and anxiety. There was some variation in quality of the studies in regards to their methodology, analysis and reported measures/outcomes, which may have affected the results reported.It is possible that anxiety does predict hospitalisations in chronic heart failure populations, however further research is required to confirm this observation.
Bhattarai, P., Hickman, L. & Phillips, J.L. 2016, 'Pain among hospitalized older people with heart failure and their preparation to manage this symptom on discharge: a descriptive-observational study', CONTEMPORARY NURSE, vol. 52, no. 2-3, pp. 204-215.
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Fisher, C., Adams, J., Hickman, L. & Sibbritt, D. 2016, 'The use of complementary and alternative medicine by 7427 Australian women with cyclic perimenstrual pain and discomfort: a cross-sectional study', BMC COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE, vol. 16.
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Rao, A., Hickman, L.D., Phillips, J.L. & Sibbritt, D. 2016, 'Prevalence and characteristics of Australian women who use prayer or spiritual healing: A nationally representative cross-sectional study', COMPLEMENTARY THERAPIES IN MEDICINE, vol. 27, pp. 35-42.
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Fisher, C., Sibbritt, D., Hickman, L. & Adams, J. 2016, 'A critical review of complementary and alternative medicine use by women with cyclic perimenstrual pain and discomfort: A focus upon prevalence, patterns and applications of use and users' motivations, information seeking and self-perceived efficacy.', Acta obstetricia et gynecologica Scandinavica, vol. 95, no. 8, pp. 861-871.
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Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is used for treating cyclic perimenstrual pain and discomfort. This critical review examines women's reported CAM use, its perceived effectiveness and information relating to women's attitudes, behaviours, motivations and patterns of CAM use in its treatment MATERIAL AND METHODS: An extensive search of the main medical databases EBSCO, CINAHL, Medline, AMED and SCOPUS, as well as additional hand searches, was conducted. Papers included were confined to those that had been peer-reviewed, written in English and containing original research into CAM use for cyclic perimenstrual pain and discomfort amongst adult women RESULTS: CAM, particularly herbal medicine, nutritional supplements and massage, is widely used for a range of cyclic perimenstrual pain and discomfort symptoms. A large number of CAM modalities are adopted, often simultaneously and with little professional oversight. Women's assessment of efficacy of different CAM modalities is positive, though the majority of users are self-prescribing apparently without professional guidance. Although the uptake of CAM for cyclic perimenstrual pain and discomfort is wide-spread, little empirical data is available regarding which women are using CAM, their motivations for doing so and importantly the sources via which women receive information about CAM CONCLUSIONS: This review highlights the extensive use of (often self-prescribed) CAM in a number of countries to alleviate the widespread symptoms of cyclic perimenstrual pain and discomfort. An understanding of all health care utilisation by women with perimenstrual pain and discomfort is vital to help ensure safe, effective and coordinated health care that can lead to optimal patient outcomes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Sibbritt, D., Davidson, P., Peng, W.B., Adams, J. & Hickman, L. 2016, 'Hypertension: What are the self-care and health-care-seeking behaviours in women over time?', Journal of human hypertension.
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The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence and incidence of hypertension in women, and describe their self-care and health-seeking behaviours. This research was conducted as part of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health, a study comprising a nationally representative sample of Australian women in three age groups. The focus of this research is 14099 women born in 1946-1951, who have been surveyed six times (1996-2010). Student t-tests were used to compare women who did or did not have hypertension by their health-care utilization. Longitudinal analyses were conducted using a Poisson generalized estimating equation model. The incidence of hypertension among this cohort during 1996 to 2010 ranged from 400 to 597 participants per survey, resulting in an increase in prevalence of hypertension from 20.9% in 1996 to 41.3% in 2010. For all survey periods, women with hypertension had a significantly higher average number of visits to doctors and allied health practitioners compared with women without hypertension (P<0.005). The use of complementary medicine (practitioners and self-prescribed treatments) by women with hypertension was significantly lower compared to women without hypertension (P<0.005). Over time, conventional health-care utilization was higher for women with hypertension compared with women without hypertension (adjusted RR=1.18; 95% CI: 1.14, 1.22; P<0.0001). Our findings show that women with hypertension are using a range of conventional and complementary and alternative medicine: with hypertensive women using more conventional medicine and less complementary and alternative medicine than non-hypertensive women. As such, health-care providers should communicate with their patients regarding their use of complementary and alternative medicine in their efforts to provide safe, effective and coordinate care.Journal of Human Hypertension advance online publication, 28 April 2016; doi:10.1038/jhh.2016.20.
Ferguson, C., Hickman, L., Lal, S., Newton, P., Kneebone, I., McGowan, S. & Middleton, S. 2016, 'Addressing the stroke evidence-treatment gap', Contemporary Nurse.
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Rao, A., Hickman, L.D., Sibbritt, D., Newton, P.J. & Phillips, J.L. 2016, 'Is energy healing an effective non-pharmacological therapy for improving symptom management of chronic illnesses? A systematic review', Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, vol. 25, pp. 26-41.
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Hickman, L.D., Neville, S., Fischer, T., Davidson, P.M. & Phillips, J.L. 2016, 'Editorial: Call to action: greater investment in the registered nurse role is required to improve care outcomes for dementia patients living in residential aged care and their families.', Contemporary nurse, vol. 52, no. 2-3, pp. 137-139.
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The number of people living with dementia will triple by 2050 (World Health Organization, 2012). Dementia is a complex terminal illness and international global public health priority (World Health Organization, 2012). Whilst enormous efforts focus on dementia treatments, there is an equally urgent need to address workforce issues and invest in increasing the registered nurse role and ratios in residential aged care to meet the projections. In most high-income countries residential aged care facilities have evolved over the past two to three decades from homes for the aged into slow-stream hospices, caring for our most vulnerable community members (Allen, Chapman, O'Connor, & Francis, 2008). This population has complex care needs requiring the input of a range of health professionals, such as geriatricians, general practitioners, registered nurses and care assistants (Hickman, Rolley, & Davidson, 2010; Phillips, Heneka, Hickman, Lam, & Shaw, 2014). Over this same time period the number of registered or enrolled nurses working in residential aged care facilities has fallen and those that remain have been largely relegated to managerial responsibilities. As a result the bulk of nursing care in residential aged care is now provided by a largely unskilled and unregulated workforce. Without the prerequisite dementia knowledge, skills or training, these staff are supervised by a small number of registered nurses (Hullick et al., 2016). This is in contrast to emerging evidence from long-term care and acute care setting, that nurse qualifications impact outcome. It also differs significantly from standards in countries like Germany, where a minimum RN ratio of 50% is mandatory (Aiken et al., 2010)
Halcomb, E. & Hickman, L. 2016, 'Attitudes and immunisation practices of Australian general practice nurses', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 52, no. 4, pp. 440-446.
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&copy; 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis GroupBackground: Despite the decline in vaccine-preventable diseases, immunisation rates remain important. Nurses working in general practice (GPN) are often the first contact for childhood and adult immunisations and so impact vaccine provision. Aim: This study sought to describe the current immunisation practices and attitudes of GPN prior to attending the Nurse Immuniser Training Program. Methods: Prior to undertaking a Nurse Immuniser Training Program, registered nurses completed a survey describing their demographics, immunisation practice and attitudes to immunisation. Results: Ninety-five GPNs completed the survey. Approximately 98% of participants perceived vaccines to be safe, effective and necessary for child healthcare, while 56.4% of participants reported insufficient knowledge of the childhood immunisation schedule. The majority of participants' practices provided free influenza vaccinations for their general practitioners (GPs) (89.5%) and Practice Nurses (91.6%). However, only half of the participants had been immunised against influenza themselves in the previous three years. Conclusion: It is important for GPNs to be equipped with sufficient knowledge of immunisation to provide appropriate education and opportunistic intervention. However, nurses also need to be aware of their own vaccination status and its impact on their practice.
Halcomb, E., Purcell, R., Hickman, L. & Smyth, E. 2016, 'Telemonitoring is acceptable amongst community dwelling older Australians with chronic conditions', Collegian, vol. 23, no. 4, pp. 383-390.
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&copy; 2015 Australian College of Nursing LtdBackground Telemonitoring is an innovative model of care being implemented to address the growing burden of chronic and complex disease. Objectives This paper explores the perceptions of community dwelling older people with chronic and complex conditions towards a general practice nurse-led telemonitoring intervention. Method A pre-test post-test intervention study was conducted with consumer surveys administered before and after the intervention. The telemonitoring intervention consisted of a period of home monitoring during which daily vital signs and symptoms were transmitted to the general practice nurse. Results 21 participants completed both pre and post-test surveys. There was a significant difference between pre and post ratings on the survey item 'the use of telemonitoring equipment seems difficult to me (p&nbsp;=&nbsp;0.013), and 'telemonitoring will be a standard way of health care delivery in the future (p&nbsp;=&nbsp;0.032). Approximately half of the participants reported that telemonitoring provided them with a sense of security and peace of mind, assisted them to manage their health, in addition to improving their confidence in managing their care. Most participants felt more involved and expressed that daily monitoring helped them to understand changes in their condition. Conclusion Telemonitoring is acceptable to Australian community dwelling older persons with chronic conditions. Prior experience with computers and technology may not be a meditating factor in acceptability. The use of telemonitoring not only provided important physiological information to health professionals but also has the potential to empower older people by allowing them to better understand their own health.
Peng, W., Adams, J., Hickman, L. & Sibbritt, D.W. 2015, 'Association between consultations with complementary/alternative medicine practitioners and menopause-related symptoms: a cross-sectional study', Climacteric, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 551-558.
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Jha, S.R., Ha, H.S.K., Hickman, L.D., Hannu, M., Davidson, P.M., Macdonald, P.S. & Newton, P.J. 2015, 'Frailty in advanced heart failure: a systematic review', Heart Failure Reviews, vol. 20, no. 5, pp. 553-560.
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Rao, A., Sibbritt, D., Phillips, J.L. & Hickman, L.D. 2015, 'Prayer or spiritual healing as adjuncts to conventional care: a cross sectional analysis of prevalence and characteristics of use among women', BMJ Open, vol. 5, no. 6, pp. e007345-e007345.
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Halcomb, E. & Hickman, L. 2015, 'Mixed methods research', Nursing Standard, vol. 29, no. 32, pp. 41-47.
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Hickman, L.D., Phillips, J.L., Newton, P.J., Halcomb, E.J., Al Abed, N. & Davidson, P.M. 2015, 'Multidisciplinary team interventions to optimise health outcomes for older people in acute care settings: A systematic review', Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, vol. 61, no. 3, pp. 322-329.
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Anuruang, S., Davidson, P.M., Jackson, D. & Hickman, L. 2015, 'Strategies to enhance recruitment of rural-dwelling older people into community-based trials.', Nurse researcher, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 40-43.
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To describe strategies that can enhance the recruitment of rural-dwelling older people into clinical trials.Recruitment to studies can be time-consuming and challenging. Moreover, there are challenges associated with recruiting older people, particularly those living in rural areas. Nevertheless, an adequate sample size is crucial to the validity of randomised controlled trials (RCTs).The authors draw on the literature and their personal experiences, to present a range of flexible and inclusive strategies that have been successfully used to recruit older people into clinical trials.This paper describes attempts to improve recruitment of rural-dwelling, older Thai people to a clinical trial.To attract potential participants, researchers should consider minimising the burden of their study and maximising its benefits or convenience for participants. Three factors that may influence participation rates are: personal factors of participants, researchers' personal attributes, and protocol factors. In addition, three important strategies contribute to improving recruitment: understanding the culture of the research setting, identifying the 'gatekeepers' in the setting and building trust with stakeholders.Even though the study covered did not recruit a large number of participants, these understandings were crucial and enabled recruitment of a sufficient number of participants in a reasonable timeframe.These strategies may be of use in rural settings and with different communities including urban communities.
Peng, W., Sibbritt, D.W., Hickman, L. & Adams, J. 2015, 'Association between use of self-prescribed complementary and alternative medicine and menopause-related symptoms: a cross-sectional study.', Complementary Therapies in Medicine, vol. 23, no. 5, pp. 666-673.
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To examine the association between self-prescribed complementary and alternative medicine use and menopause-related symptoms, stratified by menopausal status.Data were obtained from a cross-sectional survey of a nationally representative sample of 10,011 menopausal women from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health, conducted in 2010. Multivariable logistic regression models were applied to identify if the use of selected self-prescribed complementary and alternative medicine was significantly associated with a range of menopause-related symptoms.Vitamins/minerals were more likely to be used by natural menopausal women experiencing anxiety (adjusted OR=1.20) and/or stiff/painful joints (adjusted OR=1.16). Yoga/meditation was more likely to be used by women with hysterectomy (adjusted OR=1.76) or natural menopausal women (adjusted OR=1.38) experiencing anxiety. Herbal medicines were more likely to be used by natural menopausal women experiencing anxiety (adjusted OR=1.22), tiredness (adjusted OR=1.20), and/or stiff/painful joints (adjusted OR=1.17), and by women with oophorectomy experiencing tiredness (adjusted OR=1.45). Aromatherapy oils were more likely to be used by natural menopausal women experiencing night sweats (adjusted OR=1.25) and by women with hysterectomy experiencing anxiety (adjusted OR=2.02). Chinese medicines were more likely to be used by women with oophorectomy experiencing stiff/painful joints (adjusted OR=4.06) and/or palpitations (adjusted OR=3.06).Our study will help improve the patient-provider communication regarding complementary and alternative medicine use for menopause, and we conclude that menopausal status should be taken into account by providers for menopause care. The women's experience and motivations of such use warrant further research.
Ferguson, C., Davidson, P.M., Scott, P.J., Jackson, D. & Hickman, L.D. 2015, 'Augmented reality, virtual reality and gaming: an integral part of nursing.', Contemporary nurse, vol. 51, no. 1, pp. 1-4.
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Anuruang, S., Hickman, L., Jackson, D.E., Dharmendra, T., Van Balen, J. & Davidson, P.M. 2014, 'Community-based interventions to promote management for older people: an integrative review', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 23, no. 15-16, pp. 2110-2120.
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Aims and objectives To review community programmes promoting self-care or self-management for older people with chronic disease in Thailand. Background Identifying successful elements of culturally appropriate and effective community-based interventions to promote self-care with chronic illness is increasingly important. Design Integrative review. Data sources CINAHL, Medline, Health Source Nursing Academic databases. Methods Integrative review of peer-reviewed articles written between 19462012. Articles were included if they described self-care, self-management, chronic disease and community care interventions targeting older people in Thailand. Results Of the 58 articles retrieved, only 13 articles met the eligibility criteria. Elements of effective interventions included: (1) providing culturally sensitive information, (2) including approaches of shared decision-making and mutual goal setting and (3) flexibility within the intervention to adapt to participant needs. Conclusions Shared decision-making and mutual goal setting between interventionists and patients improved health behaviours and outcomes. Moreover, the flexibility to adopt the intervention to local characteristics demonstrated positive results.
Al Abed, N.A., Hickman, L., Jackson, D.E., DiGiacomo, M. & Davidson, P.M. 2014, 'Older Arab migrants in Australia: Between the hammer of prejudice and the anvil of social isolation', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 46, no. 2, pp. 259-262.
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Peng, W., Sibbritt, D., Hickman, L., Kong, X., Yang, L. & Adams, J. 2014, 'A critical review of traditional Chinese medicine use amongst women with menopausal symptoms', Climacteric, vol. 17, no. 6, pp. 635-644.
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Objectives To provide the first critical review of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) use amongst symptomatic menopausal women, drawing upon work examining the perspectives of both TCM users and TCM practitioners. Methods A search was conducted in three English-language databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL and AMED) and three Chinese-language databases (CNKI, VIP and CBM Disc) for 2002-2013 international peer-reviewed articles reporting empirical findings of TCM use in menopause. Results A total of 25 journal articles reporting 22 studies were identified as meeting the review inclusion criteria. Chinese herbal medicine appears to be the most common therapy amongst symptomatic menopausal women, and vasomotor symptoms and emotional changes are the most frequent symptoms for which TCM is sought. However, evidence regarding the prevalence of TCM use and users' profile in menopause is limited. Existing studies are of varied methodological quality, often reporting low response rate, extensive recall bias and a lack of syndrome differentiation. Conclusions This review provides insights for practitioners and health policy-makers regarding TCM care to symptomatic menopausal women. More nationally representative studies are required to rigorously examine TCM use for the management of menopausal symptoms. Syndrome differentiation of menopausal women is an area which also warrants further attention.
Phillips, J.L., Andrews, L. & Hickman, L. 2014, 'Role ambiguity, role conflict or burnout: are these areas of concern for Australian palliative care volunteers?', American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine, vol. In press.
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To determine whether burnout, role ambiguity, or conflict affects Australian hospice volunteers.
Al Abed, N.A., Davidson, P.M. & Hickman, L. 2014, 'Healthcare needs of older Arab migrants: a systematic review', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 23, no. 13-14, pp. 1770-1784.
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Aims and objectives To explore the healthcare needs of older Arab migrants, focussing on Arab-Australians and their socio-cultural characteristics.
Phillips, J.L., Heneka, N.A., Hickman, L., Lam, L. & Shaw, T. 2014, 'Impact of a novel online learning module on specialist palliative care nurses' pain assessment competencies and patients' reports of pain: Results from a quasi-experimental pilot study', Palliative Medicine, vol. 28, no. 6, pp. 521-529.
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Background: Pain is a complex multidimensional phenomenon moderated by consumer, provider and health system factors. Effective pain management cuts across professional boundaries, with failure to screen and assess contributing to the burden of unrelieved pain.
Peng, W., Adams, J., Hickman, L. & Sibbritt, D.W. 2014, 'Complementary/alternative and conventional medicine use amongst menopausal women: Results from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', Maturitas, vol. 79, no. 3, pp. 340-342.
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Jackson, D., Hickman, L.D., Power, T., Disler, R., Potgieter, I., Deek, H. & Davidson, P.M. 2014, 'Small group learning: graduate health students' views of challenges and benefits.', Contemporary nurse, pp. 5297-5312.
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Abstract Background: For health care professionals, particularly nurses, the need to work productively and efficiently in small groups is a crucial skill required to meet the challenges of the contemporary health-care environment. Small group work is an educational technique that is used extensively in nurse education. The advantage of group work includes facilitation of deep, active and collaborative learning. However, small group work can be problematic and present challenges for students. Many of the challenges occur because group work necessitates the coming together of collections of individuals, each with their own personalities and sets of experiences. Aim: This study aimed to identify challenges and benefits associated with small group work and to explore options for retaining the positive aspects of group work while reducing or eliminating the aspects the students experienced as negative. Method: Online survey; thematic analysis. Results: Over all, students experienced a range of challenges that necessitated the development of problem-solving strategies. However, they were able to elucidate some enjoyable and positive aspects of group work. Implications for teaching and learning are drawn from this study. Conclusion: The ability to work effectively in small groups and teams is essential for all health care workers in the contemporary health environment. Findings of this study highlight the need for educators to explore novel and effective ways in which to engage nurses in group work.
Jackson, D., Hickman, L.D., Hutchinson, M., Andrew, S., Smith, J., Potgieter, I., Cleary, M. & Peters, K. 2014, 'Whistleblowing: An integrative literature review of data-based studies involving nurses.', Contemporary nurse, pp. 5495-5513.
Abstract Aim To summarise and critique the research literature about whistleblowing and nurses. Background Whistleblowing is identified as a crucial issue in maintenance of healthcare standards and nurses are frequently involved in whistleblowing events. Despite the importance of this issue, to our knowledge an evaluation of this body of the data-based literature has not been undertaken. Method An integrative literature review approach was used to summarise and critique the research literature. A comprehensive search of five databases including Medline, CINAHL, PubMed and Health Science: Nursing/Academic Edition, and Google, were searched using terms including: 'whistleblow*', 'nurs*'. In addition, relevant journals were examined, as well as reference lists of retrieved papers. Papers published during the years 2007-2013 were selected for inclusion. Findings Fifteen papers were identified, capturing data from nurses in seven countries. The findings in this review demonstrate a growing body of research for the nursing profession at large to engage and respond appropriately to issues involving suboptimal patient care or organisational wrongdoing. Conclusions Nursing plays a key role in maintaining practice standards and in reporting care that is unacceptable although the repercussions to nurses who raise concerns are insupportable. Overall, whistleblowing and how it influences the individual, their family, work colleagues, nursing practice and policy overall, requires further national and international research attention.
Jackson, D., Hickman, L.D., Power, T., Disler, R., Potgieter, I., Deek, H. & Davidson, P.M. 2014, 'Small group learning: Graduate health students' views of challenges and benefits', Contemporary nurse, vol. 48, pp. 117-128.
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Hickman, L.D., Kelly, H. & Phillips, J.L. 2014, 'EVITEACH: A study exploring ways to optimise the uptake of evidence-based practice to undergraduate nurses', NURSE EDUCATION IN PRACTICE, vol. 14, no. 6, pp. 598-604.
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Hickman, L.D., Mannix, J. & Neville, S. 2014, 'Editorial: Is postgraduate education a luxury or necessity for professional nurses: A trans-Tasman perspective.', Contemporary nurse, vol. 49, pp. 2-3.
Abstract &nbsp;
Jackson, D., Hickman, L.D., Hutchinson, M., Andrew, S., Smith, J., Potgieter, I., Cleary, M. & Peters, K. 2014, 'Whistleblowing: An integrative literature review of data-based studies involving nurses', CONTEMPORARY NURSE, vol. 48, no. 2, pp. 240-251.
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Jackson, D., Cleary, M. & Hickman, L. 2014, 'Case reports as a resource for teaching and learning.', Clinical case reports, vol. 2, no. 5, pp. 163-164.
Hickman, L. 2013, 'The resilient nurse: Empowering your practice', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 45, no. 1, pp. 144-144.
Book review
Hickman, L., Davidson, P.M., Chang, E. & Chenoweth, L. 2011, 'INHospital study: Do older people, carers and nurses share the same priorities of care in the acute aged care setting?', International Journal of Multiple Research Approaches, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 76-88.
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The aim of the INHospital study was to compare the level of importance of care priorities and satisfaction levels with care among patients, carers, and nurse caregivers in the acute aged care setting. The INHospital study used sequential mixed methods approach for data collection. Survey data was completed within fi ve metropolitan acute aged care wards on patients (n = 78), their carers (n = 45) and nurses (n = 37). The caring activity scale (CAS) survey was administered to participants in order to determine and compare the perceptions of the importance and satisfaction of care. Semistructured interviews of patients (n = 7) and carers (n = 7) were conducted after completion of the CAS survey. This qualitative data aimed to probe more deeply into the patients and carers care priorities and satisfaction as measured in the CAS. The CAS data demonstrated that patients, carers and nurses rated implementing, observing and reporting doctors orders similarly, while differences between groups were observed in relation to prioritising physical and psychosocial care and discharge. There were signifi cant differences between patients, carers and nurses on overall importance (p = 0.001) and satisfaction with respect to nursing care (p = 0.001). Qualitative data generated fi ve themes (1) Nurses doing the best they can in challenging circumstances; (2) Achieving a balancing act in a pressured environment; (3) Striving to maintain and sustain independence; (4) The discharge process: not a shared priority; and (5) Challenges of the carer role. A key implication of this study is the incongruence between what patients consider a priority for care and the priority ascribed to those tasks by nurses.
Hickman, L., Rolley, J. & Davidson, P.M. 2010, 'Can principles of the Chronic Care Model be used to improve care of the older person in the acute care sector?', Collegian, vol. 17, no. 2, pp. 63-69.
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Chronic care; Models of care; Aged care; Acute care; Nursing
Halcomb, E. & Hickman, L. 2010, 'Development of a clinician-led research agenda for general practice nurses', Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing, vol. 27, no. 3, pp. 4-11.
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This study sought to identify and prioritise research issues as perceived by Australian general practice nurses. In this context, a research priority refers to the most pressing research problems that necessitate exploration to improve clinical practice.
Ramjan, J.M., Costa, C.M., Hickman, L., Kearns, M. & Phillips, J.L. 2010, 'Integrating palliative care content into a new undergraduate nursing curriculum: The University of Notre Dame, Australia - Sydney experience', Collegian, vol. 17, no. 2 Special Issue, pp. 85-91.
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The majority of society's deaths occur in a health care environment. Regardless of whether a death occurs in acute care, hospice, residential aged care or community settings, nurses are the health professionals that will spend the largest proportion of time with the patient who has a terminal condition and their families. As few nurses have specialist palliative care qualifications it is essential that nursing education prepares graduates to achieve the core capabilities required for the delivery of best evidenced based palliative care. This reality makes the integration of palliative care content into the undergraduate nursing curricula an important priority. This paper aims to describe how palliative care content has been embedded throughout the three-year University of Notre Dame Australia, Sydney (UNDA) undergraduate nursing degree. Method: The School of Nursing at the University of Notre Dame Australia, Sydney campus is committed to ensuring that students graduate with the capabilities to deliver appropriate care to people with requiring end-of-life care. The establishment of this new School of Nursing coincided with the release of the 'The Palliative Care Curricula for Undergraduates Program' (PCC4U) learning resources. These resources have been integrated into relevant units across the three-year nursing curricula. The nursing curriculum has been design to supports the integration of palliative care knowledge into clinical practice. The Palliative Care Curricula for Undergraduates Program learning resources offer engaging palliative care case studies and scenarios for academics to utilise. Adopting an iterative approach where palliative care content is spiralled across multiple units provides opportunities for undergraduate nursing students to sequentially build and consolidate their palliative care capabilities.
Halcomb, E., Fernandez, R.S., Griffiths, R., Newton, P.J. & Hickman, L. 2008, 'The infection control management of MRSA within the acute care hospital', International Journal of Evidence-Based Healthcare, vol. 6, no. 4, pp. 440-467.
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Background Many acute care facilities report endemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), while others describe the occurrence of sporadic disease outbreaks. The timely implementation of effective infection control measures is essential to minimise the incidence of MRSA cases and the magnitude of disease outbreaks. Management strategies for the containment and control of MRSA currently vary between facilities and demonstrate varying levels of effectiveness. Objectives This review sought to systematically review the best available research regarding the efficacy of infection control practices in controlling endemic MRSA or MRSA outbreaks in the acute hospital setting. It updates an original review published in 2002. Search strategy A systematic search for relevant published or unpublished English language literature was undertaken using electronic databases, the reference lists of retrieved papers and the Internet. This extended the search of the original review. Databases searched included: Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE, Cochrane Library and Joanna Briggs Institute Evidence Library. Selection criteria All research reports published between 1990 and August 2005 in the English language that focused upon the infection control strategies that were implemented in response to either a nosocomial outbreak of MRSA or endemic MRSA within an acute clinical setting were included. Only studies that reported interventions which were implemented following the collection of baseline data were included. Data collection and analysis Two reviewers assessed each paper against the inclusion criteria and a validated quality scale. Data extraction was undertaken using a purposely designed tool. Given the heterogeneity of the interventions and outcomes measures, statistical comparisons of findings were not possible, therefore, the findings of this review are presented in a narrative format.
Halcomb, E.J., Fernandez, R., Griffiths, R., Newton, P. & Hickman, L. 2008, 'The infection control management of MRSA in acute care.', International journal of evidence-based healthcare, vol. 6, no. 4, pp. 440-467.
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Background Many acute care facilities report endemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), while others describe the occurrence of sporadic disease outbreaks. The timely implementation of effective infection control measures is essential to minimise the incidence of MRSA cases and the magnitude of disease outbreaks. Management strategies for the containment and control of MRSA currently vary between facilities and demonstrate varying levels of effectiveness. Objectives This review sought to systematically review the best available research regarding the efficacy of infection control practices in controlling endemic MRSA or MRSA outbreaks in the acute hospital setting. It updates an original review published in 2002. Search strategy A systematic search for relevant published or unpublished English language literature was undertaken using electronic databases, the reference lists of retrieved papers and the Internet. This extended the search of the original review. Databases searched included: Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE, Cochrane Library and Joanna Briggs Institute Evidence Library. Selection criteria All research reports published between 1990 and August 2005 in the English language that focused upon the infection control strategies that were implemented in response to either a nosocomial outbreak of MRSA or endemic MRSA within an acute clinical setting were included. Only studies that reported interventions which were implemented following the collection of baseline data were included. Data collection and analysis Two reviewers assessed each paper against the inclusion criteria and a validated quality scale. Data extraction was undertaken using a purposely designed tool. Given the heterogeneity of the interventions and outcomes measures, statistical comparisons of findings were not possible, therefore, the findings of this review are presented in a narrative format. Results Fourteen papers met the inclusion criteria for this review. Of these, 11 ...
Hickman, L., Newton, P.J., Halcomb, E., Chang, E. & Davidson, P.M. 2007, 'Best practice interventions to improve the management of older people in acute care settings: a literature review', Journal of Advanced Nursing, vol. 60, no. 2, pp. 113-126.
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Aim. This paper is a report of a literature review of experimental evidence describing interventions to manage the older adult in the acute care hospital setting. Background. Older people are increasingly being cared for in a system largely geared toward
Chang, E., Hancock, K., Hickman, L., Glasson, J. & Davidson, P.M. 2007, 'Outcomes of acutely ill older hospitalized patients following implementation of tailored models of care: A repeated measures (pre- and post-intervention) design', International Journal of Nursing Studies, vol. 44, no. 7, pp. 1079-1092.
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Background: There is a lack of research investigating models of nursing care for older hospitalised patients that address the nursing needs of this group. Objectives: The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of models of care for acutely older patients tailored to two contexts: an aged care specific ward and a medical ward. Design: This is a repeated measures design. Efficacy of the models was evaluated in terms of: patient and nurses&acirc; satisfaction with care provided; increased activities of daily living; reduced unplanned hospital readmissions; and medication knowledge. Settings: An aged care specific ward and a medical ward in two Sydney teaching hospitals. Participants: There were two groups of patients aged 65 years or older who were admitted to hospital for an acute illness: those admitted prior to model implementation (n &Acirc;&frac14; 232) and those admitted during model implementation (n &Acirc;&frac14; 116). Patients with moderate or severe dementia were excluded. The two groups of nurses were the pre-model group (n &Acirc;&frac14; 90) who were working on the medical and aged care wards for the study prior to model implementation, and the post-model group (n &Acirc;&frac14; 22), who were the nurses working on the wards during model implementation. Methods: Action research was used to develop the models of care in two wards: one for an aged care specific ward and another for a general medical ward where older patients were admitted. The models developed were based on empirical data gathered in an earlier phase of this study.
Davidson, P.M., Halcomb, E., Hickman, L., Phillips, J.L. & Graham, B. 2006, 'Beyond the rhetoric: what do we mean by a model of care?', Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 47-55.
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This paper aims to define what is meant by the term 'model of care' and document the pragmatic systems and processes necessary to develop, plan, implement and evaluate novel models of care delivery.

Other

Anuruang, S., Davidson, P.M., Jackson, D. & Hickman, L. 2015, 'Strategies to enhance recruitment of rural dwelling older people with hypertension into community-based randomised controlled trials study'.
Hickman, L., Phillips, Newton, P. & Davidson, P.M. 2014, 'Montreal cognitive assessment tool: feasibility in a heart failure population group'.
Rao, A., Hickman, L., Sibbritt, D. & Phillips, J.L. 2014, 'Palliative care patients may benefit from biofield (energy) therapies'.
Phillips, J.L., Shaw, T., Heneka, N., Hickman, L. & Lam, L. 2013, 'Specialist palliative care nurses pain assessment capabilities: results from a baseline survey'.