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Professor Lawrence Wallen

Biography

Prof. Dr. Lawrence Wallen is Head of School, Design at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS), from 2002 to 2012  Lawrence was Professor of Scenography at the Zurich University of the Arts, Switzerland.

His current research interests are focused on the narrative and interactive elements of performance, design and urban space and how these contribute to an evolving theory of spatial practice. Lawrence is currently preparing a monograph on the Model as Performance for publication by Bloomsbury, London (co-authored  with Thea Brejzek, 2017) and has been announced a Bogliasco fellow for 2017

Lawrence has co-edited and contributed to a series of books on Space and Scenography.

  1. *Brejzek, T., Greisenegger, W. and Wallen, L.P. (Eds.) (2011), Space and Desire: Scenographic Strategies in Theatre, Art and Media. Zurich: Zurich University of the Arts.
  2. *Brejzek, T., Greisenegger, W. and Wallen, L.P. (Eds.) (2009), Space and Truth / Raum und Wahrheit. Zurich: Zurich University of the Arts.
  3. *Brejzek, T., Greisenegger, W. and Wallen, L.P. (Eds.) (2008), Space and Power. Zurich: Zurich University of the Arts..

Recent projects  include on the reconstruction of landscape,. Cairotronica, Egypt,  the fractured landscape of mount subatico at the Gallery Le Logge in Assisi , Italy (2015). The photomedia installation Simultaneous in the Carlton Project Space, Sydney (2014). The drawing and photography installation Ascension 1-3 at NG Art, Sydney (2013). Writing the Landscape light installation festivalBEEPART, Vilnius, Lithuania (2012). The Mediterranean Diaries, The Nicholson Museum, Sydney Australia. (2012 - 2015). The Installation Spatial Narratives,  PQ2011 National Gallery Prague (2011). A Grammar of Space, FCA Gallery University of Wollongong / UTS Gallery (2011). The installation Repetitive Systems (2009) for the Cairo Biennale. The 20 metre titanium object Past Mapping (2007) Digital Media City, KGIT Seoul. Theatre and Opera projects include De los afectos  (2008) with Lanònima Imperial Barcelona, Grec Festival, Mercat de les Flors de Barcelona, Festival and Walking in the Limits (2006 - 07)  Theaterspektakel Zürich, Volksbühne Berlin (März Musik).

Previous projects / collaborations have been realised in venues internationally including the ZKM, Vitra Design Museum, Expo 2000, Istanbul Design Week, Art Basel, Mercat de les Flors de Barcelona, Venice Architectural Biennale, Cite de la Musique Paris, Museo d'Arte Moderna e Contemporanea di Trento e Rovereto, Festival Danza Gijón’08| Gijón, Teatro Central | Sevilla, Festival La Bâtie Genf, Grand Théâtre Luxembourg, Leipziger Tanztheater Leipzig, Münchener Biennale (opera), Teatro Zorrilla de Badalona, Donaueschinger Musiktage,, Frankfurter Kunstverein, Ludwig Forum Aachen, Wellington City Gallery, La Fundición, Barcelona, Teatro Nacional de Catalunya, Madrid Teatro de Madrid, Ludwigshafen Theater, Bregenz Festspielhaus, Dresdener Musikfestspiele, Eclat Festival für Neue Musik, Festival Escena Abierta, Teatre Principal, Dansa València,  CC Hasselt, Hasselt  Belgium, Spil, Roeselare - Belgium,  Festival Itálica, Sevilla, Festival de Danza de Terrassa- Spain, West International Festival, Festival Neuer Tanz, Freiburg,  ICC - Tokyo,  ISEA - Nagoya, WMF Berlin and more.

Professional

Australian Commissioner for the 2011 Prague Quadrennial of Performance Design and Space.

Member - Educational Council, ESARQ School of Architecture, Barcelona

Artistic Director - Doctorate Program Scenography, Zurich University of the Arts / University of Vienna

Image of Lawrence Wallen
Head of School, Design, School of Design
Bachelor of Architecture, MArch, DCA
 
Phone
+61 2 9514 8933

Research Interests

Lawrence's current research interests focus on spatial prototyping influenced by diverse forms of digital cultural production in the narrative and interactive elements of performance, visual art and urban space
Can supervise: Yes

Chapters

Brejzek, T. & Wallen, L. 2016, 'Unstable Architectures:Camping, Modernism and Beyond' in Perren, C. & Breen Lovett, S. (eds), Expanded Architecture: Temporal Formal Practices, AADR Art Architecture Design Research Bauhaus Edition 47, Leipzig, pp. 125-138.
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This chapter investigates the phenomenon of 'transience' in modernist architecture and postmodernist transdisciplinary and architectural experimentation. With case studies spanning over a time period from 1922 -2012, the authors argue what connects the selected key practice case studies is their common origin in the positively connoted notion of the nomadic, the temporary and unsettled. In architecture as much as in philosophical thought, temporary occupations have offered an alternate vision of inhabitation to the constraints of a society that typically defines itself through conventions of settledness, stability, and duration. Deleuze's notion of nomadism as an activity and a process that sets up a counter-space to the dominant space of the State, provides one set of relations with which to think about temporal and transient built structures and its contemporary reflections, and Heidegger's practices of 'dwelling' as a mode of 'being in the world' where, however, identity is not linked to a place, form another theoretical provocation. Through two modernist case studies of 'unstable architectures', namely Rudolph Schindler's Kings Road House in Los Angeles (1922) and Eileen Gray's E-1027 house in Roquebrune-Cap-Martin (1926-29), we reflect on both architects' desires for the design of their own houses as distinctly temporal dwellings. In contrast, the third case study, designed and built 60 years later, the architect's collective Raumlabor's Marathon Camp at the Steirischer Herbst Festival in Graz, Austria (2012) shows not a private dwelling but rather a model for the temporary housing of 'theory', i.e. for a localized and collective thinking. The concept of unstable architectures, it is argued here, is linked to the creation of systems of performative relations between people and spaces through experimentation, critique and contextualisation. Unstable architectures provoke and enable alternate modes of individual and collective behaviour and in doing so, these...
Brejzek, T. & Wallen, L. 2014, 'Artistic Research - Collateral Damage or Epistemological Tool? Writing from the Inside of Practice' in Ravelli, L. & Paltridge, B. (eds), Doctoral Writing in the Creative and Performing Arts, Libri, Faringdon UK, pp. 219-234.
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Wallen, L.P. 2011, 'Landscape and Desire' in Brejzek, T., Greisenegger, W. & Wallen, L.P. (eds), Space and Desire: Scenographic Strategies in Theatre, Art and Media, Zhdk, Zurich, pp. 12-17.
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visual essay of photographs, along the abandoned Ghan railway line between Finke and Alice Springs also exhibited
Wallen, L.P., Brejzek, T. & Haegen, G.M. 2009, 'Szenografie - Scenography' in Stephan Guentzel (ed), Raumwissenschaften, Suhrkamp, frankfurt am main, pp. 370-386.
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Moving through theatre and architecture in relationship to scenography the chapter positions the emerging field of scenography in the current debate within the spatial sciences.
Wallen, L.P. 2009, 'Soviets' in brejzek, T., greisnegger, W. & wallen, L. (eds), Space and Truth, Zhdk (Zurich Hochschule der Kunste/Zurich University of the Arts), Zurich, pp. 186-197.
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A series on Scenography by the Zurich University of the Arts. Published with the support of the Swiss National Science Foundation

Conferences

Brejzek, T. & Wallen, L. 2014, 'Derealisation, Perception and Site: Some Notes on the Doppelgänger Space', PERCEPTION in Architecture: HERE and NOW, PERCEPTION in Architecture. HERE and NOW, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, Berlin, pp. 2-10.
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In their German Dictionary from 1838, the brothers Grimm give an intriguing definition of the term Doppelganger as someone who 'is thought to be able to show himself at the same time in two different places' . Intriguing is this definition as it defies the popular notion of the Doppelganger as someone who looks just like another person, who is somebody's twin, or double. Rather than focus on the physiognomic aspects of the Doppelganger, Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm's dictionary entry proposes a shift toward a topological definition that in its consequence speaks of a person who is present and is seen in two different sites simultaneously. This paper follows Grimm's initial orientation but turns it on its head by considering the Doppelganger phenomenon from the perspective of site, thus discussing such buildings that show themselves in two different places and expanding the field of observation to include such buildings that show themselves in two different places at different times. The phenomenon of the architectural double is investigated here in relation to 'what it does' rather than 'what it is', with the authors taking their cue, again, from the word itself, the German 'doppelt gehen' is the equivalent of the English 'double walking'. Rather than 'doppelt sein' (eng 'to be double'), the Doppelganger implies the action of walking, thus suggesting that a performative element is bound to the very existence of the double. The perception of the architectural double, with perception understood here as an active and cognitive process of our sense-making of the world, this paper argues, merges into the pronounced experience of a split presence where the architectural Doppelgangers are neither identical twins nor complete reconstructions, defined by difference and, possibly, constructed across several sites and temporalities.
Brejzek, T. & Wallen, L. 2014, 'The 1:1 Architectural Model as Performance and Double', PROCEEDINGS, [in]arch international conference 2014, Universitas Indonesia, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta, pp. 95-105.
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The Model as Performance Generally, the architectural model is thought of as an expression of material exploration and experimentation, utopian ideas and speculative construction. Together with drawing, the model is the designer's main communication tool, and typically, the scaled-down model invites the viewer to look but forbids entry. The space that the scaled-down model suggests through abstraction and representation cannot be 'felt' (Merleau-Ponty), the full scale inhabitable model on the other hand elicits affective responses. And while the 'space physicality' (Husserl) of the 1:1 model remains a simulation, its potential for inhabitation makes it a temporary 'home' and the model space a strategically staged interior. The 1:1 model asks from the viewer to become a co-actor in the making of the model space, in the process completing a site-specific performative environment where exteriority and visuality are no longer privileged over interiority and haptic sense. This paper interrogates the 1:1 model as a performance of inhabitation and looks at the role of the full scale model in architecture exhibitions, ranging from Mies van der Rohe's 1927 and 1931 exhibitions, The Dwelling and The Dwelling of Our Time respectively to contemporary examples. Key Words: architectural model, architectural doppelganger, exhibition, interior
Brejzek, T. & Wallen, L.P. 2013, 'Subject, Site and Sight: Freud and Tschumi on the Acropolis', Reverse Projections, Reverse Projections: Expanded Architecture at The Rocks, Broken Dimanche Press, Sydney, pp. 52-57.
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In 1904, diverted by circumstance to Athens rather than Corfu, the brothers Freud found themselves unhappy by the change in destination. Standing on the Acropolis, an uncanny thought had entered Freud's mind: `So does this all really exist like we have learned it at school?' The experience seemed one of unreality, and Freud categorized it as `A Disturbance of Memory' during which he observed himself as separating into himself and another whose perception of the situation was an entirely different one. Spectators in the theatre of Dionysos, or any other theatre, anywhere and at any time, are willing participants in the conspiracy of this double act of looking that produces the exact double consciousness, or: autoscopic experience, that Freud describes so persuasively. In architectural discourse, the consideration of autoscopy in conjunction with processes of reverse projection, argued here to be a performative practice that engages with site in a critical discursive manner, poses a counterpart to phenomenological positions that speak of the identity of body and self.
Anderson, B. & Wallen, L.P. 2009, 'Figuring Spatial Urbanities', SEAM 2009: Spatial Phases, Sydney.
Dr Benedict Anderson and Lawrence Wallen have been engaged in exploring the city, urban conditions and performance throughout their careers. Practicing and teaching in Europe and Australia their work engages with architecture, scenography, film and dramaturgy. Their focus on performance, the city and multi-media is distinguished by how they animate relationships between body and space through the solid and fluid natures of the temporal and ephemeral states of appearances and representations inherent within. The idea for this artists talk is to generate an understanding of the artist's individual working practice by focusing on their crossovers, meeting places and connections. Their combined interests and inspiration will be examined and how these impact in their work in performance and design, urbanity and the city, teaching and research. The talk begins by going back in time to their first crossovers and the paths their careers have since followed.

Journal articles

Wallen, L. 2015, 'Report from Sydney', Theatre and Performance Design, vol. 1, no. 4, pp. 321-329.
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Brejzek, T. & Wallen, L.P. 2013, 'Artist's pages: Cronulla NSW 2230 Australia : A Fotonovela', Performance Research, vol. 18, no. 3, pp. 59-62.
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Ali, 18, was convicted of pulling down the Australian ?lag from Brighton Le Sands RSL (The Returned and Services League of Australia) in the aftermath of the Cronulla riots in December 2005. It was a day when violence was fuelled by a number of different elements of the entire community. Ali spent a number of months in juvenile detention and was subsequently convicted of the offence and ordered to make a public apology to the club in the presence of the State RSL President, Don Rowe. As part of its plan for Alis redemption, the RSL proposed that he carry the ?lag in this years Anzac Day march in Sydney, but that was withdrawn following an outcry from some members of the veteran community and the public.

Non traditional outputs

Wallen, L.P., Garcia, J.C. & Menchero, J. 2008, 'De los afectos', Grec Festival Mercat de les Flors de Barcelona, Festival Danza Gijon-08, Teatro Central -Sevilla.
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The ongoing research with choreographer Juan Carlos Garcia and his company, Lanonima Imperial, is based Oil a continual dialogue about the body in space and its dialogue with electronic timebased media. In each iteration or new production we work to extend and advance this relational knowledge set building. Most productions arc shown between 10 and 20 venues across Europe, allowing for further refinement within the production cycle. Projects are extensively workshopped and previewed in small theatres before opening. Innovative ideas, new techniques and combinations of custom software solutions, interactive systems, robotics and new display technologies allow us to create new mediated spaces. Through the refinement and re-Interpretation of existing technologies and a reflective approach to an eleven year collaboration, we have made significant conceptual advances in the use of media on stage and the usc of the body as machine interface. In this work the research focused on the framing of nature through video and technical solutions regarding the kinetic movements of display systems, based on content and spatial location. 5 channels x 80 minutes video.
Wallen, L.P. 2006, 'Struck by the lightning', Wales Millenium Centre Cardiff Wales.
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Struck by the lightning: The ongoing research with choreographer Juan Carlos Garcia and his company, Lanonima Imperial, is based on a continual dialogue about the body in space and its dialogue with electronic time-based media. In each iteration or new production we work to extend and advance this relational knowledge set building. Most productions are shown between 10 and 20 venues across Europe, allowing for further refinement within the production cycle. Projects are extensively workshopped and previewed in small theatres before opening. Innovative ideas, new techniques and combinations of custom software solutions, interactive systems, robotics and new display technologies allow us to create new mediated spaces. Through the refinement and reinterpretation of existing technologies and a reflective approach to an eleven year collaboration, we have made significant conceptual advances in the use of media on stage and the use of the body as machine interface. Research into Michelangelo's lost painting, The Battle of Cascina (known from sketches), the work reconstructs a lost work through a set of electronic systems. Through the use of interactive and sensoric video systems we create a mediatised space that allowed the pieces (sketches) to be located and reassembled.
Wallen, L.P., Reber, H. & Krug, F. 2006, 'Walking in the Limits', Berlin Volksbuhne, Gessnerallee Zurich, Festival La Batie Genf, Grand Theatre Luxembourg.
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Walking in the limits is a homogenic artistic work made of sound, words and space, dealing with the understanding of space and time in a very existential sense: it reflects upon perception and illumines the structures of individual memory.â : Isabell Hemmel, Walking in the limits, in: Tagesanzeiger Zurich, 17-8-2006 The stage space was based on a two year investigation into the supersymmetric string theory. In the case of string theory, consistency requires spacetime to have 10 (3+1+6) dimensions. The conflict between observation and theory is resolved by making the unobserved dimensions compactified. By simulating a biographical event staged over 24 hours in a hotel room in Berlin on the night that the wall fell on the 9 November 1989 and viewing these events in terms of the string theory we propose an 'observable' ten-dimensional simulation of the proposed reality offered by the string theory. Working closely with researchers at CERN in Geneva and the composer Heinz Reber the works seeks to make the invisible, visible and allow us to simulate the incomprehensible. The research goes further than illustrating a theory by proposing a new perspective on quantum physics through the disciplines of literature (Borges) Art (Wallen) and Music (Reber) by creating a fluid space in perpetual movement and ten differentiated space-time layers.
Wallen, L.P., Carlos, J. & Menchero, J. 2006, 'En la noche herida por el rayo', Mercat de les Flors de Barcelona - Spain La Fundicion - Bilbao, Spain.
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En la roche herida por el rayo: The ongoing research with choreographer Juan Carlos Garcia and his company, Lanonima Imperial, is based on a continual dialogue about the body in space and its dialogue with electronic time-based media. In each iteration or new production we work to extend and advance this relational knowledge set building. Most productions are shown between 10 and 20 venues across Europe, allowing for further refinement within the production cycle. Projects are extensively workshopped and previewed in small theatres before opening. Innovative ideas, new techniques and combinations of custom software solutions, interactive systems, robotics and new display technologies allow us to create new mediated spaces. Through the refinement and re-interpretation of existing technologies and a reflective approach to an eleven year collaboration, we have made significant conceptual advances in the use of media on stage and the use of the body as machine interface. Inspired by Greek tragedy by Euripides, The Bacchantes, New post production techniques were developed for this production, allowing for a parallel narrative to interact with the live stage action. Extensive research into projection surfaces and wearable displays made this a pivotal production in terms of the development of new technological approaches.
Wallen, L.P., Garcia, J.C. & Menchero, J. 2005, 'La Mar de Formas', Sant Andreu Teatre Barcelona Teatro Zorrilla de Badalona.
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The ongoing research with choreographer Juan Carlos Garcia and his company Lanonima Imperial is based on a continual dialogue about the body in space and its dialogue with electronic time-based media. In each iteration or new production we work to extend and advance this relational knowledge set building. Most productions are shown between 10 and 20 venues across Europe allowing for further refinement within the production cycle. Projects are extensively workshopped and previewed in small theatres before opening. Innovative ideas, new techniques and combinations of custom software solutions, interactive systems, robotics and new display technologies allow us to create new mediated spaces. Through the refinement and re-interpretation of existing technologies and a reflective approach to an eleven-year collaboration, we have made significant conceptual advances in the use of media on stage and the use of the body as machine interface. "The pure forms of knowledge are science, art and revelation, or rather, beliefs. The scientific method is used to deal with ideas but not to have new ideas. That is why the scientist has to be aware of art, of its capacity for intuition." (Prof. Wagensberg) In collaboration with Jorge Wagensberg, Professor for Theory of Irreversible Processes (University of Barcelona), the work engaged in a dialogue between mediated representation, dance and scientific thought in order to both advance and give meaning to the production, but also to provoke new ideas about the science of forms.
Wallen, L.P., Garcia, J.C. & Menchero, J. 2005, 'Cosa de Hombres', Mercat de les Flors Barcelona Festival Internacional de San Luis Potosí Mexico Sala Xavier Villaurr.
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The ongoing research with choreographer Juan Carlos Garcia and his company Lanonima Imperial is based on a continual dialogue about the body in space and its dialogue with electronic time based media. In each iteration or new production we work to extend and advance this relational-knowledge set building. Most productions are shown at between 10 and 20 venues across Europe, allowing for further refinement within the production cycle. Projects are extensively workshopped and previewed in small theatres before opening. Innovative ideas, new techniques and combinations of custom software solutions, interactive systems, robotics and new display technologies allow us to create new mediated spaces. Through the refinement and re-interpretation of existing technologies, and a reflective approach to an eleven-year collaboration, we have made significant conceptual advances in the use of media on stage and the use of the body as machine interface. Research continues into narrative structure, media gender politics, space and sexuality through custom advanced camera tracking sytems and high speed photography.
Wallen, L.P., garcia, J. & Menchero, J. 2002, 'Scala 1:infinito', Teatre Principal, Dansa Valencia, Valencia - Spain CC Hasselt, Hasselt - Belgium De Spil, Roeselar.
The ongoing research with choreographer Juan Carlos Garcia (and his company Lanonima Imperial) is based on a continual dialogue about the body in space and its dialogue with electronic time-based media. In each iteration or new production we work to extend and advance this relational knowledge set building. Most productions are shown between 10 and 20 venues across Europe, allowing for further refinement within the production cycle. Projects are extensively workshopped and previewed in small theatres before opening. Innovative ideas, new techniques and combinations of custom software solutions, interactive systems, robotics and new display technologies allow us to create new mediated spaces. Through the refinement and re-interpretation of existing technologies, and a reflective approach to an eleven-year collaboration, we have made significant conceptual advances in the use of media on stage and the use of the body as machine interface. The work was commisioned for the opening of the futurist and contemporary art museum in Rovereto, Italy. Beyond technical research, extensive visual and dramaturgical research was made in the Depero archives (in search of underlying structures for the work). note: this production underwent extensive restructuring in march 2003
Wallen, L.P., 'Past Mapping', Past Mapping, Korean German Institute of Technology, KGIT, Seoul, South Korea.
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Past Mapping is two twenty meter long titanium sculptural objects on permenant display in the foyer of the Korean German Institute of Technology, Digital Media City, Seoul, South Korea In the art of the cartographer lies a tension between an objective description of the world and its subjective reading. In the labyrinth it is the visitor not the architect that creates the space. Past Mapping maps Seoul and Berlin, interpreting the cartographers art to locate the representations of the two cities physically, intellectually and culturally. The resultant sculpture or "map" is a rhizomic object defined by a non-hierarchical system without a centre or central automaton. The work is comprised of many inter-connected elements derived from past mappings of the geographic and cultural landscapes of both cities to form anew hybridised intellectual territory. It suggests the importance of intellectual and artistic to work (outside traditional hierarchies of culture and knowledge) to increase territory through deterritonalization. The artistic act extends the line of flight or imagination to the point where the map becomes an abstract machine. By taking specific maps and relocating them through processes of scale, juxtaposition and imposition we define representations of landscape in order to achieve a new spatiality that engages across the differing cultural perspective and positions. Past mapping redefines the space within the map and is a research processmade visible through the medium of sculpture and the creation of a representation of a hybrid city.
Wallen, L.P., 'Limits', Limits, Zurcher-Theaterspektakel, Shedhalle Zurich, Switzerland.
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'Walking in the limits is a homogenic artistic work made of sound, words and space, dealing with the understanding of space and time in a very existential sense: it reflects upon perception and illumines the structures of individual memory.' : Isabell Hemmel, Walking in the limits, in: Tagesanzeiger Zurich, 17-8-2006 The media installation and stage space were based on a two year investigation into the supersymmetric string theory. In the case of string theory, consistency requires spacetime to have 10 (3+1+6) dimensions. The conflict between observation and theory is resolved by making the unobserved dimensions compactified. By simulating a biographical event staged over 24 hours in a hotel room in Berlin on the night that the wall fell on the 9 November 1989 and viewing these events in terms of the string theory we propose an 'observable' ten-dimensional simulation of the proposed reality offered by the string theory. Working closely with researchers at CERN in Geneva and the composer Heinz Reber the works seeks to make the invisible, visible and allow us to simulate the incomprehensible. The research goes further than illustrating a theory by proposing a new perspective on quantum physics through the disciplines of literature (Borges) Art (Wallen) and Music (Reber) by creating a fluid space in perpetual movement and ten differentiated spacetime layers.
Wallen, L.P. & eschler, K., 'Galata / Karakoy', Istanbul Design Week, Istanbul Design Week, Istanbul Design Week main site and two urban sites.
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Galata / Karakoy: was a large-scale research project from the Institute for Design Research, University of the Arts Zurich. My contribution to this 2-year project was three site-specific urban installations in different parts of the city that reflected back on the development of Istanbul as a city over the past twenty years, a period when the population had moved from 2 million to 20 million. We worked with a series of maps. The installation used a system of back projection and multiple screens, working in often-hostile environment systems that had to be developed for high tolerance to a complex urban environment. Addressing issues of spatial location, dislocation and spatial drift, we search for the cultural differences in interpretation and the common ground laid before us. Tensions exist between the seemingly objective mapping of the physical space and the more subjective interpretation of the non-visible landscapes that co-exist in the same space. Rather than mapping the surface, we began to map spatially, reconstructing scenes of social interaction proximity and location. This matrix forms by applying a number of cartographic processes, ranging from conventional approaches of contour and cross-section to more artistic approaches, involving the appropriation of gps, video, google earth, data maps, sound maps and memory maps. The Installation redefined the space within the map and was a research process made visible through the medium of installation.
Wallen, L.P., iglhaut, S., Fujisaki, K. & Shimizu, Y., 'robot garden', Pacific Flora, Hamamatsu, Japan.
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Project producer :Stefan Iglhaut, Berlin Content Robots and Exhibition Design: Lawrence Wallen, Berlin Content research:Dr. Bettina Drescher, Berlin Technical realisation: Fraunhofer Institute, Dortmund Patron: Goethe Institute Tokyo Co-operation:Fujisaki Office Inc., Tokyo Robot garden was a commissioned work to develop a garden in a pavillion in the international Garden exhibition (Pacific Flora). Working from layout of the baroque garden in Worlitz Germany to inform the circulation paths images used refer to both to drawings of botanical specimens under the first microscopes in the 17th century to images obtained using the latest electron scanning microscope at the University of Basel. The result was an exhibition about the European garden and the botanists who document it from the earliest machines for viewing the invisible to the current generation of visualisation technologies. The exhibition broke new ground in using artistic strategies to make visible the unseen and to present through the use of robotic systems the internal structures of the world that surrounds us.
Wallen, L.P. & winkler, G., 'Terra Incognito', Terra Incognito, SWR, Donaueschinger musiktage 2004.
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Terra Incognito was a continuation of a project developed for the Munich biennale and the ZKM in 2002. It took the form of an Installation (solo) and an interactive concert (in collaboration with composer Gerhard Winkler). The technical research focussed on real time scores for musicians to play live and the frozen points that became the installation elements. The shifts in score started to break up the text, highlighting specific words and their relationship to sounds. The research was technical in terms of interactive systems and code, and aesthetic in terms of objects moulded from frozen music.
Wallen, L.P., 'Mapping Vilnius - European Cutural Capital 2009', Lithuanian Energy Museum, Vilnius, Lithiuania.
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Mapping Vilnius- Modelling Vilnius was a workshop and exhibition hosted and funded by the European Cultural Capital 2009. Exhibited at the Lithuanian Energy Museum, RinktinÄs str. 2, Vilnius and curated by Lawrence Wallen. This project involved the creative mapping of urban spaces in ways that the complexity and shifting nature of such entities are expressed in the form of both dialogue and installation. Addressing issues of spatial location, dislocation, and spatial drift we searched for the cultural differences in interpretation and the common ground laid before us. Tensions exists between the seemingly objective mapping of the physical space and the more subjective interpretation of the non-visible landscapes that co-exist in the same space. Rather than mapping the surface, we began to map spatially, reconstructing scenes of social interaction proximity and location. This matrix forms by applying a number of cartographic processes ranging from conventional approaches of contour and cross-section to more artistic approaches, involving the appropriation of gps, video, google earth, data maps, sound maps and memory maps. The project allowed differing points of view on the way a city is structured to be directly compared, by providing a matrix of varying disciplines, transformed into physical reality that takes the form of models and maps of the city.
Wallen, L.P., 'repetitive systems', Cairo Biennale 2008/2009, Cairo Biennale 2008/2009, Cairo Biennale 2008/2009.
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City as Stage – the photographic and conceptual material for the photomedia installation at the Cairo Biennale 2008-09 – was collected in the Dubai International City, a housing development divided into districts named after countries (Morocco, China, Spain, England), with some that have ceased to exist (Persia). The brochure for the development makes interesting claims, for example, International City's 'Morocco' features three and four storey residential buildings decorated with vibrant green tiles, natural terracottas, stucco walls and wide arch windows. The simplicity of the architecture conjures up images of life in the desert, with airy spaces and sand-coloured walls evoking an old world charm and, International City's 'England' harks back to traditional London life. Two, three and four storey buildings reflecting 18th and 19th Century Georgian and Revivalist styles are topped by red gabled roofs and brick chimneys. Shop fronts on the ground floor add to the sense of old English community spirit The research involved looking at fictional scenarios developed in the built environment and contrasting them with the photographic documentation of what is actually a scenographic space, a stage designed to be somewhere it is not. We are told through text and symbol that we are not in the Arabian desert but experiencing the old world charm of the souk or Regents Park, London. We find new definitions of authenticity, complexity and simulation in this 'city' that has been conceptualised on the desire of the other. This is identifiable when removed from its context and reconfigured in the form of a photomedia installation.
Wallen, L.P., 'Pop 34', Pop 34, European Patent Office, European Patent Office.
Pop 34: is a 34-channel Video installation for the European patent office in Munich that explores key innovations across human history. The multiple image and categories set up an extension of the viewersâ knowledge through the curated juxtaposition of ideas, represented by physical objects. New production techniques were used to allow for an instant reading of the work, critical in a public drive-by situation in demanding light situation (daylight). The work resolved our desire to articulate (on the facade of the building) the inner workings of intellectual property documentation and history. Through a refinement of post production technique, combined with conceptual advances made within the editorial frame of the project, we could bring new understanding and dissemination to the tension between the precedent and the innovative.
Wallen, L.P., 'Leucosis 2', Inside Out, ArtTech, Object Gallery, Sydney; DMU Cube Gallery, Leicester; Righton Gallery, Manchester; The Poly, Falmouth.
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Inside Out, curated by Claire Smith, is an international touring exhibition that focuses on emerging digital design techniques and the growth of sophisticated rapid prototyping tools and methods. It features forty-six miniature sculptures produced in resin using 3D printing technologies by emerging and established artists and designers produced through an exchange programme between art and design schools in the UK and Australia. Developments in virtual computer visualisation and integrated digital technologies are giving contemporary makers new insight and opportunities to create objects and forms which were previously impossible to produce or difficult to envisage. Collaborators included the Art Technology Coalition, the University of Technology, Sydney and RMIT University in Australia along with De Montfort University, Manchester Metropolitan University and University College Falmouth incorporating Dartington College of Arts in the United Kingdom. Working on narrative, transformative and interaction of spaces that explore the complexity and shifting nature of urban environments, Wallen's concerns include Spatial (dis)location, spatial drift, (auto)biography and spatial narrative. Leucosis 2 is a domestic work that explores relationships between micro and macro structures by proposing the virus as architecture. Juxtaposing the domestic and safe with the inherent dangers of microorganisms the work explores our sense of unease in spaces where the critical is neither physical nor visible. As SARS, H5N1, HIV have begun to define our operations so must our architecture respond.
Wallen, L.P., 'A Grammar of Space', A Grammar of Space, University of Wollongong, FCA Gallery, University of Wollongong.
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'A Grammar of Space' takes some of the questions on the relationship between a territory and its descriptions, developed in Spatial Narratives (National Gallery Prague June 2011) and discusses those in a different materiality and aesthetic logic. In 'spatial narratives', a large and monolithic structure carries excerpts of landscape descriptions by eleven prominent Australian writers from indigenous and colonial backgrounds. This "body" of text is sliced through by a metal wheel studded with a description of the Australian landscape by Joseph Banks, botanist on Captain Cooks Endeavour. \ The eleven drawings of A Grammar of Space seem to be concealing a script underneath or possibly within their furious lines. Again, the eleven literary excerpts are present in the gallery space. But unlike in Spatial Narratives, here they are removed from the actual body of work. Mediated and at a distance to the drawings, they can be read in isolation, evoking many subjective landscapes of difference: physical and emotional, visible and imaginary. Each drawing comprises a landscape within its rich texture of webbed lines. The clearly defined outlines of the drawings, though, suggest an invisible border that is not to be transgressed just as the texts remain within their linguistic frame. Literary strategies and spatial strategies in this exhibition of alternate geographies describe the production and formulation of interior territories as the only possible model of an attempt to understand the spaces we create by living.
Wallen, L.P., 'staging landscape', staging landscape, University of Wollongong, FCA Gallery, University of Wollongong / UTS Gallery.
Each of the eleven drawings in the body of work Staging Landscape differs from the others in its perspective, scale and movement. They are based on different narratives and different (auto)biographies. They display different artistic strategies for dislocating a central axis or point of view, and for advocating the drift of lines across the paper. Each drawing represents a different field of colour and, by moving physically away from the works, the viewer will experience different reflections and refractions of light, producing many different shades of blue.
Wallen, L.P., 'excavation site: The Mediterranean Diaries', Aphrodite's Island: Australian archaeologists in Cyprus, The Nicholson Museum, The Nicholson Museum.
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Wallen, L.P., 'excavation site: Water', Response To Cyprus, Centre of Classical and Near Eastern Studies of Australia, Centre of Classical and Near Eastern Studies of Australia.
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http://lha.uow.edu.au/taem/news/UOW152567.html
Wallen, L.P., 'excavation site: Blue', Who has the amphora handle? Responses to Cyprus, FCA Gallery University of Wollongong, FCA Gallery University of Wollongong.
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Wallen, L.P., 'Writing the Landscape', beepositive - light installation festival 2012, V'I kurybines dirbtuves 'BEEpart', BEEPART, Vilnius, Lithuania.
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Photographs of the desert landscapes on the abandoned embankments of the old Ghan railway line in Central Australia retrace the routes of the settlers of the late 19th century. The images of empty landscapes are both evocations of historical desire and hope, and contemplations on the contemporary romanticism of unspectacular desert. The photographs are juxtaposed against a line cut through the forest in Vilnius, operating as a way into the histories and fictions of this particular environment. Both site specific and culturally specific, the work explores ideas around identity, landscape and fiction.
Wallen, L.P., 'Ascension 1, Ascension2, Ascension3', Ascension, NGArt, NGArt.
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The installation Ascension acts as a collection of influences on an unformed new series of work dealing with biodiversity, constructions of utopia, institutional collections and individual narratives engaged in the reconstruction of nature. Ascension refers to the Ascension Island a remote and desolate point in the South Atlantic that in the mid nineteenth century was planted from the stock of the Kew Gardens in London resulting in the artificial creation of a tropical cloud forest. The mixed media installation spatially explores the motivations, histories, narratives and found material of a project in formation.
Wallen, L.P., 'Prague Quadrennial 2011', Prague National Gallery / St Anne´s Church Prague, Czech Republic.
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Australian commissioner/curator Prague Quadrennial 2011 for National, architecture and student section.
Wallen, L.P., 'Spatial Narratives', PQ2011, Prague Quadrennial of Performance Design and Space, Prague National Gallery.
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'Spatial Narratives' is an installation constructed of spatial descriptors from the writings of Australian authors and playwrights. The exhibition presents a curated selection of extracts that describe landscape and spaces posited as being a central characteristic of Australian literature and a critical influence on the spatial autobiographies and narratives of contemporary Australian artists, architects and scenographers. It explores spatial location as an influence on the cultural production of its immediate audience, and identifies regional intellectual differentiation as a critical factor in a globalised art discourse. The origins of the installation lie in the journal entries of Joseph Banks (1743-1820), the botanist on the ship that discovered Australia. Being the first description of a unique Australian landscape and space unknown to European culture, it has become a definitive descriptor. Working inside the void of the seemingly objective authority of the text and our spatial interpretation, the work questions the way we define physical stage space and the socio-political influences that affect our memory of space.
Wallen, L.P., 'The Fractured Landscape of Subasio', INTERNATIONAL CONTEMPORARY ART EXHIBITION 2015, Art Gallery Le Logge - Piazza del Comune, Assisi, Italy.
Lawrence Wallen's work The Fractured Landscape of Subasio (2015) comprises five books with a total of 135 drawings that were created during his residency at artestudioginestrelle, Italy in April 2015. The work realised on paper in a concertina format using ink, graphite and tempera allows the 23 individual drawings per book to fold out to a drawing with a size of 299 cm x 21cm.