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Daniele Hromek

Biography

Daniele Hromek is a lecturer at the School of Design, in the Interdisciplinary Design team. She is considering how to decolonise and Indigenise the curricula by creating spaces to substantially affect Indigenous rights and culture within the institution of the university.

After 12 years living abroad working in fashion, styling, photography and people/project management, Daniele returned to Sydney in 2011 to complete an undergraduate degree in Interior and Spatial Design with a Performance major at University of Technology Sydney.

Her research contributes an understanding of the Indigenous experience and comprehension of space, and investigates how Aboriginal people occupy, use, narrate, sense, Dream and contest their space. It considers the traumas affected to land, places, spaces and, by extension, to Indigenous peoples by the consequences of invasion and colonisation. It questions how, through decolonisation, space can be re-Indigenised, and rethinks the 'values' that inform Aboriginal understandings of space through Indigenous spatial knowledge. It offers a reconstruction, reinterpretation, retranslation and reclamation of Aboriginal experiences of space, in doing so considering the sustainability of Indigenous cultures from a spatial perspective.

Daniele is also a spatial designer and artist, fusing design elements with installations and sculptural form. As an Aboriginal designer her work derives from her cultural and experiential heritage. Her work often considers the urban Aboriginal condition, the Indigenous experience of Country and contemporary Indigenous identities.

Daniele Hromek is a proud Saltwater woman, born on Gadigal lands, brought up in Bundjalung region, with ancestral roots in the Budawang tribe of the Yuin nation.

Image of Daniele Hromek
Lecturer, School of Design
Design (UTS)
 

Research Interests

Decolonisation and Indigenisation of space

Spatial identity and stories

Indigenous experience of Country

Interdisciplinary Design Studies

Design Thinking

Mapping

Indigenous space, place and Country

Design with Indigenous communities

Non traditional outputs

Hromek, D.S. 2017, 'Impact', UTS Art Gallery, Sydney, Australia.
Catalogue essay for touring exhibition titled Impact at UTS Art Gallery which examines the long-term effects and ongoing presence of colonisation on First Nation communities in Australia and the Pacific region. New media and video works by Michael Cook, Fiona Foley, Taloi Havini and Angela Tiatia explore narratives of dispossession, alienation, conflict, gender, race and history.
Hromek, D. 2016, 'Winyanboga Yurringa', Set and costume designer, Carriageworks Sydney and Geelong Performing Arts Centre.
This project is in the field of Indigenous theatrical design relating to the Aboriginal experience of Country and contemporary Indigenous identities. The work includes the set and costume design and construction for Winyanboga Yurringa, a play set in Yorta Yorta Country in the Barmah National Park. Written and directed by Andrea James of Moogahlin Performing Arts, the play features six Aboriginal women camping on Country who, in their attempts to connect with the land and each other, address themes such as Indigenous women's identities and worldviews, the ongoing effects of colonisation, and intergenerational women's business. Responding to these confronting topics, the design challenges whether the enduring relationships Indigenous people have with Country can be designed into a colonised theatrical setting, in both a culturally and aesthetically respectful way. Featuring stylised shell shapes, such as those that might be found in middens that indicate thousands of years of Indigenous inhabitation, the shells form abstracted sculptural forms to create the 'forest' that surround a circular campground.
Hromek, D.S., Hromek, M. & Hromek, S., 'Covered By Concrete', Underbelly Arts Festival, Cockatoo Island.
Concealed in the strata of Australia are Indigenous stories and culture. Hromek, Hromek & Hromek are interested in the hidden histories of places. In Covered By Concrete, the artists attempt to engage with these obscured stories on Cockatoo Island at Underbelly Arts Festival. Can you sense this place's spirit? This installation aims to investigate how a space can be reclaimed and Aboriginal culture be reflected on contemporary identities.

Other

Hromek, D.S. 2016, 'Winyanboga Yurringa - Set and costume design'.
This project is in the field of Indigenous theatrical design relating to the Aboriginal experience of Country and contemporary Indigenous identities. The work includes the set and costume design and construction for Winyanboga Yurringa, a play set in Yorta Yorta Country in the Barmah National Park. Written and directed by Andrea James of Moogahlin Performing Arts, the play features six Aboriginal women camping on Country who, in their attempts to connect with the land and each other, address themes such as Indigenous women's identities and worldviews, the ongoing effects of colonisation, and intergenerational women's business. Responding to these confronting topics, the design challenges whether the enduring relationships Indigenous people have with Country can be designed into a colonised theatrical setting, in both a culturally and aesthetically respectful way. Featuring stylised shell shapes, such as those that might be found in middens that indicate thousands of years of Indigenous inhabitation, the shells form abstracted sculptural forms to create the 'forest' that surround a circular campground. Venues were Carriageworks Sydney and Geelong Performing Arts Centre.