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Dr Bhuva Narayan

Biography

Dr. Narayan is a transdisciplinary researcher in the School of Communication and coordinates the Information and Knowledge Management (IKM) Program, including the Master of Digital Information Management.

Dr. Narayan holds degrees from Chatham University (BA Hons. in English), Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism (Hardvard-Radcliffe GradDip in Publishing Procedures), University of Pittsburgh (Master of Library and Information Science), Queensland University of Technology (PhD, Information Technology) and University of Technology Sydney (GradCert. in Higher Education Teaching). Other degrees include a BA in English with sub-majors in History and Political Science from Nagarjuna University and an MA in English Literature from Madras University.
Before moving to academia, Dr. Narayan spent over two decades in the book industry as a bookstore consultant, development editor, and publisher.
Honorary and Invited Positions held:
2012 Visiting Professor (Jinling University of Technology, Nanjing, China)
2012-2013 Visiting Research Fellow (Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia)
2014-2015 Foreign Research Fellow (University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan)

Professional

Member of:

The Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA)

The Association of Internet Researchers (AoIR)

The Association for Information Science and Technology (ASIS&T)

The Association for Library and Information Science Education (ALISE)

Associate Editor:

Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association (JALIA)

Editorial Board:

Proceedings of The Document Academy (PDOCAM)

Committees:

Co-chair of ALIA Research Advisory Committee

Steering Committee Member of the International Conference on Asia-Pacific Digital Libraries

Organising Committee of the Library Applied Research Kollective (LARK)

Image of Bhuva Narayan
Senior Lecturer, IKM and Digital Studies Program
Core Member, CCS - Cosmopolitan Civil Societies
GradCertHEd
Member, Special Libraries Association
Member, MENSA International
Associate, Australian Library and Information Association
Member, Association for Library and Information Science Education
Member, American Society for Information Science & Tech
 
Phone
+61 2 9514 2718

Research Interests

Dr. Narayan's research encompasses Library and Information Sciences, Social Informatics, Social Justice, HCI, ICT, and Human Learning; specifically:
  • Transdiscipinary Studies
  • Information Studies
  • Digital Social Media Studies
  • Document Studies
  • Internet studies, including online privacy
  • Knowledge Systems
  • Traditional Knowledges
  • Social Justice (information and access to education for vulnerable communities including LGBTQI youth, homeless youth, prisoners, victims of domestic violence etc.)
  • Diversity and inclusion in media
  • Professional Practice and User Research related to the GLAMR industries (Galleries, Libraries, Archives, Museums, and Records Management)
  • Open Access Publishing and Open Educational Resources
  • Pedagogies and Andragogies in Higher Education 

Open Access versions of Dr. Narayan's research outputs can be found at QUT ePrints and UTS OPUS.

Can supervise: Yes

Dr. Narayan is an experienced research supervisor and has successfully supervised several Honours, Masters by Research, and Doctor of Philosophy students in Communication, Social Sciences, IT, ICT, and Library and Information Science. She would be particularly interested in working with potential research students in the following areas:

  • Transdisciplinary Research
  • Library and Information Science
  • Media Studies including Social Media Studies
  • Diversity Studies
  • Design Thinking
  • Traditional Knowledges
  • Document Studies
  • Social Justice

Dr. Narayan is also activley involved in the UTS Graduate Research School's training modules for research students, and in the UTS Library's research training modules.

Dr. Narayan has extensive programme management, curriculum development and teaching experience across information studies, ICT, and social sciences. She has received a series of awards and citations for her teaching, including the Dean’s Outstanding Achievement Award in 2014, a Faculty Team Teaching Award in 2015, and two First Year Experience Grants in 2014 and 2015. Her current teaching areas include:
  • Design Thinking for Social Innovation
  • Digital Social Media Studies
  • Information Architecture and Design
  • Internet Studies
  • Information Cultures
  • Knowledge Management
  • Library and Information Science
  • Social Informatics
  • Social Science Research Methods
  • Transdisciplinary Research Methods
  • User Experience Design
  • All areas of the GLAMR industry (Galleries, Libraries, Archives, Museums, and Records Management)
Teaching Awards 
2014: Outstanding Achievement in the School of Communication (FASS Learning and Teaching Awards)
2015: Team Teaching Award (FASS Learning and Teaching Awards)
Teaching Grants
2014: First Year Experience Grant: A Maker Faire approach to the User Experience Design classroom.
2014: Learning Festival Grant for developing a smartphone app to teach information retrieval principles.
2015: First Year Experience Grant: Developing students' professional identity through authentic assessments and industry mentoring.

Chapters

Narayan, B. 2014, 'Information Organising Behaviours in Everyday Life: An Exploration Using Diaries' in Du, J.T., Zhu, Q. & Koronios, A. (eds), Library and Information Science Research in Asia-Oceania: Theory and Practice, IGI Global, Hershey, PA, pp. 24-44.
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This chapter discusses people's everyday-life encounters with information and the difficulties they face in finding information within both personal and profressional contexts, with a specific focus on information-oganisation -related behaviours in everyday-life, based on a diary study where participants maintained an information journal. The discussion is based on the literature along with selected findings from a larger empirical study of human information behaviours, which found that information-organisation -related behaviours (including the lack of it) in everyday life is a problematic area due to various factors. The factors include problems with knowledge representation and intersubjectivity, along with spatiotemporal dimensions that give rise to intrasubjectivity in our minds. These factors have implications on the findability of information and also on personal information management.
Narayan, B. & Olsson, M.R. 2013, 'Sense-making Across Space and Time: Implications for the Organization and Findability of Information', Association for Information Science & Technology, Montreal, Canada, pp. 1-9.
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This paper presents the results from a study of information behaviors, with specific focus on information organisation-related behaviours conducted as part of a larger daily diary study with 34 participants. The findings indicate that organization of information in everyday life is a problematic area due to various factors. The self-evident one is the inter-subjectivity between the person who may have organized the information and the person looking for that same information (Berlin et. al., 1993). Increasingly though, we are not just looking for information within collections that have been designed by someone else, but within our own personal collections of information, which frequently include books, electronic files, photos, records, documents, desktops, web bookmarks, and portable devices. The passage of time between when we categorized or classified the information, and the time when we look for the same information, poses several problems of intra-subjectivity, or the difference between our own past and present perceptions of the same information. Information searching, and hence the retrieval of information from one's own collection of information in everyday life involved a spatial and temporal coordination with one's own past selves in a sort of cognitive and affective time travel, just as organizing information is a form of anticipatory coordination with one's future information needs. This has implications for finding information and also on personal information management.
Narayan, B. & Spink, A.H. 2008, 'Reading nineteenth century schoolbooks online : user behavior in a digitized special collection' in Ross, D. (ed), Issues in Librarianship : Presented Papers at the ALA Annual Conference, American Library Association, pp. 72-87.
Special collections, because of the issues associated with conservation and use, a feature they share with archives, tend to be the most digitized areas in libraries. The Nineteenth Century Schoolbooks collection is a collection of 9000 rarely held nineteenth-century schoolbooks that were painstakingly collected over a lifetime of work by Prof. John A. Nietz, and donated to the Hillman Library at the University of Pittsburgh in 1958, which has since grown to 15,000. About 140 of these texts are completely digitized and showcased in a publicly accessible website through the University of Pittsburgh's Library, along with a searchable bibliography of the entire collection, which expanded the awareness of this collection and its user base to beyond the academic community. The URL for the website is http://digital.library.pitt.edu/nietz/. The collection is a rich resource for researchers studying the intellectual, educational, and textbook publishing history of the United States. In this study, we examined several existing records collected by the Digital Research Library at the University of Pittsburgh in order to determine the identity and searching behaviors of the users of this collection. Some of the records examined include: 1) The results of a 3-month long user survey, 2) User access statistics including search queries for a period of one year, a year after the digitized collection became publicly available in 2001, and 3) E-mail input received by the website over 4 years from 2000-2004. The results of the study demonstrate the differences in online retrieval strategies used by academic researchers and historians, archivists, avocationists, and the general public, and the importance of facilitating the discovery of digitized special collections through the use of electronic finding aids and an interactive interface with detailed metadata.

Conferences

Boateng, H. & Narayan, B. 2017, 'Exploring knowledge creation and information sharing within the culturally situated world of Ghana's traditional Kente community', i3 Conference, Aberdeen Business School Building, Robert Gordon University, Scotland.
Du, J.T., Xie, I., Narayan, B., Abdi, E.S., Wu, H., Liu, Y. & Westbrook, L. 2017, 'Vulnerable communities in the digital age: Advancing research and exploring collaborations', https://www.ideals.illinois.edu/handle/2142/96785, iConference 2017, Illinois Digital Environment for Access to Learning and Scholarship, Wuhan, China, pp. 911-914.
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The intersection between digital information worlds and vulnerable communities is a critical research area within the iSchools movement. There have been concerns about issues regarding bias, social exclusion, cyber-racism, cyberbullying, digital divide, misinformation, and other information sharing hazards in the information experience of vulnerable communities. We seek to bring together a community of researchers and information professionals researching in this important area of our society. We will cover research across disciplinary borders, explore new opportunities for collaboration, and lay the groundwork for a journal special issue centered on vulnerable groups. The iSchools community provides an excellent place to discuss this crucial topic at the intersection of information, society, and technology.
Bakharia, A., Bruza, P., Watters, J., Narayan, B. & Sitbon, L. 2016, 'Interactive Topic Modeling for aiding Qualitative Content Analysis', CHIIR'16: Proceedings of the 2016 ACM Conference on Human Information Interaction and Retrieval, ACM SIGIR Conference on Human Information Interaction and Retrieval, ACM, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.
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Topic Modeling algorithms are rarely used to support the qualitative content analysis process. The main contribut- ing factors for the lack of mainstream adoption can be at- tributed to the perception that Topic Modeling produces topics of poor quality and that content analysts do not trust the derived topics because they are unable to sup- ply domain knowledge and interact with the algorithm. In this paper, interactive Topic Modeling algorithms namely Dirichlet-Forrest Latent Dirichlet Allocation and Penalised Non-negative Matrix Factorisation, are evaluated with re- spect to their ability to aid qualitative content analysis. More specifically, the relationship between interactivity, in- terpretation, topic coherence and trust in interactive content analysis is examined. The findings indicate that providing content analysts with the ability to interact with Topic Mod- eling algorithms produces topics that are directly related to their research questions. However, a number of improve- ments to these algorithms were also identified which have the potential to influence future algorithm development to bet- ter meet the requirements of qualitative content analysts.
Narayan, B. 2016, 'Developing a Human-trained Contextual Technology to Combat Cyberbullying Amongst Tweens', http://no2bullying.org.au/n2bblog/session-speaker-announcement-bhuva-nar..., No2Bullying Conference, Australian and New Zealand Mental Health Association, Gold Coast, Australia.
Due to the proliferation of social media within our information society, cyberbullying has emerged as a key issue within digital environments across the world, particularly among children and adolescents. A recent Australian study found that victimisation via the Internet was the most common form of cyberbullying with 11.5% of students reporting at least one experience of it during the school year, with junior secondary school students the most likely to be victimised in this manner, and text-based bullying being the most common form of cyberbullying. Cyberbullying is a group phenomenon most prevalent during the transitional ages between primary and secondary school shows an overlap in roles between 'bully' and 'victim'. Despite the serious emotional impacts of cyberbullying, over a quarter of victims did not seek support for various including the risk of losing access to devices or to the Internet if parents find out about it. This highlights the need for bystander education and 'upstander' action. We have developed an online monitoring tool for schools, parents and public librarians to detect emergent episodes of cyber-bullying occurring within their local networks and released it as open source software in July 2015. This program can be used to train adolescents and their parents in identifying bullying episodes if needed, and can also be automated or used as is to alert the user when patterns of emergent bullying episodes are detected. This can lead to early intervention to stop the continuation of such incidents and also to identify those who may need counselling support, be they perpetrators or victims. This paper discusses the design and development of this open-source application that is made freely available to schools, libraries, Internet cafes, and other providers. The application allows problem interactions within social media messages to be identified with the least intrusion using existing technologies that have been enhanced and 'taught' by hum...
Luca, E. & Narayan, B. 2016, 'Redesigning the Open-Access Institutional Repository: A User Experience Approach', 18th International Conference on Asia-Pacific Digital Libraries, Tsukuba, Japan.
pingo, Z. & Narayan, B. 2016, 'When Personal Data Becomes Open Data: An Exploration of Lifelogging, User Privacy, and Implications for Privacy Literacy', 18th International Conference on Asia-Pacific Digital Libraries, Tsukuba, Japan.
Boateng, H. & Narayan, B. 2016, 'The Warps and Wefts of Knowledge Creation: A Case of Kente Weaving', Research Applications Information and Library Studies, Wellington, New Zealand.
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Narayan, B. & Luca, E. 2016, 'Promoting Open-Access Adoption Through a User Experience Approach: A Case Study of a University eRepository', Research Applications in Information and Library Studies, Wellington, New Zealand.
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Narayan, B. & pingo, Z. 2016, 'Understanding Privacy through an Information Behaviour Perspective: Implications for Privacy Literacy', Research Applications in Information and Library Studies, Wellington, New Zealand.
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Pingo, Z. & Narayan, B. 2016, 'When Personal Data Becomes Open Data: An Exploration of Lifelogging, User Privacy, and Implications for Privacy Literacy', Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Springer Verlag (Germany): Series, pp. 3-9.
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Luca, E. & Narayan, B. 2016, 'Redesigning the Open-Access Institutional Repository: A User Experience Approach', Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Springer Verlag (Germany): Series.
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Wijesundara, C., Sugimoto, S., Narayan, B. & Tuamsuk, K. 2016, 'Bringing Cultural Heritage Information from Developing Regions to the Global Information Space as Linked Open Data: An Exploratory Metadata Aggregation Model for Sri Lankan Heritage and its Extension', Proceedings of the The 7th Asia-Pacific Conference on Library and Information Education and Practice, The 7th Asia-Pacific Conference on Library and Information Education and Practice (A-LIEP), Nanjing University.
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Narayan, B. 2015, 'Chasing the Antelopes: A Reflection', Proceedings from the 12th Annual Meeting of the Document Academy, 12th Meeting of the Document Academy: DOCAM2015 Conference, University of Akron Press, Sydney, Australia, pp. 1-10.
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This article is a personal reflection based on the author's experience of visiting the Ajanta Caves in India and what they mean to the author -- as documents, as evidence, and as social and cultural heritage.
Narayan, B. & Preljevic, M. 2015, 'The Information Worlds of Conspiracy Theories: A Case Study of Anti-vaccination Groups on Social Media', Research Applications in Library and Information Science, Sydney, Australia, pp. 1-4.
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Did the moon landing really happen? Did the royal family orchestrate the death of Princess Diana? Was the American government actually to blame for the September 11 attacks? Do vaccinations cause autism? It appears that in contemporary society one cannot avoid hearing about conspiracy theories and forming their own views. In fact, such conspiracy theories often begin as mere gossip and often become popular interpretations of knowledge. Knowledge is, as Kelley (2002, cited in Liew 2007) states, that which 'resides in the user [and] happens only when human experience and insight is applied to data and information'. A user, in this sense a conspiracy theorist, selects certain data and information and applies their own human experience, attitudes, and behaviours to it, sometimes subscribing to a conspiracy theory. These theories are then spread in numerous 'information grounds' which are 'environment(s) temporarily created when people come together for a singular purpose but from whose behaviour emerges a social atmosphere that fosters the spontaneous and serendipitous sharing of information' (Fisher et al. 2006). Once these theories are spread, individuals interact and engage with this information through 'passive and active information seeking, and information use' (Wilson 2000). This paper explores the questions: what are conspiracy theories, where are they found, who believes in them, why, and, most importantly, how they are propagated and spread through specific types of information worlds? The answers to these questions can provide insights in regard to areas such as human information behaviours and information grounds. In contemporary society, these information grounds are online, mediated through Internet and Social technologies, and they play an increasingly important role in how conspiracy theories are created, shared, and interacted with. This study used the anti-vaccination movement as an example of one such conspiracy theory. A 2002 study of anti-vac...
Narayan, B., Wijesundara, C. & Sugimoto, S. 2015, 'Documenting Spatial Information for Heritage Preservation: A Case Study of Sri Lanka', Proceedings from the 12th Annual Meeting of the Document Academy, Document Academy's DOCAM2015 Conference, University of Akron Press, Sydney, Australia, pp. 1-10.
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Narayan, B. & Bakharia, A. 2015, 'An Information-Centred Approach to Combat Cyberbullying', Research Application, Library and Information Science, Sydney, Australia, pp. 1-4.
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Narayan, B. 2013, 'Information organisation behaviours within everyday life : an exploration using the diary method', i3 Information Interactions and Impact Conference 2013, Information: Interactions and Impact, Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen, pp. 95-98.
This paper presents the results from a study of information behaviours (IB), with specific focus on information- organisation-related behaviours conducted as part of a larger daily diary study with 40 participants. The findings indicate that organisation of information in everyday life is problematic due to various factors, specifically temporal and spatial ones, i.e., the passage of time, along with the difference in the physical environment between when the information was organised and when the information is retrieved. These have implications for information organisation schemas, and point toward the need for a context-sensitive model of information organisation that reflects the relation between information objects, information representation, and information users.
Narayan, B., Boles, W. & beck, H. 2012, 'Faculty mentoring, evidence-based assessment, and student learning: An Australian exploration of American initiatives', Proceedings of the 8th International CDIO Conference, CDIO Initiative, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, pp. 1-14.
There have been many improvements in Australian engineering education since the 1990s. However, given the recent drive for assuring the achievement of identified academic standards, more progress needs to be made, particularly in the area of evidence-based assessment. This paper reports on initiatives gathered from the literature and engineering academics in the USA, through an Australian National Teaching Fellowship program. The program aims to establish a process to help academics in designing and implementing evidence-based assessments that meet the needs of not only students and the staff that teach them, but also industry as well as accreditation bodies. The paper also examines the kinds and levels of support necessary for engineering academics, especially early career ones, to help meet the expectations of the current drive for assured quality and standards of both research and teaching. Academics are experiencing competing demands on their time and energy with very high expectations in research performance and increased teaching responsibilities, although many are researchers who have not had much pedagogic training. Based on the literature and investigation of relevant initiatives in the USA, we conducted interviews with several identified experts and change agents who have wrought effective academic cultural change within their institutions and beyond. These reveal that assuring the standards and quality of student learning outcomes through evidence-based assessments cannot be appropriately addressed without also addressing the issue of pedagogic training for academic staff. To be sustainable, such training needs to be complemented by a culture of on-going mentoring support from senior academics, formalised through the university administration, so that mentors are afforded resources, time, and appropriate recognition.
Talip, B.H.J.A. & Narayan, B. 2012, 'An exploration of the role of web and mobile social media in the implementation of e-Government in Malaysia', 2nd DGI Conference : Social Media & Web Science - The Web as a Living Space.
This paper reports on an exploratory study of the role of web and social media in e-governments, especially in the context of Malaysia, with some comparisons and contrasts from other countries where such governmental efforts have been underway for awhile. It describes the current e-government efforts in Malaysia, and proposes that applying a theoretical framework would help understand the context and streamline these ongoing efforts. Specifically, it lays out a theoretical and cultural framework based on Mary Douglas' (1996) Grid-Group Theory, Mircea Georgescu's (2005) Three Pillars of E-Government, and Gerald Grant's and Derek Chau's (2006) Generic Framework for E-Government. Although this study is in its early stages, it has relevance to everyone who is interested in e-government efforts across the world, and especially relevant to developing countries.
Talip, B.A. & Narayan, B. 2011, 'A Proposed Model for Successful Implementation of E-Government in Malaysia', 2011 7TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN ASIA (CITA 11).
Narayan, B., Edwards, S.L. & Case, D.O. 2011, 'The role of information avoidance in everyday-life information behaviors', Annual Conference of the American Society of Information Science and Technology, ASIST.
This paper presents the results from a study of information behaviors in the context of people's everyday lives as part of a larger study of information behaviors (IB). 34 participants from across 6 countries maintained a daily information journal or diary – mainly through a secure web log – for two weeks, to an aggregate of 468 participant days over five months. The text-rich diary data was analyzed using Grounded Theory analysis. The findings indicate that information avoidance is a common phenomenon in everyday life and consisted of both passive avoidance and active avoidance. This has implications for several aspects of peoples' lives including health, finance, and personal relationships.
Talip, B.H.J.A. & Narayan, B. 2011, 'A proposed model for successful implementation of e-Government in Malaysia', The 7th International Conference on IT in Asia 2011, Universiti Malaysia Sarawak.
This paper proposes a theoretical model for e-Government in Malaysia and addresses issues involved in its implementation. It presents three possible models including the Framework for Electronic Government (Grant & Chau, 2005), the Three Pillars Framework (Georgescu, 2007) and The Grid-Group Theory from cultural studies (Douglas, 1996) and integrates and adapts them to the specific needs of the Malaysian environment.
Narayan, B. 2007, 'Query Modifications Patterns During Web Searching', Proceedings Fourth International Conference on Information Technology, Las Vegas, Nevada, pp. 239-444.
Jansen, B.J., Spink, A. & Narayan, B. 2007, 'Query modifications patterns during web searching', International Conference on Information Technology, Proceedings, pp. 439-444.

Journal articles

Narayan, B. & Luca, E. 2017, 'Utiliser le design thinking pour repenser la signalétique en bibliothèque universitaire', i2d: Information, données & documents, vol. 54, no. 1, pp. 59-61.
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Déambuler sans but d'un rayonnage à l'autre peut être une expérience agréable, mais lorsqu'on est peu familier des bibliothèques, on peut facilement être désorienté par leurs richesses. Une bonne signalétique permet au public de trouver son chemin. En revanche, une signalétique incohérente ou mal conue fait fuir les usagers. Le design thinking permet de traiter cette question.
Narayan, B. 2017, 'Documents, Futures: Palm Reading, Palmyra Leaves, and Planetary Prophesy', Proceedings from the Document Academy, vol. 4, no. 1.
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I begin to feel as if I'd been wandering around with these false documents permanently tattooed to my hand, forcing me to walk through life in a story not really my own.
Talip, B.A., Narayan, B., Watson, J.W. & Edwards, S.L. 2016, 'Digital Ethnography as a Way to Explore Information Grounds on Twitter', Qualitative and Quantitative Methods in Libraries, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 89-105.
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Information grounds are social settings where information, people, and place come together to create information flow within a physical environment (Karen E. Pettigrew, 1998). Information grounds also facilitate the opportunistic discovery of information within social settings created temporarily by people gathered for some purpose other than seeking information, but the social environment stimulates spontaneous information sharing (K. E. Pettigrew, 1999), such as in hair salons, doctor's waiting rooms and other public places. Professional and scholarly use of social media is a rapidly emerging area of research. In this regard, qualitative analysis of data gathered from Twitter is a relatively unexplored area of Library and Information Science (LIS) research. This paper details the results of a qualitative study of Twitter using digital ethnography, in order to investigate the use of Twitter by IT professionals in forming communities of practice. This study is relevant to Library and Information Science (LIS) research as LIS professionals are part of the IT community of practice. This study used information grounds theory (K. E. Fisher, 2005) to explore Twitter as an online information ground. The research used online observation - conceptualised here as online ethnography or digital ethnography - and interviews to collect data. The online observations helped the researcher to understand the norms and culture of the participants along with patterns of behaviour. Interviews were used to understand the information grounds of the virtual environment through the participants' individual perspectives and their information experiences. A total of eleven participants were interviewed after a total of 734 tweets from these same participants were downloaded and analysed. Both interview and Twitter data were analysed using constructivist grounded theory (Charmaz, 2006). The findings highlight a variety of information sharing types, the role of information sharing in profes...
Narayan, B. & preljevic, M. 2016, 'An Information Behaviour Approach to Conspiracy Theories: Listening in on Voices from Within the Vaccination Debate', http://www.abm.uu.se/digitalAssets/254/254150_1colis-9-abstracts--1.4.pdf, vol. 2016.
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Narayan, B. & Preljevic, M. 2016, 'An Information Behaviour Approach to Conspiracy Theories: Listening in on Voices from Within the Vaccination Debate', Information Research: an international electronic journal, vol. 22, no. 1.
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INTRODUCTION. We report on a research study that uses the vaccination debate as a case to understand the information worlds of conspiracy theories. We pay specific attention to the information behaviours of the believers of anti-vaccination theories through self-reports of people who have since converted to pro-vaccination and examine the circumstances under which this belief revision occurred. METHOD. We used publicly available data, mainly from a curated portal for personal blogs where converts from anti-vaccination to pro-vaccination post the stories of their information journeys. ANALYSIS. Text from blog posts about the personal experiences from twelve different individuals on the topic were manually coded and analysed by two researchers using content analysis, which was informed by a constructive grounded theory approach. RESULTS. All twelve individuals moved from a paradigm of passionate belief in anti-vaccination, primarily based on online and social media information, and toward a more informed understanding, only when the issue affected them in a very personal manner. This prompted them to seek authoritative information from a healthcare professional, after which they shed their fears and reservations about vaccines, and proceeded to vaccinate their children. CONCLUSION. People trust their primary health care professionals, but they do not often hear such trusted and authoritative voices on social media and the Internet, which has become the first point of information seeking for many. Social media and many other open online forums often bring the polarised voices on both sides of the debate to the forefront, drowning out any other voices. Hence, we argue that there is a need for first-line healthcare professionals, such as doctors and nurses, who are trained to address patients' concerns, to engage with social media.
Luca, E. & Narayan, B. 2016, 'Signage by Design: A Design-Thinking Approach to Library User Experience', Weave: Journal of Library User Experience, vol. 1, no. 5.
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Signage is a powerful visual tool for communication and a crucial component of the library user experience. Signage can welcome, guide, instruct, and delight users, helping them navigate the complex information world of any library. In practice, however, signage can be problematic, revealing tensions between various stakeholders, and contributing to visual noise through information overload; this often leads to signage blindness, library anxiety, and confusion. This article explores how libraries can use a design-thinking approach to improve the user experience in physical library spaces, particularly with respect to signage, based on our experience at the UTS Library, a university library in Australia that serves the University of Technology Sydney (UTS). We found that a design-thinking approach that uses the processes of empathy, problem definition, solution ideation, prototyping, and testing, can help libraries make significant and meaningful changes that can be adopted at relatively low cost.
Narayan, B. & Fransen-Taylor, P. 2016, '#Homeless but at Home in Cyberspace', Information Research: an international electronic journal, vol. 21, no. 4.
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Narayan, B., Talip, B., Watson, J. & Edwards, S.L. 2013, 'Social media as online information grounds : a preliminary conceptual framework', Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol. 8279, pp. 127-131.
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15th International Conference on Asia-Pacific Digital Libraries, ICADL 2013, Bangalore, India, December 9-11, 2013. Proceedings Series: Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Vol. 8279 Subseries: Information Systems and Applications, incl. Internet/Web, and HCI
Narayan, B. 2013, 'Social Media Use and Civil Society: From Everyday Information Behaviours to Clickable Solidarity', Cosmopolitan Civil Societies: An Interdisciplinary Journal, vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 32-53.
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Digital social media has, in many ways, transformed the way people create, maintain, and sustain their social information networks, and has also influenced their information-related behaviours such as searching, seeking, finding and use of information. This is especially true in technologically-mediated environments. In many ways, social media is the contemporary incarnation of the Internet itself. It is a complex information-and-communication environment, very much analogous to physical environments, but consisting of symbolic matter rather than physical matter. All social situations are information environments and social media is no different. This paper is an inter-disciplinary literature-review essay that examines the social media phenomenon using the lens of selected theories in information science and allied disciplines such as communication and media ecology with a specific focus toward its possible role in civil society using the conceptual framework of spatial metaphors drawn from the study of traditional physical environments.
Narayan, B. 2012, 'Interactive Information Seeking, Behaviour and Retrieval', Library Management, vol. 33, no. 4/5, pp. 335-336.
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Narayan, B. & Spink, A. 2008, 'Building an integrated model of information behavior through information journals', Proceedings of the ASIST Annual Meeting, vol. 45.
Information behavior models generally focus on one of many aspects of information behavior, either information finding, conceptualized as information seeking, information foraging or information sense-making, information organizing and information using. This ongoing study is developing an integrated model of information behavior. The research design involves a 2-week-long daily information journal self-maintained by the participants, combined with two interviews, one before, and one after the journal-keeping period. The data from the study will be analyzed using grounded theory to identify when the participants engage in the various behaviors that have already been observed, identified, and defined in previous models, in order to generate useful sequential data and an integrated model.
Spink, A., Alvarado-Albertorio, F., Narayan, B., Brumfield, J. & Park, M. 2007, 'Multitasking information behaviour in public libraries - A survey study', JOURNAL OF LIBRARIANSHIP AND INFORMATION SCIENCE, vol. 39, no. 3, pp. 177-186.
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Spink, A., Alvarado-Albertorio, F., Narayan, B., Brumfield, J. & Park, M. 2007, 'Multitasking information behaviour in public libraries A survey study', Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, vol. 39, no. 3, pp. 177-186.
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Multitasking information behaviour is the human ability to handle the demands of multiple information tasks concurrently. When we multitask, we work on two or more tasks and switch between those tasks. Multitasking is the way most of us deal with the complex environment we all live in, and recent studies show that people often engage in multitasking information behaviours. Multitasking information behaviours are little understood, however, and an important area of research for information behaviour research. Our study investigated the multitasking information behaviours of public library users at the Brentwood and Wilkinsburg Public Libraries in Pittsburgh through diary questionnaires. Findings include that some 63.5 percent of library users engaged in multitasking information behaviours, with a mean of 2.5 topic changes and 2.8 topics per library visit. A major finding of our study is that many people in libraries are seeking information on multiple topics and are engaged in multitasking behaviours. The implications of our findings and further research are also discussed. © 2007 Sage Publications.
Spink, A., Currier, J. & Narayan, B. 2006, 'Extending Alexander's ecological dominance-social competition (EDSC)', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, vol. 58, pp. 49-49.

Other

Narayan, B. & Edwards, S.L. 2014, 'eResources: Curriculum Renewal', Network of Australian Tertiary Associations (NATA).
Narayan, B. & Spink, A.H. 2011, 'Presenting an integrated model of information behaviors developed through information journals'.
Narayan, B. 2011, 'University Libraries and Digital Learning Environments20112Penny Dale, Jill Beard, and Matt Holland.. Farnham, Surrey: Ashgate c2011. xxv, 278 pp., ISBN: 9780754679578 (hardcover)', pp. 487-488.
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Edwards, S.L., Shea, P.J.O., Cretchley, P. & Narayan, B. 2010, 'It really is black and white when you look at it like this : reporting on a study into Australian professors' research and teaching priorities'.
Despite optimistic claims about the research-teaching nexus, Australian academics still face tension between research and teaching. The teaching and research priorities, beliefs and behaviours of 70 Professorial and Associate Professorial academics in Science, Information Technology and Engineering were examined in this study. The academics from 4 faculties in 3 Australian universities, were asked to rank 16 research activities and 16 matched learning and teaching (L&T) activities from each of three perspectives: job satisfaction, leadership behaviour, and perceptions of professional importance. The findings, which were remarkably consistent across the three universities, were unequivocally in favour of Research. The only L&T activity that was ranked consistently well was 'Improving student satisfaction ratings for Teaching. The data demonstrates that Australian government and university initiatives to raise the status of L&T activity are not impacting significantly on Australia's future leaders of university learning.
Narayan, B. 2010, 'Down the rabbit hole and through the looking glass: A conception of information seeking and searching through a diary study.'.
Information behaviour (IB) is an area within Library and Information Science that studies the totality of human behaviour in relation to information, both active and passive, along with the explicit and the tacit mental states related to information. This study reports on a recently completed dissertation research that integrates the different models of information behaviours using a diary study where 34 participants maintained a daily journal for two weeks through a web log or paper diary. This resulted in thick descriptions of IB, which were manually analysed using the Grounded Theory method of inquiry, and then cross-referenced through both text-analysis and statistical analysis programs. Among the many key findings of this study, one is the focus this paper: how participants express their feelings of the information seeking process and their mental and affective states related specifically to the sense-making component which co-occurs with almost every other aspect of information behaviour. The paper title – Down the Rabbit Hole and Through the Looking Glass – refers to an observation that some of the participants made in their journals when they searched for, or avoided information, and wrote that they felt like they have fallen into a rabbit hole where nothing made sense, and reported both positive feelings of surprise and amazement, and negative feelings of confusion, puzzlement, apprehensiveness, frustration, stress, ambiguity, and fatigue. The study situates this sense-making aspects of IB within an overarching model of information behaviour that includes IB concepts like monitoring information, encountering information, information seeking and searching, flow, multitasking, information grounds, information horizons, and more, and proposes an integrated model of information behaviour illuminating how these different concepts are interleaved and inter-connected with each other, along with it's implications for information services.
Lakshminarayanan, B. 2010, 'Towards developing an integrated model of information behaviour'.
This paper presents the results from a study of information behaviors in the context of people's everyday lives undertaken in order to develop an integrated model of information behavior (IB). 34 participants from across 6 countries maintained a daily information journal or diary – mainly through a secure web log – for two weeks, to an aggregate of 468 participant days over five months. The text-rich diary data was analyzed using a multi-method qualitative-quantitative analysis in the following order: Grounded Theory analysis with manual coding, automated concept analysis using thesaurus-based visualization, and finally a statistical analysis of the coding data. The findings indicate that people engage in several information behaviors simultaneously throughout their everyday lives (including home and work life) and that sense-making is entangled in all aspects of them. Participants engaged in many of the information behaviors in a parallel, distributed, and concurrent fashion: many information behaviors for one information problem, one information behavior across many information problems, and many information behaviors concurrently across many information problems. Findings indicate also that information avoidance – both active and passive avoidance – is a common phenomenon and that information organizing behaviors or the lack thereof caused the most problems for participants. An integrated model of information behaviors is presented based on the findings.
Narayan, B. & Spink, A.H. 2008, 'Towards an integrated model of information behavior'.
Information behavior models generally focus on one of many aspects of information behavior, either information finding, conceptualized as information seeking, information foraging or information sense-making, information organizing and information using. This ongoing study is developing an integrated model of information behavior. The research design involves a 2-week-long daily information journal self-maintained by the participants, combined with two interviews, one before, and one after the journal-keeping period. The data from the study will be analyzed using grounded theory to identify when the participants engage in the various behaviors that have already been observed, identified, and defined in previous models, in order to generate useful sequential data and an integrated model.
Narayan, B. 2008, 'Understanding users' information behaviors through information journals'.
Information behavior studies in the field of Library and Information Science (LIS) generally focus on one of many aspects of information behavior: information finding, information organizing, and information using. Information seeking is further specialized into information searching, information seeking, information foraging or information sense making. Spink and Cole (2006) highlighted the lack of integration across these various approaches and models of information behavior within LIS. Often, each approach provides a different language for similar processes (Spink & Cole, 2004), and it is sometimes hard for practicing information professionals to parse the various theories and models to see how they shape and affect the provision of information resources, services, and products. An integrated model of information behaviors that explains the key dimensions of how peoples' contextual and situational dimensions affect their information needs and behavior will help information providers and LIS researchers alike with a framework that can help 'depict and explain a sequence of behaviors by referring to relevant variables, rather than merely indicating a sequence of events? while indicating something about information needs and sources (Case, 2002). This presentation presents an integrated model of peoples' information behaviors based on research that studied participants' information behaviors through a detailed daily information journal maintained for two weeks.
Spink, A.H. & Narayan, B. 2006, 'Extending Alexander's ecological dominance-social competition (EDSC) evolutional model'.
Alexander's Ecological Dominance and Social Competition (EDSC) model currently provides the most comprehensive overview of human traits in the development of a theory of human evolution and sociality (Alexander, 1990; Finn, Geary & Ward, 2005; Irons, 2005). His model provides a basis for explaining the evolution of human socio-cognitive abilities. Our paper examines the extension of Alexander's model to incorporate the human trait of information behavior in synergy with ecological dominance and social competition as a human socio-cognitive competence. This paper discusses the various interdisciplinary perspectives exploring how evolution has shaped information behavior and why information behavior is emerging as an important human socio-cognitive competence. This paper outlines these issues, including the extension of Spink and Currier's (2006a,b) evolution of information behavior model towards a more integrated understanding of how information behaviors have evolved (Spink & Cole, 2006).
Spink, A.H. & Narayan, B. 2006, 'Extending Alexander's ecological dominance-social competition model : information behavior adaptation'.
Alexander's Ecological Dominance and Social Competition (EDSC) model currently provides the most comprehensive overview of human traits in the development of a theory of human evolution and sociality (Alexander, 1990; Finn, Geary & Ward, 2005; Irons, 2005). His model provides a basis for explaining the evolution of human socio-cognitive abilities. Our paper examines the extension of Alexander's model to incorporate the human trait of information behavior in synergy with ecological dominance and social competition as a human socio-cognitive competence. This paper discusses the various interdisciplinary perspectives exploring how evolution has shaped information behavior and why information behavior is emerging as an important human socio-cognitive competence. This paper outlines these issues, including the extension of Spink and Currier's (2006a,b) evolution of information behavior model towards a more integrated understanding of how information behaviors have evolved (Spink & Cole, 2006).
Narayan, Jakubowicz, A., Bebawi, S., Middleweek, ghosh, D., sun, W., khamis, S. & vatsikopoulos, H., 'Shock horror: the big end of town has finally discovered Australia's media is a whitewash'.

Reports

Narayan, B. & Brookes, W. Australian Government Office of Learning and Teaching 2012, Changing the Culture of Teaching and Learning in ICT and Engineering: Facilitating Research Professors to be Teaching and Learning Leaders, Sydney.
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Narayan, B. & Edwards, S.L. Australian Government Office of Learning and Teaching 2011, Good Practice Report : Curriculum Renewal, p. 1, Canberra.
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This good practice report, commissioned by the ALTC, provides a summative evaluation of useful outcomes and good practices from ALTC projects and fellowships on curriculum renewal. The report contains: -a summative evaluation of the good practices and key outcomes for teaching and learning from completed ALTC projects and fellowships -a literature review of the good practices and key outcomes for teaching and learning from national and international research the proposed outcomes and resources for teaching and learning which will be produced by current incomplete ALTC projects and fellowships -identifies areas in which further work or development are appropriate.