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Microbial Structural Dynamics PhD Scholarships

Value

$26,682 per annum
 

3 years

Status

Closed

Closed.
Opens
26/10/2017
Closes
20/12/2018

Overview

Two scholarships are open to applicants wishing to undertake their PhD, in the area of microbial cell shape and structural dynamics, in the ithree institute, UTS Faculty of Science.

The ithree institute focuses on discovery and applied research to build an understanding of how microbes grow, live, adapt and survive. ithree comprises a team of excellent professional and trainee scientists, a PhD program and track record that promote the future success of graduates, and a wide range of state-of-the-art research equipment for modern molecular life sciences research.

Our team seeks to gain a molecular understanding of microbial cell shape and structural responses to change and stress. We are leading the development of Haloferax volcanii as a powerful model microorganism for molecular cell biology, and for understanding cytoskeletal protein function and evolution. With this model, we have discovered the roles of two new families of cytoskeletal proteins from the tubulin-FtsZ superfamily in archaea (Duggin et al. 2015 Nature 519:362).

These PhD projects aim to understand how these proteins function to control cell shape and division, by (1) building a “ground-up” understanding of their ability to remodel the cell envelope, and (2) discovering the function of novel proteins linked to the cytoskeleton. The projects will involve methodological innovation and development, and the utilization of cutting-edge technology, including recombinant DNA and molecular genetics, high-resolution fluorescence or electron microscopy, and protein structure and function studies.

Selection process

Qualifications: 

  • 1st Class Honours or Masters research degree, or equivalent, in Molecular Biology/Genetics, Structural Biology, Microbiology, or related area.

Desirable attributes and skills:

  • Laboratory research experience in molecular biology and microbiology, particularly application of recombinant DNA technology in microorganisms, and/or protein science.
  • Strong interest and motivation to pursue research in discovery/fundamental science, evolution, microbial model organism development, and/or protein and structure and function.

Other information

Project title: Cytoskeletal protein function in the control of archaeal cell shape and division

Supervisor: ARC Future Fellow and Associate Professor Iain Duggin

Project description: 

Our team seeks to gain a molecular understanding of microbial cell shape and structural responses to change and stress. We are leading the development of Haloferax volcanii as a powerful model microorganism for molecular cell biology, and for understanding cytoskeletal protein function and evolution. With this model, we have discovered the roles of two new families of cytoskeletal proteins from the tubulin-FtsZ superfamily in archaea (Duggin et al. 2015 Nature 519:362).

These PhD projects aim to understand how these proteins function to control cell shape and division, by (1) building a “ground-up” understanding of their ability to remodel the cell envelope, and (2) discovering the function of novel proteins linked to the cytoskeleton. The projects will involve methodological innovation and development, and the utilization of cutting-edge technology, including recombinant DNA and molecular genetics, high-resolution fluorescence or electron microscopy, and protein structure and function studies.