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Implications of Environmental Variability on Marine Microbes ARC Scholarship

Value

$27,082 (2018 RTPS rate)

3 years

Status

Closed

Closed.
Opens
01/01/2018
Closes
30/06/2018

Overview

This project is funded by the Australian Research Council and will be hosted within the Productive Coasts Group (COAST), within the Climate Change Cluster (C3) at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS). COAST is one of 7 key research programs within C3, focused on the functional ecology of algae. C3 is one of the UTS “research strength” institutes and currently hosts 90 researchers and a comprehensive suite of field and laboratory-based analytical equipment and research infrastructure that will be available to the project.

How organisms will response to more frequent, extreme and unpredictable changes in their environment remains almost completely untested in biological systems, and is slated by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change as urgently required if we are to manage its consequences for human society.

This project will investigate the strategies marine eukaryotes use to grow under increasing environmental variation; specifically examining whether they transition from a principally autotrophic (photosynthetic) to mixotrophic mode, whereby cells subsidise their light-driven carbon fixation by taking up organic nutrients or engulfing prey (phagotrophy).

The candidate will undertake acclimation and experimental evolution studies with numerous taxa to investigate responses to changes in environmental variability on two timescales: (1) short (weeks) where acclimation responses dominate; and (2) long (months-years) timescales that include evolutionary dynamics.

Who is eligible?

  • Domestic students; or international students who are able to pay tuition fees (or have their own tuition fee scholarship). 
  • Those that have completed a Bachelor of Science degree with first class honours or Master of Science by research, or an equivalent level of training. 

Selection process

  • Experience in algal physiology and biological oceanography, and strong knowledge of microbiology and molecular biology
  • Strong written and verbal communication skills, with demonstrated ability to publish research outcomes in peer-reviewed scientific journals
  • High levels of motivation and enthusiasm 

Other information

How organisms will response to more frequent, extreme and unpredictable changes in their environment remains almost completely untested in biological systems, and is slated by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change as urgently required if we are to manage its consequences for human society.

This project will investigate the strategies marine eukaryotes use to grow under increasing environmental variation; specifically examining whether they transition from a principally autotrophic (photosynthetic) to mixotrophic mode, whereby cells subsidise their light-driven carbon fixation by taking up organic nutrients or engulfing prey (phagotrophy).

The candidate will undertake acclimation and experimental evolution studies with numerous taxa to investigate responses to changes in environmental variability on two timescales: (1) short (weeks) where acclimation responses dominate; and (2) long (months-years) timescales that include evolutionary dynamics.