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Dr Terry Fitzgerald

Biography

Since obtaining my doctorate in education in 2007, I have been a casual research assistant and occasional lecturer in the Education area of the UTS Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. This work has included project management, grant applications, literature reviews and editing.

My first profession was as a Civil and Public Health Engineer in Sydney and London. Since 1979, I have taught the Alexander Technique and other forms of human movement coordination in private practice and as a trainer of teachers. My doctoral research was in this field.

I am an Accredited Editor with the Institute of Professional Editors (Australia).

Image of Terry Fitzgerald
Research Assistant, School of Education
B.E. (UNSW), Grad Cert (Adult Education and Training) (UTS), GradCert (Editing and Publishing)(UTS), M.EngSc., M.Ed. (Adult Ed.), Ed.D. (UTS)
Member, Australasian Association for Engineering Education
 
Phone
+61 2 9514 4525

Chapters

Rooney, D.L., Willey, K., Gardner, A.P., Boud, D.J., Reich, A.J. & Fitzgerald, T. 2015, 'Engineers' professional learning: through the lens of practice' in Williams, B., Figeiredo, J. & Trevelyan, J. (eds), Engineering practice in a global context: understanding the technical and the social, CRC Press/Balkema, Leiden, The Netherlands, pp. 265-280.
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Conferences

Rooney, D.L., Willey, K., Gardner, A.P., Boud, D.J., Reich, A.J. & Fitzgerald, T. 2012, 'Using practice theory to investigate professional engineers workplace learning', 2012 Frontiers in Education Conference Proceedings - Soaring to New Heights in Engineering Education, 2012 Frontiers in Education Conference: Soaring to New Heights in Engineering Education, IEEE, Seattle, Washington, USA, pp. 1031-1036.
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This paper reports on the first phase of an Australian inter-disciplinary partnership study concerned with professional learning of experienced engineers. It is a theoretically motivated, qualitative paper that aims to produce detailed descriptions of professional learning that arise within professional engineering work. The paper uses practice theory to conceptualise professional learning. By using âpracticesâ as the units of analysis, professional learning is understood as an integral part of everyday work practices that is embodied, relational and material rather than an individual attribute. The paper concludes by suggesting that practice theory may provide organisations with an alternative perspective of workplace learning, inviting them to reconsider how professional learning is acknowledged, rewarded and fostered in organisations.
Rooney, D.L., Boud, D.J., Reich, A.J., Willey, K., Fitzgerald, T. & Gardner, A.P. 2012, 'Using practice theory to investigate professional engineers' workplace learning', Frontiers in Education Conference, IEEE, Oklahoma City, Seattle, pp. 1031-1036.
This paper reports on the first phase of an Australian inter-disciplinary partnership study concerned with professional learning of experienced engineers. It is a theoretically motivated, qualitative paper that aims to produce detailed descriptions of professional learning that arise within professional engineering work. The paper uses practice theory to conceptualise professional learning. By using `practices as the units of analysis, professional learning is understood as an integral part of everyday work practices that is embodied, relational and material rather than an individual attribute. The paper concludes by suggesting that practice theory may provide organisations with an alternative perspective of workplace learning, inviting them to reconsider how professional learning is acknowledged, rewarded and fostered in organisations

Journal articles

Rooney, D.L., Reich, A.J., Boud, D.J., Willey, K., Gardner, A.P. & Fitzgerald, T. 2015, 'Reimagining site-walks: sites for rich learning', Australasian Journal of Engineering Education, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 19-30.
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This paper presents the preliminary results of a multi-phased qualitative investigation of continuing professional learning. The study focused on the identification of common engineering practices that contribute to learning. This paper examines a particular practice, that of the site-walk. It draws on practice theory, an emerging set of conceptual resources used in workplace learning research. Data was elicited via qualitative methods such as interviews, focus groups and site visits with experienced engineers employed in a large Australian engineering company. It was analysed using the lens of practice theory. The findings suggest that site-walks, while an everyday practice for engineers, are also highly learning-rich. This understanding has implications for continual professional learning, and for educators of novice engineers.
Reich, A., Rooney, D.L., Gardner, A., Willey, K., Boud, D. & Fitzgerald, T. 2015, 'Engineers' professional learning: a practice-theory perspective', European Journal of Engineering Education.
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Reich, A., Rooney, D., Gardner, A., Willey, K., Boud, D. & Fitzgerald, T. 2015, 'Engineers' professional learning: a practice-theory perspective', European Journal of Engineering Education, vol. 40, no. 4, pp. 366-379.
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© 2014 SEFI. With the increasing challenges facing professional engineers working in more complex, global and interdisciplinary contexts, different approaches to understanding how engineers practice and learn are necessary. This paper draws on recent research in the social sciences from the field of workplace learning, to suggest that a practice-theory perspective on engineers' professional learning is fruitful. It shifts the focus from the attributes of the individual learner (knowledge, skills and attitudes) to the attributes of the practice (interactions, materiality, opportunities and challenges). Learning is thus more than the technical acquisition and transfer of knowledge, but a complex bundle of activities, that is, social, material, embodied and emerging. The paper is illustrated with examples from a research study of the learning of experienced engineers in the construction industry to demonstrate common practices – site walks and design review meetings – in which learning takes place.
Fitzgerald, T. 2014, 'Various ways of reading 'The Evolution of a Technique'', The Alexander Journal, vol. 24.
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Maher, D., Seaton, L., McMullen, C.M., Fitzgerald, T., Otsuji, E. & Lee, A. 2008, ''Becoming and being writers': the experiences of doctoral students in writing groups', Studies in Continuing Education, vol. 30, no. 3, pp. 263-275.
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The use of writing groups to support students undertaking post-graduate research within universities has begun to receive attention from academic supervisors and doctoral researchers. Very little has been written by doctoral students themselves on the benefits of working within such writing groups. In this article, the experiences of working within a doctoral writing group at an Australian University are presented, primarily from the perspective of students. The authors identify two main benefits they have experienced through participating in a writing group using a 'multi-voiced' approach. First, they discuss the kind of learning that they achieved through working in a writing group. They do this with reference to key principles of peer learning and of peer review. Second, they focus on the ways the group worked as a community of discursive social practice. An overarching message for them in participating in the group and now writing this article is the shift in their thinking and experience of writing from seeing writing as an essentially private and implicit process to writing becoming a matter of public and shared work. These two notions are bound by the concept of identity building, drawing from the literature on communities of practice.

Other

Fitzgerald, T., 'Rejoinder to Craig A. Cunningham, David Grainger, Jane Fowler Morse, Barbara Stengel, and Terri Wilson, "Dewey, Women, and Weirdoes"', pp. 83-86.

Reports

Bell, C., Dunston, R., Fitzgerald, T., Hawke, G., Lee, A., Lee, A., Matthews, L., Nisbet, G., Pockett, R., Slade, D., White, J. & et al Centre for Research in Learning and Change 2008, Interprofessional health education in Australia: A proposal for future research and development, no. L-TIPP, Sydney.
Selected Peer-Assessed Projects