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Associate Professor Shiko Maruyama

Associate Professor, Economics Discipline Group
PhD in Econonics
 
Phone
+61 2 9514 7730
Can supervise: Yes

Chapters

Maruyama, S. 2009, 'Health care system in Australia - Its unique dual system' in Masako Ii (ed), National health care systems in Asia and Oceania, University of Tokyo Press, Tokyo, Japan, pp. 1-33.
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Conferences

Mu, C. & Maruyama, S. 2013, 'Salient gender differences in the wage elasticity of General Practitioners', iHEA 9th World Congress on Health Economics, Sydney.
Johar, M. & Maruyama, S. 2010, 'Intergenerational cohabitation in modern Indonesia: Filial support and dependence', 1st Australasian Workshop on Econometrics and Health Economics, Melbourne.

Journal articles

Maruyama, S. & Johar, M. 2017, 'Do Siblings Free-Ride in 'being There' for Parents?', Quantitative Economics, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 277-316.
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There is a potential free-rider problem when several siblings consider future provision of care for their elderly parents. Siblings can commit to not providing long-term support by living far away. If location decisions are made by birth order, older siblings may enjoy a Örstmover advantage. We study siblingsílocation decisions relative to their parents by estimating a sequential participation game for US data. We Önd: (1) limited strategic behavior: in two-child families, more than 92% of children have a dominant strategy; and (2) a non-negligible public good problem: in families with multiple children, 18.3% more parents would have had at least one child living nearby had location decisions been made cooperatively
Johar, M., Maruyama, S. & Truong, J. 2017, 'The contribution of Western fast food to fast-growing body mass in China', Applied Economics, vol. 49, no. 8, pp. 797-811.
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The westernization of Asian countries has led to the rapid expansion of Western-style fast-food restaurants, which are believed to be fueling an unprecedented rise in body mass in these countries. This study tests this belief using longitudinal data from China. Exploiting the opening of a Western-style fast-food restaurant in a particular community, we conduct a transition analysis to make a more convincing causal interpretation than the standard cross-sectional or fixed-effects approach. Considering several measures of fatness, we find no robust evidence of Western fast food having a substantial effect overall, but there is some indication of effect heterogeneity.
Johar, M., Maruyama, S. & Nakamura, S. 2015, 'Reciprocity in the formation of intergenerational coresidence', Journal of Family and Economic Issues, vol. 36, no. 2, pp. 192-209.
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Maruyama, S. 2015, 'The effect of coresidence on parental health in Japan', Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, vol. 35, pp. 1-22.
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© 2014 Elsevier Inc. The empirical evidence of the effect of intergenerational coresidence by elderly parents and their adult children on parental health remains inconclusive. This study provides a new estimate of the coresidence effect by addressing non-random selection and heterogeneity in the treatment effect. Examination of Japanese data reveals: (i) an insignificant, negative average coresidence effect; (ii) a significant, negative coresidence effect on the treated; and (iii) that parents with unmet care needs and limited resources, typically widowed, disabled mothers, are most likely to suffer from a significant, negative coresidence effect. The results support the theory that coresidence may worsen elderly parents' health because care burdens on their adult children create disincentives for the parents to invest in longevity. The significant heterogeneity in the coresidence effect suggests potential scope for a better-targeted long-term care program.
Maruyama, S. & Nakamura, S. 2015, 'The decline in BMI among Japanese women after World War II.', Economics and human biology, vol. 18, pp. 125-138.
The body mass index (BMI) of the Japanese is significantly lower than is found in other high-income countries. Moreover, the average BMI of Japanese women is lower than that of Japanese men, and the age-specific BMI of Japanese women has decreased over time. The average BMI of Japanese women at age 25 decreased from 21.8 in 1948 to 20.4 in 2010 whereas that of men increased from 21.4 to 22.3 over the same period. We examine the long-term BMI trend in Japan by combining several historical data sources spanning eleven decades, from 1901 to 2012, to determine not only when but also how the BMI decline among women began: whether its inception was period-specific or cohort-specific. Our nonparametric regression analysis generated five findings. First, the BMI of Japanese women peaked with the 1930s birth cohort. This means that the trend is cohort-specific. Second, the BMI of men outpaced that of women in the next cohort. Third, the BMI of Japanese children, boys and girls alike, increased steadily throughout the 20th century. Fourth, the gender difference in the BMI trend is due to a gender difference in the weight trend, not the height trend. Fifth, these BMI trends are observed in urban and rural populations alike. We conclude that the BMI decline among Japanese women began with those who were in their late teens shortly after World War II.
Johar, M. & Maruyama, S. 2014, 'Does coresidence improve an elderly parents health?', Journal of Applied Econometrics.
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Maruyama, S. 2014, 'Estimation of finite sequential games', Journal of Econometrics, vol. 178, no. 2, pp. 716-726.
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Maruyama, S. & Yin, Q. 2012, 'The Opportunity Cost of Exercise: Do Higher-Earning Australians Exercise Longer, Harder, or Both?', Health Policy, vol. 106, no. 2, pp. 187-194.
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Despite the widely documented benefits of exercise, very little is known about how individuals make the decision on exercise. In particular, the decision on the intensity of exercise has attracted only one US study to date, which tests the hypothesis that individuals shift toward less time-intensive but more physically intensive forms of exercise as their wages increase. In this article, we revisit this hypothesis by employing a more credible empirical framework. Studying Australian data we confirm that higher-income Australians tend to exercise more frequently with a longer duration and a higher intensity of exercise. Exercise regimens individualised based on the behavioural patterns of exercise across socio-economic groups will contribute to the efficiency and efficacy of the exercise promotion.
Johar, M. & Maruyama, S. 2011, 'Intergenerational cohabitation in modern Indonesia: Filial support and dependence', Health Economics, vol. 20, no. S1, pp. 87-104.
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Informal filial care plays an important role for elderly parents facing health challenges. Ageing, however, exacerbates the burden of filial care because the ratio of older to younger individuals is higher and disabled parents live longer. The well-being of elderly parents is even more insecure in Asian developing countries that are undergoing unprecedented ageing and drastic changes in social norms and values, whereas old-age support systems have yet to be developed. In this paper, we investigate factors that influence cohabitation decision by elderly parents and their adult children using the longitudinal Indonesian Family Life Survey (IFLS). Focusing on new cohabitation in which a parent who lives independently starts to cohabitate with a child, we conduct transition analysis to make a more convincing causal interpretation than the standard cross-sectional approach. We find that, while parental needs are important, cohabitation is influenced to a larger extent by the costs and gains of children. The elderly facing health and economic challenges are at higher risk of not receiving filial support than other elderly individuals.
Maruyama, S. 2011, 'Socially Optimal Subsidies for Entry: The Case of Medicare Payments to HMOs', International Economic Review, vol. 52, no. 1, pp. 105-129.
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The U.S. Medicare program has increased its spending on private Medicare plans in anticipation of larger consumer surplus and higher efficiency. To evaluate the welfare consequences of such policy interventions, I develop an empirical model with endogenous entry. Counterfactual simulation reveals the following: subsidizing HMO entry can be justified to enhance national welfare (no excessive entry); the level of price subsidies in 2008, however, is far beyond the optimal level; and the geographic inconsistency between the subsidies and the Medicare fee-for-service costs is another source of inefficiency. Resolving this geographic inconsistency significantly raises national welfare by restructuring entry
Maruyama, S. 2009, 'Estimating Sequential-Move Games by a Recursive Conditioning Simulator', UNSW Australian School of Business Research Paper, no. 2009.

Other

Maruyama, S. & Johar, M. 2017, 'Do siblings free-ride in 'being there for parents?', pp. 277-316.
View/Download from: Publisher's site
Copyright © 2017 The Authors. There is a potential free-rider problem when several siblings consider future provision of care for their elderly parents. Siblings can commit to not providing long-term support by living far away. If location decisions are made by birth order, older siblings may enjoy a first-mover advantage. We study siblings' location decisions relative to their parents by estimating a sequential participation game for U.S. data. We find (i) limited strategic behavior, that is, in two-child families, more than 92% of children have a dominant strategy, and (ii) a nonnegligible public good problem, that is, in families with multiple children, 18.3% more parents would have had at least one child living nearby had location decisions been made cooperatively.
Perks, G. & Maruyama, S. 2016, 'The "Flock" Phenomenon of the Sydney Lockout Laws: Dual Effects on Rental Prices'.
Geographically targeted crime control is a controversial attempt to alleviate crime by targeting 'hot spots, which risks the potential displacement of crime into bordering areas. The 2014 Sydney lockout laws have severely decreased the nightlife economy in the once bustling entertainment district of the CBD, and there have been reports of increased violence in displacement, or 'flock, areas. These laws have also displaced attractive nightlife entertainment hubs into neighbouring suburbs, which may contribute to the land value of the displacement areas. To address the paucity of empirical evidence for the displacement effect of geographical alcohol regulations, this paper investigates the effect of the Sydney lockout laws on rental prices in the displacement areas. We find differential 'flock effects: a negative effect on small dwellings and a positive effect on large dwellings. The former effect is relatively weak and short-lived, while the latter is persistent, indicating that the positive effect dominates in the long run. We speculate that the differential effect arises because of difference in the locations of small and large dwellings. Our results suggest that well-designed geographically targeted alcohol control can enhance social welfare not only in targeted areas but also in surrounding areas.
Maruyama, S. 2012, 'Inter Vivos Health Transfers: Final Days of Japanese Elderly Parents'.
Johar, M., Maruyama, S. & Nakamura, S., 'Transition to Parent-Child Coresidence: Parental Needs and the Strategic Bequest Motive'.
The strategic bequest motive implies that children may want to live with their parents and provide care for them with the expectation of inheriting a larger portion of their bequest. This paper examines this hypothesis by focusing on the transition to coresidence by elderly Japanese parents and their children using underutilized Japanese panel data. Unlike previous studies, evidence for the bequest motive is generally tenuous. In addition, our use of a two-component mixture logit model identifies the minority group of families that follows the bequest motive and the majority group that does not.
Johar, M. & Maruyama, S., 'Externality and Strategic Interaction in the Location Choice of Siblings under Altruism toward Parents.'.
When siblings wish for the well-being of their elderly parents, the cost of caregiving and long-term commitment creates a free-rider problem among siblings. We estimate a sequential game to investigate externality and strategic interaction among adult siblings regarding their location choice relative to their elderly parents. Using the US Health and Retirement Survey, we find a positive externality and strategic interaction. The first-mover advantage of eldest children and the prisoner's dilemma are likely to exist but their magnitudes are negligible compared with inefficiency in joint utility. Inefficiency is large in a family with an educated, widowed mother and with educated siblings who are younger (relative to parents), married, and similar to each other. Had siblings fully internalized externality and jointly maximized utility sum in 2010, 17\% more parents with multiple children would have had a child nearby. Public policies that reduce children's private costs may enhance social welfare.
Johar, M. & Maruyama, S., 'Externality and Strategic Interaction in the Location Choice of Siblings under Altruism toward Parents'.
When siblings wish for the wellbeing of their elderly parents, the cost of care giving and long-term commitment creates a free-rider problem among siblings. We estimate a sequential game to investigate externality and strategic interaction among adult siblings regarding their location choice relative to their elderly parents. Using the US Health and Retirement Survey, we find a positive externality and strategic interaction. The first-mover advantage of eldest children and the prisoner's dilemma are likely to exist but their magnitudes are negligible compared with inefficiency in joint utility. Inefficiency is large in a family with an educated, widowed mother and with educated siblings who are younger (relative to parents), married, and similar to each other. Had siblings fully internalized externality and jointly maximized utility sum in 2010, 17% more parents with multiple children would have had a child nearby. Public policies that reduce children's private costs may enhance social welfare.