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Professor Sandra Schuck

Biography

Sandy Schuck is a Professor of Education in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS). She is the Head of Research Degrees in FASS. She convenes the Pedagogical Practice and Innovation stream of the Research Strength, Learning and Change. She started her career as a secondary school teacher and then became a lecturer in primary and secondary mathematics education. She currently teaches in a number of areas concerning teacher education, and coordinates the preparatory Honours year subjects. She is a member of several faculty and university committees.

Image of Sandra Schuck
Head of Research Degrees, ADMIN Dean's Unit
Core Member, Centre for Research in Learning and Change
Professor of Education, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
BA (Wits), BA (Hons) (UNISA), B.A. (Hons) (UNISA), TTHD (JCE), GradDipEdComputer Studies (CSU), PhD (UTS)
 
Phone
+61 2 9514 5218
Room
KG02.02.94

Research Interests

Four main research areas:

  • Induction, mentoring and teacher professional learning
  • Learning and teaching with new media
  • Belief and practices in mathematics education in schools and teacher education institutions
  • Teacher Education Futures

Can supervise: Yes
See Teaching areas for topics supervised

Mathematics education for prospective primary school teachers, research subjects, honours course preparation, Mentoring in the Workplace (Masters level subject), and an elective on the early years of teaching. Supervision of doctoral research students in different areas of education, including teacher professional formation, and learning in a digital age. In particular, supervised projects regarding pedagogical issues related to learning and teaching with Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs), mathematics education, mentoring and self-study of teacher education practices.

Book Chapters

Burden, K., Schuck, S.R. & Aubusson, P.J. 2011, 'Ethical professional mobile learning for teaching and nursing workplaces' in Pachler, N., Pimmer, C. and Seipold, J. (eds), Work-based mobile learning: concepts and cases., Peter Lang, Oxford, UK, pp. 277-303.
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The ubiquity, accessibility and flexibility of mobile technologies suggests they will be valuable for professional learning, particularly in professions where most of the work does not occur at a set workstation. This chapter focuses on two such professions: teaching and nursing. But their use by these professions is not unproblematic (Aubusson, Schuck and Burden, 2009; Fisher, Higgins and Loveless, 2006; Wishart, 2009 ). While mobile activities are likely to contribute to these professionals' learning in the workplace, a tension arises regarding the ethical nature of such activities. This chapter explores the complexities and confusion faced by teachers and nurses in their use of work-based mobile learning. The chapter considers the ethical issues involved in the use of mobile technologies to capture, reflect upon and share moments of professional learning in these work-based contexts. It suggests a number of ethical principles which might provide a useful guide for professional practice for teaching and nursing and beyond.
Schuck, S.R. & Pereira, P. 2011, 'What counts in mathematics education' in Schuck, S. and Pereira, P. (eds), What counts in teaching mathematics: Adding value to self and content, Springer, Dordrecht, The Netherlands, pp. 1-9.
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The chapter argues for the value of self-study of teaching and teacher education practices that is focused on a particular disciplinary domain. In this case the domain is mathematics education. We argue that teaching and learning mathematics has unique characteristics, challenges and joys. Self-study of teaching maths helps to identify, articulate and reframe those characteristics and the assumptions underlying them. We discuss the increasing emphasis in maths education on communication, problem solving, reflection and making connections with other concepts and areas, and consider the views and status of maths education existing in different countries. The study of maths suffers from low uptake at the higher levels and static teaching in secondary schools. At the same time primary school teachers often feel anxious about their competence in maths and this anxiety transfers to their students. For this reason, it is essential to disrupt practices and initiate new ones in teacher education programs. Self-study of teaching and teacher education supports this process.
Schuck, S.R. 2011, 'Resisting complacency: my teaching through an outsider's eyes.' in S.Schuck and P. Pereira (eds), What counts in teaching mathematics: Adding value to self and content, Springer, Dordrecht, The Netherlands, pp. 61-73.
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As an experienced mathematics teacher educator, how can I creatively disrupt my current practices? In this chapter I describe what happened when I invited a teacher educator of social studies into my classroom to help me challenge my assumptions and reframe my practice. Would a critical friend, with similar passions about teacher education but a different discipline expertise, help me to see things that a colleague from maths education might not see? Certain issues arose in our discussions, including my nervousness before classes, my efforts to build a safe and welcoming environment for the students, the relative importance of our different subject areas, the aims we each hold for our classes, and our thoughts about control. I found that my ideas of maths teaching, highly influenced by reform notions of maths education, needed to be made more visible to my critical friend. This gave me important insights into the assumptions I hold that might need to be made more explicit to my students. The critical friendship did disrupt my complacency, and it also stimulated my thinking about my aims for my teaching and for my students' learning. For both of us, the critical friendship contributed a different set of lenses with which to view our teaching.
Pereira, P. & Schuck, S.R. 2011, 'Adding value to self and content in mathematics education: working in a third space' in S.Schuck and P. Pereira (eds), What counts in teaching mathematics: Adding value to self and content, Springer, Dordrecht, The Netherlands, pp. 177-185.
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The chapter discusses the complexities that are an inevitable part of mathematics teaching, introduces the concept of a 'third space' as a way of thinking about these complexities, shows how the chapters in the book can be located within a third space, and explores ways in which the metaphor of a third space can be used to gain insight and raise questions. The chapter concludes with an appeal to readers to try their own discipline based self-studies as a way to rejuvenate their own practices.
Schuck, S.R. & Foley, G.W. 2010, 'Viewing Mathematics in New Ways: Can Electronic Learning Communities Assist?' in A. J. Bishop (ed), Mathematics Education, Routledge, UK, pp. 75-90.
Collection of major works in four volumes.
Aubusson, P.J. & Schuck, S.R. 2006, 'Research and learning from our practices' in Aubussin P, Schuck S (eds), Teacher Learning and Development: The Mirror Maze, Springer, Dordrecht, The Netherlands, pp. 1-12.
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Seaton, L. & Schuck, S.R. 2006, 'Working with Gandalf: Professional & personal learning in a doctoral student-supervisor relationship' in Aubusson P, Schuck S (eds), Teacher Learning and Development: The Mirror Maze, Springer, Dordrecht, The Netherlands, pp. 53-66.
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Schuck, S.R. 2006, 'Evaluating & enhancing my teaching: What counts as evidence?' in Aubusson P, Schuck S (eds), Teacher Learning and Development: The Mirror Maze, Springer, Dordrecht The Netherlands, pp. 209-220.
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Schuck, S.R. & Grootenboer, P. 2004, 'Affective issues in mathematics education' in Perry B; Anthony G; Diezmann C (eds), Research in Mathematics Education in Australia 2002-2003, Post Pressed, Queensland, pp. 53-74.
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Schuck, S.R. & Segal, G. 2002, 'Learning about our teaching from our graduates, learning about our learning with critical friends' in Loughran J; Russell T (eds), Improving Teacher Education Practices Through Self-study, Routledge/Falmer, London, UK, pp. 88-101.

Books

Schuck, S.R., Aubusson, P.J., Buchanan, J.D. & Russell, T. 2012, Beginning Teaching: Stories from the classroom, 1, Springer, Dordrecht, The Netherlands.
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The recruitment and retention of new entrants to the teaching profession has long been an important aspect of education, as so often these new entrants renew and refresh practice in schools. At times there have not been enough recruits or there are high levels of attrition, at other times there have been too many teachers. This has often resulted in either emergency measures to educate them quickly or a pool of unemployed teachers. There have also been concerns about the quality of teaching, the content of the curriculum and the ever-present need for more rigorous assessment procedures. We have witnessed an unwarranted rise in government intervention in teacher education and the spiralling out of control of quality measurement through inspections, evaluations and long lists of standards to be met. Fortunately, despite these problems, many young people still aspire to be teachers and many experienced teachers remain in schools and in universities due to mainly altruistic reasons such as helping to realise others+ potential and providing a better life for young people
Schuck, S.R. & Pereira, P. 2011, What counts in teaching mathematics: Adding value to self and content, Springer, Dordrecht.
Investigates current practice and research developments in the area of mathematics education and mathematics teacher education.
Aubusson, P.J. & Schuck, S.R. 2006, Teacher Learning and Development: The Mirror Maze, Springer, Dordrecht.
Edited volume in which authors write about their research in pursuing understanding of teaching and learning about teaching in teacher education, and engendering news ways of shaping teacher education.

Conference Papers

Schuck, S.R., Aubusson, P.J., Kearney, M.D. & Burden, K. 2010, 'Mobagogy - mobile learning for a higher education community', International Association for Development of the Information Society International Conference, Porto, Portugal, March 2010 in Mobile Learning 2010 Proceedings, ed Sanchez, I. A. & Isaias, P., International Association for Development of the Information Society (IADIS), Porto Portugal, pp. 69-76.
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This paper reports on a project in which a learning community of higher educators was formed to investigate how best to use mobile technologies in their own learning and teaching. Activities of this group included investigating best practice approaches by interviewing experts in the field, exploring the literature on mobile learning and then initiating and testing some mobile learning pedagogies in the context of their own higher education subjects. The community met regularly to discuss emerging issues and applications. The paper shares some of the findings gained both from the expert interviews and from the experiences of members of the community, and discusses the challenges and constraints that were experienced. We conclude with recommendations for promoting mobile learning communities in higher education.
Kearney, M.D., Schuck, S.R. & Burden, K. 2010, 'Locating mobile learning in the third space', MLearn Mobile Learning, Valetta, Malta, October 2010 in Conference Proceedings MLearn 2010 Mobile Learning, ed Montebello, M., Camilleri, V., & Dingli, A., University of Malta, Malta, pp. 108-115.
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The paper provides a framework for mobile learning that highlights three key features characterising such learning. These features are authenticity, social interactivity and customisation. The features were suggested through their presence in two mobile learning projects, Mobagogy, a project in which a higher education learning community developed understanding of mobile learning and The Bird in the Hand Project, which explored the use of smartphones by trainee teachers and their mentors.
Aubusson, P.J., Schuck, S.R. & Burden, K. 2009, 'Mobilising Collaborative Teacher Professional Learning', International Association for Development of the Information Society International Conference, Barcelona, February 2009 in Mobile Learning 2009 Proceedings: IADIS International Conference, ed Sanchez, I. A. and Isaias, P., IADIS: International Association for Development of the Information Society, Spain, pp. 351-354.
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This paper reflects on the role of m-learning in teachers' professional learning. It argues that effective professional learning requires reflection and collaboration; and that m-learning is ideally suited to allow reflection-in-action and to capture the spontaneity of learning moments. The paper also argues for the value of collaborations between teachers and students in professional learning. It suggests that authentic artefacts and anecdotes, captured through mobile technologies, can enable the sharing, analysis and synthesis to improve classroom learning environments. Opportunities fro usercreated content are discussed as well as ethical issues that might arise through using mobile technologies in this way. Practical, school systemic, attitudinal and ethical factors may inhibit m-technology adoption; these factors need to be researched and addressed to realize the potential of teacher mobile professional learning.
Schuck, S.R. & Aubusson, P.J. 2009, 'Reconceptualising schooling for a Web 2.0 generation', International Conference on Information Communication Technologies in Education, Corfu Island, Greece, July 2009 in Readings in Technology and Education: Proceedings of ICICTE 2009, ed Fernstrom, K, University of the Fraser Valley Press, Canada, pp. 751-762.
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This paper frames and theorises the nature of adolescents+ informal experiences in Web 2.0 environments to articulate their fit or misfit with current conceptions of school education. Adolescents are increasingly active Web 2.0 users. However, the traditional research and education communities have been slow to respond to the rapid emergence of the digital generational culture. Adolescents+ new ways of interacting and producing are likely to render current configurations of schooling obsolete and hence demand new conceptualisations of schooling. This paper discusses how these new visions might influence, disrupt and interact with future schooling scenarios.
Aubusson, P.J., Buchanan, J.D., Schuck, S.R. & Russell, T. 2008, 'Making sense of teaching through shared observation and conversation', International Conference on Self-study of Teacher Education practices., Herstmonceux Castle, East Sussex, England, August 2008 in The seventh international conference on self-study of teacher education practices. Pathways to change in teacher education: Dialogue, diversity and self-study, ed Heston, M., Tidwell, D., East, K. & Fitzgerald, L., Self-study of teacher education practices special interest group, Iowa: USA, pp. 18-21.
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Schuck, S.R., Kearney, M.D. & Aubusson, P.J. 2008, 'Education, opportunities and challenges for generation OurSpace: Taming the beast', Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications, Vienna, Austria, June 2008 in Proceedings of Ed-Media 2008 world conference on educational multimedia, hypermedia and telecommunications, ed Luca, J. & Weippl, E., Association for the advancement of computing in education (AACE), Virginia, USA, pp. 5804-5811.
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The paper discusses the opportunities and challenges presented for current notions of schooling by adolescent online cultures. Young people are increasingly active Web 2.0 users and their interactions through these technologies are altering their social identities, styles of learning, and exchanges with others around the world. The paper argues for the need for more research to investigate this phenomenon through the use of virtual ethnography and identifies the ethical challenges that lie therein. It raises questions for school education and presents an argument for the need to study the area in culturally sensitive ways that privilege adolescents+ voices.
Schuck, S.R. & Kearney, M.D. 2007, 'Disruptive or Compliant? The impact of two educational technologies on pedagogy.', Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, June 2007 in Proceedings of Ed-media 2007 World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecommunications, ed Montgomery, C. & Seale, J., Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education, Chesapeake, VA, USA, pp. 2619-2626.
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In this paper, we discuss the fit between educational technologies and teacher views and pedagogies in light of two recently completed research projects. These studies focused on observed pedagogies associated with the classroom-based use of two learning technologies: (student-generated) digital video, and interactive whiteboards (IWBs). The paper considers the use of these two learning technologies from a socio-cultural perspective that recognizes that the nature of tools and the nature of societal use of these tools are mutually dependent. We raise questions of how the inherent nature of different technologies might shape different learning experiences and outcomes, and whether certain technologies fit better with some pedagogical approaches than others.
Schuck, S.R., Prescott, A.E. & Buchanan, J.D. 2007, 'Sharing and supporting through an online network: Four studies with newly appointed teachers.', Australian Association for Research in Education, Adelaide, Australia, November 2006 in Engaging pedagogies: AARE 2006 International Education Research Conference Proceedings, ed P.L. Jeffery, AARE, Adelaide, Australia, pp. 1-18.
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The paper discusses the experiences, needs and concerns of newly appointed teachers in four separate studies conducted by UTS teacher educators over the years 1999-2006. Newly appointed teachers were invited to participate in an online support network in each of the studies. The studies were all small in scale, and allowed teachers to express their concerns, aspirations and experiences to others in the online network. Although participation in the online network was limited, those who did participate found the network to be supportive and helpful in providing much-needed advice and suggestions. Support was offered by mentor teachers, lecturers from the university and the other newly appointed teachers in the network. The paper will highlight the common issues regarding online access to support, as well as aspects of online interaction that were found to be beneficial to participants. It will also discuss issues of participation as highlighted by the different designs of the four studies, and indicate the strengths and weaknesses of each of the research designs with regard to meeting the needs of the participants.
Schuck, S.R., Buchanan, J.D. & Gordon, S.E. 2007, 'Improving student learning through teaching: Questions we should be asking', 14th Improving Student Learning International Symposium, Bath, UK, September 2006 in Improving Student Learning Through Teaching. Proceedings of the 2006 14th International Symposium., ed Rust, C., Oxford Centre for Staff Learning and Development, Oxford, UK, pp. 282-292.
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Schuck, S.R. & Aubusson, P.J. 2006, 'Sharing the Mirror Maze: self-study community formation', International Conference on Self-Study of Teacher Education Practices, East Sussex, UK, July 2006 in The Sixth International Conference on Self-Study of Teacher Education Practices, ed Fitzgerald LM, Heston MI, Tidwell DL, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, USA, pp. 230-233.
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Kearney, M.D. & Schuck, S.R. 2005, 'Students in the Director's Seat', Ed-Media, Montreal, June 2005 in Proceedings of Ed-Media 2005, ed Kommers P, Richards G, AACE, Norfolk VA USA, pp. 2864-2871.
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Schuck, S.R. & Kearney, M.D. 2005, 'Teachers as producers, students as directors: why teachers use student-generated digital video in their classes', Apple University Consortium Academic and Developers Conference, Hobart, Australia, September 2005 in Proceedings of the Apple University Consortium Conference, ed MacColl I, Apple Computer Australia, Sydney, Australia, pp. 1-13.
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New developments with digital video and editing software have facilitated the use of student-generated video to enhance teaching and learning. The project discussed in this paper investigated the value of such use for enhancing pedagogy in K-12 schools. The collaborative project between academics from a NSW university and Apple Computer Australia identified, examined and analysed pedagogical practices in relation to use of this technology in five case schools. This paper will focus on the perspectives of the teachers in the study and their rationale for using student-generated digital video in their classrooms. It will also analyse important contextual factors in the schools which contributed to successful practices with digital video.
Kearney, M.D. & Schuck, S.R. 2004, 'Authentic learning through the use of digital video', Australasian Computing Education Conference, Adelaide, Australia, July 2004 in 'Research, Reform, Realise the potential?' ACEC2004, ed Au W; White B, Australian Council for Computers in Education, Adelaide, Australia, pp. 1-7.
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Schuck, S.R. & Russell, T. 2004, 'How critical are critical friends and how critical should they be?', International Conference on Self-study of Teacher Education Practices, East Sussex, UK, June 2004 in Conference proceedings Fifth International Conference on Self Study of Teacher Education Practices, ed Tidwell D; Fitzgerald L; Heston M, Self-study of Teacher Education Practices Group, Iowa, USA, pp. 213-216.
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Schuck, S.R. & Kearney, M.D. 2004, 'Digital video as a tool in research projects: Zooming in on current issues', Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications, Lugano, Switzerland, June 2004 in Proceedings of Ed-media 2004 World Conference on educational multimedia, hypermedia and telecommunications, ed Cantoni L; McLoughlin C, AACE, Norfolk, USA, pp. 2085-2092.
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Kearney, M.D. & Schuck, S.R. 2003, 'Focus on pedagogy: the use of digital video and iMovie in K-12 schools', Apple University Consortium Academic and Developers Conference, Adelaide, Australia, September 2003 in Proceedings of the Apple University consortium conference, ed N Smythe, Apple Computer Australia, Sydney, Australia, pp. 1-9.
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Schuck, S.R. 2003, 'Help wanted please! Supporting beginner teachers through an electronic mentoring', Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications, Honolulu, USA, June 2003 in Proceedings of Ed-Media 2003 World conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecommunications, ed D Lessner & C McNaught, Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education, Norfolk, VA, USA, pp. 1904-1912.
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Schuck, S.R. 2002, 'Learning through question and answer interactions on the web', International Conference on Computers in Education, Auckland, New Zealand, December 2002 in International conference on computers in education, ed AkahoriR et al, IEEE, USA, pp. 939-941.
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Schuck, S.R. 2002, 'Professional development of teacher educators: the eChange Project example', Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education 2002 13th International conference, Tennessee, USA, March 2002 in Information Technology and Teacher Education Annual. Proceedings of SITE 2002, ed Davis; Price; Willis, AACE, USA, pp. 716-720.
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Schuck, S.R. 2002, 'Walking the electronic tightrope: Questions surrounding infusion of IT into education subjects', Improving student learning using learning technologies, 9th International Improving Student Learning Symposium, Edinburgh, Scotland, September 2001 in Improving Student Learning 9: Improving student learning using learning technology, ed Rust, C, Oxford Centre for Staff and Learning Development, Oxford, UK, pp. 186-194.
Schuck, S.R., Segal, G., Anderson, T.A. & Balding, P. 2000, 'Mentoring beginning teachers: a seamless process of induction', Sydney, Australia, February 2000 in Change & Choice in the New Century, ed Schuck S; Segal G, CERG, UTS, Sydney, Australia, pp. 211-217.
Schuck, S.R. & Segal, G. 2000, 'Good luck, goodbye, have a nice career: questioning our responsibilities & our learning as teacher educators', East Sussex, UK, July 2000 in Third International Conference on Self-study of Teacher Education Practices, ed Loughran J; Russell T, Queen's University, Ontario, Canada, pp. 223-227.

Journal Articles

Aubusson, P.J., Burke, P.F., Schuck, S.R., Kearney, M.D. & Frischknecht, B.D. 2014, 'Teachers Choosing Rich Tasks: The Moderating Impact of Technology on Student Learning, Enjoyment and Preparation', Educational Researcher, vol. 43, no. 5, pp. 219-229.
Schuck, S.R., Aubusson, P.J., Kearney, M.D. & Burden, K. 2013, 'Mobilising teacher education: A study of a professional learning community', Teacher Development, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 1-18.
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This paper reports on a study of a community of university educators that investigated the introduction of mobile technologies into their learning and teaching. The study was conducted by a subgroup of that community. Given the ubiquity of mobile devices, members of the community felt they needed to develop expertise in mobile learning so that they could incorporate it into their teaching. They studied their own learning, supported by a critical friend who evaluated the community's functioning and activities, providing valuable feedback. Activities of this group were informed by and focused on: development of awareness of the potential of mobile devices for learning; construction of action plans within the community; and implementation of these plans. They also included investigating best-practice approaches by interviewing experts in the field, exploring the literature on mobile learning and then initiating and testing some mobile learning pedagogies in the context of their own teacher education subjects. The community met regularly to discuss emerging issues and applications. The paper shares some of the findings gained from studying the community, and discusses the challenges and constraints that were experienced. The authors conclude with recommendations for professional learning communities aiming to learn about technology-mediated teaching practices.
Schuck, S.R. 2013, 'The opportunities and challenges of research partnerships in teacher education', The Australian Educational Researcher, vol. 40, no. 1, pp. 47-60.
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Collaborative research partnerships are widely recognised as being of value. This paper examines the benefits, constraints and challenges of research partnerships between teacher education faculties in universities and teacher employing authorities or departments of education and schooling. A case study of a collaborative research partnership between an education faculty and a teacher employing authority is examined to illustrate the features that supported a truly collaborative partnership and also to provide insights about the challenges that occurred. This research partnership was studied using self-study methods. The partnership between the individual researchers was examined in the context of the systemic partnership, to investigate the impact of the two contexts on each other and on the partnership. Constraints and facilitators of this collaborative partnership are identified in this paper. The feasibility of truly collaborative partnerships between institutions with differing aims and methods of operation is critiqued, using this particular partnership as an illustrative case study.
Buchanan, J.D., Prescott, A.E., Schuck, S.R., Aubusson, P.J., Burke, P.F. & Louviere, J.J. 2013, 'Teacher retention and attrition: Views of early career teachers', The Australian Journal of Teacher education, vol. 38, no. 3, pp. 112-129.
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The provision and maintenance of quality teachers is a matter of priority for the profession. Moreover, teacher attrition is costly to the profession, to the community and to those teachers who leave feeling disillusioned. There is a need to investigate the experiences of early career teachers to consider how these issues contribute to decisions about staying in or leaving the profession. This paper reports on an aspect of a larger study on teacher retention. It describes and analyses the experiences of teachers participating in the study and highlights implications for teacher retention. The study proposes the notion of `resilient stayers+, and how beginning teachers+ resilience might be strengthened and supported. It asks what combination of circumstances in the school and the system, and individual resources of resilience on the part of early career teachers, might maximise the chances of teachers choosing to remain in the profession.
Burke, P.F., Schuck, S.R., Aubusson, P.J., Buchanan, J.D., Louviere, J.J. & Prescott, A.E. 2013, 'Why do early career teachers choose to remain in the profession? The use of best-worst scaling to quantify key factors', International Journal of Educational Research, vol. 62, no. 1, pp. 259-268.
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Many countries report high attrition rates among beginning teachers. The literature cites many factors that influence a teacher+s decision to remain in the profession. These include remuneration, workload, support, administration and parents. It is unclear, however, which factors matter most to teachers and, consequently, where best to direct limited resources. This study uses Best-worst Scaling (BWS) and complementary experimental design methods to quantify the relative importance of these factors. The results suggest that improving student engagement, experiencing professional challenges and enjoying collegial support are the most important factors influencing teacher decisions to stay in the profession. Beginning teachers nominate remuneration, recognition, and external factors (e.g., class size; location) as playing a lesser role in their decision to remain teachers.
Schuck, S.R. & Aubusson, P.J. 2013, 'Teacher Education Futures: Special Issue', Teacher Development, vol. 17, no. 3.
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Aubusson, P.J. & Schuck, S.R. 2013, 'Teacher education futures: today's trends, tomorrow's expectations', Teacher Development, vol. 17, no. 3, pp. 322-333.
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Education is facing significant political and contextual challenges that will impact its future. This study employs a Delphi methodology to investigate teacher educators+ views of current trends and their consequences for teacher education futures. Interviews were conducted with a sample of expert teacher educators drawn from eight countries. This provided international perspectives on both local and global trends. The data were analysed to identify and elaborate key themes reported by the participants. The article draws on these themes to develop brief narratives around current developments that the teacher educators argue will have a major impact on the future of teacher education. These narratives are used to develop possible scenarios to inform thinking about teacher education futures.
Kearney, M.D., Schuck, S.R., Burden, K. & Aubusson, P.J. 2012, 'Viewing mobile learning from a pedagogical perspective', ALT-J, Research in learning technology, vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 1-17.
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Mobile learning is a relatively new phenomenon and the theoretical basis is currently under development. The paper presents a pedagogical perspective of mobile learning which highlights three central features of mobile learning: authenticity, collaboration and personalisation, embedded in the unique timespace contexts of mobile learning. A pedagogical framework was developed and tested through activities in two mobile learning projects located in teacher education communities: Mobagogy, a project in which faculty staff in an Australian university developed understanding of mobile learning; and The Bird in the Hand Project, which explored the use of smartphones by student teachers and their mentors in the United Kingdom. The framework is used to critique the pedagogy in a selection of reported mobile learning scenarios, enabling an assessment of mobile activities and pedagogical approaches, and consideration of their contributions to learning from a socio-cultural perspective.
Burden, K., Schuck, S.R. & Aubusson, P.J. 2012, 'm-Research: Ethical issues in researching young people's use of mobile devices', Youth Studies Australia, vol. 31, no. 3, pp. 17-26.
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A growing area of research concerns the increasing use by young people of mobile phones. Inevitably, researchers interested in exploring the lives and habitus of young people must also consider their engagement with the ubiquitous mobile. This research, however, can create a number of ethical dilemmas, some that are already discussed in literature on internet use and ethics, but also others that are more specifically related to mobile usage, such as the trail left by the data from mobile technologies, and the inclusion of third parties in research without explicit permission. This article discusses the ethical dilemmas arising in this research with young people; it indicates how these dilemmas may challenge current research ethics guidelines and provides recommendations for ethical research in these situations.
Schuck, S.R. & Buchanan, J.D. 2012, 'Dead certainty? The case for doubt in Teacher Education', The Australian Journal of Teacher Education, vol. 37, no. 8, pp. 1-11.
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In this conceptual paper we discuss the value of doubt in teacher education for ourselves and, by implication, more broadly. We develop an argument for the value of doubt in teacher education that grows out of the recognition of the complexity of teaching. We interrogate meanings of doubt in this context and debate the value of doubt and certainty. We also indicate the challenges of fostering and nurturing doubt in teaching and teacher education. We suggest that doubt is a necessary element of teacher education as its presence helps to prepare our students for their careers as teachers in a complex and uncertain world. It is also more fundamentally honest than a professed certainty on the part of the teacher educator.
Schuck, S.R., Aubusson, P.J. & Kearney, M.D. 2010, 'Web 2.0 in the classroom? Dilemmas and opportunities inherent in adolescent web 2.0 engagement.', Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education (CITE), vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 234-246.
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The paper discusses the implications of the current phenomenon of adolescent engagement in digital spaces. Young people are increasingly active Web 2.0 users, and their interactions through these technologies are altering their social identities, styles of learning, and exchanges with others around the world. The paper argues for more research to investigate this phenomenon through the use of virtual ethnography and identifies the ethical challenges that lie therein. It raises questions for school education and presents an argument for studying the area in culturally sensitive ways that privilege adolescents+ voices.
Schuck, S.R. & Aubusson, P.J. 2010, 'Educational scenarios for digital futures', Learning, media and technology, vol. 35, no. 3, pp. 293-305.
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This article frames and theorises the nature of adolescents' informal experiences in Web 2.0 environments to articulate their fit or misfit with current conceptions of school education and educational practices. Adolescents are increasingly active Web 2.0 users. However, the traditional research and education communities have been slow to respond to the rapid emergence of the digital generational culture. Adolescents' new ways of interacting and producing could possibly render current configurations of schooling obsolete and hence require new conceptualisations of schooling. While scenarios for schooling in the future have been broadly discussed by educators, little analysis exists of the possible impact on these scenarios of adolescents' engagement with Web 2.0 spaces. This article discusses how these new visions might influence, disrupt and interact with future schooling scenarios and educational practices.
Schuck, S.R. 2009, 'How did we do? Beginning teachers teaching mathematics in primary schools.', Studying Teacher Education, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 113-123.
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This article examines the findings of a research program that investigated primary school mathematics teaching by graduates of the teacher education program at the University of Technology Sydney. The research comprised two distinct studies, one examining the experiences of student teachers in our teacher education program and the other considering the experiences of our graduates once they began to teach. I focus on what I learnt from these studies, particularly on the second one that highlights dilemmas faced by teacher educators when preparing their students for the realities of the classroom. I discuss the overwhelming nature of the experience of the first year of teaching and argue for more support from teacher educators for helping their graduates in those early days of teaching.
Aubusson, P.J., Schuck, S.R. & Burden, K. 2009, 'Mobile learning for teacher professional learning: benefits, obstacles and issues', ALT-J, Research in learning technology, vol. 17, no. 3, pp. 233-247.
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This paper reflects on the role of mobile learning in teachers professional learning. It argues that effective professional learning requires reflection and collaboration and that mobile learning is ideally suited to allow reflection-in action and to capture the spontaneity of learning moments. The paper also argues for the value of collaborations between teachers and students in professional learning. It suggests that authentic artefacts and anecdotes, captured through mobile technologies, can enable the sharing, analysis and synthesis of classroom experiences by teachers and students. Such analysis and synthesis helps to encourage collaborative reflective practice and is likely to improve teacher and student learning as a result. Ethical issues that might arise through using mobile technologies in this way are also discussed. Teacher voice is presented to indicate the range of views about mobile learning and to indicate current practices. Practical, school systemic, attitudinal and ethical factors may inhibit mobile technology adoption; these factors need to be researched and addressed to realise the potential of teacher mobile professional learning.
Buchanan, J.D., Gordon, S.E. & Schuck, S.R. 2008, 'From mentoring to monitoring: the impact of changing work environments on academics in Australian universities', Journal of Further and Higher Education, vol. 32, no. 3, pp. 241-250.
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Universities in many western nations are experiencing increasing performance measures for academic accountability. This paper maps the pitted pathway that has led Australian universities from mentoring to monitoring and from performance enhancement to performance evaluation, and reviews implications for teaching and learning in higher education. We explore understandings of good mentoring and its effects and examine the social and political climate out of which quality assurance processes have arisen, to articulate the aims and philosophies underpinning these approaches. Drawing on the published literature, we critique processes that have as their main goals monitoring rather than mentoring, and performance evaluation rather than performance enhancement. From our perspectives as teachers in higher education in Australia we raise issues for consideration, including the tensions between practice and promise and the roles of mentors and monitors in promoting growth or compliance. We discuss criteria and models for evaluating mentoring and monitoring.
Schuck, S.R., Gordon, S.E. & Buchanan, J.D. 2008, 'What are we missing here? Problematising wisdoms on teaching quality professionalism in higher education', Teaching in Higher Education, vol. 13, no. 5, pp. 537-547.
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In this discussion paper we seek to challenge prevailing wisdoms in higher education regarding the value of measuring teaching quality, prescribing standards for professionalism and using student satisfaction as an indicator of teaching effectiveness. Drawing on the literature, we explore and probe four wisdoms in an attempt to identify and problematise popular assumptions about teaching and professionalism. We suggest that externalising procedures for assessing quality can be counter-productive to effective teaching and learning and propose core values we see as central to enhancing higher education practice: collegial reflection on practice, consideration of ethical issues and risk-taking.
Schuck, S.R., Aubusson, P.J. & Buchanan, J.D. 2008, 'Enhancing teacher education practice through professional learning conversations', European Journal of Teacher Education, vol. 31, no. 2, pp. 215-227.
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The paper discusses the value of peer observation followed by professional learning conversations for the professional development of teacher educators. The authors analyse their shared learning experiences and articulate what challenged them in these experiences. They discuss the ways in which their perceptions of this process differed or were similar. The grounding of the experience in a context of trust and professional relationship was seen as an essential part of the learning process. The authors highlight the importance of the cognitive-emotional and personal-professional aspects of teacher educators' lives in supporting their learning through the combination of peer observation and ongoing professional learning conversations.
Kearney, M.D. & Schuck, S.R. 2008, 'Exploring pedagogy with interactive whiteboards in Australian schools', Australian Educational Computing, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 8-13.
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This research project investigated the use of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) in K-12 education. Exploration of the use of IWBs in six different school settings provided insights into the activities, approaches, roles and beliefs of students and teachers in a range of primary and secondary class contexts and discipline areas. The study was informed by socio-cultural theory and a major focus was on the interactions between the new technology, pedagogy and the social conditions of the classroom. The findings presented in this paper focus on the pedagogical aspects of using IWBs that emerged from the study.
Schuck, S.R. & Kearney, M.D. 2008, 'Classroom-based use of two educational technologies: A sociocultural perspective', Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education (CITE), vol. 8, no. 4, pp. 1-10.
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This paper describes the fit between educational technologies and teacher views and pedagogies in light of two recently completed research projects. These studies focused on observed pedagogies associated with the classroom-based use of two learning technologies: digital video (student-generated), and interactive whiteboards. The paper considers the use of these two technologies from a sociocultural perspective, recognizing that the nature of tools and the nature of societal use of these tools are mutually dependent. Questions are raised about how the inherent nature of different technologies might shape different learning experiences and outcomes and whether certain technologies fit better with some pedagogical approaches than others.
Kearney, M.D. & Schuck, S.R. 2006, 'Spotlight on authentic learning: Student developed digital video projects', Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 189-208.
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Schuck, S.R. & Kearney, M.D. 2006, 'Using digital video as a research tool: Ethical issues for researchers', Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia, vol. 12, no. 4, pp. 447-463.
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Schuck, S.R. & Kearney, M.D. 2006, 'Capturing learning through student-generated digital video', Australian Educational Computing, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 15-20.
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Brady, L.I. & Schuck, S.R. 2005, 'Online mentoring for the induction of beginning teachers', Journal of Educational Enquiry, vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 65-75.
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Schuck, S.R., Brady, L.I. & Griffin, J.M. 2005, 'Initiation and Rites of Passage: Learning the school culture', Change. Transformations in Education, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 44-55.
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Schuck, S.R. & Russell, T. 2005, 'Self-study, critical friendship, and the complexities of teacher education', Studying Teacher Education, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 107-121.
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Maher, D. & Schuck, S.R. 2004, 'Getting access to the 'underground'-insights into children's identities online', Australian Educational Computing, vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 18-24.
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Schuck, S.R. 2003, 'Getting help from the outside: developing a support network for beginning teachers', Journal of Educational Enquiry, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 49-67.
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Schuck, S.R. 2003, 'The use of electronic question and answer forums in mathematics teacher education', Mathematics Teacher Education and Development, vol. 5, pp. 19-30.
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Many mathematics educators share a view of mathematics as a social and cultural phenomenon and believe that the learning of mathematics concepts is developed and enhanced through the use of learning communities. Electronic discussion boards provide one avenue for supporting such social learning. This paper discusses the use of a Question and Answer section of a discussion board in a first year mathematics education subject for primary student teachers, and the way in which this facility fits with ideas of social learning. Theoretical perspectives of social learning in mathematics through the use of an electronic community are explored. Examples are given of how learning was developed through questions and answers in the mathematics education subject and insights shared regarding the various uses of this facility by the students. Issues related to participation, peer misconceptions, learning styles and teacher intervention are raised and discussed. The paper concludes that for students who are comfortable with the use of electronic conferencing, there is value in Question and Answer facilities in raising autonomy and supporting conceptual understanding of mathematical concepts, but that the medium does not suit all learners of mathematics.
Schuck, S.R. 2003, 'The eChange project: Supporting a Faculty of education's move to authentic use of information and communication technologies through mentoring', ultiBASE, vol. July 2003, pp. 1-14.
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It is becoming increasingly apparent that there is a need for higher education institutions to support their staff in the development of course offerings that are either online or have Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) integrated in meaningful and effective ways in them (Burbules & Callister 2000, Franklin & Peat 2001). Consequently, the Faculty of Education at the University of Technology, Sydney embarked on a professional development project, the eChange Project, in 2000 which has continued 2001-2003. It has the goals of supporting academic staff in developing pedagogically appropriate online components in their subjects. The project is underpinned by change management principles as suggested by Scott (1999), Brown (1999), and confirmed by Trowler and Cooper (2002). eChange agents were appointed from within the faculty to implement the project. Factors such as managerial support, the development of good working relationships between the agents and the academic staff, and the opportunities for staff to consider and discuss problematic issues raised by the introduction of online learning, have contributed to the successes of the project. Time constraints, cynicism about the value of using ICT to enhance teaching and learning, staff and student satisfaction with current methods of teaching, and access and equity issues have been barriers to uptake for some of the faculty staff.
Schuck, S.R. 2002, 'Using self-study to challenge my teaching practice in mathematics education', Reflective Practice, vol. 3, no. 3, pp. 327-337.
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Reports

Schuck, S.R., Aubusson, P.J., Buchanan, J.D., Louviere, J.J., Burke, P.F. & Prescott, A.E. 2012, 'Retaining effective early career teachers in NSW schools', UTS: CRLC and CENSOC, Sydney, pp. 1-193.
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This project was commissioned by the NSW Department of Education and Training. This four and a half year research project had the aims of tracking a cohort of final year (2005) preservice teacher education students through their post-graduation experience into 2006, 2007, 2008 and 2009, in order to understand more clearly the reasons why some early career teachers (ECTs) in NSW public schools choose to leave the profession, and why others choose to remain; and in order to develop strategies to increase the retention rate of effective teachers during their early years of teaching.
Schuck, S.R., Aubusson, P.J., Kearney, M.D., Frischknecht, B.D. & Burke, P.F. 2012, 'Choice at the pedagogy-technology interface: Interactive whiteboards for learning', University of Technology, Sydney, Sydney, pp. 1-123.
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Schuck, S.R. & Kearney, M.D. 2007, 'Exploring pedagogy with interactive whiteboards: A case study of six schools.', UTS, Sydney, Australia, pp. 1-113.
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This study investigated pedagogy, attitudes, and school contexts in six schools in which interactive whiteboards are being used. The research questions that guided this study are the following: + What do teachers and students see as the value of using interactive electronic whiteboards in lesson designs and what beliefs do they hold about this technology and its relationship to learning and teaching? + What is the role of the school in promoting innovative use of the technology? What other contextual factors constrain or enhance the use of this technology in teaching and learning? + What learning outcomes are supported by the use of interactive electronic whiteboards in various Key Learning Areas? What learning tasks are associated with these outcomes? + What pedagogical approaches are being used with this technology? + What does reflection about good practice and insights provided by the cases suggest about principles of good practice using interactive electronic whiteboards? The study comprised a case study at multiple sites, four of them primary schools and two high schools, all in NSW. The schools were all DET schools and there were three in the metropolitan Sydney region, one in an urban area out of Sydney and two in a rural area. The study was a qualitative one, investigating perceptions and usage through interviews, focus groups, observations and document analysis.
Schuck, S.R. & Kearney, M.D. 2004, 'Students in the director's seat: Teaching and learning across the school curriculum with student-generated video.', UTS, Sydney, Australia, pp. 1-108.
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This project investigated the value and use of student-generated digital video for enhancing pedagogy in K-12 schools. It aimed to identify, examine and analyse pedagogical practices in relation to use of this technology in five case schools. A further aim was to articulate the principles, contexts and approaches underlying these practices. An understanding of the practices and approaches which enhance or constrain pedagogy in these five cases will contribute to a future larger study. Principles of good practice developed in this study will be used to inform future research on models for enhancing pedagogy with digital video in education.
Kearney, M.D. & Schuck, S.R. 2004, 'Students in the director's seat: Teaching and learning across the school curriculum with student-generated video', UTS Faculty of Education (now FASS), Australia, pp. 108-110.
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