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Professor Sam Bucolo

Biography

Sam is a leading academic and practitioner in the emerging field of design led innovation, and has led projects which have transformed businesses by embedding design capability.  As Professor of Design and Innovation at the University of Technology Sydney, he leads a team investigating the value of Design Led Innovation to the Australian Economy.  Through multiple practice led and applied research projects, the core of Sam’s published research is a better understanding of the relationship of design led innovation to business strategy and organisation value.  Sam was most recently the inaugural QMI Solutions Professor of Design and Innovation at QUT, which spanned the Creative Industries, Business, Science and Engineering faculties.  Previous positions include the R&D Director of the CRC for Interaction Design (ACID) and Program Leader for the Ulysses Design Integration program. Sam has also consulted widely to industry, spanning the medical devices, consumer products, telecommunications, automotive and mining services sectors.  Sam also is also the convenor of the recently established Australian Design Integration network and is an executive board member of the Cumulus global network.

Director, Innovation and Engagement, Deputy Vice-Chancellor (International & Advancement)
Core Member, DIRC - Design Innovation
Director, DIRC - Design Innovation
B. App. Sc, Grad. Dip., M. App. Sci., PhD (QUT)
 
Phone
+61 2 9514 8998
Can supervise: Yes

Books

Bucolo, S. 2015, Are we there yet? insights on how to lead by design, BIS Publishers, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
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We face high costs, global competition, low productivity, and technology disruptions. Our education system is geared towards solving known problems through an inductive thinking mindset. We have relied on massive technology investments as our source of competitive advantage, but our growth is declining. If we want to maintain our standard of living, we need firms to grow. The concept of design thinking is often described as the mindset for firms to make this transition. But with so much being written on design thinking, why do so many firms struggle to adopt this mindset and make this transition?

Chapters

Bucolo, S. & Wrigley, C. 2015, 'Demystifying design for innovation' in Samson, D. & Gloet, M. (eds), Innovation and Entrepreneurship: Creating New Value, Oxford University Press, Oxford, England, pp. 126-163.
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Innovation and Entrepreneurship: Creating New Value covers all of the major aspects of innovation strategy and capabilities, including leadership of innovation, creativity, design led innovation, open innovation, management of the innovation portfolio and new product development processes. Ultimately, innovation is accomplished by people, and this book recognises the critical contribution of leadership and organisational culture to developing and promoting innovation behaviours. For startups and entrepreneurs, the book covers the practical, powerful tests that a new idea should be subjected to, as well as providing an overview of the entrepreneurship process. Another feature of the book is the detailed presentation of the practices common to highly innovative organisations that distinguishes them from low innovating organisations. Underpinned by research, this information is translated into an innovation audit tool that can be used by managers or students alike.
Bucolo, S. 2015, 'Mentors, catalysts and provocateurs: The changing role for designers in the shift to design integrated business' in Anderson, L., Ashton, P. & Colley, L. (eds), Creative Business in Australia: Learnings from the Creative Industries Innovation Centre 2009-2015, UTSePress, Sydney, pp. 113-127.
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Designers are key to enabling Australian companies to transform and compete through the process of design-led innovation. Beyond the development of new products and services, and the creation of graphics and communications, there is an untapped role for designers to work with industry at a strategic level as either 'catalysts' or 'mentors' to embed design-led innovation practices. This chapter examines this opportunity, outlines the capabilities of emerging design roles and considers the potential impact on the broader professional discipline of design.
Roos, G. & Kennedy, N. 2014, 'Conclusion' in Global Perspectives on Achieving Success in High and Low Cost Operating Environments, pp. 481-482.
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Bucolo, S. & Wrigley, C. 2014, 'Design-led innovation: Overcoming challenges to designing competitiveness to succeed in high cost environments' in Global Perspectives on Achieving Success in High and Low Cost Operating Environments, pp. 241-251.
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© 2014 by IGI Global. All rights reserved. This chapter focuses on demonstrating the role of Design-Led Innovation (DLI) as an enabler for the success of Small to Medium Enterprises (SMEs) within high growth environments. This chapter is targeted toward businesses that may have been exposed to the concept of design previously at a product level and now seek to better understand its value through implementation at a strategic level offering. The decision to engage in the DLI process is made by firms who want to remain competitive as they struggle to compete in high cost environments, such as the state of the Australian economy at present. The results presented in this chapter outline the challenges in the adoption of the DLI process and the implications it can have. An understanding of the value of DLI in practice-as an enabler of business transformation in Australia-is of benefit to government and the broader design community.
Brunswicker, S., Wrigley, C. & Bucolo, S. 2013, 'Business Model Experimentation: What is the Role of Design-Led Prototyping in Developing Novel Business Models?' in The Experimental Nature of New Venture Creation, Springer, pp. 139-151.
Bucolo, S. & Wrigley, C. 2013, 'Design led innovation as a means to sustain social innovation enterprises' in Jurgen, F. (ed), Business Design Conference: - a discursive summary, CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, pp. 170-171.
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Conferences

Thurgood, C., O'Donnell, M., Peppou, G., Lulham, R. & Bucolo, S. 2016, 'A Tool to Bridge Design Innovation Research and Practice: The Project Experience Map', 20th DMI: Academic Design Management Conference, Design Management Institute, Boston, USA, pp. 1486-1502.
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Design is reaching out to business and society as an approach to innovation. Consequently, there is a need for collaboration between research and practice: if we want to assure quality of design practices and to build knowledge in these new domains, we need to be able to conduct research into their application and trace these processes as they fold through longitudinal research. The outcomes from these collaborations are often documented in formal reports on other deliverables for partner organisations, and scholarly publications for the researcher; however, the speed and nature of design projects and research processes means critical learnings and opportunities for new knowledge are often lost. Thus, there exists a need for high quality, reliable knowledge capture and transfer methods for the establishment of design practice and research in these new domains. In this paper we offer a new tool, the Project Experience Map (PEM), to assist in this process. The PEM shares the visual layout and principles of an existing design tool, the customer journey map; however, instead of depicting the story of a customer interacting with an organisation, we argue that the PEM can be put to an entirely different use: collating data and insights from design projects.
O'Donnell, M. & Bucolo, S. 2016, 'Developing a Design Led Innovation Sprint: A Case Study within a Global Engineering Firm', 20th DMI: Academic Design Management Conference, Design Management Institute, Boston, USA, pp. 369-387.
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Design for business and strategy is now accepted as a means to develop an advantage within established sectors, particularly those that have a need to innovate. There are many design thinking proponents and methodologies available to industry. Whilst they may share similar attributes, such as a customer-centric philosophy, at their foundation they differ in the steps they take and the delivery method that is applied. We present the Design Led Innovation (DLI) Sprint as a process to diffuse design methodology to a non-design audience. The development of the DLI Sprint at the University of Technology Sydney, Design Innovation research centre was a consequence of collaboration between researchers, practitioners, and industry partners. The DLI Sprint is a shorthand method of a full program that although is in its infancy is delivering promising results. The DLI Sprint offers organisations a practical but thorough introduction to the broader principles of DLI and a method to tackle complex problems and explore new products and service offerings. The DLI Sprint is illustrated through a case study of a global engineering firm; reflection upon this has presented challenges and opportunities for the further development of DLI Sprints in the future.
Peppou, G., Bucolo, S. & Thurgood, C. 2016, 'Designing competitive industry sectors', 20th DMI: Academic Design Management Conference, Design Management Institute, Boston, USA, pp. 348-368.
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Industry sectors are typified by their complex, networked and open nature; characteristics making them well suited to innovation through the application of design. In spite of this apparent suitability there remains little research published specifically regarding the application of design to sector-level strategy formation. In response to this apparent suitability of design, a Design-Led Innovation (DLI) (Bucolo, 2016) approach was modified to scale to a sector. DLI is a design thinking method that integrates deep customer insights into business models informing organisational transformation and strategy. This paper explores the adaptations and challenges that occur when scaling design to a sector in the form of a proposed framework: The Sector Grand Challenge Framework (SGC Framework). This is described through a case study applying the SGC Framework to the development of a Food and Agribusiness (Agrifood) growth and competitiveness strategy in partnership with Food Innovation Australia Limited (FIAL), an Australian Federal Government Industry Growth Centres initiative. The SGC Framework uses many of the same principles as DLI, scaling from successful applications to small and large firms to an entire industry sector. This scale exacerbates key challenges observed within a firm including: poor linkages between groups, large, complex stakeholder networks, and lack of unifying purpose or vision. Based on this initial experience there is a significant opportunity for future research both into the new value created by a Design-Led approach to sector level challenges and the implications for design as a field.
Pettigrew, D.K., Thurgood, C. & Bucolo, S. 2016, 'A Design Innovation Adoption Tool for SMEs', 20th DMI: Academic Design Management Conference, Design Management Institute, Boston, USA, pp. 14-38.
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The success of design led innovation practices in driving sustainable long-term growth in business revenue, shareholder value and company performance has ben demonstrated in a number of studies. Notwithstanding the recognition and acceptance of design led innovation (DLI) as an impetus for growth, many commercial organizations struggle with the adoption of design based management concepts in practice. This is particularly evident in small and medium enterprises (SMEs) which are a key sector in most Western economies and a major driver of employment and economic growth. This paper addresses a significant gap in the practical adoption of design based management practices by SMEs. We present a new tool developed to assess adoption maturity across multiple facets of DLI. The purpose of this maturity assessment instrument is to provide utility to both design researchers as well as design practitioners. Maturity is assessed against an extension of the Danish Design Ladder while the firm's progress is gauged against four aspects of DLI implementation and two aspects of competitiveness. Each cell of this matrix contains a positioning statement to frame the maturity score. The derivation of the tool from well-established design research is discussed along with the results of initial research validating the tool with nine SMEs.
Pettigrew, D., Thurgood, C. & Bucolo, S. 2015, 'Design led growth: Lessons from Lean.', Paper presented at the R&D Management Conference, Pisa, Italy.
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Thurgood, C., Dorst, C., Bucolo, S., van der Bijl-Brouwer, M. & Vermaas, P. 2015, 'Design innovation for societal and business change.', Proceedings of the 20th International Conference on Engineering Design (ICED 15), The 20th International Conference on Engineering Design (ICED15): Design for Life, The Design Society, Milan, Italy, pp. 61-70.
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We present two approaches for addressing complex societal and business problems: frame creation and design led innovation. Both methods combine a broad systems approach to problem solving together with the reframing of problems based on uncovering deep underlying human values and needs. While the practical usefulness and viability of our methods has been established through a series of projects, design methods need evaluative criteria to enable a more formal discussion and assessment of projects. This is particularly important for enabling comparisons across studies, and/or when attempting to communicate the value of design to non-design audience. For this purpose, we suggest articulating the steps of design methods using S.M.A.R.T. criteria from the management literature. We describe the aims, means, and evaluative criteria of each step of our methods, which can be likened to the specific (S) and measurable (M) indices of S.M.A.R.T. Thus, S.M.AR.T. descriptions enable management of projects by means of their own design methods and contribute to establishing sound design innovation methodologies that can eventually be scaled up for large research programs and educational purposes.
van der Bijl-Brouwer, M. & Bucolo, S. 2014, 'The learning needs of small and medium-sized enterprises for design led innovation', Proceedings of DRS2014: Design's big debates, Pushing the boundaries of design research, DRS2014, Design Research Society, Umeå, Sweden, pp. 1288-1300.
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Many scholars in the design research field are involved in (post)-graduate design education on the one hand, and some type of corporate education on the other. While there is a growing body of knowledge on educating design students, there is a gap in this research field with regard to the education of non-design professionals. This type of education has become more important now it is increasingly recognized that design can support innovation in businesses, so-called design led innovation. In this paper we focus on educating Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs). We propose a learner-centred approach to the development of education, which means that insights in the learners' needs are used to develop programs on design-led innovation. To illustrate this approach we present how the learning needs of SMEs were investigated through the qualitative evaluation of a 'Building Design Competency' program. From this study can be concluded that SMEs have specific emotional, social and cognitive characteristics that influence their learning needs. These needs include trustworthy course providers and instructors, a learning community of non-competing peers, customized stimulation of a deep learning approach, and adjustment of teaching material to their initial level of customer and business insights.
Johnson, D., Wrigley, C., Straker, K. & Bucolo, S. 2014, 'Designing innovative business models: Five emerging meta-models', 2013 IEEE-Tsinghua International Design Management Symposium: Design-Driven Business Innovation, TIDMS 2013 - Proceedings, pp. 70-77.
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© 2013 IEEE. Business models to date have remained the creation of management, however, it is the belief of the authors that designers should be critically approaching, challenging and creating new business models as part of their practice. This belief portrays a new era where business model constructs become the new design brief of the future and fuel design and innovation to work together at the strategic level of an organization. Innovation can no longer rely on technology and R&D alone but must incorporate business models. Business model innovation has become a strong type of competitive advantage. As firms choose not to compete only on price, but through the delivery of a unique value proposition in order to engage with customers and to differentiate a company within a competitive market. The purpose of this paper is to explore and investigate business model design through various product and/or service deliveries, and identify common drivers that are catalysts for business model innovation. Fifty companies spanning a diverse range of criteria were chosen, to evaluate and compare commonalities and differences in the design of their business models. The analysis of these business cases uncovered commonalities of the key strategic drivers behind these innovative business models. Five Meta Models were derived from this content analysis: Customer Led, Cost Driven, Resource Led, Partnership Led and Price Led. These five key foci provide a designer with a focus from which quick prototypes of new business models are created. Implications from this research suggest there is no 'one right' model, but rather through experimentation, the generation of many unique and diverse concepts can result in greater possibilities for future innovation and sustained competitive advantage.
Nusem, E., Matthews, J., Wrigley, C. & Bucolo, S. 2014, 'The challenges of adopting design-led innovative strategies in not for profits the role of consumers, culture and employees', 2013 IEEE-Tsinghua International Design Management Symposium: Design-Driven Business Innovation, TIDMS 2013 - Proceedings, pp. 284-293.
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© 2013 IEEE. Major changes to regulations, funding and consumer demand in the Australian aged care industry are driving not for profits in this sector to reshape and rethink the services they offer and the ways in which they deliver their services to consumers. Many not for profit organisations facing these new challenges are also facing organisational cultural barriers in the development and implementation of innovative strategies. This paper presents a case study where one organisation, using design led innovation, explored consumer insights and employee values to find new ways to facilitate change.
Townson, P., Wrigley, C., Matthews, J. & Bucolo, S. 2014, 'Making sense of purpose, direction and innovation: An embedded design led innovation case study in the Australian mining industry', 2013 IEEE-Tsinghua International Design Management Symposium: Design-Driven Business Innovation, TIDMS 2013 - Proceedings, pp. 268-276.
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© 2013 IEEE. The mining equipment technology services sector is driven by a reactive and user-centered design approach, with a technological focus on incremental new product development. As Australia moves out of its sustained mining boom, companies need to rethink their strategic position, to become agile to stay relevant in an enigmatic market. This paper reports on the first five months on an embedded case study within an Australian, family-owned mining manufacturer. The first author is currently engaged in a longitudinal design led innovation project, as a catalyst to guide the company's journey to design integration. The results find that design led innovation could act as a channel for highlighting and exploring company disconnections with the marketplace and offer a customer-centric catalyst for internal change. Data collected for this study is from 12 analysed semi-structured interviews, a focus group and a reflective journal, over a five-month period. This paper explores limitations to design integration, and highlights opportunities to explore and leverage entrepreneurial characteristics to stay agile, broaden innovation and future-proof through the next commodity cycle in the mining industry.
Price, R., Wrigley, C., Dreiling, A. & Bucolo, S. 2014, 'Design LED innovation: Shifting from smart follower to digital strategy leader in the Australian airport sector', 2013 IEEE-Tsinghua International Design Management Symposium: Design-Driven Business Innovation, TIDMS 2013 - Proceedings, pp. 251-258.
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© 2013 IEEE. This paper presents and discusses organisational barriers and opportunities arising from the dissemination of design led innovation within a leading Australian airport corporation. This research is part of a greater action research program which aims to integrate design as a strategic capability through design led innovation within Australian businesses. Findings reveal that there is an opportunity to employ the theoretical framework and tools of design led innovation in practice to build collaborative idea generation by involving customers and stakeholders within the proposal of new to world propositions. The iterative gathering of deep customer insights also provided an opportunity to leverage a greater understanding of stakeholders and customers in strengthening continuing business partnerships through co-design. Challenges to the design led approach include resistance to the exploratory nature of gathering deep customer insights, the testing of long held assumptions and market data, and the disruption of an organisational mindset geared toward risk aversion instilled within the aviation industry. The implication from these findings is that design led innovation can provide the critical platform to allow for a business to grow and sustain internal design capabilities necessary to challenge prevailing assumptions about how its business model operates to deliver value to customers and stakeholders alike. The platform of design led innovation also provides an avenue to support a cultural transformation towards anticipating future needs necessary for establishing a position of leadership within the broader economic environment.
Doherty, R., Matthews, J., Wrigley, C. & Bucolo, S. 2014, 'Early challenges of shifting an Australian manufacturer's utilisation of design', 2013 IEEE-Tsinghua International Design Management Symposium: Design-Driven Business Innovation, TIDMS 2013 - Proceedings, pp. 259-267.
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© 2013 IEEE. This paper presents the findings from the initial exploration phase of an 11 month project, identifying the early challenges that a design innovation catalyst faces while initiating a shift in the way a medium sized manufacturing firm utilises design. Ultimately, the overarching aims of the project are to transform the utilisation of design within the participating company from a styling tool to a strategic process through the implementation of a design led approach to innovation. Insights were found through qualitative interviews with company staff and reflective journal entries as part of an Action Research methodology. Challenges identified include managing expectations, conveying the potential of a design innovation catalyst and a design led approach to innovation, and a siloed and risk averse culture. Findings presented in this paper will assist in identifying and understanding the preliminary challenges encountered by a design innovation catalyst when embarking on a design led transformation. Future innovation catalysts can prepare for possible barriers by highlighting considerations, opportunities and challenges when embarking on a design led transformation. Implications of this research are provided as possible approaches to overcoming these challenges.
Krabye, A., Matthews, J., Wrigley, C. & Bucolo, S. 2014, 'From production to purpose-Using design led innovation to build strategic potential in a family-owned SME', 2013 IEEE-Tsinghua International Design Management Symposium: Design-Driven Business Innovation, TIDMS 2013 - Proceedings, pp. 37-46.
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© 2013 IEEE. There is an evident need to develop the strategic capabilities of companies from within, to ensure competitive competence in a time where strategy is a necessity. This paper is based on the first 4 months of a longitudinal embedded case study of a family-owned Australian small to medium enterprise, in their journey towards design integration. The first author was embedded as a 'Design Innovation Catalyst' to collaborate on overcoming early barriers of strategic development, using design led innovation. Action research methodology, semi-structured interviews with seven out of eight employees and a reflective journal revealed the absence of a shared vision, conflicting drivers and a focus on operational efficiency rather than strategy. Through the Catalyst's facilitation, a company vision, general awareness, practice and knowledge in strategic development have emerged as the first steps to generating strategic design competence within the firm.
Doherty, R., Wrigley, C., Matthews, J.H. & Bucolo, S. 2014, 'Climbing the design ladder: step by step', Proceedings of 19th DMI : Academic Design Management Conference, The 19th DMI: Academic Design Management Conference "Design Management in an Era of Disruption", Design Management Institute, London, pp. 2576-2597.
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This research presents findings of a research project where the first author worked with a small to medium sized enterprise (SME) manufacturing company in order to integrate design at a strategic level within the company. This study aims to identify the changes experienced in the participating company while shifting the perspective of design from a product focus towards a strategic focus. Staff interviews at two points in time and a reflective journal were used as data sources within an action research methodology. A shift in the perspective of design was noted in three cultural changes within the firm over time: a focus on long term as well as short term outcomes, on indirect as well as direct value and on intangible as well as tangible benefits. These three components are proposed as 'cultural stepping stones' that describe how a company transitions from an exclusively product focused utilisation of design, to a process-level application of design. Implications of this research are provided as considerations for businesses that are attempting to facilitate a similar transformation in the future.
Wright, N., Wrigley, C. & Bucolo, S. 2013, 'A methodological approach to modelling design led innovation across secondary education: An Australian case study', DRS//CUMULUS Oslo 2013: Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference for Design Education Researchers, ABMmedia, Norway, pp. 2209-2226.
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Pozzey, E., Bucolo, S. & Wrigley, C. 2013, 'Influencing innovation in SME's: from designer to transitional engineer', Proceedings of the 2013 Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research Exchange, ACERE, Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research Exchange (ACERE), Australia, pp. 1-1.
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Bucolo, S. & Wrigley, C. 2011, 'Sustaining social innovation enterprises through a design led innovation framework', Business Design Conference: - a discursive summary, CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, Spain, pp. 1-1.
Wrigley, C. & Bucolo, S. 2013, 'Teaching new product development to design led innovation', DRS//CUMULUS Oslo 2013: Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference for Design Education Researchers, Volume 4, ABMmedia, Norway, pp. 1839-1851.
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Wright, N., Davis, B. & Bucolo, S. 2013, 'The creative citizen: Understanding the value of design education programs in the knowledge economy', DRS//CUMULUS Oslo 2013: Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference for Design Education Researchers, DRS Cumulus, ABMmedia, Norway, pp. 2227-2245.
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Wright, N., Wrigley, C. & Bucolo, S. 2012, 'Broadening horizons: An emerging research agenda modelling design led innovation across secondary education', Leading Innovation Through Design: Proceedings of the DMI 2012 International Research, International Design Management Research Conference, Design Management Institute (DMI), Boston, M.A, USA, pp. 519-523.
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A re-examination of design education at all levels is needed to ensure global economic competitiveness and social and environmental sustainment. This paper presents an emerging research agenda modelling design led innovation approaches from the business sector to secondary education curriculum. To do this, a review of literature is provided and current knowledge gaps surrounding design education are detailed. A regional secondary school design immersion program is outlined as a future research case study using action research. A framework and recommendations for developing and delivering pedagogical approaches for 21st century skill outcomes in secondary education are briefly introduced and future research objectives are overviewed and discussed.
Matthews, J., Bucolo, S. & Wrigley, C. 2012, 'Challenges and opportunities in the journey of the design-led innovation champions', Leading Innovation Through Design: Proceedings of the DMI 2012 International Research, International Design Management Research Conference, Design Management Institute (DMI), Boston, M.A., USA, pp. 759-766.
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The purpose of this study is to deepen our knowledge and understanding of the challenges faced by design champions in proposing and applying design methods and insights in existing firms. This study investigates the early stages of the journey of the design champions as they incorporate design into operational and strategic conversations and practices, and their progress in mastering these challenges as opportunities in a firm context. Little research on this topic has been reported, yet it is of growing interest as more firms turn to design-led innovation to shape their strategies and practices. Interviews with design champions were used to investigate first hand the experience and reflections the many challenges provide. Findings from the study provide some early insights that can be extended through further research.
Buckley, M., Beames, M., Bucolo, S. & Wrigley, C. 2012, 'Designing radical business model innovation: A case study', Proceedings of the Participatory Innovation Conference 2012, Swinburne University, Faculty of Design, Australia, pp. 1-5.
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Matthews, J. & Bucolo, S. 2012, 'How can design methodologies build strategic renewal in SMEs?', Proceedings of the 2012 Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research and DIANA Conference (ACERE DIANA), Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research (ACERE), Australia, pp. 1-12.
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Wrigley, C. & Bucolo, S. 2012, 'I just want to design a sexy flying car! Teaching design-led innovation to designers', Projecting Design 2012: Cumulus Working Papers, Duoc UC, Chile, pp. 71-76.
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Wrigley, C. & Bucolo, S. 2012, 'New organisational leadership capabilities: Transitional engineer the new designer?', Leading Innovation Through Design: Proceedings of the DMI 2012 International Research, International Design Management Research Conference, Design Management Institute (DMI), Boston, M.A., USA, pp. 901-910.
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Traditionally, design has been centred within the manufacturing and production areas of companies and or as a styling afterthought. Increasingly, design is viewed as a vital and important strategic business resource (DellEra, Marchesi & Verganti, 2010) and consequently companies worldwide look to design to help them innovate, differentiate and compete in the global marketplace. The role of the professional designer is evolving to a point where they are needed to work beyond being a specialist in the manufacturing and aesthetics of an artefact (Wrigley & Bucolo, 2011). This paper challenges the values held by academics and industry regarding the traditional role of designers in business. It investigates the emerging transitional engineering framework and puts forward a proposal for the next generation designer in the future era of design. Questions surrounding how designers will develop these new skills and how the Authors new framework of design led innovation can contribute to the future of design will be presented. This research is needed to better equip future designers to have a more central role in business.
Pozzey, E., Wrigley, C. & Bucolo, S. 2012, 'Unpacking the opportunities for change within a family owned manufacturing SME: A Design Led Innovation case study', Leading Innovation Through Design: Proceedings of the DMI 2012 International Research, International Design Management Research Conference, Design Management Institute (DMI), Boston, M.A., USA, pp. 831-844.
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The following paper presents insights found during an ongoing industry engagement with a family-owned manufacturing SME in Australia. The initial findings presented as a case study look at the opportunities available to the firm engaging in a design led approach to innovation. Over the period of one year, the first authors immersion within the firm seeks to unpack the cultural, strategic, product opportunities and challenges when adopting design led innovation. This can provide a better understanding of how a firm can more effectively assess their value proposition in the market and what factors of the business are imperative in stimulating competitive difference. The core insight identified from this paper is that design led innovation cannot be seen and treated as a discrete event, nor a series of steps or stages; rather the whole business model needs to be in focus to achieve holistic, sustainable innovation. Initial insights were found through qualitative interviews with internal employees including: overcoming silos; moving from reactive to proactive design; empowerment; vision for growth and the framing of innovation.
Bucolo, S. & Wrigley, C. 2012, 'Using a design led approach to emotional business modelling', Leading Innovation Through Design: Proceedings of the DMI 2012 International Research, International Design Management Research Conference, Design Management Institute (DMI), Boston, M.A., USA, pp. 325-335.
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Prototyping is an established and accepted practice used by the design community. Prototypes play a valuable role during the design process and can greatly affect the designed outcome. The concept of a business model prototype, however, is not well understood by the design and business communities. Design industry trends indicate a move away from product and service innovation towards business model innovation. Therefore, it stands to reason that the role of prototypes and prototyping in this context should also be considered. This paper is conceptual and presents a process for creating and enabling business model prototypes. Specifically, the focus is on building emotional connections across the value chain to enable internal growth within firms. To do this, the authors have relied on personal observations and critical reflection from multiple industry engagements. The outcomes of this critical reflective practice are presented and the opportunities and challenges for this approach are discussed. Future research opportunities are also detailed and presented within the context of the emotional business model.
Chamorro-koc, M., Adkins, M. & Bucolo, S. 2012, 'Using scenarios to explore the social aspects of design led innovations', Projecting Design 2012: Global Design Bridge - Cumulus Conference, Duoc UC, Chile, pp. 186-191.
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Bucolo, S. & Matthews, J. 2011, 'A conceptual model to link deep customer insights to both growth opportunities and organisational strategy in SME's as part of a design led transformation journey', Design Management: Towards a New Era of Innovation: Proceedings of the 2011 Tsinghua-DMI International Design Management Symposium, Innovation and Design Management Association Ltd., Hong Kong, pp. 243-250.
Matthews, J. & Bucolo, S. 2011, 'Continuous innovation in SMEs: how design innovation shapes business performance through doing more with less', Proceedings of the 12th International CINet Conference - Continuous Innovation: Doing More With Less, CINet, Denmark, pp. 696-708.
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Bucolo, S. & Matthews, J. 2011, 'Design-led innovation - Exploring the synthesis of needs, technologies and business models', 2011 Participatory Innovation Conference Proceedings, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark, pp. 351-354.
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Matthews, J. & Bucolo, S. 2011, 'Do programs to improve business performance in small and medium manufacturing enterprise improve opportunity recognition?', Regional Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research 2011: Proceedings of the 8th AGSE International Entrepreneurship Research Exchange, Swinburne University of Technology, Australia, pp. 999-1009.
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Matthews, J., Bucolo, S. & Wrigley, C. 2011, 'Multiple perspectives of design thinking in business education', Design Management: Towards a New Era of Innovation: Proceedings of the 2011 Tsinghua-DMI International Design Management Symposium, Innovation and Design Management Association Ltd., Hong Kong, pp. 299-308.
Behrendorff, C., Bucolo, S. & Miller, E. 2011, 'Designing disruption: Linking participatory design and design thinking in technology orientated industries', DPPI'11 - Designing Pleasurable Products and Interfaces, Proceedings.
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A vast proportion of companies nowadays are looking to design and are focusing on the end users as a means of driving new projects. However still many companies are drawn to technological improvements which drive innovation within their industry context. The Australian livestock industry is no different. To date the adoption of new products and services within the livestock industry has been documented as being quite slow. This paper investigates how disruptive innovation should be a priority for these technologically focused companies and demonstrates how the use of design led innovation can bring about a higher quality engagement between end user and company alike. A case study linking participatory design and design thinking is presented. Within this, a conceptual model of presenting future scenarios to internal and external stakeholders is applied to the livestock industry; assisting companies to apply strategy, culture and advancement in meaningful product offerings to consumers. © 2011 ACM.
Behrendorff, C. & Bucolo, S. 2010, 'Participatory design for technological disruption within the agricultural sector', ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, pp. 267-268.
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Agricultural adoption of innovation has traditionally been described as slow to diffuse. This paper therefore describes a case study grounded in PD to address a disruptive technology/system within the livestock industry. Results of the process were positive, as active engagement of stakeholders returned rich data. The contribution of the work is also presented as grounds for further design research in the livestock industry. Copyright 2010 ACM.
Bucolo, S. & Matthews, J. 2010, 'Using a design led disruptive innovation approach to develop new services: Practicing innovation on times of discontinuity', Proceedings of the 11th International CINet Conference: Practicing Innovation in the Times of Discontinuity, CINet, Switzerland, pp. 176-187.
Gomez, R., Popovic, V. & Bucolo, S. 2006, 'Emotional driving experiences: An opportunity for future technology', Proceedings from the 5th Conference on Design and Emotion 2006.
The paper focuses on the emotional aspect of the driving experience. An experiment studying emotions during interaction between driver and vehicle interface in a natural driving situation was conducted. The aim was to identify aspects that affected the driving experience in a positive or negative manner. A triangulation method comprising interviews, observations and think-aloud protocols were used. Participants were required to drive around a specified route while interacting with the vehicle interface. They were interviewed before and after driving to identify their emotional state. During the drive they were asked to perform particular tasks with the interface as well as conduct a think-aloud protocol about their emotions while performing the tasks. Findings showed that emotions during interaction in low-traffic contexts did not impact the overall experience, while emotions elicited in high-traffic context influenced the overall emotional experience perceived. In addition, drivers in a positive emotional state before driving that experienced challenging interactions in high-traffic context perceived the overall experience as negative. Surprisingly, drivers in a negative emotional state prior to driving that experienced and overcame challenging interactions in high-traffic contexts perceived the overall experience as positive. An additional finding revealed that extended visual interaction with the vehicle interface in high-traffic situations led to negative emotions. The paper concludes by outlining future directions and suggestions as to how current and upcoming technology such as context aware interfaces, digital interfaces, and interfaces utilising smart materials may be applied to vehicle interiors to help support positive (and avoid negative) emotional experiences in a variety of contexts.
Bucolo, S., Mott, J. & Kimble, R. 2006, 'The design of a tangible interaction device to alleviate anxiety and pain in paediatric burns patients', Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings, pp. 129-134.
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This paper presents a case study on the design of a unique tangible media device to alleviate anxiety and pain in paediatric burns patients. The multidisciplinary interaction design approach used throughout the study is presented together with the hardware and content design solution. Results of an initial study are presented which qualify the use of the device within a clinical trial. The paper concludes with a reflection on the process undertaken leading to suggestions for undertaking successful collaborative projects which span medical science, computer science and design disciplines.
Francis, C., Bucolo, S. & Popovic, V. 2004, 'Designers Search Strategies Influenced by Information Retrieval Systems (IRS): Within the Early Stages of the Design Process', Proceedings of Futureground, Melbourne, Monash University, Faculty of Art & Design, Australia, Victoria, Melbourne, pp. 1-9.
Gomez, R., Popovic, V. & Bucolo, S. 2004, 'Driving Experience and the Effect of Challenging Interactions in High Traffic Context', Futureground: Volume 2 Proceedings, Monash University, Australia, Victoria, Melbourne, pp. 1-12.
Summerville, J., Buys, L., Ginn, S., Bucolo, S., Walker, A., Gard, S. & Bell, L. 2005, 'Engaging People in Environmentally Sustainable Behaviours using Interactive Virtual Reality: A Conceptual Framework', Social Change in the 21st Century 2005 Conference Proceedings, Queensland University of Technology, Australia, Queensland, Brisbane, pp. 1-19.
Bucolo, S., Billinghurst, M. & Sickinger, D. 2005, 'Mobile maze: A comparison of camera based mobile game human interfaces', ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, pp. 329-330.
This paper presents the findings of a comparative study investigating different input interfaces for a mobile phone games application. A standard mobile phone joystick interface is compared with a phone camera interface to detect the phone translation and tilt to control a ball's movement within various levels of difficulty of a virtual maze game. Results indicate that the joystick control provided the fastest completion times for each game, but with the lowest levels of user engagement. The Tilt interface, although perceived as challenging by the participants, provided the greatest level of user involvement, independent of game complexity. The design of appropriate human interfaces which go beyond the standard phone keypad is suggested.
Bucolo, S., Billinghurst, M. & Sickinger, D. 2005, 'User experiences with mobile phone camera game interfaces', Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Mobile and Ubiquitous Multimedia, MUM '05, pp. 87-94.
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This paper presents the findings of a comparative study investigating different input interfaces for a mobile phone games application. A standard mobile phone joystick interface is compared with a phone camera interface to detect the phone translation and tilt to control a ball's movement within various levels of difficulty of a virtual maze game. Game completion times together with the resultant user experience for each of the games was collected during the studies. Results indicate that the joystick control provided the fastest completion times for each game, but with the lowest levels of user engagement. The Tilt interface, although perceived as challenging by the participants, provided the greatest level of user involvement, independent of game complexity. The design of appropriate human interfaces which go beyond the standard phone keypad is suggested. The selection and design of these interfaces should also consider the intended user experience for the game.
Gomez, R., Popovic, V. & Bucolo, S. 2004, 'Driving: The Emotional Experience and Automotive Design', Fourth International Conference on Design and Emotion, http://www.designandemotion.org/knowledgebase.php, Ankara, Turkey, pp. 1-16.
Bucolo, S. 2004, 'Understanding cross cultural differences during interaction within immersive virtual environments', Proceedings VRCAI 2004 - ACM SIGGRAPH International Conference on Virtual Reality Continuum and its Applications in Industry, pp. 221-224.
The result of a comparative study that investigates the cross-cultural differences between individuals interacting within immersive virtual environments is presented. The study has measured and compared levels of Presence obtained by Australian and Chinese participants during an immersive Virtual Reality session related to urban design evaluation. Presence was measured using the Immersive Tendency Questionnaire and Presence Questionnaire developed by Witmer and Singer (1998). The research objective was to identify the value of Immersive Virtual Reality for community consolation and design evaluation within varying cultural contexts. The results have highlighted that a statistical difference in Presence exists between the two groups, however no difference in Immersive Tendency was identified. Considering cultural differences in the design of both virtual environment content and appropriate human computer interaction hardware is suggested.
Bucolo, S., Ginn, S., Gilbert, D. & Hayes, J. 2003, 'Transit oriented sustainable urban developments - Enhancing community consultation through web based virtual environments', Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques in Australasia and South East Asia, GRAPHITE '03, pp. 271-272.
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This paper will present a project in progress on the use of computer graphics to enhance the communication of an emerging Urban Design concept - Transit Oriented Sustainable Urban Design (TOSUD). Two detailed virtual environments have been created relating to hypothetical TOSUD developments within an Australian and Chinese context. The process of development and resultant virtual environment will initially be discussed within the paper. Following this, the development of a unique computer interface, which facilitates community consultation within these virtual environments, will be presented. The case study and interface development provides a framework for the future application of such tools within the Built Environment disciplines. Copyright © 2003 by the Association for Computing Machinery, Inc.
Bucolo, S., Ginn, S. & Gilbert, D. 2003, 'Using Virtual Reality Models to Better Communicate How Transport Infrastructure can Interface and Interact with the Built Urban Environment', Proceedings of the 21st ARRB and 11th REAAA Transport Conference (2003), ARRB Transport Research, Cairns, Queensland, pp. 1-8.
Bucolo, S., Ginn, S. & Gilbert, D. 2003, 'Using virtual reality models to better communicate how transport infrastructure can interface and interact with the built urban environment', Proceedings - Conference of the Australian Road Research Board, pp. 2879-2886.
The need to effectively communicate the concept of new and futuristic transportation systems and their association with the adjacent built urban environment has often eluded the transport and urban planner. The ability to communicate concepts like Personal Rapid Transit (PRT) and Light Rail Transit (LRT) systems and their interface with urban planning land uses like, for example, Transit Oriented Developments (TODs) have often been difficult for decision makers, professionals and the community to visualize within their own local environment. The solution has commonly come in a consultant's report, with options, supported by an overseas trip for senior officials and political leaders, yet still presenting the problem of transferability into the Australian urban environment. The problem is further compounded when a degree of public consultation is required to show options to help gain political approval. The power of a visual 3 dimensional walk or ride through virtual representation can within minutes express the whole concept of how, for example, a PRT or LRT may interface with existing or conceptualized models of urban terrain and associated land uses. This paper will present examples of how, using virtual reality modelling, decision makers, professionals and the wider public are able to more readily appreciate how transit systems like a PRT or LRT may interface with the built environment. The application of these transit systems will be applied to conceptual images of a transit oriented development and how these systems could be superimposed upon an urban corridor, local area transport plan or intersection, to gain a greater appreciation of what various project options may look like upon completion.
Bucolo, S., Impey, P. & Hayes, J. 2001, 'Client expectations of Virtual Environments for urban design development', Proceedings of the International Conference on Information Visualisation, pp. 690-694.
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© 2001 IEEE. This paper presents two case studies related to the application of Virtual Environments for urban design development based on an analysis of client expectations. Within the first study, community consultation is the focus of the application of the Virtual Environment, whereas the second study considers the application of the technology within the design development process. Therefore, client within this paper is considered as both the community and designer as end users of the technology. In both studies a comparison is made between traditional tools used for urban design development and Virtual Environments. Findings from the research indicates that both user groups have preference for Virtual Environments in certain aspects of the design development process, however development time, disruption to the design process and display medium all impact on the experience recorded.
Bucolo, S., Goss, H. & Hayes, J. 2001, 'Developing a Web-Based Methodology to Teach a Web-Based Technology - The e-Journal Approach', Short Paper Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference of the Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education, Biomedical Multimedia Unit, University of Melb, Melbourne, Victoria, pp. 17-20.
Bucolo, S. & Chan, N. 2001, 'Emerging Computer Based Conceptual Design Tools: Implications for Design Education', Proceedings of the ICSID Educational Seminar 2001 Seongnam, Seongnam City, Korea, Seoul, Korea, pp. 210-217.
Bucolo, S. 2000, 'Computer Assisted Conceptual Design Tools for New Product Development', Third International Symposium on Tools and Methods of Competitive Engineering, Delft University Press, Delft, Netherlands, pp. 341-348.

Journal articles

Straker, K., Wrigley, C. & Bucolo, S. 2016, 'Designing new business models: blue sky thinking and testing', Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 37, no. 5, pp. 22-31.
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Purpose In what is going to be an uncertain and rapidly evolving global economic landscape, it is clear that firms will have to become more adaptive and responsive to changes within their marketplace. To do this, businesses will not only need to engage in business model experimentation but also look to embrace business model innovation as a core competency and a means for sustained competitive advantage. Design/methodology/approach This paper outlines how a design process of experimenting and prototyping can apply to the design of business models through the case study of hypothetical luggage company Packright. Findings Five meta-models with differing foci are illustrated as an accessible and provoking framework that provides a new logic to classifying, experimenting and prototyping business model designs. Practical implications These five meta-models provide a tangible starting point from which a business can begin to explore different perspectives and gain insights into the internal and external capabilities of their company. Originality/value This paper builds upon the emerging research and exploration into the importance and relevance of dynamic, design-driven approaches to the creation of innovative business models.
Doherty, R., Wrigley, C., Matthews, J. & Bucolo, S. 2015, 'Climbing the design ladder: Step by step', Revista D. : Design, Educaão, Sociedade e Sustentabilidade, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 60-82.
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This research presents findings of a research project where the first author worked with a small to medium sized enterprise (SME) manufacturing company in order to integrate design at a strategic level within the company. This study aims to identify the changes experienced in the participating company while shifting the perspective of design from a product focus towards a strategic focus. Staff interviews at two points in time and a reflective journal were used as data sources within an action research methodology. Af shift in the perspective of design was noted in three cultural changes within the firm over time: a focus on long term as well as short term outcomes, on indirect as well as direct value and on intangible as well as tangible benefits. These three components are proposed as 'cultural stepping stones' that describe how a company transitions from an exclusively product-focused utilisation of design, to a process-level application of design. Implications of this research are provided as considerations for businesses that are attempting to facilitate a similar transformation in the future.
Wilson, K., Desha, C., Bucolo, S., Miller, E. & Hargroves, C. 2014, 'Emerging opportunities for "design thinking" to deliver sustainable solutions in the built environment', International Journal of Design Management and Professional Practice, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 1-10.
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© Common Ground, Kimberley Wilson, Cheryl Desha, Sam Bucolo,Evonne Miller, Charlie Hargroves, All Rights Reserved. In the built environment sector, a range of innovations are delivering environmental improvements with mixed success worldwide. The authors of this paper argue that a more "disruptive" form of innovation is needed to bring about significant and systemic change within the sector. Critical to this transition is the development of new behaviours and values. In particular, built environment professionals need to become active change agents in cultivating these new behaviours and values through the development of collaborative visions, scenarios, practices, and ideas. This paper identifies and discusses the critical role that design (in its broadest sense) can play in this process. Drawing on a comprehensive review of literature, the authors highlight a number of transformational opportunities for cross-professional learning and sharing between design and built environment disciplines in achieving environmental innovation (eco-innovation). The paper also considers several design-based concepts that have a potential application in the built environment sector including: design thinking, social innovation (human-centered), and disruptive innovation (transformational) approaches. The research findings will assist in building the capabilities of designers and innovators to create sustainable solutions to global problems, and in supporting the social diffusion of systems-changing ideas in the built environment sector.
Bucolo, S., Wrigley, C. & Matthews, J. 2012, 'Gaps in organizational leadership: Linking strategic and operational activities through design-led propositions', Design Management Journal, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 18-28.
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Wrigley, C. & Bucolo, S. 2011, 'Teaching Design Led Innovation: the future of industrial design', Design Principles and Practices, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 231-240.
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Miller, K., Rodger, S., Bucolo, S., Greer, R. & Kimble, R.M. 2010, 'Multi-modal distraction. Using technology to combat pain in young children with burn injuries', Burns, vol. 36, no. 5, pp. 647-658.
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Background: The use of non-pharmacological pain management remains adhoc within acute paediatric burns pain management protocols despite ongoing acknowledgement of its role. Advancements in adult based pain services including the integration of virtual reality has been adapted to meet the needs of children in pain, as exemplified by the development of multi-modal distraction (MMD). This easy to use, hand held interactive device uses customised programs designed to inform the child about the procedure he/she is about to experience and to distract the child during dressing changes. Aim: (1) To investigate if either MMD procedural preparation (MMD-PP) or distraction (MMD-D) has a greater impact on child pain reduction compared to standard distraction (SD) or hand held video game distraction (VG), (2) to understand the impact of MMD-PP and MMD-D on clinic efficiency by measuring length of treatment across groups, and lastly, (3) to assess the efficacy of distraction techniques over three dressing change procedures. Methods: A prospective randomised control trial was completed in a paediatric tertiary hospital Burns Outpatient Clinic. Eighty participants were recruited and studied over their first three dressing changes. Pain was assessed using validated child report, caregiver report, nursing observation and physiological measures. Results: MMD-D and MMD-PP were both shown to significantly relieve reported pain (p ? 0.05) and reduce the time taken for dressings (p ? 0.05) compared to SD and VG. The positive effects of both MMD-D and MMD-PP were sustained with subsequent dressing changes. Conclusions: The use of MMD as a preparatory or a distraction tool in an outpatient burns clinic offered superior pain reduction across three dressing changes to children when compared to standard practices or hand held video games. This device has the potential to improve clinic efficiency with reductions in treatment lengths. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI.
Miller, K., Rodger, S., Bucolo, S., Wang, X.Q. & Kimble, R.M. 2009, 'Multimodal distraction to relieve pain in children undergoing acute medical procedures', Chinese Journal of Burns, vol. 25, no. 5, pp. 352-356.
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Objective: Non-pharmacological approaches to pain management have been used by therapists for decades to reduce the anxiety and pain experienced by children during burn care procedures. With a greater understanding of pain and the principles behind what causes a child to be distracted, combined with access to state of the art technology, we have developed an easy to use, hand held multimodal distraction device (MMD). MMD is an interactive device that prepares the child for a procedure and uses developmentally appropriate distraction stories and games during the procedures to alleviate anxiety and pain. This paper summarizes the results of three randomized control trials. The trials aimed to understand the effectiveness of MMD as a distraction and preparation tool in reducing anxiety and pain in children undergoing burns and non-burns medical procedures compared to pure pharmacological approaches Standard Distraction (SD) and off the shelf video games (VG). Methods: Three separate prospective randomized control trials involving 182 children having 354 dressing changes were conducted in the burns and orthopedic departments at Royal Children's Hospital, Brisbane, Australia, to address the above aims. Pain and anxiety scores were completed for the child, caregiver and nursing staff according to the Modified Faces, Legs, Activity, Cry and Consolability Scale, Faces Pain Scale-Revised, Visual Analogue Scale and Wong-Baker Faces Pain Rating Scale. Procedural length was recorded. Results: MMD as a preparation and distraction tool were shown to have a significant impact on child, parent and nursing staff reported anxiety and pain during procedures compared to standard care and video games (P <0.01). The MMD had a positive effect on clinical time and was shown to sustain its impact on pain and time with further dressing changes. Conclusions: MMD is more effective in reducing the pain and anxiety experienced by children in acute medical procedures as compared with SD and VG...
Miller, K., Bucolo, S., Patterson, E. & Kimble, R.M. 2008, 'The emergence of Multi-Modal Distraction as a paediatric pain management tool', Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, vol. 132, pp. 287-292.
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The emergence of Multi Modal Distraction (MMD) has occurred following appraisal of the developmental and clinical concerns surrounding Virtual Reality's (VR) applicability to pediatric pain management. MMD was developed to expand current distraction tools and technology available for pain management in the pediatric population. This paper will examine how the challenges faced by VR have motivated the collaborative design and development process of MMD. It will then outline the continuous clinical trialling being undertaken to ensure its efficacy in managing childhood procedural anxiety and pain. &copy; 2008 The authors. All rights reserved.
Mott, J., Bucolo, S., Cuttle, L., Mill, J., Hilder, M., Miller, K. & Kimble, R.M. 2008, 'The efficacy of an augmented virtual reality system to alleviate pain in children undergoing burns dressing changes: a randomised controlled trial.', Burns, vol. 34, no. 6, pp. 803-808.
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In children, the pain and anxiety associated with acute burn dressing changes can be severe, with drug treatment alone frequently proving to be inadequate. Virtual reality (VR) systems have been successfully trialled in limited numbers of adult and paediatric burn patients. Augmented reality (AR) differs from VR in that it overlays virtual images onto the physical world, instead of creating a complete virtual world. This prospective randomised controlled trial investigated the use of AR as an adjunct to analgesia and sedation in children with acute burns. Forty-two children (30 male and 12 female), with an age range of 3-14 years (median age 9 years) and a total burn surface area ranging from 1 to 16% were randomised into a treatment (AR) arm and a control (basic cognitive therapy) arm after administration of analgesia and/or sedation. Pain scores, pulse rates (PR), respiratory rates (RR) and oxygen saturations (SaO2) were recorded pre-procedurally, at 10 min intervals and post-procedurally. Parents were also asked to grade their child's overall pain score for the dressing change. Mean pain scores were significantly lower (p=0.0060) in the AR group compared to the control group, as were parental pain assessment scores (p=0.015). Respiratory and pulse rates showed significant changes over time within groups, however, these were not significantly different between the two study groups. Oxygen saturation did not differ significantly over time or between the two study groups. This trial shows that augmented reality is a useful adjunct to pharmacological analgesia.
Varan, D., Turk, A., Bucolo, S., Polson, D., Brereton, M., Donovan, J., Montgomery, K. & McIndoe, G. 2006, 'Interactive lounge: An interdisciplinary approach to the design of a gestural interaction device', Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, vol. 10, no. 2-3, pp. 166-169.
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Among the many new opportunities that digital technologies are enabling are an increased capacity for viewers to interact not only with the program content, but with an increasingly wide array of other digital applications. Within this context this project has developed a new interaction device (incorporating gestural platform technology) and user interfaces to facilitate interactive access to digital media in a lounge room setting. This paper provides an overview of an interdisciplinary design process applied by Australasian CRC for Interaction Design (ACID) researchers - in order to develop the device and present in detail its unique features. &copy; Springer-Verlag London Limited 2005.
Bucolo, S., Thomson, M., Quirk, P. & Shepherd, R. 1995, 'Measured Versus Predicted Resting Energy Expenditure In Infants: A Need For Reappraisal.', The Journal of Pediatrics., vol. 0, no. NA, pp. 21-27.
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Bucolo, S., Thomson, M., Thomas, A., Holt, T. & Shepherd, R. 1995, 'The Body Cell Mass And Altered Protein Energy Metabolism In Cystic Fibrosis.', Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition., vol. 0, no. NA, pp. 141-142.
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Reports

Thurgood, C., Bucolo, S. & Cockburn, J. 2015, Design Thinking for Export and Competitiveness: Advanced Manufacturing in Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises.
Bucolo, S. & Wrigley, C. European Union 2012, Levesys : innovation management enabling a conversation about the future., In IMP³rove: High-Impact Innovation Management - Consulting services for SMEs, pp. 74-76, Luxembourg.
This case study reports on the impact and business transformation of an IMP&sup3;rove assessment and follow-up workshop on Australian SME LEVESYS (www.levesys.com), which was undertaken by QMI Solutions. Innovation was not a foreign term to the company, which focuses on the development of enterprise resource planning (ERP) software for the Australian construction sector. However, before seeing and undergoing the IMP&sup3;rove process, this company had difficulty articulating their innovation problems and, therefore, had not achieved growth targets from its R&D efforts. This case study highlights the role of IMP&sup3;rove in assisting LEVESYS to take the first step in transforming itself through innovation.