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Dr Pierre Mukheibir

Biography

Pierre is a professionally registered civil engineer with over 20 years experience in the water and sanitation sector. He has worked in both the development and research environments, with a specific focus on rural water and sanitation and more recently in the climate change adaptation sector. Before joining the Institute for Sustainable Futures, Pierre worked for three years as a senior planning engineer with an Australian water utility.

Pierre’s PhD thesis examined the impact of climate change on water resource management in small towns. The thesis demonstrated an approach that could be adopted by small towns to develop their water adaptation response to climate change impacts that includes an assessment of existing climate variability responses. By drawing on a case study of a small town in South Africa, it was demonstrated that the consequence of climate change impacts on water resources is an economic issue when it comes to meeting projected water demand and ensuring access to basic water supplies. 

Pierre currently leads on options analysis projects related to water supply and demand planning, including drought response strategies,  using multi-criteria decision support frameworks and those that aim to improve the understanding of institutional issues for green-grey infrastructure. He is a keen champion of urban sensitive water planning and restorative infrastructure strategies.

Pierre also leads ISF’s adaptation research, investigating the barriers hindering adaptation responses by local government to climate change, and the capacity of small and micro enterprises to respond to the impacts due to climate change. He was the key developer of the framework developed for the Melbourne water utilities to address the uncertainty of climate change in ensuring a resilient water supply system.

Pierre is a member of the Self-Assessment Team progressing the UTS application for an Athena SWAN Bronze award, as part of the Science in Australia Gender Equity (SAGE) pilot. UTS is one of 40 higher education and research institutions in Australia joining this national gender equity pilot program for women and men in STEMM fields

Professional

Registered Professional Engineer (South Africa)

Image of Pierre Mukheibir
Associate Professor and Research Director, Institute for Sustainable Futures
Core Member, ISF - Institute for Sustainable Futures
BSc Civil Engineering, MSc Civil Engineering, Doctor of Philosophy
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Phone
+61 2 9514 4962

Research Interests

Urban water planning for liveable cities, strategy development, drought response planning, 

Risk and uncertainty assessment and multi-criteria decision support

Climate change vulnerability assessments and adaptation planning

Efficiencies in the water industry

Can supervise: Yes

I am interested in supervising postgraduate research in the areas of water planning and uncertainty (e.g. climate change adaptation): 

  • Integrated water planning and management - responding to changing customer and societal demands
  • Defining liveability in a developing country context - understanding the tensions and contextual factors.
  • Economic pathways and challenges to integrated water systems which include reuse water.
  • Issues related to smart metering and data for utilities and customers
  • Autonomous vs co-ordinated climate change adaptation  - triggers for change and tipping points.

Current post graduate students:

Rachel Watson: (submitted 2016) The costs and benefits of local recycled water systems and their role in contributing to sustainable urban water servicing

This thesis demonstrates the interactions between impacts and the context (environment, social, regulatory and institutional setting) are  a critical component of explaining what investment occurs and therefore what role distributed recycled water systems (or any alternative) can have in urban water servicing. 

Jack ThomsonDisaster risk reduction amongst the rural poor in Lao PDR

Reba PaulEnergy Sensitive Urban Water Panning in Developing Countries

Anh NongUsing collaborative modelling approach as an aid to support adaptive water management process under uncertainty

Completed PhD students:

Ariane Lui: (2016) Smart water-use feedback: Options, preferences, impacts, and implications for implementation

This thesis investigates the opportunity for more detailed information and feedback on household water consumption by: (i) conceptualising the different options for the presentation of detailed feedback enabled via SW metering (ii) uncovering householder interests and preferences; (iii) measuring the various impacts of detailed feedback on householders and their consumption of water; and (iv) developing an implementation framework.

Verena Streitferdt: (2016) Optimising energy efficiency finance in emerging economies in Southeast Asia

This thesis investigates the relationship between public and private sector efforts to optimise energy efficiency finance initiatives in an emerging country context, using Thailand as a case study.  

Books

Mukheibir, P. 2011, Small Towns, Water Access and Climate Change: Towards sustainable access to urban water services under projected climate change impacts, LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing, Germany.
Climate change does not feature prominently in the mainstream development and water management literature, so much so that robust strategies have not been developed to adapt to the projected impacts nor have the consequences of future adaptation costs on water affordability and access been investigated.This book examines the impact of climate change on water resource management in small towns. Specifically it suggests that climate change be integrated into existing planning frameworks in order that small towns build resilient strategies against projected climate change impacts. An approach is proposed for small towns to develop their water adaptation response that includes an assessment of existing responses to climate variability. By screening these against qualitative and quantitative criteria, robust strategies can be identified that will ensure sustainable water supplies under projected climate change impacts. By drawing on a case study of a small town in South Africa, it is demonstrated that the consequence of climate change impacts on water resources is indeed an economic issue when it comes to meeting projected water demand and providing an equitable service.

Chapters

Mukheibir, P., Boronyak, L. & Alofa, P. 2017, 'Dynamic adaptive management pathways for drinking water security in Kiribati' in Leal Filho, W. (ed), Climate Change Adaptation in Pacific Countries Fostering Resilience and Improving the Quality of Life, Springer, Berlin, pp. 287-301.
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This book showcases vital lessons learned from research, field projects and best practice examples with regard to climate change adaptation in countries throughout the Pacific region, a part of the planet that is particularly vulnerable to ...
Kuruppu, N., Mukheibir, P. & Murta, J. 2014, 'Ensuring small business continuity under a changing climate: the role of adaptive capacity' in Palutikof, J.P., Boulter, S.L., Barnett, J. & Rissik, D. (eds), Applied Studies in Climate Adaptation, Wiley-Blackwell, pp. 429-436.
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Mukheibir, P. & Ziervogel, G. 2009, 'Municipal adaptation planning: A city-based framework for climate change adaptation' in Tang, K. (ed), Green CITYnomics, Greenleaf Publishing, Sheffield, UK, pp. 77-93.
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Scientific evidence confirms that climate change is already taking place and that most of the warming observed during the past 50 years is due to human activities OPCC 2007). Climate change projections suggest increased variability in rainfall, more frequent extreme events and increased temperatures. This will occur even if global emissions were to be reduced in accordance with the Kyoto Protocol. In recent years, reducing vulnerability to climate change has become an urgent issue in low- and middle-income countries and is at the forefront of any sustainable development policy agenda. Adaptation to climate change is a process whereby individuals and communities seek to respond to 'actual or expected climatic stimuli or their effects' OPCC 2007). This process is not new and, throughout history, people have adapted to changing climate conditions.
Mukheibir, P. & Ziervogel, G. 2009, 'Developing a Municipal Adaptation Plan for climate change: the city of Cape Town' in Bicknell, J., Dodman, D. & Satterthwaite, D. (eds), Adapting Cities to Climate Change: Understanding and Addressing the Development Challenges, Earthscan, London, UK, pp. 271-285.
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Winkler, H., Mukheibir, P. & Mwakasonda, S. 2006, 'Sustainability of electricity supply and climate change in South Africa' in Halsnaes, K. & Garg, A. (eds), Sustainable Development, Energy and Climate: Exploring Synergies and Tradeoffs. Methodological issues and case studies from Brazil, China, India, South Africa, Bangladesh and Senegal, UNEP Riso Centre on Energy, Climate and Sustainable Development, Roskilde, Denmark, pp. 37-42.

Conferences

Watson, R., Mukheibir & Mitchell, C. 2017, 'Local recycled water in Sydney: what's happening and why', OzWater'17, Sydney.
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Mukheibir, P. & Currie, L. 2015, 'Institutional Challenges for Achieving a Whole of Water Approach – The City of Sydney Response', European Water Resources Association, 9th World Congress, Water Resources Management in a changing World: Challenges and Opportunities, EWRA, Istanbul, Turkey.
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Urban water managers and policy makers are struggling with the challenge of transitioning to an approach that considers a whole of urban water approach, where water planning and the urban form are considered in an integrated manner. The recent drive for liveable cities, where water is used to enhance the urban landscape through reuse and stormwater management, has seen a shift in focus. This has brought a number of challenges to bear on institutions charged with water planning and management at strategic, tactical and operational levels. Five central challenges have emerged from the research undertaken by ISF, viz.: Legislations and regulations that are prescriptive, overlapping and inconsistent Economic and financial systems that are restrictive and traditional Planning that is uncoordinated and non-collaborative Organisational and professional cultures that are siloed and inflexible Citizens engagement that is uncoordinated, technical and uninspiring Drawing on the approach adopted by the City of Sydney, the paper will illustrate how a number of these challenges were overcome by local council in their attempt to achieve liveability goals, make the city more resilient to climate change, and reduce pollution levels in the water ways and harbour. The City undertook a consultative process to develop a decentralised water master plan that would both drive and guide future recycling, stormwater management, and pollution control initiatives. Six transferable lessons and enabling actions were identified that will have relevance to other cities and urban planners aiming to achieve a whole water approach and liveable cities.
Liu, A., Giurco, D. & Mukheibir, P. 2015, 'Household water-use feedback: moving forwards towards sustainable urban water', International Conference on Sustainable Water Management, Murdoch University, pp. 1-8.
Sustainable water management is becoming increasingly essential in an age characterised by rapid population and urban growth, industrial development and climate change. Opportunities to promote conservation and water-use efficiencies remain attractive in directly reducing water demand. Smart water metering and the provision of detailed water-use feedback to consumers present exciting new opportunities for improved urban water management. This paper explores two smart water metering trials in New South Wales, Australia, which provided household water consumption feedback via (i) paper end-use reports and (ii) an online portal. This combination enabled a deeper exploration of the various impacts of detailed feedback enabled via smart water metering, while simultaneously extending experience of the practical issues and challenges involved. The positive effects uncovered by the research present an important opportunity for smart water metering feedback to contribute towards more sustainable urban water management. Their summary contributes empirical evidence on the impacts for water utilities considering embarking on the smart water metering journey with their customers. The identification of future research and policy needs sets an agenda for smart water metering to promote a sustainable digital urban water future. A more coordinated approach to feedback programs is called for between the water industry and research to ensure very clear business and sustainability objectives are met. Utilities should also aim to integrate the design and plans for advanced feedback programs at the outset of smart meter implementations.
Mukheibir, P., Abeysuriya, K., Drinkwater, K. & Cole, C. 2014, 'Multi-criteria decision support for drought security', Ozwater14, Brisbane.
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The recently completed Lower Hunter Water Plan identified a portfolio of drought response measures to ensure that the region does not run out of water under severe drought conditions. A multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) process was developed to guide the assessment of the drought response options against multiple criteria (both quantitative and qualitative), and for the assembly and analysis of drought response portfolios. The process guided stakeholders in considering a wide range of alternative supply and demand side options, and allowed for the transparent trade-off between options or portfolios of options. The MCDA process integrated the assessment of social, environmental and risk/resilience criteria with cost effectiveness analysis. The process also included the analysis of contextual uncertainties and risk to determine the flexibility of the options under different future situations. The outcome of this process revealed a portfolio of drought response options that best met the weighted critieria and satisfied the drought response objectives.
Mukheibir, P., Turner, A.J., Mitchell, C.A., Chong, J., Murta, J., Retamal, M.L., Carrard, N.R. & Delaney, C.C. 2014, 'Shifts happen: Making better recycled water investment decisions', Sustainability in Public Works Conference 27 29 July 2014, Sustainability in Public Works Conference 27 29 July 2014, IPWEA, Tweed Heads.
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ABSTRACT: Recycled water has increasingly been considered as a means to deal with water supply-demand imbalances, treated wastewater disposal and stormwater management. It contributes to the sustainability of urban water systems and the regeneration of the urban landscape. However, recycled water schemes are not mainstream, and are often confronted with numerous challenges. By considering the contextual and project related risks associated with a diverse selection of recycling projects in Australia, a range of business related risks have become apparent. There is now evidence that shifts in both the contextual landscape and the objectives of the various players involved can occur over the life of a project, resulting in risk and uncertainty often not foreseen. Many guidelines on recycling have been produced which focus mainly on technical risk. Drawing on the experiences of a diverse selection of case studies in Australia, this paper contemplates the additional risks and uncertainties, often not initially considered at the inception of a recycling scheme. This paper presents an overview and discussion of six key issues to consider when planning a recycling scheme.
Liu, A., Giurco, D. & Mukheibir, P. 2014, 'Online household water portal: user interactions and perceptions of water-use', The 2nd Smart Water Grid International Conference 2014, Incheon, South Korea.
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Mukheibir, P., Giurco, D., Turner, A.J., Franklin, J., Teng, M.L. & McClymont, T. 2013, 'Integrated resources planning: Contemporary insights', Proceedings of the 5th National Water Efficiency Conference, 5th National Water Efficiency Conference, Australian Water Association (AWA), Sydney, pp. 1-9.
Liu, A., Giurco, D., Mukheibir, P. & Graeme, W. 2013, 'Smart metering and billing: Information to guide household water consumption', Proceedings of the 2013 AWA Water Education, Efficiency and Skills conference, AWA Water Education, Efficiency and Skills conference, Australian Water Association (AWA), Sydney, Australia.
Mukheibir, P., Boyle, T.M. & Mitchell, C.A. 2013, 'End-use forecasting in the context of building adaptive water services', 8th International Conference of European Water Research Association, Porto, Portugal.
Mukheibir, P. 2013, 'The future of end-use forecasting in Australia to plan adaptive water services', Local Government NSW Water Management Conference 2013: Improving the Working Flow, Terrigal, NSW, Australia.
Mukheibir, P., Mitchell, C.A., McKibbin, J.L., Komatsu, R., Ryan, H. & Fitzgerald, C. 2012, 'Adaptive planning for resilient urban water systems under an uncertain future', Proceedings of OzWater'12 'Sharing Knowledge, Planning the Future', OzWater'12 'Sharing Knowledge, Planning the Future', Australian Water Association (AWA), Sydney, Australia, pp. 1-8.
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Water planners are familiar with some form of variability in climate and demand. However, the uncertainty associated with the frequency and magnitude of the variations, coupled with broader performance expectations, means that long term deterministic planning needs to give way to a new approach. The structured adaptive planning process proposed in this paper aims to meet those objectives and accommodate the uncertainty in the future by developing a portfolio of measures that are both flexible to gradual changes in trends and robust to sudden shocks. A step-by-step process of the planning framework is presented. This is followed by a case study of the inputs and results based on its implementation by the Melbourne water businesses.
Mukheibir, P. 2012, 'Water efficiency - Yesterday's magic potion? (Keynote address)', savewater! NSW Members' Forum, Sydney, Australia.
Mukheibir, P., Mitchell, C.A., McKibbin, J.L., Komatsu, R., Ryan, H. & Fitzgerald, C. 2012, 'Planning for adaptive urban water systems under an uncertain future', Climate Adaptation in Action 2012: Sharing knowledge to adapt, Climate Adaptation in Action 2012: Sharing knowledge to adapt, National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility (NCCARF), Melbourne, Australia.
Mukheibir, P., Kuruppu, N., Gero, A. & Herriman, J. 2012, 'Cross-scale barriers to climate change adaptation in local government, Australia', National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility's (NCCARF's) Climate Adaptation in Action 2012: Sharing knowledge to adapt, Melbourne, Australia.
Kuruppu, N., Mukheibir, P., Murta, J., Gero, A., Brennan, T. & Chong, J. 2012, 'Enhancing the adaptive capacity of Small-to-Medium Enterprises (SMEs) in Australia to climate change and variability', Climate Adaptation in Action 2012: Sharing knowledge to adapt, Climate Adaptation in Action 2012: Sharing knowledge to adapt, National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility (NCCARF), Melbourne, Australia.
Mukheibir, P. 2012, 'Overcoming cross-scale barriers to local government adaptation in Australia - workshop presentation', Workshop on Barriers to Adaptation to Climate Change, Chameleon Research Group, Berlin, Germany.
Mukheibir, P. 2011, ''Resilience': the new 'sustainability'', Proceedings of the LGSA 2011 Water Management Conference, LGSA 2011 Water Management Conference, LGSA (Local Government and Shires Association), Grafton, NSW, pp. 1-19.
Mukheibir, P. 2011, '"Resilience" - the new "sustainability"', LGSA Water Management Conference 2011, Grafton, NSW.
Mukheibir, P. 2010, 'Less water loss: An integrated approach for small water supply systems', Proceedings of OzWater'10, OzWater'10, Australian Water Association (AWA), Brisbane, Australia.
Harrold, T. & Mukheibir, P. 2009, 'Climate correction of bulk meter consumption', Proceedings of OzWater'09, OzWater'09, Australian Water Association (AWA), Melbourne, Australia.
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Mukheibir, P. 2009, 'Assessing the economic impact of projected climate change on water supplies in small towns', Proceedings of OzWater'09, OzWater'09, Australian Water Association (AWA), Melbourne, Australia.

Journal articles

Liu, A., Giurco, D. & Mukheibir, P. 2017, 'Advancing household water-use feedback to inform customer behaviour for sustainable urban water', Water Science and Technology: Water Supply, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 198-205.
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© IWA Publishing 2017.Sustainable water management is increasingly essential in an age characterised by rapid population growth, urban and industrial development and climate change. Opportunities to promote conservation and water-use efficiencies remain attractive in directly reducing water demand. Smart water metering and the provision of detailed water-use feedback to consumers present exciting new opportunities for improved urban water management. This paper explores two smart water metering trials in New South Wales, Australia, which provided household water consumption feedback via (i) paper end-use reports and (ii) an online portal. This combination enabled a deeper exploration of the various impacts of detailed feedback enabled via smart water metering. The positive effects uncovered by the research present an important opportunity for smart water metering feedback to contribute towards more sustainable urban water management. Their summary contributes empirical evidence on the impacts for water utilities considering embarking on the smart water metering journey with their customers. The identification of future research and policy needs sets an agenda for smart water metering to promote a sustainable digital urban water future. Larger-scale trials are now required and utilities should integrate the design and plans for scalable advanced feedback programs at the outset of smart meter implementations.
Liu, A., Giurco, D., Mukheibir, P., Mohr, S., Watkins, G. & White, S. 2017, 'Online water-use feedback: household user interest, savings and implications', Urban Water Journal, pp. 1-8.
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© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis GroupThis paper reports on the short- and long-term impacts of online water-use feedback provided via a smart metering trial involving 120 households in New South Wales, Australia. Near-real time water consumption feedback was provided via an online portal to half of the sample. Water consumption was uniquely analysed one year pre- and post-intervention, and in conjunction with login data. During one year of available access, the intervention group saved an overall average of 24.1 litres per household per day (L/hh/d) (4.2%). Regression analysis showed the significant savings of active users related specifically to portal login activity. Significant short-term effects persisted for 42 days, averaging at 63.1 L/hh/d. The article discusses the implications for research and practice, including a consideration of how, in addition to providing ongoing access, online portals could be leveraged further by water authorities to help meet urgent short-term supply constraints such as in drought.
Watson, R., Mukheibir, P. & Mitchell, C. 2017, 'Local recycled water in Sydney: A policy and regulatory tug-of-war', Journal of Cleaner Production, vol. 148, pp. 583-594.
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Liu, A., Giurco, D. & Mukheibir, P. 2016, 'Urban water conservation through customised water and end-use information', Journal of Cleaner Production, vol. 112, no. 4, pp. 3164-3175.
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Water conservation in urban centres is an ongoing challenge in which new technologies can play an important role. Smart water metering in conjunction with end-use analysis enables the collection of more detailed information on household water consumption than was previously possible. This presents a new and currently underexplored opportunity to promote more efficient water use via the provision of detailed customised water-use information to householders. Among the variety of possible approaches, is the option of paper-based reports containing a highly detailed 'snapshot' of household water use. This paper describes a mixed methods study in which customised paper-based 'Home Water Updates' were provided to a group of households in Australia to explore the idea of providing detailed feedback, including detailed end-use consumption information on uses of water within the home. The methods used within this research are described in detail to disseminate experience in this relatively new area of research. Analysis of the post-intervention householder evaluation survey showed the provision of detailed water-use information via the Home Water Updates appealed to the vast majority of householders; and further resulted in changed behaviours (e.g. shorter showers and full washing machine loads) and installations of new infrastructure. These research findings suggest a role for customised household water and end-use information via smart metering. However, more work is required to optimise approaches to enable a significant contribution towards more sustainable urban water management.
Turner, A.J., Mukheibir, P., Mitchell, C., Chong, J., Retamal, M., Murta, J., Carrard, N. & Delaney, C. 2016, 'Recycled water – lessons from Australia on dealing with risk and uncertainty', Water Practice and Technology, vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 127-138.
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Much can be learned from the numerous water recycling schemes currently in operation in Australia, especially with respect to making investment decisions based on uncertain assumptions. This paper illustrates through a number of case studies, that by considering the contextual and project related risks, a range of business related risks become apparent. Shifts in the contextual landscape and the various players' objectives can occur over the life of a project, often leading to unforeseen risk and uncertainty. Through a thorough consideration of the potential risks presented in this paper, proponents as well as owners and managers might make better recycled water investment decisions, enhancing the benefits and minimizing the costs of water recycling schemes. This paper presents an overview and discussion of seven key factors to consider when planning a recycling scheme.
Mukheibir, P. & Currie, L. 2016, 'A whole of water approach for the city of Sydney', Water Utility Journal, vol. 12, pp. 27-38.
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Urban water managers and policy makers are struggling with the challenge of transitioning to an approach that considers a whole of urban water approach, where water planning and the urban form are considered in an integrated manner. The recent drive for liveable cities, where water is used to enhance the urban landscape through reuse and stormwater management, has seen a shift in focus. This has brought a number of challenges to bear on institutions charged with water planning and management at strategic, tactical and operational levels. Five central challenges have emerged from the research undertaken by ISF, viz.: a) Legislations and regulations that are prescriptive, overlapping and inconsistent, b) Economic and financial systems that are restrictive and traditional, c) Planning that is uncoordinated and non-collaborative, d) Organisational and professional cultures that are siloed and inflexible, e) Citizens engagement that is uncoordinated, technical and uninspiring. Drawing on the approach adopted by the City of Sydney, the paper will illustrate how a number of these challenges were overcome by local council in their attempt to achieve liveability goals, make the city more resilient to climate change, and reduce pollution levels in the water ways and harbour. The City undertook a consultative process to develop a decentralised water master plan that would both drive and guide future recycling, stormwater management, and pollution control initiatives. Six transferrable lessons and enabling actions were identified that will have relevance to other cities and urban planners aiming to achieve a whole water approach and liveable cities.
Mukheibir, P. 2016, 'Shifting to urban-sensitive water design - OneWater', Future Water - Australian Water Management Yearbook.
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Liu, A., Giurco, D., Mukheibir, P. & White, S. 2016, 'Detailed water-use feedback: A review and proposed framework for program implementation', Utilities Policy, vol. 43, pp. 140-150.
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Smart water metering (SWM) introduces new opportunities to engage householders about water use based on detailed information. Water utilities must decide how to embrace these opportunities, but remain hesitant due to limited available experience and knowledge, which risks delaying the benefits of involving householders more fully in SWM and more sustainable water consumption. An implementation framework is developed outlining the key strategic, practical and evaluative elements in decision-making for detailed feedback programs by drawing on the literature and first-hand experiences of two feedback trials involving SWM. Existing approaches are reviewed and recommendations are provided to advance more well-considered approaches and realise benefits regarding sustainable water use.
Mukheibir, P., Howe, C. & Gallet, D. 2015, 'Institutional issues for One Water management', Advances in Water Research, vol. April-June 2015, pp. 20-22.
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Liu, A., Giurco, D. & Mukheibir, P. 2015, 'Motivating metrics for household water-use feedback', Resources Conservation and Recycling, vol. 103, pp. 29-46.
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Mukheibir, P. 2015, 'Integrating One Water into urban liveability', Water, vol. 42, no. 6, pp. 40-41.
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Liveability is the new catch phrase in urban planning, where residents get to enjoy an urban landscape that consists of green open spaces, trees to keep the concrete jungle cool, and a water system that is resilient to drought and disruptions. For the water industry this means a shift in the way we view service delivery, from one of avoiding bad impacts, to one where the services we provide add more value. This means viewing all forms of water in the urban landscape as potential resources, and not problems to get rid of. Water-sensitive urban design (WSUD) considers this to be a whole-of-water approach, or a 'One Water approach, as termed by some in the US. This approach attempts to integrate planning and management of water supply, wastewater and stormwater systems in a way that minimises the impact on the environment and maximises the contribution to social and economic vitality.
Mukheibir, P., Cole, C., Drinkwater, K. & Abeysuriya, K. 2015, 'Consultative multi-criteria decision making process for drought security', Water Practice & Technology, vol. 10, no. 4, pp. 725-738.
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Water businesses have always sought to plan for drought-resilient urban water supply systems, especially in areas with extreme climate variability. The recently completed Lower Hunter Water Plan was developed to support population and business growth, and ensure reliable water supplies in drought. As well as introducing Water Wise Rules to encourage water conservation in normal conditions, the plan identified a portfolio (or combination) of drought response measures to be deployed progressively in a drought as water storage levels drop. The keys to the success of the Plan were thorough consultation with stakeholders, and collaborative analysis facilitating transparent evaluation of trade-offs among options and portfolios. A multi-criteria decision analysis process guided the assessment of the drought response options against both quantitative and qualitative criteria, and the assembly and analysis of portfolios. The process integrated the assessment of social and environmental criteria with cost effectiveness analysis, along with analysis of contextual uncertainties and risks, to determine the resilience of the options under different scenarios. The outcome was a portfolio of drought response options that best met the weighted criteria and satisfied their objectives.
Mukheibir, P., Howe, C. & Gallet, D. 2014, 'What's getting in the way of a One Water approach to water services planning and management?', Water, vol. May, no. 1, pp. 67-73.
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A range of factors prevents the development of institutional changes that would allow a shift to "One Water" systems. Foremost of these is the inertia associated with the dominant paradigm of centralised and siloed systems. This, together with the complex structure of regulations that currently exist for water supply, wastewater and storm water management, poses significant obstacles to a fully integrated approach. The regulatory patchwork environment, with overlapping responsibilities and jurisdictions, particularly with respect to the need for management of both public health and environmental risks, currently hinders system integration. This paper aims to understand what institutional challenges organisations engaged in the One Water approach have faced.
Mukheibir, P. & Mitchell, C. 2014, 'Decision-making under future uncertainty: developing adaptive urban water strategies', International Journal of Water, vol. 8, no. 4, pp. 435-447.
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This paper describes a decision-making framework created to develop long term adaptive water supply and demand strategies to respond to future contextual uncertainties, such as climate change and urbanisation. Whilst there are various theoretical methods for decision making under uncertainty, they generally have not been applied to the water sector. Nor have they been brought together in an integrated, practically-grounded process to guide strategic planning and project level decisions, such as the approach proposed in this paper. This approach avoids predictions of the future or modelling intensive analysis, rather it integrates the fundamental characteristics of uncertain system influences (trends and shocks) with two additional thinking tools: the use of scenarios based on a number of uncertainties to describe potential futures, and the focus on investment approaches to guide the packaging of potential response measures.
Turner, A.J., Mukheibir, P. & Mitchell, C. 2014, 'Making better investment decisions', Waste Management and Environment, vol. 15, no. 10, pp. 36-37.
Lederwasch, A.J. & Mukheibir, P. 2013, 'The Triple Bottom Line and progress toward Ecological Sustainable Development: Australia's coal mining industry as a case study', Resources, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 26-38.
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A common goal shared by the world is to achieve well-being for the planetfor this generation and generations to come. The world formalized this common goal when it accepted the concept of ecological sustainable development (ESD) at the 1992 Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro, and through the adoption of the United Nations Agenda 21. This paper explores the capacity of New South Wales planning system to deliver on this shared goal. It does this through an evaluation of the triple bottom line (TBL), as an impact assessment framework, in the context of coal mine development proposals. The evaluation is performed against ESD principles, and draws from the experience of the authors in reviewing a recent coalmine expansion application in New South Wales, Australia. During this review the authors encountered opportunities to improve the impact assessment process. The opportunities identified relate to the process of robust and consistent drawing of impact boundaries and selection of scales (geographic and temporal), in which to conduct an impact assessment. The findings are significant, as they offer a path toward greater discussion around, and realization of, opportunities for achieving development in each TBL domain, i.e., social, environmental and economic.
Mukheibir, P., Giurco, D., Turner, A.J., Franklin, J., Teng, M.L. & McClymont, T. 2013, 'End-use demand forecasting: Contemporary insights', Water, vol. 40, no. 3, pp. 76-80.
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This paper reports on the application of integrated resource planning using the integrated supply demand planning tool in regional Victoria (Geelong and Colac) and New South Wales (Lower Hunter region) . It discusses data assumptions and findings across the case studies. A key finding is that the uptake of efficient appliances has been decreasing total water use (e.g. in toilets and showers) despite population growth. However, this will be driven close to the maximum limits over the next 15 years or so, while customer behaviour patterns such as length and frequency of appliance use will be crucial for informing future demand side management strategies.
Liu, A., Giurco, D., Mukheibir, P. & Graeme, W. 2013, 'Smart metering and billing: Information to guide household water consumption', Water, vol. 40, no. 5, pp. 73-77.
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Until now householders have received limited information on their water consumption patterns. Smart water metering presents far more detailed information resources and the opportunity to transform the e xisting flow of information to consumers for improved efficiencies in water usage. However, a balance is needed between delivering current minimal information and the ful l detail smart metering can provide on time of use and end uses. It is critical to understand what information is of value to householders. This paper presents results from a recent householder survey at MidCoast Water {N5W}, which improves our understanding of the customer perspective on water consumption information.
Mukheibir, P., Kuruppu, N., Gero, A. & Herriman, J. 2013, 'Overcoming cross-scale challenges to climate change adaptation for local government: A focus on Australia', Climatic Change, vol. 121, no. 2, pp. 271-283.
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This paper aims to identify key cross-scale challenges to planned adaptation within the context of local government in Australia, and suggest enabling actions to overcome such challenges. Many of the impacts of climate change and variability have or will be experienced at the local level. Local governments are embedded in a larger governance context that has the potential to limit the effectiveness of planned adaptation initiatives on the ground. This study argues that research on constraints and barriers to adaptation must place greater attention to understanding the broader multi-governance system and cross-scale constraints that shape adaptation at the local government scale. The study identified seven key enabling actions for overcoming cross-scale challenges faced by local governments in Australia when undertaking climate change adaptation planning and implementation. A central conclusion of this study is that a cooperative and collaborative approach is needed where joint recognition of the scale of the issue and its inherent cross-scale complexities are realised. Many of the barriers or constraints to adaptation planning are interlinked, requiring a whole government approach to adaptation planning. The research suggests a stronger role at the state and national level is required for adaptation to be facilitated and supported at the local level.
Mukheibir, P. 2013, 'Potential consequences of projected climate change impacts on hydroelectricity generation', Climatic Change, vol. 121, no. 1, pp. 67-78.
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There is a growing concern that countries should reduce their dependence on fossil fuels for electricity generation and look to other cleaner technologies. Hydroelectricity is one such option. However, given that hydropower is dependent on rainfall and associated runoff for power generation, it is susceptible to both the positive and negative impacts of climate change, such as increases in temperature and changes in precipitation and runoff. In this paper, impacts on hydropower generation have been organised as either changes in long-term trends or short-term variability and shocks. These impacts could either manifest themselves as direct impacts on hydropower generation potential or as indirect impacts (or ancillary impacts) such as increased competition for water. Citing examples from around the world, this paper investigates the scale of these projected impacts, and the potential cost implication of inaction. It concludes by making recommendations for possible adaptive options to build resilience in response to local impacts.
Mukheibir, P., Boyle, T.M., Delaney, C.C. & White, S. 2013, 'Estimating the reliable residential water substitution from household rainwater tanks'.
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Boyle, T.M., Giurco, D., Mukheibir, P., Liu, A., Delaney, C.C., White, S. & Stewart, R.A. 2013, 'Intelligent metering for urban water: A review', Water, vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 1052-1081.
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This paper reviews the drivers, development and global deployment of intelligent water metering in the urban context. Recognising that intelligent metering (or smart metering) has the potential to revolutionise customer engagement and management of urban water by utilities, this paper provides a summary of the knowledge-base for researchers and industry practitioners to ensure that the technology fosters sustainable urban water management. To date, roll-outs of intelligent metering have been driven by the desire for increased data regarding time of use and end-use (such as use by shower, toilet, garden, etc.) as well as by the ability of the technology to reduce labour costs for meter reading. Technology development in the water sector generally lags that seen in the electricity sector. In the coming decade, the deployment of intelligent water metering will transition from being predominantly pilot or demonstration scale with the occasional city-wide roll-out, to broader mainstream implementation. This means that issues which have hitherto received little focus must now be addressed, namely: the role of real-time data in customer engagement and demand management; data ownership, sharing and privacy; technical data management and infrastructure security, utility workforce skills; and costs and benefits of implementation
Mukheibir, P., Boyle, T.M. & Mitchell, C.A. 2013, 'End-use forecasting in the context of building adaptive water services', Water Utility Journal, vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 29-39.
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Water resource managers are faced with planning for an uncertain future constrained by limited knowledge of how demands will change in future and what supplies will be available to match them. By adopting an adaptive management approach, flexible and robust responses can be developed as new information comes to hand. A transparent approach has been developed that avoids complicated probabilistic approaches and encourages planners to consider investment policies to accommodate a range of potential scenarios. Integrated resource planning (IRP) principles are key to this approach and requires that both supply and demand side options are considered. Whilst much focus has been on the supply side, end user interventions have received less attention as a longer term approach. Restrictions have to date been the fall back option to deal with impending droughts, but this is not likely to be acceptable under reduced trending supplies. By focusing on end-use planning, savings through suppressed customer demand can free up further water thereby delaying the introduction of large expensive supply options. By disaggregating the end uses by residential customers into for example, showers, toilets, baths, washing machines, outdoor use, etc., a richer understanding of where residential water actually gets used and therefore where the potential for demand reduction lie. This paper firstly presents a framework for adaptive planning for urban water supplies and secondly, introduces the notion of end-use modelling and planning as a means to reduce consumption. Real examples from work conducted in Australia will be used to illustrate these approaches.
Mukheibir, P., Stewart, R.A., Giurco, D. & O'Halloran, K. 2012, 'Understanding non-registration in domestic water meters: Implications for meter replacement strategies', Water, vol. 32, no. 8, pp. 95-100.
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Ziervogel, G., Johnston, P.A., Matthew, M. & Mukheibir, P. 2010, 'Using enhanced knowledge of climate variability for adapting to climate change in water resource management in South Africa', Climatic Change, vol. 103, no. 3-4, pp. 537-554.
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Water resources, and in particular run-off, are significantly affected by climate variability. At present, there are few examples of how the water management sector integrates information about changing intra-annual climate conditions in a systematic manner in developing countries. This paper, using the case study of Cape Town in the Western Cape, South Africa, identifies processes and products to facilitate increased uptake of seasonal climate forecasts among water resource managers. Results suggest that existing seasonal forecasts do not focus enough on specific users needs. In order to increase uptake, forecasts need to include information on the likely impact of precipitation variability on runoff and water availability. More opportunities are also needed for those with climate knowledge to interact with water resource managers, particularly in the developing country context where municipal managers capacity is strained. Although there are challenges that need to be overcome in using probabilistic climate information, seasonal forecast information tailored to the needs of water resource planners has the potential to support annual planning and is therefore a means of adapting to climate change.
Mukheibir, P. 2010, 'Water access, water scarcity and climate change', Environmental Management, vol. 45, no. 5, pp. 1027-1039.
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This article investigates the approaches of the various discourses operating in the water sector and how they address the issues of scarcity and equitable access under projected climate change impacts. Little synergy exists between the different approaches dealing with these issues. Whilst being a sustainable development and water resources management issue, a holistic view of access, scarcity and the projected impacts of climate change is not prevalent in these discourses. The climate change discourse too does not adequately bridge the gap between these issues. The projected impacts of climate change are likely to exacerbate the problems of scarcity and equitable access unless appropriate adaptation strategies are adopted and resilience is built. The successful delivery of accessible water services under projected climate change impacts therefore lies with an extension of the adaptive water management approach to include equitable access as a key driver.
Mukheibir, P. 2010, 'The potential economic impact of climate change on equitable water access in small towns: A South African case study', International Journal of Water, vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 223-245.
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This case study demonstrates that the consequence of climate change impacts on water resources is indeed an economic issue when it comes to meeting projected water demand and ensuring access to basic water supplies. In order to meet the same water demand under climate change conditions as compared with normal climate conditions the investment cost quadruples over the 30 year period. This in turn results in an increase in the average annual unit selling price of the water increasing by 25%. A fundamental shift in development policy is therefore required if equitable access to affordable water is to be achieved.
Ziervogel, G., Johnston, P., Matthew, M. & Mukheibir, P. 2010, 'Using climate information for supporting climate change adaptation in water resource management in South Africa', Climatic Change, vol. 103, no. 3, pp. 537-554.
View/Download from: Publisher's site
Water resources, and in particular run-off, are significantly affected by climate variability. At present, there are few examples of how the water management sector integrates information about changing intra-annual climate conditions in a systematic manner in developing countries. This paper, using the case study of Cape Town in the Western Cape, South Africa, identifies processes and products to facilitate increased uptake of seasonal climate forecasts among water resource managers. Results suggest that existing seasonal forecasts do not focus enough on specific users' needs. In order to increase uptake, forecasts need to include information on the likely impact of precipitation variability on runoff and water availability. More opportunities are also needed for those with climate knowledge to interact with water resource managers, particularly in the developing country context where municipal managers' capacity is strained. Although there are challenges that need to be overcome in using probabilistic climate information, seasonal forecast information tailored to the needs of water resource planners has the potential to support annual planning and is therefore a means of adapting to climate change. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Mukheibir, P. 2008, 'Water resource management strategies for adaptation to climate induced impacts in South Africa', Water Resource Management, vol. 22, no. 9, pp. 1259-1276.
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This paper focuses on the development of a framework for strategy considerations for water resources management in South Africa to meet the development goals in the municipal and agricultural sectors. The north western part of South Africa experiences severe periods of drought and according to the climate change projections, will be most vulnerable to future climate induced water supply stress. A framework for selecting appropriate strategies is presented. A series of potential adaptation strategies most suitable for long term adaptation are discussed. These include both supply and demand side strategies. Barriers and obstacles to implementing these strategies include human and financial resource deficiencies at local municipal and community levels.
Mukheibir, P. & Ziervogel, G. 2008, 'Urban adaptation planning', Tiempo, vol. 67, no. April 2008, pp. 3-7.
Mukheibir, P. & Ziervogel, G. 2007, 'Developing a Municipal Adaptation Plan (MAP) for climate change: the city of Cape Town', Environment and Urbanization, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 143-158.
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Climate change increases the likelihood of extreme weather events such as droughts, floods and heat waves, as well as more gradual changes in temperature and precipitation. The city of Cape Town (South Africa) is at risk from projected climate-induced warming and changes in rainfall variability. This makes resource management and infrastructure planning more challenging and increases the urgency of the need to adapt city-level operations to both current climate variability and future climate change. To date, however, the main focus of adaptation planning has been at the nationallevel, and has not adequately addressed municipal-scale adaptation. This paper presents and discusses an overarching framework that would facilitate the development of a Municipal Adaptation Plan (MAP). The example of the city of Cape Town illustrates some of the sector-level assessments and potential climate threats, as well as resource mobilization issues that need to be addressed during the development and implementation of a MAP. In conclusion, a number of barriers to developing a MAP are discussed.
Mukheibir, P. 2007, 'Possible climate change impacts on large hydroelectricity schemes in southern Africa', Journal of Energy In South Africa, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 4-9.
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There is growing concern that developing countries, such as South Africa, should reduce their coal dependence for energy generation and look to other cleaner technologies. Hydroelectricity is one such option. A number of potential large hydro sites have been identified in Southern Africa, which form part of the Southern African Power Pool. However, limited information exists on the impact of climate change on these sites and its effect on the viability of the hydroelectric schemes. Using downscaled global circulation model information, projected climate impacts and the potential impact these may have on future hydro schemes are discusse
Mukheibir, P. 2007, 'Qualitative assessment of municipal water resource management strategies under climate impacts: the case of the Northern Cape, South Africa', Water SA, vol. 33, no. 4, pp. 575-581.
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This paper considers existing coping strategies in times of climate variability and proposes long term strategies for dealing with future projected climate change and variability. A qualitative strategy assessment methodology is proposed and tested for climate conditions in the Northern Cape. The analysis of the results suggests that dry sanitation, education projects and tariff structures are identified as being the most useful strategies. Key factors which were perceived to inhibit the implementation of appropriate drought adaptation strategies are the lack of local capacity and the low financial resource base to cover the capital and running costs of most of the strategies. With the likelihood of increased future rainfall variability, it is important that planners and decision-makers take into account the effects of climate change and variability on water resources. In so doing, they need to adopt sustainable water supply and demand solutions for the longer term.
Mukheibir, P. & Ziervogel, G. 2007, 'A framework for adaptation to climate change in the City of Cape Town', Energy Management News, vol. 13, no. 2.
Winkler, H., Nkomo, J.C., Mwakasonda, S., Mukheibir, P. & Sparks, D. 2005, 'Climate change mitigation: A training manual', Journal of Energy In South Africa, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 55-58.
Mukheibir, P. 2005, 'Municipal water resource management', Tiempo, vol. 57, no. October, pp. 26-26.
Nkomo, J.C., Winkler, H., Mwakasonda, S., Mukheibir, P. & Sparks, D. 2005, 'Climate change mitigation: A training manual', Journal of Energy in Southern Africa, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 139-142.
A training manual on climate change mitigation courses with the overall objective of meeting the challenges of climate change in the future and providing a support and skills is developed by the Energy Research Center (ERC).The objectives of the training include, improve participation in the UNESCO, provide a timely implementation of UNFCCC and Kyoto protocol, and transfer skills and know-how to trainees. Groups targeted for the training include, negotiators policy analysts, country teams, and other relevant stakeholders. Intellectual and management skills associated with the design, development, preparation and delivery of skills training in negotiation, policy analysis and co-ordination are expected to be the outcome of the training.
Mukheibir, P. 2000, 'The provision of basic services to farm-dwellers', Land and Rural Digest, vol. 10.
Mukheibir, P. 1992, 'The use of artificial wetlands to treat rural effluent', New Ground, vol. 7.
Mukheibir, P. 1991, 'The deformation properties of hardened concrete containing classified Lethabo fly ash', Concrete Beton, vol. 61, no. Nov 1991.
Mukheibir, P. 1991, 'Mix properties of concrete with classified Lethabo fly ash in the Western Cape', Concrete Beton, vol. 58, no. April 1991.

Other

Mukheibir, P. & Kohlitz, J. 2015, 'Pacific islands are not passive victims of climate change, but will need help', The Conversation.
Kuruppu, N., Murta, J. & Mukheibir, P. 2014, 'Small businesses in Australia and their capacity needs under a changing climate', Asian Disaster Preparedness Center, pp. 22-23.
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Kuruppu, N., Mukheibir, P. & Murta, J. 2013, 'A changing climate for SME continuity', Business Continuity Institute, pp. 27-28.

Reports

Abeysuriya, K.R., Kome, A., Carrard, N., Mukheibir, P. & Willetts, J. SNV and ISF 2016, Are we doing the right thing? Critical questioning for city sanitation planning.
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Our aim is to provoke practitioners, policy makers and development agencies to reflect on their approaches to city sanitation planning and the assumptions that underlie them. The document is not intended as a critique, and it does not recommend a particular planning approach. Nor does it add to existing stocks of guidance materials on how to develop sanitation plans (e.g. Sanitation 21, WHO Sanitation Safety Planning Guide 2015, Community-Led Urban Environmental Sanitation Planning (CLUES), guidance for City Sanitation Strategies (SSK) in Indonesia and City Sanitation Plans (CSPs) in India etc). Rather, our premise is that raising awareness of underlying assumptions in sanitation planning may lead to better targeted approaches to sanitation planning, if and when those assumptions are shown not to match realities.
Mukheibir, P. & Boronyak, L. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2016, Dynamic Adaptive Management Process - Supporting Community Adaptation to Water Shortages in Kiribati, Sydney, Australia.
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In the water-scarce Pacific Island nation of Kiribati wells that supply water are increasingly affected by saltwater intrusion due to high tides, sea level rise and increasingly frequent storms and tropical cyclones. A handbook had been produced to help local facilitators to train communities to identify climate change adaptation strategies by drawing from various sources of knowledge, including traditional knowledge.
Mukheibir, P. SNV 2016, A guide to septage transfer stations.
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Mukheibir, P., Rickwood, P. & Mohr, S. 2015, Improved leak detection method for water reticulation zones, Sydney, Australia.
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The Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF) was tasked with developing new leak detection algorithms that detect leaks based on data from bulk water flow and pressure meters within South East Water's potable water distribution network.
Mukheibir, P., Howe, C. & Gallet, D. IWA Publishing 2015, Institutional Issues for Integrated 'One Water' Management, no. SIWM2T12.
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The looming capital investment required to refurbish aging infrastructure, upsizing and upgrading existing infrastructure, as well as building new infrastructure to meet growing demands through urbanization and densification is putting financial strain on utilities and local government institutions. This together with the impending impact of climate change and increased resource insecurity and variability will mean that planners and decision makers will need to adopt a new way of thinking and pooling resources. Customers are also demanding a whole society approach where water sensitive urban design and sustainable urban water management addresses all the needs of the urban landscape. A One Water approach is expected to bring together all these water streams through workable institutional arrangements and management. However, urban water planners and policymakers around the world are wrestling with the challenge of transitioning to a One Water approach, or as defined in the report as the One Water paradigm. Foremost of these is the inertia associated with the dominant paradigm of centralized systems and siloed institutions. This dominant paradigm results in the lack of engineering and community understanding of the benefits of integrated systems, such as lower costs, higher resilience to extreme events, more localized availability of water for reuse, etc. A further significant challenge is the complex structure of regulations that currently exist separately for water supply, wastewater and stormwater management. This report outlines the challenges that have been faced to date, and suggests enabling strategies and actions that could be deployed at both the implementation and policy levels. These are illustrated through a range of case studies and supported by a review of published literature. To support planners and policymakers, a Framework for Transitioning to a One Water approach is presented which organizes the range of enabling actions required to make the tra...
Mukheibir, P. & Howe, C. Water Environment Research Foundation 2015, Pathways to One Water: A guide for institutional innovation.
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The primary audiences for this guide are urban water professionals and local government leaders. However, this guide is also targeted at urban planners, academics, developers, architects, regulators, funding agencies and nongovernmental organizations, as well as the building and infrastructure trades. All of these groups will need to be engaged to truly achieve a One Water outcome. The guide includes: A description of how cities are moving into a new generation of infrastructure An introduction to One Water and a summary of the key institutional challenges in moving to this approach Key elements of institutions that have embraced a One Water approach Case study snapshots of innovative initiatives taken by organizations Examples of institutional change at the regional, city and utility level Finally, how an individual, an organization or an association might take action or influence change toward a One Water approach
Mohr, S. & Mukheibir, P. 2015, Pressure management leak reduction assessment.
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The Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF) was tasked with estimating the actual savings from South East Water's (SEW) installing pressure reducing valves (PRVs) and the establishment of pressure management zones within SEW's potable water distribution network. ISF used an algorithm (ISF1) developed to detect changes in flow characteristics in a previous SEW project. The algorithm was able to estimate the average daily saving based on analysis of the consumption for 14 days prior and after the switching on of the pressure management zone (PMA) – as shown in the table below. The algorithm implicitly takes variations in weather and other influences into account in the analysis.
Mukheibir, P., Chong, J. & Turner, A. Institute of Sustainable Futures 2014, CARM Evaluation Framework, Sydney, Australia.
The Institute developed a monitoring and evaluation framework for State Water to assess the impact of the new Decision Support System for river management, part of the Murrumbidgee Computer Aided River Management Project (CARM) - a $65 million upgrade of infrastructure and operational processes throughout the Murrumbidgee River System.
Mukheibir, P. & Herriman, E. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2014, Multi-criteria decision support framework for Burwood Beach WWTW Stage 3 upgrade.
Razian, H. & Mukheibir, P. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2013, Evaluation of the sustainable water management in the Duck River Catchment project, Sydney.
Mukheibir, P., Delaney, C.C., Boyle, T.M. & Milne, G.R. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2013, Lower Hunter Water Plan: Options investigation - rainwater tanks (Final Report), pp. 1-130, Sydney.
Mukheibir, P., Kuruppu, N., Gero, A. & Herriman, E. National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility 2013, Cross-scale barriers to climate change adaptation in local government, Australia, Cross-scale barriers to climate change adaptation in local government, Australia: Final report, pp. 1-101, Gold Coast.
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This report documents a study aimed at identifying cross-scale barriers to planned adaptation within the context of local government in Australia, and the development of enabling actions to overcome these barriers. Many of the impacts of climate change and variability have been, or will be, experienced at the local level. As a result, local governments in Australia (and overseas) have initiated plans to adapt to these impacts. However, the pathway to planning and implementation of adaptation is not a barrier-free process. Local governments are embedded in a larger governance context that has the potential to limit the effectiveness of planned adaptation initiatives on the ground. Identifying barriers or constraints to adaptation is an important process in supporting successful adaptation planning, particularly where reworking the path-dependent institutional structures, organisational cultures and policy-making procedures is required.
Kuruppu, N., Murta, J., Mukheibir, P., Chong, J. & Brennan, T. National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility 2013, Understanding the adaptive capacity of Australian small-to-medium enterprises to climate change and variability, Understanding the adaptive capacity of Australian small-to-medium enterprises to climate change and variability.
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Small-to-medium enterprises (SMEs) comprise 96 per cent of all private businesses in Australia. The SME sector is the economys largest employer and the largest contributor to GDP. Moreover, SMEs play a significant role within socio-economic systems: they provide employment, goods and services and tax revenue for communities. Climate change may result in adverse business outcomes including business interruptions, increased investment and insurance costs, and declines in financial indicators such as measures of value, return and growth. After natural disasters, SMEs face greater short-term losses than larger enterprises, and may have lower adaptive capacity for various reasons. This study examines the underlying factors and processes shaping adaptive capacity of Australian SMEs to climate change and associated sea level rise. Specifically, the research asks the following questions: 1) How have SMEs considered and integrated adaptation into business planning? 2) What are the key underlying processes that constrain and influence the adaptive capacities of SMEs? and 3) What types of support are required to promote SME business continuity under a changing climate? The study adopts theories from Political Ecology and draws on literature on vulnerability and hazards to understand the processes that mediate the adaptive capacity of SMEs. The empirical research involved an online survey targeting SMEs, attending business engagement events hosted by chambers of commerce, 30 semi-structured interviews with secondary stakeholders, five case studies involving SMEs and secondary stakeholders, and finally a stakeholder workshop which brought together participants from both groups
Mukheibir, P. & Abeysuriya, K. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2013, Multi-criteria decision support framework for the Lower Hunter Water Plan: Process, options and portfolio assessments, Sydney, Australia.
Howe, C.A., Mukheibir, P. & Gallet, D. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2013, Institutional issues for green-grey infrastructure based on integrated 'One Water' management and resource recovery: Literature Review, Sydney, Australia.
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Institute for Sustainable Futures Australian Water Recycling Centre of Excellence 2013, Building industry capability to make recycled water investment decisions.
Murta, J., Gero, A., Kuruppu, N. & Mukheibir, P. Institute for Sustainable Futures, University of Technology Sydney 2012, Enhancing adaptive capacity of small to medium enterprises - Background Report (draft), pp. 1-43, Sydney, Australia.
Lederwasch, A.J. & Mukheibir, P. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2012, Independent review of the Coalpac environmental assessment, pp. 1-33, Sydney, Australia.
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Mukheibir, P. & Boyle, T.M. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2012, Review of the Integrated Supply-Demand Planning Model for Hunter Water Corporation's Demand Forecast, pp. 1-50, Sydney.
Gero, A., Kuruppu, N. & Mukheibir, P. Institute for Sustainable Futures, University of Technology, Sydney 2012, Cross-scale barriers to climate change adaptation in local government, Australia - Draft background report, pp. 1-35, Sydney.
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Murta, J., Milne, G.R., Turner, A.J., White, S., Harris, S.M. & Mukheibir, P. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2012, Options to improve the water and energy efficiency of existing evaporative air conditioners, pp. 1-47, Sydney.
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Murta, J., Milne, G.R., Turner, A.J., White, S., Harris, S.M. & Mukheibir, P. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2012, Water and energy use efficiency of evaporative air conditioners: Stage 1 - scoping study, Sydney, Australia.
Mukheibir, P. & Giurco, D. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2011, Understanding apparent water losses through non-registration of domestic meters: The relevance for non-revenue water and meter replacement policies, pp. 1-24, Sydney.
Mukheibir, P. & Mitchell, C.A. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2011, Planning for resilient water systems - a water supply and demand investment options assessment framework, pp. 1-37, Sydney.
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The Managing Directors of the four Melbourne water businesses have set out a clear vision for the future role of water in shaping a sustainable, liveable, prosperous and healthy city. The Melbourne Water Supply Demand Strategy (WSDS) is a 50-year strategy to balance the supply of water to meet Melbourne's consumptive, environmental, industrial and agricultural water needs. The strategy examines long-term future supply augmentations for the city. The last Melbourne WSDS was completed in 2006. The next Melbourne WSDS is due for completion in March 2012, and is one of the key mechanisms through which the Managing Directors' vision can be achieved. The Institute for Sustainable Futures was contracted by the Smart Water Fund to develop an options assessment framework for the preparation of water supply demand investment strategies, including the forthcoming WSDS, that will meet the MDs' broad vision. This options assessment framework brief indicates there is now widespread recognition across the Melbourne water businesses that a generational shift is required away from conventional deterministic planning towards more flexible and adaptive planning and management. This shift is being driven by the need to maintain water security in the face of increasing uncertainty in key determinants of water businesses, as well as by increasing determination to broaden the objectives that a water system should meet. For example, the recent dry period highlighted that the role of water in a city is wider than that of a commodity. In addition, feedback from key city stakeholders indicates that there is an opportunity for the water sector to play a larger role in actively shaping the future of our city.
Mukheibir, P. 2009, Vulnerability–Adaptation–Energy Resilience: Indicators and Methodology for Adaptation Projects that reinforce Energy Systems Resilience: UGANDA.
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Ziervogel, G., Johnston, P.A., Walawege, R., Matthew, M. & Mukheibir, P. Climate Systems Analysis Group, University of Cape Town and Wannon Water, Australia 2008, Using enhanced knowledge of climate variability for the benefit of water resource management, South Africa.
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Mukheibir, P. 2007, A preliminary assessment of energy and ecosystem resilience in ten African countries.
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