UTS site search

Associate Professor Matthew Kearney

Biography

Kearney is an Associate Professor in the area of ICT in Education. His scholarly interests focus on innovative technology-based learning in K-12 and teacher education contexts (see full list of Kearney's publications).

He teaches across two programs in The School of Education, coordinating ICT in Education subjects in the BABEd and MTeach (Sec). He has led or participated in numerous funded research projects investigating pedagogical practices with emerging learning technologies (see Research tab). He is currently a chief investigator on an ARC Discovery Grant, Optimising Mobile Learning in Maths and Science; and also part of an Erasmus+ funded project, Mobilising and Transforming Teacher Education Pedagogies, exploring the use of mobile technologies in teacher education.

Kearney has worked full-time in Education for 30 years. He has been a staff member in UTS: Education and the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences since joining UTS in March 1999.

Citations: via Google Scholar
Publications via ORCID
Diigo: mkearneypost
Twitter: mkearneypost
Wiki: An Introduction to the World of ICT in Education (for prospective teachers)
Skype: matthewk456

Image of Matthew Kearney
Associate Professor, Teacher Education Program
BSc (Syd), GradcertHEd (UTS), GradDipEd (SCAE), MEd (Syd), PhD (Curtin)
 
Phone
+61 2 9514 5165

Research Interests

Kearney’s research and development interests are in the area of technology-enhanced learning in K-12 and teacher education contexts. His work focuses on two areas:

  1. Pedagogical practices with new and emerging learning technologies;
  2. Development and use of technology-enhanced learning designs.

Kearney has published widely in high ranking journals such as the Australasian Journal of Educational Technology and Computers and Education. He is currently a chief investigator on an ARC Discovery Grant, Optimising Mobile Learning in Maths and Science; and also part of an Erasmus+ funded project, Mobilising and Transforming Teacher Education Pedagogies, exploring the use of mobile technologies in teacher education.

Citations: via Google Scholar
Publications via ORCIDS
Full list of Kearney's publications

Can supervise: Yes
PhD

Kearney has coordinated and taught in several core and elective ICT in Education subjects, mainly in the BABEd and MTeach(sec) teacher education programs. He also has coordinated and taught in educational technology subjects in the MEd programs as well as teaching short courses for practising teachers.

2017 Teaching
021702 ICT in Primary Education: Current Issues and Applications
012233 Professional Experience 3: Integrating Learning Technologies
013002 Designing Learning for a Digital Generation

These subjects provide an opportunity for prospective teachers to reflect on their beliefs about the nature of learning and their own notions of teaching. Experiences in these subjects are designed to help students to further develop these views and understand the role of digital technologies in enhancing pedagogy. Student teachers enrolled in these subjects arrive with a wide range of experiences with technology and come with a variety of perceptions of how ICTs can be used in education. They further develop their understandings of potential approaches to using technologies to enrich physical and virtual learning environments. In a dynamic field that changes so rapidly each year, these subjects provide career-long professional learning strategies for teachers to keep up to date with  new and emerging digital pedagogies.

Other teaching activities include research supervision and assessment of Doctoral, Masters and BABEd (Honours) theses and tertiary supervisor of practicum students.

Citations: via Google Scholar
Publications via ORCID
Skype: matthewk456
Diigo: mkearneypost
Twitter: mkearneypost
Wiki: An Introduction to the World of ICT in Education (for prospective teachers)

Chapters

Kearney, M.J., Pressick-Kilborn, K.J. & Aubusson, P.J. 2016, 'Students' use of digital video in contemporary science teacher education' in Hoban, G., Nielsen, W. & Shepherd, A. (eds), Student-generated Digital Media in Science Education: Learning, explaining and communicating content, Routledge, UK, pp. 136-147.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Burden, K. & Kearney, M.D. 2016, 'Conceptualising Authentic Mobile Learning' in Mobile Learning Design, Springer, Germany, pp. 27-42.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Conventional accounts of authentic learning focus on contextual factors: tasks, processes, how situated the learning is and the extent to which learners engage in simulated or participative real-world activities. This paper theorises how ubiquitous mobile technologies are fracturing the boundaries that demarcate traditional accounts of authentic learning affording new opportunities to reconceptualise what authenticity means for learners when they use a boundary object such as a mobile device. Whilst some of this has been captured previously with terms like 'seamless', 'contextualised' and 'agile' learning, this paper argues that the concept of authentic mobile learning is a highly fluid construct which will continue to change as the technologies develop and as the pedagogical affordances become better understood by educators and end-users. The paper offers a three-dimensional model of authentic mobile learning and argues that further empirical research is required to understand what is authentic mobile learning from the perception of learners.
Aubusson, P.J., Griffin, J.M. & Kearney, M.D. 2012, 'Learning beyond the classroom: Implications for school science' in Fraser, B.J., Tobin, K. & McRobbie, C.J. (eds), The second international handbook of science education, Springer, Dordrecht; London, pp. 1123-1134.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Young people learn outside school, beyond the classroom. Much of the science that they learn comes from relatively informal experiences. The ideas and thinking that derive from daily experiences, conversations, curiosity, watching and listening are difficult to trace. However, we are fortunate that there is a significant body of research that has investigated the learning experiences of children and adolescents in a variety of settings beyond the classroom. These are sometimes referred to as informal settings but many include a variety of activities ranging from relatively formal and structured to entirely informal and ad hoc. We believe that much can be learned from a consideration of the way children and adolescents operate in these settings and that the patterns of engagement that have been observed have deep, fundamental implications for learning in science classrooms. It is impossible here to consider all the various fields in which learning beyond the classroom occurs.
Kearney, M.D., Young, K.A. & Prescott, A.E. 2009, 'Investigating Prospective Teachers as Learning Design Authors' in Lockyer, L., Bennett, S., Agostinho, S., Harper, B., Wollongong, U.O. & Australia (eds), Handbook of Research on Learning Design and Learning Objects: Issues, Applications, and Technologies, IGI Global, Hershey, USA, pp. 263-281.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
This chapter reports on findings from a recent project situated in the area of preservice teacher education. The project investigated prospective teachers authoring and using their own contextualised learning designs. The chapter describes how 17 secondary and primary preservice teachers adapted existing, well-researched learning strategies to inform the design of their own specific online learning tasks and how they implemented these tasks in the context of their teaching practicum. The prospective teachers used an online learning design authoring system as a tool and flexible `test-bed for their learning designs and implementation. An account of the ways in which the prospective teachers developed sophisticated understandings of their chosen learning strategy and developed fresh insights into online and face-toface teaching issues is presente

Conferences

Bano, M., Zowghi, D. & Kearney, M. 2017, 'Feature Based Sentiment Analysis for Evaluating the Mobile Pedagogical Affordances of Apps', World Conference on Computers in Education (WCCE) 2017, Springer, Dublin, Ireland.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
The launch of millions of apps has made it challenging for teachers to select the most suitable m-learning app for their teaching purposes. Several evaluation frameworks have been proposed in the research literature to assist teachers in selecting the right apps for their needs. This paper presents an innovative technique for evaluating educational mobile apps by analysing the feedback of past app users through the lens of a mobile pedagogical perspective. We have utilized a sentiment analysis tool to assess the opinions of the app users against the criteria offered by a rigorous mobile learning pedagogical framework. The investigation has provided initial confirmation of the powerful utility of the feature based sentiment analysis technique for evaluating the mobile pedagogical affordances of learning apps.
Kearney, M.D., Pressick-Kilborn, K.J. & Maher, D. 2012, 'Driving Pre-Service Science Teachers' TPACK Development Through Their Generative Use Of Digital Video', Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2012, Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2012, AACE., Austin, Texas, US, pp. 1381-1388.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
An emerging body of literature explores the benefits of prospective science teachers creating and sharing digital video in their professional learning activities. A common theme is the facilitation of reflection on experience and a range of other potential professional teaming benefits. This paper takes a snapshot of current developments with teacher-generated digital video tasks in teacher education with a focus on pre-service science teachers' technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) development. The paper draws on preliminary analysis of data from one of the 39 teacher preparation institutions participating in The Teaching Teachers for the Future (TTF) project, funded by the Australian Government.
Kearney, M.D. 2012, 'How iVideos Inspire Teacher Learning.', Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2012, Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2012, AACE., Austin, Texas, US, pp. 1389-1396.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
This paper reports on the findings of a study investigating the efficacy of learner-generated 'Ideas Video' tasks in pre-service teacher education. It explores the experiences of student teachers and their lecturer interacting with this succinct, advocacy-style video genre. The findings indicate this immersive task, modelling a design-based pedagogy involving student teachers as filmmakers, leveraged rich outcomes in relation to their professional knowledge, beliefs and competency development. The study adds to the growi ng literature base espousing the significant roles of learner-generated digital video projects in teacher education.
Kearney, M.D., Jones, G.C. & Roberts, L. 2011, 'An emerging learning design for student-generated 'iVideos'', Proceedings of the 6th International LAMS & Learning Design Conference 2011: Learning design for a changing world, International LAMS Conference, LAMS Foundation, Macquarie University, Sydney, pp. 117-127.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
This paper describes an emerging learning design for a popular genre of learner-generated video projects: Ideas Videos or iVideos. These advocacy-style videos are short, two-minute, digital videos designed âto evoke powerful experiences about educative ideasâ (Wong, Mishra, Koehler & Siebenthal, 2007, p1). We draw on a recent study in teacher education to present a structured description of a pedagogical approach to iVideo filmmaking. A visual learning design representation (Agostinho, Harper, Oliver, Hedberg & Wills, 2008) and a LAMS-based generic learning design template (Cameron, 2008) form part of this description.
Schuck, S.R., Aubusson, P.J., Kearney, M.D. & Burden, K. 2010, 'Mobagogy - mobile learning for a higher education community', Mobile Learning 2010 Proceedings, International Association for Development of the Information Society International Conference, International Association for Development of the Information Society (IADIS), Porto, Portugal, pp. 69-76.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
This paper reports on a project in which a learning community of higher educators was formed to investigate how best to use mobile technologies in their own learning and teaching. Activities of this group included investigating best practice approaches by interviewing experts in the field, exploring the literature on mobile learning and then initiating and testing some mobile learning pedagogies in the context of their own higher education subjects. The community met regularly to discuss emerging issues and applications. The paper shares some of the findings gained both from the expert interviews and from the experiences of members of the community, and discusses the challenges and constraints that were experienced. We conclude with recommendations for promoting mobile learning communities in higher education.
Kearney, M.D., Schuck, S.R. & Burden, K. 2010, 'Locating mobile learning in the third space', Conference Proceedings MLearn 2010 Mobile Learning, MLearn Mobile Learning, University of Malta, Valetta, Malta, pp. 108-115.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
The paper provides a framework for mobile learning that highlights three key features characterising such learning. These features are authenticity, social interactivity and customisation. The features were suggested through their presence in two mobile learning projects, Mobagogy, a project in which a higher education learning community developed understanding of mobile learning and The Bird in the Hand Project, which explored the use of smartphones by trainee teachers and their mentors.
Kearney, M.D. 2009, 'Investigating Digital Storytelling and Portfolios in Teacher Education', Proceedings of World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecommunications 2009, Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications, AACE, Honolulu, USA, pp. 1987-1996.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
This paper explores connections between digital storytelling and learning portfolios in the context of pre-service teacher education. It examines the potential role of digital stories in supporting the presentational functions and reflective processes inherent in portfolio tasks. Eleven prospective primary teachers participated in this completed study by incorporating their own digital story as an integral part of their learning portfolio. Their digital stories helped the student teachers to present their learning journey in compelling ways and enhanced synthesis and analysis of the learning experiences associated with their portfolio artefacts. The digital stories also became an object of reflection in their own right.
Kearney, M.D. 2009, 'Towards a learning design for student-generated digital storytelling.', Proceedings of the The Future of Learning Design conference, The Future of Learning Design conference, University of Wollongong, University of Wollongong, pp. 25-39.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
The literature on digital video in education often emphasises the use of pre-fabricated, instructional style video assets. Learning designs for supporting the use of these expert-generated video products have been developed (e.g. Burden & Atkinson, 2008). However, there has been a paucity of pedagogical frameworks for facilitating learner-generated video projects. This paper outlines an emerging learning design for a popular genre: learner-generated digital storytelling.
Schuck, S.R., Kearney, M.D. & Aubusson, P.J. 2008, 'Education, opportunities and challenges for generation OurSpace: Taming the beast', Proceedings of Ed-Media 2008 world conference on educational multimedia, hypermedia and telecommunications, Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications, Association for the advancement of computing in education (AACE), Vienna, Austria, pp. 5804-5811.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
The paper discusses the opportunities and challenges presented for current notions of schooling by adolescent online cultures. Young people are increasingly active Web 2.0 users and their interactions through these technologies are altering their social identities, styles of learning, and exchanges with others around the world. The paper argues for the need for more research to investigate this phenomenon through the use of virtual ethnography and identifies the ethical challenges that lie therein. It raises questions for school education and presents an argument for the need to study the area in culturally sensitive ways that privilege adolescents voices.
Schuck, S.R. & Kearney, M.D. 2007, 'Disruptive or Compliant? The impact of two educational technologies on pedagogy.', Proceedings of Ed-media 2007 World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecommunications, Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications, Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, pp. 2619-2626.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
In this paper, we discuss the fit between educational technologies and teacher views and pedagogies in light of two recently completed research projects. These studies focused on observed pedagogies associated with the classroom-based use of two learning technologies: (student-generated) digital video, and interactive whiteboards (IWBs). The paper considers the use of these two learning technologies from a socio-cultural perspective that recognizes that the nature of tools and the nature of societal use of these tools are mutually dependent. We raise questions of how the inherent nature of different technologies might shape different learning experiences and outcomes, and whether certain technologies fit better with some pedagogical approaches than others.
Kearney, M.D. & Young, K.A. 2007, 'An emerging learning design based on analogical reasoning', Proceedings of the 2nd International LAMS Conference 2007, International LAMS Conference, LAMS Foundation, Macquarie University, Sydney, pp. 51-61.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
This paper presents a beta version of a generic learning design based on analogical reasoning. The value of applying principles of analogical reasoning, informed by key literature, is explored. The need to work collaboratively, not only with field experts but also teachers themselves is also discussed. This relationship is evidenced through the contribution of pre-service teacher participants who took part in a recent study which focused on their experiences in designing and implementing a learning design based on well researched learning strategies. Participants chose to implement their own contextualised analogical reasoning online tasks in school-based learning environments and the crucial role of the teacher to facilitate learning of target concepts is highlighted.
Kearney, M.D. & Young, K.A. 2007, 'Pre-Service teachers' perceptions of LAMS as a teaching tool.', ICT: Providing choices for learners and learning. Proceedings of ASCILITE Singapore 2007, Annual Conference of the Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education, Centre for Educational Development, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Centre for Educational Development, Nanyang Technological University,Singapore, pp. 490-499.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
This paper reports on one component of a recent study which examined pre-service teachers' use of the Learning Activity Management System (LAMS) to facilitate their professional learning. Over a period of two semesters, seventeen pre-service teachers took part in an in depth study of their professional development as a result of authoring a learning design and implementing it during their practicum. This paper reports on the pre-service teachers' perceptions of LAMS' useability, flexibility and potential for use in K-12 classrooms.
Kearney, M.D. & Schuck, S.R. 2005, 'Students in the Director's Seat', Proceedings of Ed-Media 2005, Ed-Media, AACE, Montreal, pp. 2864-2871.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Schuck, S.R. & Kearney, M.D. 2005, 'Teachers as producers, students as directors: why teachers use student-generated digital video in their classes', Proceedings of the Apple University Consortium Conference, Apple University Consortium Academic and Developers Conference, Apple Computer Australia, Hobart, Australia, pp. 1-13.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
New developments with digital video and editing software have facilitated the use of student-generated video to enhance teaching and learning. The project discussed in this paper investigated the value of such use for enhancing pedagogy in K-12 schools. The collaborative project between academics from a NSW university and Apple Computer Australia identified, examined and analysed pedagogical practices in relation to use of this technology in five case schools. This paper will focus on the perspectives of the teachers in the study and their rationale for using student-generated digital video in their classrooms. It will also analyse important contextual factors in the schools which contributed to successful practices with digital video.
Kearney, M.D. & Schuck, S.R. 2004, 'Authentic learning through the use of digital video', 'Research, Reform, Realise the potential?' ACEC2004, Australasian Computing Education Conference, Australian Council for Computers in Education, Adelaide, Australia, pp. 1-7.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Schuck, S.R. & Kearney, M.D. 2004, 'Digital video as a tool in research projects: Zooming in on current issues', Proceedings of Ed-media 2004 World Conference on educational multimedia, hypermedia and telecommunications, Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications, AACE, Lugano, Switzerland, pp. 2085-2092.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Kearney, M.D. & Schuck, S.R. 2003, 'Focus on pedagogy: the use of digital video and iMovie in K-12 schools', Proceedings of the Apple University consortium conference, Apple University Consortium Academic and Developers Conference, Apple Computer Australia, Adelaide, Australia, pp. 1-9.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Kearney, M.D. & Treagust, D.F. 2000, 'An investigation of the classroom use of POE computer tasks designed to elicit & promote discussion of students' conceptions of force & motion', NARST 2000, NARST, New Orleans, USA, pp. 0-0.
Kearney, M.D. & Treagust, D.F. 2000, 'Constructivism as a referent in the design & development of a computer program using interactive digital video to enhance learning in physics', ASCILITE 2000, Annual Conference of the Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education, Southern Cross university, Coffs Harbour, Australia, pp. 57-68.

Journal articles

Schuck, S.R., Kearney, M. & Burden, K.J. 2017, 'Exploring mobile learning in the Third Space', Technology, Pedagogy and Education, vol. 26, no. 2, pp. 121-137.
View/Download from: Publisher's site
Mobile learning is enabling educators and students to learn in ways not previously possible. The ways that portable, multi-functional mobile devices can untether the learner from formal institutional learning give scope for learning to be conceptualised in an expanded variety of places, times and ways. In this conceptual article the authors articulate this notion by using the metaphor of the Third Space to envision what can be achieved with mobile learning. They outline their use of the metaphor, consider how it extends notions of twenty-first century learning and use a previously established Mobile Pedagogical Framework to provide a context for the discussion. They conclude with implications of learning in the Third Space for teachers and students. These implications suggest that roles of teachers and students and structure of the curriculum need to change to ensure we leverage the potential of mobile learning.
Burden, K. & Kearney, M. 2016, 'Future Scenarios for Mobile Science Learning', Research in Science Education, vol. 46, no. 2, pp. 287-308.
View/Download from: Publisher's site
© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.This paper adopts scenario planning as a methodological approach and tool to help science educators reconceptualise their use of mobile technologies across various different futures. These 'futures' are set out neither as predictions nor prognoses but rather as stimuli to encourage greater discussion and reflection around the use of mobile technologies in science education. Informed by the literature and our empirical data, we consider four alternative futures for science education in a mobile world, with a particular focus on networked collaboration and student agency. We conclude that 'seamless learning', whereby students are empowered to use their mobile technologies to negotiate across physical and virtual boundaries (e.g. between school and out-of-school activities), may be the most significant factor in encouraging educators to rethink their existing pedagogical patterns, thereby realizing some of the promises of contextualised participatory science learning.
Kearney, M.D., Burden, K. & Rai, T. 2015, 'Investigating teachers' adoption of signature mobile pedagogies', Computers & Education, vol. 80, pp. 48-57.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
This study investigated how teachers are using distinctive pedagogical features of mobile learning: collaboration, personalisation and authenticity. The researchers developed and validated a survey instrument based on these three established constructs (Kearney, Schuck, Burden, & Aubusson, 2012) and used it to interrogate current mobile learning practices in school and university education. This paper focuses on data from school teachers (n = 107). Findings indicated that teachers' perceptions of authenticity were high but aspects of online collaboration, networking and student agency were rated surprisingly lower than expected, given the rhetoric about enhanced connection and flexible learning opportunities afforded by mobile technologies. Device ownership was identified as one factor influencing adoption of these mobile pedagogies. Implications for effective use of handheld devices in teaching are addressed.
Aubusson, P.J., Burke, P.F., Schuck, S.R., Kearney, M.D. & Frischknecht, B.D. 2014, 'Teachers Choosing Rich Tasks: The Moderating Impact of Technology on Student Learning, Enjoyment and Preparation', Educational Researcher, vol. 43, no. 5, pp. 219-229.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Kearney, M.D. 2013, 'Learner-generated digital video: Using ideas videos in teacher education', Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, vol. 21, no. 3, pp. 321-336.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
This qualitative study investigates the efficacy of Ideas Videos (or iVideos) in pre-service teacher education. It explores the experiences of student teachers and their lecturer engaging with this succinct, advocacy-style video genre designed to evoke emotions about powerful ideas in Education (Wong, Mishra, Koehler, & Siebenthal, 2007). The findings indicate this generative task, involving student teachers as filmmakers, leveraged rich outcomes in relation to their professional knowledge development. The study adds to the growing literature base espousing the significant roles of learner-generated digital video projects in teacher education.
Kearney, M.D. & Maher, D. 2013, 'Mobile learning in Maths teacher education: Using Ipads to support pre-service teachers' professional development', Australian Educational Computing, vol. 27, no. 3, pp. 76-84.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
An emerging body of literature explores mobile learning in teacher education contexts. A common theme is the facilitation of collaborative, authentic professional learning experiences, often leveraged by the immediate and spontaneous nature of learning in informal settings. This paper takes a snapshot of current developments with mobile learning in teacher education. It draws on analysis of data from a study investigating mobile learning approaches in this context, with a particular focus on pre-service Maths teachers professional development. The study was developed as part of our institutions activities in the national Teaching Teachers for the Future (TTF) project.
Schuck, S.R., Aubusson, P.J., Kearney, M.D. & Burden, K. 2013, 'Mobilising teacher education: A study of a professional learning community', Teacher Development, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 1-18.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
This paper reports on a study of a community of university educators that investigated the introduction of mobile technologies into their learning and teaching. The study was conducted by a subgroup of that community. Given the ubiquity of mobile devices, members of the community felt they needed to develop expertise in mobile learning so that they could incorporate it into their teaching. They studied their own learning, supported by a critical friend who evaluated the community's functioning and activities, providing valuable feedback. Activities of this group were informed by and focused on: development of awareness of the potential of mobile devices for learning; construction of action plans within the community; and implementation of these plans. They also included investigating best-practice approaches by interviewing experts in the field, exploring the literature on mobile learning and then initiating and testing some mobile learning pedagogies in the context of their own teacher education subjects. The community met regularly to discuss emerging issues and applications. The paper shares some of the findings gained from studying the community, and discusses the challenges and constraints that were experienced. The authors conclude with recommendations for professional learning communities aiming to learn about technology-mediated teaching practices.
Kearney, M.D., Schuck, S.R., Burden, K. & Aubusson, P.J. 2012, 'Viewing mobile learning from a pedagogical perspective', ALT-J, Research in learning technology, vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 1-17.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Mobile learning is a relatively new phenomenon and the theoretical basis is currently under development. The paper presents a pedagogical perspective of mobile learning which highlights three central features of mobile learning: authenticity, collaboration and personalisation, embedded in the unique timespace contexts of mobile learning. A pedagogical framework was developed and tested through activities in two mobile learning projects located in teacher education communities: Mobagogy, a project in which faculty staff in an Australian university developed understanding of mobile learning; and The Bird in the Hand Project, which explored the use of smartphones by student teachers and their mentors in the United Kingdom. The framework is used to critique the pedagogy in a selection of reported mobile learning scenarios, enabling an assessment of mobile activities and pedagogical approaches, and consideration of their contributions to learning from a socio-cultural perspective.
Kearney, M.D., Jones, G.C. & Roberts, L. 2012, 'An emerging learning design for student-generated iVideos.', Teaching English with Technology, vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 103-120.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
This paper describes an emerging learning design for a popular genre of learner-generated video projects: Ideas Videos or iVideos. These advocacy-style videos are short, two-minute, digital videos designed " to evoke powerful experiences about educative ideas" (Wong, Mishra, Koehler & Siebenthal, 2007, pi). We draw on a recent study in teacher education to present a structured description of a pedagogical approach to iVideo filmmaking. A visual learning design representation (Agostinho, Harper, Oliver, Hedberg & Wills, 2008) and a LAMS-based generic learning design template (Cameron, 2008) form part of this description.
Kearney, M.D. 2011, 'A Learning Design For Student-Generated Digital Storytelling', Learning, Media and Technology, vol. 36, no. 2, pp. 169-188.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
The literature on digital video in education emphasises the use of pre-fabricated, instructional-style video assets. Learning designs for supporting the use of these expert-generated video products have been developed. However, there has been a paucity o
Schuck, S.R., Aubusson, P.J. & Kearney, M.D. 2010, 'Web 2.0 in the classroom? Dilemmas and opportunities inherent in adolescent web 2.0 engagement.', Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education (CITE), vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 234-246.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
The paper discusses the implications of the current phenomenon of adolescent engagement in digital spaces. Young people are increasingly active Web 2.0 users, and their interactions through these technologies are altering their social identities, styles of learning, and exchanges with others around the world. The paper argues for more research to investigate this phenomenon through the use of virtual ethnography and identifies the ethical challenges that lie therein. It raises questions for school education and presents an argument for studying the area in culturally sensitive ways that privilege adolescents voices.
Kearney, M.D. & Schuck, S.R. 2008, 'Exploring pedagogy with interactive whiteboards in Australian schools', Australian Educational Computing, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 8-13.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
This research project investigated the use of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) in K-12 education. Exploration of the use of IWBs in six different school settings provided insights into the activities, approaches, roles and beliefs of students and teachers in a range of primary and secondary class contexts and discipline areas. The study was informed by socio-cultural theory and a major focus was on the interactions between the new technology, pedagogy and the social conditions of the classroom. The findings presented in this paper focus on the pedagogical aspects of using IWBs that emerged from the study.
Schuck, S.R. & Kearney, M.D. 2008, 'Classroom-based use of two educational technologies: A sociocultural perspective', Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education (CITE), vol. 8, no. 4, pp. 1-10.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
This paper describes the fit between educational technologies and teacher views and pedagogies in light of two recently completed research projects. These studies focused on observed pedagogies associated with the classroom-based use of two learning technologies: digital video (student-generated), and interactive whiteboards. The paper considers the use of these two technologies from a sociocultural perspective, recognizing that the nature of tools and the nature of societal use of these tools are mutually dependent. Questions are raised about how the inherent nature of different technologies might shape different learning experiences and outcomes and whether certain technologies fit better with some pedagogical approaches than others.
Schuck, S.R. & Kearney, M.D. 2006, 'Capturing learning through student-generated digital video', Australian Educational Computing, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 15-20.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Schuck, S.R. & Kearney, M.D. 2006, 'Using digital video as a research tool: Ethical issues for researchers', Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia, vol. 12, no. 4, pp. 447-463.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Kearney, M.D. & Schuck, S.R. 2006, 'Spotlight on authentic learning: Student developed digital video projects', Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 189-208.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Kearney, M.D. 2006, 'Prospective science teachers as e-learning designers', Australian Journal of Educational Technology, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 229-250.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Kearney, M.D. 2004, 'Classroom use of multimedia-supported predict-observe-explain tasks in a social constructivist learning environment', Research in Science Education, vol. 34, no. 4, pp. 427-453.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Kearney, M.D., Treagust, D.F., Yeo, S. & Zadnik, M. 2001, 'Student and teacher perceptions of the use of multimedia supported POE tasks to probe understanding', Research in Science Education, vol. 31, no. 4, pp. 589-615.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
This paper discusses student and teacher perceptions of a new development in the use of the predictobserveexplain (POE) strategy. This development involves the incorporation of POE tasks into a multimedia computer program that uses real-life, digital video clips of difficult, expensive, time consuming or dangerous scenarios as stimuli for these tasks. The program was created by the first author to be used by pairs of secondary physics students to elicit their conceptions of force and motion and encourage discussion about these views. In this computer learning environment, students were required to type full sentence responses that were recorded by the computer for later analysis by the researcher. Other data sources for this study included audio and video recordings of student discussions, interviews with selected students and their teachers, classroom observations, and student questionnaires. This paper will report on some findings from the study, focussing on student and teacher perceptions of the computer-mediated POE tasks. The findings have implications for the effective use of multimedia to enhance meaningful learning in science classrooms.
Kearney, M.D. & Treagust, D.F. 2001, 'Constructivism as a referent in the design and development of a computer program using interactive digital video to enhance learning in physics', Australian Journal of Educational Technology, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 64-79.
This paper describes the fruitful interaction between educational research on constructivism and the development and use of a multimedia computer program. The software uses interactive digital video clips to present sixteen real world demonstrations to Physics students. It is designed to be used by pairs of students to elicit their pre-instructional conceptions of Force and Motion and encourage discussion about these views. A predict-observe-explain (POE) strategy is used to structure the learners engagement with the video clips. The choice and sequence of the video clips, as well as the multiple choice options available to students in the prediction phase of each task was informed by misconception research in physics education. All multiple choice selections and written responses made by users are recorded automatically in a text file on the computer hard drive

Reports

Schuck, S.R., Aubusson, P.J., Kearney, M.D., Frischknecht, B.D. & Burke, P.F. University of Technology, Sydney 2012, Choice at the pedagogy-technology interface: Interactive whiteboards for learning, pp. 1-123, Sydney.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Schuck, S.R. & Kearney, M.D. NSW Department of Education and Training 2007, Exploring pedagogy with interactive whiteboards: A case study of six schools., pp. 1-88, Sydney, Australia.
NA
Schuck, S.R. & Kearney, M.D. UTS 2007, Exploring pedagogy with interactive whiteboards: A case study of six schools., pp. 1-113, Sydney, Australia.
This study investigated pedagogy, attitudes, and school contexts in six schools in which interactive whiteboards are being used. The research questions that guided this study are the following: ⢠What do teachers and students see as the value of using interactive electronic whiteboards in lesson designs and what beliefs do they hold about this technology and its relationship to learning and teaching? ⢠What is the role of the school in promoting innovative use of the technology? What other contextual factors constrain or enhance the use of this technology in teaching and learning? ⢠What learning outcomes are supported by the use of interactive electronic whiteboards in various Key Learning Areas? What learning tasks are associated with these outcomes? ⢠What pedagogical approaches are being used with this technology? ⢠What does reflection about good practice and insights provided by the cases suggest about principles of good practice using interactive electronic whiteboards? The study comprised a case study at multiple sites, four of them primary schools and two high schools, all in NSW. The schools were all DET schools and there were three in the metropolitan Sydney region, one in an urban area out of Sydney and two in a rural area. The study was a qualitative one, investigating perceptions and usage through interviews, focus groups, observations and document analysis.
Schuck, S.R. & Kearney, M.D. NA 2004, Students in the director's seat: Teaching and learning across the school curriculum with student-generated video., pp. i-108, NA.
NA
Kearney, M.D. & Schuck, S.R. UTS Faculty of Education (now FASS) 2004, Students in the director's seat: Teaching and learning across the school curriculum with student-generated video, pp. 108-110, Australia.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Schuck, S.R. & Kearney, M.D. UTS 2004, Students in the director's seat: Teaching and learning across the school curriculum with student-generated video., pp. 1-108, Sydney, Australia.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
This project investigated the value and use of student-generated digital video for enhancing pedagogy in K-12 schools. It aimed to identify, examine and analyse pedagogical practices in relation to use of this technology in five case schools. A further aim was to articulate the principles, contexts and approaches underlying these practices. An understanding of the practices and approaches which enhance or constrain pedagogy in these five cases will contribute to a future larger study. Principles of good practice developed in this study will be used to inform future research on models for enhancing pedagogy with digital video in education.