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Dr Kate Barclay

Biography

Kate Barclay researches the social aspects of the production and trade of food, especially fisheries in the Asia Pacific region. One current project is the sustainable development of tuna resources in the island Pacific in the context of changing governance systems and globalization, especially the opportunities and pitfalls presented by ‘ethical consumption’. Another interest is how to meaningfully integrate social factors into assessments of sustainability in fisheries. Kate has been commissioned to do research on social aspects of fisheries by several organizations including: WWF, Greenpeace, the United Nations Development Program, the European Parliament, and the Pacific Islands Forum Fisheries Agency.

Kate’s undergraduate teaching is in the International Studies program at the University of Technology Sydney. She is Course Coordinator for the Bachelor of Global Studies.

Kate also supervises higher degree research students in the areas of international development and international relations in the Asia Pacific region, and on topics relating to the social aspects of fisheries.

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS
Barclay, K., Kinch, J. In press, ‘Local Capitalisms: Sustainability in Coastal Fisheries’, in McCormack, F. and Barclay, K. (eds) Engaging with Capitalism: Cases from Oceania, Research in Economic Anthropology series, Emerald, Bingley, United Kingdom.

Barclay, K., Epstein, C. In press. ‘Securing Fish for the Nation: Food Security and Governmentality in Japan’, Asian Studies Review (part of special issue on the International Politics of Resources).

Epstein, C., Barclay, K. 2013, ‘To Shame or Not to Shame? Shaming Practices in International Politics: Australia-Japan Relations and Whales and Tuna Compared’, International Relations of the Asia Pacific 13(01): 95-123.

Barclay, K. 2012. ‘The Social in Assessing for Sustainability. Fisheries in Australia. Special issue on Measuring Social Impact’, Cosmopolitan Civil Societies: An Interdisciplinary Journal 4(3): 38-53.

Barclay, K. 2012, ‘Development and Negative Constructions of Ethnic Identity: Responses to Asian Fisheries Investment in the Pacific’, The Contemporary Pacific 24(1): 33-63.

Barclay, K. 2010, ‘Impacts of tuna industries on coastal communities in Pacific Island countries’ Marine Policy, 34(3), 406-413.

Barclay, K. 2009, ‘Ocean, Empire and Nation: Japanese Fisheries Politics’ in Ghosh, D. and Goodall, H. (eds) Water, Sovereignty, and Borders: Fresh and Salt in Asia and Oceania, Routledge, London.

Barclay, K. 2009, ‘Fish Imports’ in Bourke, R.M. and Harwood, T. (eds). Food and Agriculture in Papua New Guinea. ANU ePress, Australian National University, Canberra.

Barclay, K. 2008. A Japanese Joint Venture in the Pacific: Foreign Bodies in Tinned Tuna, Routledge, London.

Barclay, K. and Koh, S. 2008, ‘Neoliberalism in Japan’s Tuna Fisheries? A History of Government Intervention in a Food Producing Sector’ Japan Forum 20(2), 139-170.

Barclay, K. and Cartwright, I. 2007. Capturing Wealth from Tuna: Case Studies from Pacific Island Countries, Asia Pacific Press (ANU ePress), Australian National University, Canberra.

Barclay, K. 2007, ‘Western, Japanese and Islander Perceptions of Japanese Fishing Practices: Ecology and Modernization in the Pacific’, Japan Focus http://www.japanfocus.org/products/details/2508> (accessed 31 August 2007)

Koh, S. and Barclay K. 2007, ‘Traveling through Autonomy and Subjugation: Jeju Island Under Japan and Korea’ Japan Focus (accessed 16 July 2007).

Barclay, K. and Cartwright, I. 2007 ‘Governance of Tuna Industries: The Key to Economic Viability and Sustainability in the Western and Central Pacific Ocean’, Marine Policy 31, 348-358.

Barclay, K. 2006 ‘Between Modernity and Primitivity: Okinawan Identity in Relation to Japan and the South Pacific’, Nations and Nationalism 12(1), 117-138.

Barclay, K. 2004 ‘Mixing Up: Social Contact and Modernization in a Japanese Joint Venture in the Solomon Islands’, Critical Asian Studies 36(4), 507-540.

Senior Lecturer, Global Studies Program
Core Member, Cosmopolitan Civil Societies Research Centre
Associate Member, Transforming Cultures
MA (ANU), PhD (UTS)
 
Phone
+61 2 9514 1579
Room
CB10.05.422

Research Interests

Kate Barclay researches the social aspects of the production and trade of food, especially fisheries in the Asia Pacific region. One current project is the sustainable development of tuna resources in the island Pacific in the context of changing governance systems and globalization, especially the opportunities and pitfalls presented by ‘ethical consumption’. Another interest is how to meaningfully integrate social factors into assessments of sustainability in fisheries. Kate has been commissioned to do research on social aspects of fisheries by several organizations including: WWF, Greenpeace, the United Nations Development Program, the European Parliament, and the Pacific Islands Forum Fisheries Agency.

Can supervise: Yes

Book Chapters

McCormack, F. & Barclay, K.M. 2013, 'Insights on Capitalism From Oceania' in Fiona McCormack & Kate Barclay (eds), Engaging With Capitalism: Cases from Oceania, Emerald Group Publishing, United Kingdom, pp. 1-27.
View/Download from: UTSePress | Publisher's site
Purpose + The authors introduce the chapters of Engaging with Capitalism with a discussion of anthropological and other social theory about peoples+ approaches to capitalism, especially peoples with vibrant noncapitalist social systems, such as are found in Oceania. Approach + The introduction is in the form of a review of anthropological and other social theory about interactions between capitalism and noncapitalist social systems. Findings + The theoretical literature has tended to dichotomize capitalist and noncapitalist societies. While heuristically it is useful to contrast capitalist and noncapitalist social systems, in practice once societies come into the orbit of capitalism people adapt elements of capitalism to suit their aims. Furthermore, societies generally considered thoroughly capitalist also include noncapitalist features. So it is more accurate to think of societies as involving a mix of capitalism and noncapitalism, and the nature of that mix is part of what makes each society distinct. Social implications + The theoretical dichotomization of societies as capitalist or not, with capitalism understood as being universal, and noncapitalism understood in general terms such as gift economy, is prevalent in public imaginaries. Domestic social policy and international development assistance are often based on this dualistic understanding. Such programs could work better if they were based instead on an understanding that each group of people has a dynamic economic system, which includes capitalist and noncapitalist elements that interact in ways influenced by their history and locality. Value of paper + The chapter provides a conceptual scaffold for thinking about the ways people engage with capitalism.
Barclay, K.M. & Kinch, J. 2013, 'Local Capitalisms And Sustainability In Coastal Fisheries: Cases From Papua New Guinea And Solomon Islands' in Fiona McCormack & Kate Barclay (eds), Engaging With Capitalism: Cases from Oceania, Emerald Group Publishing, United Kingdom, pp. 107-138.
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Purpose + To critically assess engagements with capitalism in coastal fisheries development, considering their success or otherwise for coastal villagers. Approach + Using field research and written reports of projects and the concept of +social embeddedness+ we analyze two fisheries development projects as local instances of capitalism. Findings + Coastal peoples in the Pacific have been selling marine products for cash since the earliest days of contact with both Europeans and Asians. Since the 1970s, there have also been fisheries development projects. Both types of engagement with capitalism have had problems with commercial viability and ecological sustainability. One way to understand these issues is to view global capitalist markets as penetrating into localities through the lens of local cultures. We find, however, that local cultures are only one factor among several needed to explain the outcomes of these instances of capitalism. Other explanations include nature, national political and economic contexts, and transnational development assistance frameworks. The defining features of +local capitalisms+ thus arise from configurations of human and nonhuman, local and outside influences. Social implications + Development project design should account for local conditions including: (1) village-based socioeconomic approaches, (2) national political economic contexts, (3) frameworks that donors bring to projects, and (4) (in)effective resource management. Originality/value of paper + The chapter builds on the experience of the authors over 15 years across multiple projects. The analysis provides a framework for understanding problems people have encountered in trying to get what they want from capitalism, and is applicable outside the fisheries sector.
Barclay, K.M. 2009, 'Ocean, Empire and Nation: Japanese fisheries politics' in Ghosh, D. and Goodall, H, Hemelryk Donald, S (eds), Water, Sovereignty and Borders in Asia and Oceania, Routledge, London, UK, pp. 38-49.
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Water has been as important as land in Japanese senses of self and belonging in relation to place.' Scholar Amino Yoshihiko has proposed that ways of life revolving around the sea were at least as influential as wet rice agriculture in the historical development of Japanese cultures, and that Japanese people should be understood as being 'sea folk' (kaimin) (Amino 1994). Other scholars who have contributed to this field include Tanabe Satoru, who wrote of 'sea people' (kaijin), and proposes that the coastal peoples of Japan shared a common culture with coastal peoples in areas we now call China, Korea and Taiwan (Tanabe 1990; Habara 1949). This kaijin culture was based on shared experiences of lives lived on or ncar the sea, involving fishing, travel, trade and piracy. Marcia Yanemoto (1999) has written of Japanese imaginaries of the world in the Tokugawa era (1608-1868) through to the early modem era being made up of a 'complex web of regional and global connections' across the seas.
Bourke, R., Gibson, J., Quartermain, A., Barclay, K.M., Allen, B. & Kennedy, J. 2009, 'Food Production, Consumption and Imports' in Bourke, R. Michael; Harwood, Tracy (eds), Food and Agriculture in Papua New Guinea, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia, pp. 129-192.
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Food is made up of three major components - proteins, carbohydrates and fats and each is necessary for growth and healthy living. Although all three provide energy, carbohydrates, which consist of starches and sugars, provide the highest proportion of the food energy (or fuel) that human bodies need to function. Protein, used for building and repairing the body, comes from animal products such as meat, fish, and milk, but also from grains and vegetable foods. Small quantities of fats and oils are also important in a balanced diet. They provide more food energy per gram than either carbohydrates or protein.
Barclay, K.M. & Koh, S. 2007, 'Re-Reading the Region form the Perspective of a Travelling Society: A History of Jeju Island' in Stephanie Lawson and Wayne Peake (eds), Globalization and Regionalization: Views from the Pacific Rim, Editorial Centro Universitario De Ciencias Sociales Y Humanidades, University De Guadalajara, Guadalajara Mexico, pp. 203-240.
Barclay, K.M. & Koh, S. 2006, 'Marketization of Japanese Governance? A Case study of Long Line Tuna Fisheries' in Goodman, James (eds), Regionalization, Marketization and Political Change in the Pacific Rim, Editorial Centro Universitario De Sociales Y Humanidades (Div of University of Guadalajara Press), Guadalajara, Mexico, pp. 347-383.
Barclay, K.M. 2005, 'Mixing Up: Social Contact and Modernization in a Japanese Joint Venture in the Pacific Islands' in Barclay, K; Peake, W (eds), Globalization, Regionalization and Social Change in the Pacific Rim, Editorial Centro Univeritario de Ciencias Sociales y Humanidades, Guadaljara, Jalisco, Mexico, pp. 237-283.
Barclay, K.M. 2004, 'Regional Integration and Dis-Integration in the Pacific: Economic Articulations' in Globalization, Regionalization & Domestic Trajectories in the Pacific Rim: The Economic Impact, University of Guadalajara, University of Technology Sydney (Editorial Universitaria?), Guadalajara, Mexico, pp. 69-99.

Books

Barclay, K.M. 2013, Engaging With Capitalism: Cases from Oceania, Research in Economic Anthropology series, No. 33, Emerald, Bingley, UK.
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Barclay, K.M. 2013, Engaging with Capitalism: Cases from Oceania, Emerald, Bingley, UK.
I was co-editor with Fiona McCormack
Barclay, K.M. 2008, A Japanese Joint Venture in the Pacific: Foreign Bodies in Tinned Tuna, 1, Routledge, London, UK.
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The Japanese, and other Asians, are increasingly taking over some of the roles previously played by Europeans in the Pacific islands, which is giving rise to interesting new economic relationships, and interesting new interactions between nationalities. This book considers the role of the Japanese in the Solomon Islands, focusing in particular on a joint venture between the Japanese multinational Maruha Corporation and the Solomon Islands government, which managed a tuna fishing and processing enterprise which was a mainstay of the Solomon Islands economy from the 1970s to 2000.;It considers a range of important themes including the changing nature of colonialism, the degree to which; people's ethnic sense of self, and therefore their relationship with others, is affected by how modern (or primitive) their nation is perceived to be, and how all this relates to the development of capitalism, nationalism, and;modernity
Barclay, K.M. & Cartwright, I. 2007, Capturing Wealth From Tuna: Case studies from the Pacific, 1, Asia Pacific Press, Australia.
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Barclay, K.M. & Peake, W. 2005, Globalization, Regionalization and Social Change in the Pacific Rim, University De Guadalajara, Guadalajara.
Globalization, Regionalization and Social Change in the Pacific Rim, Guadalajara: Editorial Centro Universitario De Ciencias Sociales Y Humanidades, University De Guadalajara, 2005.
Barclay, K.M. & Cartwright, I. 2005, Capturing Wealth from Tuna: Key Issues for Pacific Island Countries, Australian Government Agency for International Development (AusAID) and the Australian Government De, Australia.
Requested by Australian Government Agency for International Development (AusAID) and the Australian Government Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry, 300+pp.

Broadcasts

Barclay, K.M. 2013, 'Japanese Fisheries Minister Hayashi announcing Japan would continue whaling and Western anti-whaling activism amounts to cultural imperialism', Interview with Genevieve Jacobs, ABC Canberra 666 (radio).
Barclay, K.M. 2012, 'Oceans and Fisheries', Praxis Discussion Series, The World Bank and Australian Government AusAID.
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Panel discussion with Michael Harte (National Manager of Marine Programmes at WWF Australia) and Chas Feinstein (Sustainable Development Leader for the World Bank in Timor-Leste, Papua New Guinea and the Pacific Islands)
Barclay, K.M. 2011, 'The Commission for the Conservation of Southern Bluefin Tuna', Interview with Sarina Locke, ABC Rural.
Barclay, K.M. 2010, 'The importance of whaling to Japan', Interview on `Afternoons with Michael Veitch+, ABC Hobart.
Barclay, K.M. 2009, 'Decision to cut Australia+s and other countries+ southern bluefin tuna quotas by 20-30%', `North and West (South Australia) Morning Show+, interview with Keiran Weir, ABC Radio.
Barclay, K.M. 2008, 'Capturing Wealth from Tuna: Case Studies from the Pacific', ++Pacific Beat ++ On the Mat++, host Jemima Garrett, ABC Radio Australia.
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Barclay, K.M. 2008, 'Interview on Japanese fisheries governance.', ++Australia Talks++, presenter Paul Barclay, ABC Radio National.
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Barclay, K.M. 2008, 'Interview on Australian government policies on whaling', Newsline, Radio Singapore International, MediaCorp Radio.
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Barclay, K.M. 2008, 'Interview on Japanese perspectives on whaling', ++Afternoon++, James Valentine, 702 ABC Radio.
Barclay, K.M. 2008, 'Interview on Sea Shepherd activists on Japanese whaling ship', Michelle Cazzulino, Daily Telegraph.
Barclay, K.M. 2008, 'Interview on anti-Australian pro-whaling Japanese piece on YouTube', Matthew Sadler, NewsRadio, ABC.
Barclay, K.M. 2008, 'Interview on Prime Minister Rudd's policy of monitoring the Japanese whaling fleet in the Southern Ocean.', National Radio News, ABC.
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Barclay, K.M. 2008, 'Interview on Japanese whaling.', ++Backchat++, Radio Television Hong Kong RTHK 3.
Barclay, K.M. 2006, 'Interview on political situation in Honiara, Solomon Islands, after Snyder Rini stepped down as Prime Minister', National Radio News, National Radio News.
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Barclay, K.M. 2006, 'Interview on political situation in Honiara, Solomon Islands, after the naming of Snyder Rini as Prime Minister', National Radio News, National Radio News.
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Barclay, K.M. 2006, 'Interview on dispute between Japanese whaling vessel and Greenpeace campaign vessel in the Southern Ocean', 7.30 Report, ABC.
The transcript of this report was picked up by international wire services; BBC (Monitoring Asia Pacific, 17/1/06), and Japan++s Kyodo News Service (Hilary Neil, 17/1/06)
Barclay, K.M. 2005, 'Japan's position in the International Whaling Commission'.
Barclay, K.M. 2005, 'Interview on Japan's position in the International Whaling Commission', 7.30 Report, ABC.
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Conference Papers

Barclay, K.M. 2012, 'Globalization and Sustainability in Canned Tuna Commodity Chains', Oceanic Conference on International Studies (biennial), Sydney University, July 2012.
Barclay, K.M. 2012, 'Green Sashimi: Governance and Sustainability in Supply Chains', Asian Studies Association of Australia (biennial conference), University of Western Sydney, July 2012.
Barclay, K.M. 2012, 'Local Capitalisms and Sustainability', Association for Social Anthropology in Oceania, Benson Hotel, Portland, Oregon, USA, February 2012.
Barclay, K.M. 2012, 'Oceanic Conference for International Studies', University of Sydney, July 2010.
Barclay, K.M. 2011, 'Engaging With Capitalism', Association for Social Anthropology in Oceania, Prince Kunio Hotel, Honolulu, USA, February 2011.
Barclay, K.M. 2011, 'UTS China Research Centre and Sydney University China Studies Centre', University of Technology Sydney, July 2011.
The International Politics of Resources: China, Japan and Korea's Demand for Energy, Minerals and Food
Barclay, K.M. 2010, 'Australia's Conflicts with Japan over Whaling and Tuna', International Seafood and Health Conference, Melbourne International Conference Centre, October 2010.
Barclay, K.M. 2010, 'Sustainability in Global Canned Tuna Commodity Chains', International Institute for Fisheries Economics and Trade, Montpellier, France, July 2010.
Barclay, K.M. 2010, 'Asian Fisheries Investment in the Pacific', Pacific-Asia Partnerships in Resource Development, Divine Word University, Madang, Papua New Guinea, October 2010.
Barclay, K.M. 2010, 'History of Tuna Fishing in the Pacific Islands', History of Marine Animal Populations research workshop, Murdoch University, June 2010.
Barclay, K.M. 2010, 'Following the Proceeds of Illegal Fishing in the Asia-Pacific', Following the Proceeds of Environmental Crime: Fish Forests and Filthy Lucre, Wollongong University, February 2010.
Barclay, K.M. 2009, 'Green Tuna: Industry Workshop on Sustainability Issues in Tuna Fishing and Trade', University of Technology Sydney, November 2009.
Barclay, K.M. 2008, 'Tuna industries development potential in Pacific Islands countries: aspirations, feasibility and influences in the WCPFC', 14th Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade 'Achieving a Sustainable Future: Managing Aquaculture, Fishing, Trade and Development', Nha Trang University, Nha Trang, Vietnam, July 2008.
Barclay, K.M., Ghosh, D. & Goodall, H. 2005, 'Water and Borders - Oceanic Cultures', Theory and Project Workshop, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, UTS, August 2005.
"Wa
Barclay, K.M. 2004, 'Research Beyond Writing: Video and Other Media', Exile and Social Change' (Institute for International Studies Annual workshop), Novotel Northbeach Wollongong NSW, December 2004.
Barclay, K.M. 2004, 'Imaginaries of the East China Sea and the History of Jeju Island', China's Provinces in Reform: Place Imaginaries, Mobilities, and the Limits of Representation, Hunter Valley NSW, June 2004.
Barclay, K.M. 2004, 'Fishing and Farming; A Comparison of the Governance of Southern Bluefin Tuna Industries in Japan and Australia', The Twelfth Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economic and Trade: IIFET 2004: What are Responsible Fisheries? Organized by the Japan International Fisheries Research Society (JIFRS), Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Japan, July 2004.
"Fishing and Farming; A Comparison of the Governance of Southern Bluefin Tuna Industries in Japan and Australia", The Twelfth Biennial Conference of the International Institute of Fisheries Economic and Trade: IIFET 2004: What are Responsible Fisheries? Organized by the Japan International Fisheries Research Society (JIFRS), Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Japan, July 26-29, 2004.
Barclay, K.M. & Koh, S. 2004, 'Re-reading the region from the perspective of a Traveling Society. A history of Jeju Island-s Economics, Politics and Culture', Regional Integration in the Pacific Rim: Imagining the Pacific, University of Guadalajar, January 2004.
Barclay, K.M. 2003, ''Good' and 'Bad' Modernities: Japanese Identity in Representations by non-Japanese', Institute for International Studies Annual Workshop (Art and Social Change), Rafferty's Resort, Lake Macquarie, December 2003.
Barclay, K.M. 2002, 'Big fish: a short history of the Southern Bluefin Tuna industry in Australia', Institute for International Studies Annual Workshop, Rafferty's Resort, Lake Macquarie, December 2002.
Barclay, K.M. 2001, 'Regional Integration and Dis-Integration in the Pacific: Economic Articulations", 'Women and Radical Social Change', Institute for International Studies Annual Research Workshop, UTS, November 2001.
Regional Integration and Dis-Integration in the Pacific: Economic Articulations", 'Women and Radical Social Change' (Institute for International Studies Annual Research Workshop), Sydney, 2001
Barclay, K.M. 2000, 'Foreign Bodies in Tinned Tuna. The Identity Relations of Economic Modernization and Double Consciousness in a Solomon Island-Japanese Joint Venture Skipjack Fishing and Processing Enterprise, Solomon Taiyo Ltd.', 6th Annual Humanities and Social Sciences Faculty Postgraduate Research Conference, UTS, September 2000.
"Foreign Bodies in Tinned Tuna. The Identity Relations of Economic Modernization and Double Consciousness in a Solomon Island-Japanese Joint Venture Skipjack Fishing and Processing Enterprise, Solomon Taiyo Ltd.", 6th Annual Humanities and Social Sciences Faculty Postgraduate Research Conference, University of Technology Sydney, 2000.
Barclay, K.M. 2000, 'Foreign Bodies in Tinned Tuna. National Identity and Double Consciousness in Processes of Economic Modernization: A Case Study', Annual International Studies Workshop, Terrigal, November 2000.
"Foreign Bodies in Tinned Tuna. National Identity and Double Consciousness in Processes of Economic Modernization: A Case Study", Annual International Studies Workshop, Terrigal, 26-28 Nov, 2000.

Journal Articles

Epstein, C. & Barclay, K.M. 2013, 'To Shame or Not to Shame? Shaming Practices in International Politics: Australia-Japan Relations and Whales and Tuna Compared', International Relations of the Asia-Pacific, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 95-123.
View/Download from: UTSePress | Publisher's site
In this article, we consider how states wield shaming strategies to `be green+ and to try to influence other states to `become green+ + environmentally responsible states. We compare Australia+Japan relations in the international politics of whales and tuna, respectively, and show that only at the level of norms and identities, rather than material interests, can two seemingly contradictory behaviors be reconciled, where a country shames another in one case (whales) and deliberately spares it from shaming in another (tuna). We argue that each issue reveals two different ways in which Australia seeks to construct itself as an environmentally responsible state, following a `preservationist+ and a `conservationist+ paradigm, respectively. We thus contribute to the constructivist understanding of the role of norms of global environmental politics and of the links between norms, identities, and the choice of shaming as an instrument of foreign policy.
Barclay, K.M. & Smith, G.K. 2013, 'Introduction: The International Politics of Resources', Asian Studies Review, vol. 37, no. 2, pp. 125-140.
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China, Japan and Korea's international relations are shaped by the fact that all three are significant importers of resources. This Introduction proposes two conceptual frameworks for understanding the politics that is taken up in the papers of this Special Issue. The first is to consider the extent to which there is an East Asian model of resource procurement. We find that there are some similarities in the approaches taken by all three countries; for example, their development assistance shares a focus on infrastructure building and a reticence to purposefully influence domestic politics. There are, however, also significant differences due in large part to the individual nature of the states as international actors. The second conceptual framework is the broad contemporary theme of the end of Western dominance of the world order. The main way this affects the international politics of resources in Northeast Asia is through the belief that the activities of those countries are threatening in some way. In some cases Northeast Asian approaches to resources are seen as a problem because they are not sufficiently liberal, whereas in others the problem is that Northeast Asian powers are seen as replacing Western powers in exploiting resource-rich developing countries
Barclay, K.M. 2013, 'Special Issue: The International Politics of Resources: China, Japan, and Korea's Demand for Energy, Minerals and Food', Asian Studies Review, vol. 37, no. 2.
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A collection of papers first presented at a research workshop hosted by the UTS China Research Centre in 2011.
Barclay, K.M. 2013, 'not ended yet', Conservation and Society.
Barclay, K.M. 2013, 'Managing Modernity in the Western Pacific by Mary Patterson and Martha Macintyre (eds)', Pacific Affairs, vol. 86, no. 1, pp. 202-204.
Barclay, K.M. & Epstein, C. 2013, 'Securing Fish for the Nation: Food Security and Governmentality in Japan', Asian Studies Review, vol. 37, no. 2, pp. 215-233.
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Concerns about supplies of food have been a feature of Japanese politics since Japan started modernising in the second half of the 1800s. It has remained a prominent political issue even after Japan cemented its status as a wealthy country in the 1980s,
Barclay, K.M. 2012, 'Development And Negative Constructions Of Ethnic Identity: Responses To Asian Fisheries Investment In The Pacific', The Contemporary Pacific A Journal of Island Affairs, vol. 24, no. 1, pp. 33-63.
View/Download from: UTSePress | Publisher's site
This article explores ethnic identities in representations of tuna fishing and canning companies in Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea. One point raised by the analysis is that while national identities in these countries are often disrupted by subnati
Barclay, K.M. 2012, 'The Social in Assessing for Sustainability: Fisheries in Australia', Cosmopolitan Civil Societies: An Interdisciplinary Journal, vol. 4, no. 3, pp. 38-53.
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The notion that sustainability rests on three pillars ' economic, environmental and social ' has been widely accepted since the 1990s. In practice, however, the economic and environmental aspects have tended to dominate the sustainability agenda, and social aspects have been sidelined. Two reasons for this are: 1) there is a lack of data collected about which to build meaningful pictures of social aspects of sustainability for populations over time, and 2) there is a lack of recognition of the role of social factors in sustainability, and a related lack of understanding of how to analyse them in conjunction with economic and environmental factors. This paper surveys the literature about sustainability in fisheries, focussing on Australia, and focussing on the way social aspects have been treated. The paper finds that the problems that have been identified for assessing the social in sustainability in general are certainly manifest in fisheries. Management of Australian fisheries has arguably made great improvements to biological sustainability over the last decade, but much remains to be done to generate similar improvements in social sustainability for fishing communities. This is the case for governmentrun resource management as well as for initiatives from the private sector and conservation organizations as part of movements for corporate social responsibility and ethical consumerism. A significant challenge for improving sustainability in Australian fisheries, therefore, lies in improving data collection on social factors, and in bridging disciplinary divides to better integrate social with economic and biological assessments of sustainability.
Barclay, K.M. 2010, 'Impacts of tuna industries on coastal communities in Pacific Island countries', Marine Policy, vol. 34, no. 3, pp. 406-413.
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Tuna fishing and processing industries have brought both a range of economic development and cultural contact opportunities to coastal communities in Pacific Island countries, and a variety of social and environmental challenges. This article outlines the main trends in the tuna industries of the region, examines the aspirations of coastal communities towards these industries, and traces actual experiences of their operations.
Barclay, K.M. 2009, 'The Last Whale by Chris Pash', Pacific Affairs, vol. 82, no. 4.
Barclay, K.M. & Koh, S. 2008, 'Neo-liberal reforms in Japan's tuna fisheries? A history of government-business relations in a food-producing sector', Japan Forum, vol. 20, no. 2, pp. 139-170.
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Neo-liberalism refers to a public policy mix that is market oriented, pro-trade liberalization and advocates minimal state intervention in the economy. Japanese governance has arguably not been based on neo-liberal principles, and some see this as contributing to Japan+s long-running recession. In 2001 Prime Minister Koizumi came to power promising neo-liberal reform. This paper presents a history of government involvement in the distant-water tuna longline industry and looks for evidence of neo-liberal reforms in fisheries, in terms both of observable changes to governance and of key stakeholders+ receptiveness to neo-liberalism as visible in their representations of issues facing tuna fisheries. We find no evidence of neo-liberal reforms in this sector, and that key stakeholders show little sympathy with neo-liberal policy prescriptions, meaning they are unlikely to champion such reforms. This conclusion may be specific to fisheries since in Japan the political importance of food production and the iconic status of fish cuisine make the sector particularly susceptible to economic and cultural nationalism. In examining relations between industry and government the paper also highlights problems in Japan+s co-management of fisheries.
Barclay, K.M. 2008, 'Asia in the Pacific Islands: Replacing the West by Ron Crocombe', Pacific Affairs, vol. 81, no. 3, pp. 499-450.
Book Review
Barclay, K.M. & Cartwright, I. 2007, 'Governance of tuna industries The key to economic viability and sustainability in the Western and Central Pacific Ocean', Marine Policy, vol. 31, no. 3, pp. 348-358.
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The Western and Central Pacific Ocean (WCPO) tuna fishery is an important global food resource, and the economies of many Pacific Islands Countries (PICs) rely heavily on tuna industries. This paper proposes that governance by PICs is the key to improvin
Barclay, K.M. 2007, 'Fishing. Western, Japanese and Islander Perceptions of Ecology and Modernization in the Pacific', Japan Focus: an Asia Pacific Journal, vol. 2007, no. 2007, pp. 1-32.
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Koh, S. & Barclay, K.M. 2007, 'Traveling through Autonomy and Subjugation: Jeju Island Under Japan and Korea', Japan Focus: an Asia Pacific Journal, vol. Online, pp. 1-13.
Barclay, K.M. 2006, 'Between modernity and primitivity: Okinawan identity in relation to Japan and the South Pacific', Nations and Nationalism, vol. 12, no. 1, pp. 97-116.
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Barclay, K.M. 2005, 'Tuna Dreams Revisited: Economic Contributions from a Tuna Enterprise in Solomon Islands', Pacific Economic Bulletin, vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 78-93.
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Barclay, K.M. 2004, 'Mixing up: Social Contact and Modernization in a Japanese Joint Venture in the Solomon Islands', Critical Asian Studies, vol. 36, no. 4, pp. 507-540.
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Chamberlain, M., Barclay, K.M., Kariminia, A. & Moyer, A. 2001, 'Aboriginal Birth: Psychosocial or Physiological Safety', Birth Issues, vol. 10, no. 3 & 4, pp. 81-85.
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The purpose of this paper is to raise awareness and stimulate discussion and research into maternity care options for Aboriginal women living in remote areas of Australia and Canada. These two countries have similar situations in that some communities are so remote that emergency medical care requires the use of aircraft. In addition, both countries have, since the 1970s, adopted policies for the transfer of mothers in late pregnancy to hospitals in urban centres. For many Aboriginal families this policy has been far from ideal. As a result, some Aboriginal women fail to seek early health care when pregnant. In order to counteract this, it is necessary to offer culturally sensitive maternity care that Aboriginal women will accept. The results of an evaluation of a birthing centre in the Canadian Arctic will be presented along with a range of birthing choices for remote area Aboriginal women and their families. Some of these options have already been initiated by some midwives. This paper challenges health service providers to identify the method of maternity health services required by Aboriginal families and provide creative solutions to meet those needs in a safe and cost effective way.
Barclay, K.M. 2000, 'Solomon Taiyo Ltd - Tuna Dreams Realized?', Pacific Economic Bulletin, vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 34-47.
Barclay, K.M. 2000, 'Psychosocial Costs of Transferring Indigenous Women from their Community for Birth', Midwifery, vol. 16, no. 0, pp. 116-122.
Barclay, K.M. & Anderson, K. 1999, 'Remaking Micronesia: Discourses Over Development In A Pacific Territory, 1944-1982 [By David Hanlon]', Journal Of Pacific History, vol. 34, no. 1, pp. 129-130.
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Barclay, K.M. 1998, 'Japan's Aid Diplomacy And The Pacific Islands, By Sandra Tarte', Journal Of Pacific History, vol. 33, no. 3, pp. 317-318.
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Media Output

Barclay, K.M. & Koh, S. 2004, 'Rich Fish: Southern Bluefin Tuna Fisheries in Japan and Australia', University of Technology, Sydney - Institute for International Studies, Broadway, NSW.
ISBN: 1-86365-865-3

Reports

Barclay, K.M. 2013, 'Transforming tuna fisheries in Pacific Island countries: an alternative model of development', Greenpeace Australia Pacific, Suva, Fiji.
View/Download from: Publisher's site
Report of case studies and recommendations based on that for improving the social responsibility and ecological sustainability of tuna fisheries in the Pacific Islands region. Mainly authored by Kate Barclay. A foreword by Greenpeace, and one section by Hannah Parris.
Barclay, K.M. 2012, 'APPLICATION OF THE SYSTEM OF DEROGATION TO THE RULES OF ORIGIN OF FISHERIES PRODUCTS IN PAPUA NEW GUINEA AND FIJI', European Parliament, Directorate-General for Internal Policies, Brussels, EU, pp. 1-254.
My part of the work was the chapter on Social Impacts (pp.155-187). I was the sole author of this section. It considers the employment provided by tuna processing factories in PNG and the way this is changing in light of the 'global sourcing' provision in the trade agreement with the EU (the 'derogation' in the report title). It considers the numbers of jobs, the conditions of employment, and other social factors related to the factories, including housing and sex work. The section asks the question whether it is better for PNG society that this industry exists than not, and finds that in light of a need for this kind of employment and a paucity of other options it is better. But that minimum wage employment in PNG does not provide a living wage, and there is much room for improvement in the social impacts of the industry.
Barclay, K.M. 2009, 'Tuna trade flows from the Coral Triangle', not published, not published.
A contract research report contracted by TRAFFIC Oceania, for WWF, for their internal campaign purposes. The report was therefore not released for public dissemination. I can supply a copy of the report to RIO/FRO for verification if needed. I was lead author on the report, with 3 other authors. The contract was administered by ACCESS UTS as a consultancy.
Barclay, K.M. 2008, 'Solomon Islands Diagnostic Trade Integration Study', Integrated Framework.
'Fisheries and Aquaculture' chapter within the larger report