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Dr Jurgen Schulte

Biography

Jurgen Schulte is an educational researcher in the Science and Mathematics Education Research and Innovation Team (SciMERIT) in the Faculty of Science at the University of Technology and recipient of the 2016 Australian Awards for University Teaching Citation. His particular interests are in learning and teaching enhancement through learning analytics, authentic learning environments and transition pedagogy.

Prior to joining UTS Jurgen was a HIVIPS Senior Researcher at HITACHI Ltd. (Tokyo, Japan) which he joined after an extensive research and teaching career at Texas A&M University (USA) and Michigan State University (USA).

Professional

Jurgen is the recipient of the Learning.Futures Award (2015) and the 2016 Australian Awards for University Teaching Citation.

He has a background in Theoretical and Experimental Nuclear Physics (MSc, Institute for Nuclear Physics, TH Darmstadt) and Nanotechnology (Dr.rer.nat. Oldenburg) with focus on industrial applications and public education. He was co-founder of the Tokyo based and Japanese government supported Asia Pacific Nanotechnology Forum, which later became instrumental in shaping Australian Nanotechnology policies and initiatives, and lead the Australian Government supported Intelligent Manufacturing Systems (IMS) initiative n-ABLE Nanotechnology in Manufacturing. He was co-founder of Hong Kong based nABACUS Ltd., a Nanotechnology investment broker specializing in early Nanotechnology startup ventures. He was co-founder of IndusMedia Pvt. Ltd. (Chennai) and IndusMedia Ltd. (San Jose), a software and Internet application developer specializing in software and internet application solutions for government and the educational sector.

In a secondary education context he was Chief Examiner and Chair of the NSW Board of Studies, Teaching and Educational Standards (BOSTES) HSC Examination Committee (Physics) 2012-2014 as well as lead the implementation of the International Baccalaureate in Mathematics and Physics at the German International School Sydney.

Image of Jurgen Schulte
Senior Lecturer, School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences
Member, A/DRsch Ctre for Real-Time Information Networks
MSc (TU Darmstadt), DSc (Oldenburg)
 
Phone
+61 2 9514 2204

Research Interests

Jurgen’s current research interest is in learning and teaching supporting learning analytics, transition pedagogy, and authentic learning environments.

He works closely with the Connected Intelligence Centre at the University of Technology Sydney and the NSW Learning Analytics Working Group (NSWLAWG).

Can supervise: Yes

Books

Schulte, J. 2005, APNF 2004 - SINC 04, Proceedings of the Asia Pacific Nanotechnology Forum, Asia Pacific Nanotechnology Forum, Sydney.
APNF 2004 - SINC 04, Proceedings of the Asia Pacific Nanotechnology Forum Proceedings of APNF 2004 conference in Shanghai, China. Vol 1 and Vol 2, 689 pages
Schulte, J. 2005, Nanotechnology: Global Strategies, Industry Trends and Applications.
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The rapid growth of miniaturisation to meet the demand for increasingly smart devices is driving global investment in a wide range of industries such as IT, electronics, energy, biotechnology and materials science. Nanotechnology: Global Strategies, Industry Trends and Applications, written by experts from Asia, Europe and the USA, gives a comprehensive and important global perspective on nanotechnology. The book is divided into 3 parts: National Nanotechnology Initiatives in Asia, Europe and the USAexplores the current status of nanotechnology in China, Korea, Europe and the USA. Investing in Nanotechnology provides practical information about the opportunities and risks involved in nanotechnology and predictions for future growth. Frontiers of Nanotechnology discusses future applications of the technology and the real-world issues surrounding these. Outlining developing trends, emerging opportunities, associated risks and future applications, this book is essential reading for professionals, prospective investors and policy makers who need an accessible introduction to the topic. © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Chapters

Schulte, J. 2011, 'The Benefits of Teaching Students the Language of Physics' in Zhang, F., Lidbury, B.A., Richardson, A.M., Yates, B.F., Gardiner, M.G., Bridgeman, A.J., Schulte, J., Rodger, J.C. & Mate, K.E. (eds), Sustainable Language Support Practises in Science Education, IGI Global, Hershey PA, USA, pp. 160-194.
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First year physics courses for non-physics majors are among the most difficult course to cope with for science and engineering students alike. Not only are students confronted with physics specific concepts and mathematics applied in unfamiliar environment, students also have to learn the specific lingo of physics and keep it separate from common language and language used in their own field of major. Anecdotally, we know that students have to master the language of their respective field of study in order to master the field. We investigated the link between language of physics used in our first year physics lectures, understanding of related physics concept, and student performance after a language focused intervention. We found that a language conscious approach in first year physics not only improved the performance of students of non-English background but also benefited the performance of students of native English speaking background.
Schulte, J. 2011, 'The benefits of teaching students the language of physics' in Sustainable Language Support Practices in Science Education: Technologies and Solutions, pp. 160-194.
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First year physics courses for non-physics majors are among the most difficult course to cope with for science and engineering students alike. Not only are students confronted with physics specific concepts and mathematics applied in unfamiliar environment, students also have to learn the specific lingo of physics and keep it separate from common language and language used in their own field of major. Anecdotally, we know that students have to master the language of their respective field of study in order to master the field. We investigated the link between language of physics used in our first year physics lectures, understanding of related physics concept, and student performance after a language focused intervention. We found that a language conscious approach in first year physics not only improved the performance of students of non-English background but also benefited the performance of students of native English speaking background. © 2012, IGI Global.
Schulte, J. 2005, 'Introduction: Movements in Nanotechnology' in Schulte, D.J. (ed), Nanotechnology - Global Strategies, Industry Trends and Applications, Wiley & Sons, New York, pp. 1-4.
Schulte, J. 2005, 'Growth through Nanotechnology - Opportunities and Risks' in Schulte, D.J. (ed), Nanotechnology - Global Strategies, Industry Trends and Applications, Wiley, New York, pp. 97-106.
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Gu, H. & Schulte, J. 2005, 'Scientific Development and Industrial Applications of Nanotechnology in China' in Schulte, D.J. (ed), Nanotechnology - Global Strategies, Industry Trends and Applications, Wiley, New York, pp. 7-24.
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Gu, H. & Schulte, J. 2005, 'Scientific Development and Industrial Application of Nanotechnology in China' in Nanotechnology: Global Strategies, Industry Trends and Applications, pp. 6-24.
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Schulte, J. 2005, 'Growth through Nanotechnology Opportunities and Risks' in Nanotechnology: Global Strategies, Industry Trends and Applications, pp. 96-105.
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Schulte, J. 1998, 'Information of Thyroxin Storage via Bipoloar Water' in Schulte, J. & Endler, P.C. (eds), Fundamental Research in Ultra High Dilutions, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, pp. 155-188.
Schulte, J. 1998, 'Fundamental Research in Ultra High Dilutions' in Schulte, J. & Endler, P.C. (eds), Fundamental Research in Ultra High Dilutions, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, pp. 3-7.
Schulte, J. 1998, 'Bio-Information between Quantum and Continuum Physics' in Schulte, J. & Endler, P.C. (eds), Fundamental Research in Ultra High Dilution and Homoeopathy, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Netherlands, pp. 45-68.
Endler, P.C., Pongratz, W., Smith, C.W., Schulte, J., Senekowitsch, F. & Citro, M. 1997, 'Non-molecular information transfer from thyroxine to frogs' in Madeleine Bastide (ed), Signals and Images, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Netherlands, pp. 149-159.
Schulte, J. & Seifert, G. 1994, 'Computer simulations of molecular collision processes' in Gentzsch, W. & Harms, U. (eds), High-Performance Computing and Networking, Springer-Verlag, Germany, pp. 226-231.

Conferences

Schulte, J., De Mendonca, P.F., Martinez-Maldonado, R. & Shum, S.B. 2017, 'Large scale predictive process mining and analytics of university degree course data', ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, pp. 538-539.
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© 2017 ACM. For students, in particular freshmen, the degree pathway from semester to semester is not that transparent, although students have a reasonable idea what courses are expected to be taken each semester. An often-pondered question by students is: "what can I expect in the next semester?" More precisely, given the commitment and engagement I presented in this particular course and the respective performance I achieved, can I expect a similar outcome in the next semester in the particular course I selected? Are the demands and expectations in this course much higher so that I need to adjust my commitment and engagement and overall workload if I expect a similar outcome? Is it better to drop a course to manage expectations rather than to (predictably) fail, and perhaps have to leave the degree altogether? Degree and course advisors and student support units find it challenging to provide evidence based advise to students. This paper presents research into educational process mining and student data analytics in a whole university scale approach with the aim of providing insight into the degree pathway questions raised above. The beta-version of our course level degree pathway tool has been used to shed light for university staff and students alike into our university's 1,300 degrees and associated 6 million course enrolments over the past 20 years.
Schulte, J. & Griffiths, N. 2016, 'Authentic Learning Experiences In A Theory Heavy Learning Context', Proceedings Of The Australian Conference On Science And Mathematics Education 2016 (22nd Annual UniServe Science Conference), Australian Conference On Science And Mathematics Education 2016 (22nd Annual UniServe Science Conference), UniServe Science, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia, Brisbane, Australia, pp. 1-6.
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Assessment in an undergraduate physics subject was re-designed to challenge and inspire students to develop and apply their disciplinary and non-disciplinary skills in a practice-based, authentic assignment task. The aims of the re-design were to expose students to workplace practice and increase their engagement in the subject. Traditionally, as a response to its emphasis on disciplinary theory, science is assessed by way of content focussed class tests and examinations, activities not reflected in workplace practice. These summative assessment types measure student attainment of knowledge rather than enable deeper understanding and learning. However, introducing students to 'real-world' practice-oriented assessment tasks can enhance student engagement and promote learning. To achieve these aims the assignment was carefully scaffolded to give students the opportunity to improve their scientific writing skills, develop an approach to systematic research, build a greater understanding of the peer-review process and acquire skills in self and team management. The task required students to work in groups to research and write a research paper based on a meta-study model. Their papers were then compiled and published in a student peer-reviewed research journal. The impact of this intervention was evaluated through a focus group discussion with the majority of the students commenting positively on their learning and engagement in the subject. This reflective article discusses the effectiveness of the assignment design, its scaffolding, the peer-review process and the authenticity of the workplace-setting. Suggestions are made as to how to further improve this type of assignment design. This workplace-focused intervention may be of interest to educators in other disciplines.
Schulte, J. & Griffiths, N. 2015, 'Learning futures: using authentic assessment to enable practice-oriented learning in Science'', International Conference: Assessment for Leaning in Higher Education, Hong Kong University, Hong Kong.
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Schulte, J. & Griffiths, N. 2015, 'Putting the Professional into Practice-based Learning', International Conference on Learning and Teaching Website, International Conference on Learning and Teaching, Temasek Learning Academy, Singapore, pp. 1-11.
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Assessment in an undergraduate physics subject was re-designed to challenge and inspire students to develop and apply their disciplinary and non-disciplinary skills in a practice-based, authentic assignment task. The aims of the re-design were to expose students to workplace practice and increase their engagement in the subject. Traditionally, as a response to its emphasis on disciplinary theory, science is assessed by way of content focussed class tests and examinations, activities not reflected in workplace practice. These summative assessment types measure student attainment of knowledge rather than enable deeper understanding and learning. However, introducing students to 'real-world' practice-oriented assessment tasks can enhance student engagement and promote learning. To achieve these aims, the assignment was carefully scaffolded to give students the opportunity to improve their scientific writing skills, develop an approach to systematic research, build a greater understanding of the peer-review process and acquire skills in self and team management. The task required students to work in groups to research and write a research paper based on a meta-study model. Their papers were then compiled and published in a student peerreviewed research journal. The impact of this intervention was evaluated through a focus group discussion, with the majority of the students commenting positively on their learning and engagement in the subject. This reflective article discusses the effectiveness of the assignment design, its scaffolding, the peer-review process and the authenticity of the workplace-setting. Suggestions are made as to how to further improve this type of assignment design. This workplace-focused intervention may be of interest to educators in other disciplines.
Schulte, J. & Pardo, A. 2015, 'ALASI 2015: Australian Learning Analytics Summer Institute', ALASI 2015: Australian Learning Analytics Summer Institute, Sydney.
Braun, M., Schulte, J. & Davila, Y.C. 2015, 'Reciprocal Peer Teaching for Problem-Solving Teams in a Senior-Year Science Course', Proceedings of the Australian Conference for Science and Mathematics Education, Australian Conference for Science and Mathematics Education 2015, The University of Sydney, Institute for Innovation in Science & Mathematics Education, Perth, Australia, pp. 13-14.
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Schulte, J. & griffiths, N. 2015, 'Learning futures: introducing authentic assessment to enable practice-oriented learning in science', International Conference on Assessment for Learning in Higher Education 2015, Hong Kong.
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Schulte, J. & Griffiths, N. 2014, 'Putting The Professional Into Practice-Based Learning', Proceedings of The Australian Conference on Science and Mathematics Education (20th Annual Uniserve Science Conference), ACSME 2014, The Australian Conference on Science and Mathematics Education, The University of Sydney, Sydney, pp. 163-169.
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Assessment in an undergraduate physics subject was re-designed to challenge and inspire students to develop and apply their disciplinary and non-disciplinary skills in a practice-based assignment task. The aims of the re-design were to expose students to workplace practice and increase their engagement in the subject. To achieve these aims the assignment was carefully scaffolded to give students the opportunity to improve their scientific writing skills, develop an approach to systematic research, build a greater understanding of the peer-review process and acquire skills in self and team management. The task required students to work in groups to research and write a research paper based on a meta-study model. Their papers were then compiled and published in a student peer-reviewed research journal. The impact of this intervention was evaluated through a focus group discussion with the majority of the students commenting positively on their learning and engagement in the subject. The effectiveness of the assignment design, its scaffolding, the peer-review process and the authenticity of the workplace-setting are discussed. Suggestions are made as to how to further improve this type of assignment design. This workplace-focused intervention may be of interest to educators in other STEM disciplines.
Schulte, J. & Hohl, M. 2014, 'First Year Pracs - What if we had a CHOICE? Creating an authentic workplace experience in a large first year subject', UTS Teaching and Learning Forum 2014, Sydney.
The presentation reports on a pilot project in the practical program of a large first year subject that received direct support by industry and provides student with an authentic learning experience. While the object of the pilot has been very specific, for the purpose of this Forum we will be focusing on two aspects which may be of interest to the larger UTS T&L community and beyond FY practical programs: 1. The process of identifying suitable industry for subject support as well as suitable industry practise for embedding authentic learning experiences, and 2. The design of student engaged learning activities to support content of practicals, subject outcomes and graduate attributes.
Schulte, J. & Griffiths, N. 2014, 'Creating an authentic learning experience: Putting the professional into practice-based learning', UTS Teaching and Learning Forum 2014, Sydney.
Assessment in a second year undergraduate physics subject was re-designed to challenge and engage students in an authentic assignment task. Students were exposed to workplace practice as the task required them to work in groups to research and write an original research paper based on a meta-study model. Peer-review and lecturer feedback sessions were built in and the final drafts were then compiled and published in a student peer-reviewed research journal. Students commented positively on their learning and engagement in the subject; they improved their scientific writing skills, developed an approach to systematic research, had a greater understanding of the peer-review process and acquired skills in self and team management.
Schulte, J. & Griffiths, N. 2014, 'PUTTING THE PROFESSIONAL INTO PRACTICE-BASED LEARNING', UTS Learning 2014 Festival, Sydney.
Hoang, D.B., Elliott, D., McKinley, S.M., Nanda, P., Schulte, J. & Duc, N.A. 2012, 'Tele-monitoring techniques to support recovery at home for survivors of a critical illness', Signal Processing and Information Technology 2012, IEEE International Symposium on Signal Processing and Information Technology, IEEE, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, pp. 1-6.
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This paper proposes and explores the design of a system that includes sensor-based procedures and techniques for remote physiological sensing and functional assessment for these individuals.
Schulte, J. 2013, 'Student engagement and learning analytics - Lecture audience response system', Faculty of Science First-Year Community of Practice Seminar Series, UTS.
Schulte, J. 2013, 'Providing individual feedback to students in large FY classes', Faculty of Science First-Year Community of Practice Seminar Series, UTS.
Schulte, J. & Griffiths, N. 2013, 'The language barrier:using concepts inventories to teach science to first-year university students', The Australian Conference on Science and Mathematics 2013, The Australian Conference on Science and Mathematics Education(The 19th UniServe Science), J Schulte, N. Griffith, Canberra, pp. 193-198.
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The effective use of language in science is a perennial topic in science education. In studying science students are confronted not only with the scientific concepts of the disciplinary area but also with its discipline specific language. In English, this challenge is compounded by the overlap in meaning between discipline specific terminology and everyday language. Science concept testing tools, which have been developed to deal with these issues, are widely used for testing understanding of science concepts. However, Science educators are facing new challenges with the increasing diversity of the student cohort accessing tertiary education. These students educational, cultural and linguistic backgrounds combined with their unfamiliarity with the academic discourse of their discipline may be an obstacle to their smooth transition. In the past, the specially written Concept Inventories supported lecturers and students in this transition but these inventories were not designed for the student cohorts of the twenty-first century. This paper reports on our study of one of the more proven concept testing tools `The Force Concept Inventory (physics) and its application in large first-year classes with non-traditional students
Schulte, J. 2012, 'Entaglement, non-locality, p-values and ultra-high dilutions', 8th AHMC Conference, Brisbane, Australia.
Schulte, J. 2012, 'The benefits of teaching non-science students the language of science', 2012 UTS Teaching and Learning Forum, UTS.
Schulte, J. & Sakaguchi, M.B. 2012, 'Reading and writing in the subject areas: Embedding academic and disciplinary language and literacies support via online materials', 2012 UTS Teaching and Learning Forum, UTS.
Schulte, J., Nguyen, V., Hoang, D.B., Elliott, D., McKinley, S.M. & Nanda, P. 2012, 'A remote sensor-based 6-minute functional walking ability test', IEEE Sensors 2012, IEEE Sensors, IEEE, Taipei, Taiwan, pp. 1-4.
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This paper proposes and implements an integrated remote sensor-based 6-minute walk test (6MWT) for monitoring a patient's clinical condition and correlate this data to the walking activity that the patient is performing to assess his/her functional ability and physical performance. The 6MWT is known to be one of the most effective rehabilitation tests for a clinician to assess individuals with a variety of clinical conditions including survivors of a critical illness. Our method deploys body sensors for measuring health conditions and an on-body accelerometer for detecting motion. An intelligent algorithm was developed to detect a walk step, count the number of steps, and dynamically derive the step distance based on an individual's real-time walking parameters. The path and the derived walk distance are then related to their vital signs to assess their functional ability under various walk conditions. Our remote 6MWT is being considered for a telehealth rehabilitation procedure in an integrated assistive healthcare system.
Hoang, D.B., Elliott, D., Mckinley, S., Nanda, P., Schulte, J. & Duc, N. 2012, 'Tele-monitoring Techniques to Support Recovery at Home for Survivors of a Critical Illness', 2012 IEEE INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON SIGNAL PROCESSING AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (ISSPIT), 12th IEEE International Symposium on Signal Processing and Information Technology (ISSPIT), IEEE, Ho Chi Minh City, VIETNAM, pp. 101-106.
Schulte, J., Roger, J., Zhang, F., Yates, B., Bridgeman, A. & Lidbury, B. 2009, 'Language difficulties in first year Science - an interim report', UniServe Science Proceedings 2009, UniServe Science, UniServe, University of Sydney, Sydney, pp. 139-145.
Schulte, J., Zhang, F., Lidbury, B., Bridgeman, A., Rodgers, J. & Yates, B. 2009, 'Embedding high impact education practices in 1st year science: outcomes and future directions', UniServe Science Proceedings, UniServe Science, UniServe, The University of Sydney, Sydney.
Schulte, J., Zhang, F., Lidbury, B., Bridgeman, A., Yates, B. & Rodger, J. 2009, 'Embedding in-discipline language support for first year students in the sciences', AUSTRALIAN ASSOCIATION FOR RESEARCH IN EDUCATION Conference 2009 (AARE 2009), AUSTRALIAN ASSOCIATION FOR RESEARCH IN EDUCATION, Canberra, pp. 1-20.
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This paper reports on a project which aims at addressing the need to cater for the language needs of a diverse student body (both domestic and international student body) by embedding strategic approaches to learning and teaching in first year sciences in tertiary education. These strategies consist of active learning skills which are widely used in language learning. The disciplines covered by the project are Biology, Chemistry and Physics and involves the University of Canberra (UC), University of Sydney (USyd), University of Tasmania (UTAS), University of Technology, Sydney (UTS) and University of Newcastle (Newcastle) in Australia. This project is funded by the Australian Learning and Teaching Council (ALTC). The paper discusses the background to the study and reports on results on the language difficulties faced by first year science student cohorts from data collected in 2008 as well as qualitative data was also collected on 2008 students' attitudes towards online science learning. It will also report on the results on the implementation of the learning strategies at UTS and UTAS in Physics and Chemistry disciplines in 2009. Keywords: First year science teaching, role of language in science teaching, active learning skills
Zhang, F., Lidbury, B., Schulte, J., Bridgeman, A., Yates, B. & Rodger, J. 2008, 'Language difficulties in first year Science', Proceedings of the Assessment in Science Teaching and Learning Symposium, Assessment in Science Teaching and Learning Symposium, UniServe, Sydney, pp. 159-164.
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A key goal of the study entitled 'A cross-disciplinary approach to language support for first year students in the science disciplines', funded by the Carrick Institute for Learning and Teaching in Higher Education, is to examine the role of language in the learning of science by first-year university students. The disciplines involved are Physics, Chemistry and Biology. This national project also aims to transfer active learning skills, which are widely used in language teaching, to the teaching of science in first year. The paper discusses the background to the study, reports on some of the preliminary results on the language difficulties faced by first year student cohorts in science from data collected in 2008, and describes the framework we have established for the organization and delivery of first year science courses to be implemented in semester one 2009.
Ostoja-Starzewski, M. & Schulte, J. 1995, 'Parallel finite difference methods for multiscale material problems', American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Applied Mechanics Division, AMD, pp. 71-79.
In this paper we discuss a parallel computer implementation of a finite difference method (equivalent to spring-networks) for elliptic-type boundary value problems. The parallelization consists in dividing the material domain into a number of connected subdomains, each of which corresponds to a single processor, and connecting them. The method is illustrated on an example of a functionally graded composite having circular inclusions with graded interphases - a material with many length scales. Rigorous scale-dependent bounds on the effective conductivity of such a composite are calculated from boundary value problems under the essential and natural boundary conditions. It is found that the presence of a narrow graded interphase dramatically changes the effective conductivity from that of a composite with perfect interfaces.

Journal articles

Endler, P.C., Schulte, J., Stock-Schroeer, B. & Stephen, S. 2015, '"Ultra High Dilution 1994" revisited 2015 - the state of follow-up research', Homeopathy, vol. 104, no. 4, pp. 223-228.
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© 2015 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Background: The "Ultra High Dilution 1994" project was an endeavour to take stock of the findings and theories on homeopathic extreme dilutions that were under research at the time in areas of biology, biophysics, physics and medicine. The project finally materialized into an anthology assembling contributions of leading scientists in the field. Over the following two decades, it became widely quoted within the homeopathic community and also known in other research communities. The aim of the present project was to re-visit and review the 1994 studies from the perspective of 2015. Method: The original authors from 1994 or close laboratory colleagues were asked to contribute papers covering their research efforts and learnings in the period from 1994 up to 2015. These contributions were edited and cross-referenced, and a selection of further contributions was added. Results: About a dozen contributions reported on follow-up experiments and studies, including further developments in theory. Only few of the models that had seemed promising in 1994 had not been followed up later. Most models presented in the original publication had meanwhile been submitted to intra-laboratory, multicentre or independent scrutiny. The results of the follow-up research seemed to have rewarded the efforts. Furthermore, contributions were provided on new models that had been inspired by the original ones or that may be candidates for further in-depth ultra high dilution (UHD) research. Conclusion: The project "Ultra High Dilution 1994 revisited 2015" is the latest output of what might be considered the "buena vista social club" of homeopathy research. However, it presents new developments and results of the older, established experimental models as well as a general survey of the state of UHD research.
Schulte, J. 2015, 'Publications on experimental physical methods to investigate ultra high dilutions--an assessment on quality.', Homeopathy : the journal of the Faculty of Homeopathy, vol. 104, no. 4, pp. 311-315.
Our first evaluation of fundamental research into the physics and physiology of Ultra High Dilution (UHD) was conducted in 1994. Since then, in 2003, Becker-Witt et al. conducted a more systematic evaluation of the literature and established the Score for Assessment of Physical Experiments on Homeopathy (SAPEH). While this evaluation focused on experimental methodologies, Stock-Schröer et al., in 2009, formulated a detailed guideline for authors on Reporting Experiments in Homeopathic Basic research (REHBaR) to promote a high standard in research as well as in its communication in scientific literature.In this paper, we evaluate publications on basic research into the physics of UHD since the decade following the presentation of the SAPEH score (2004-2014), and present the state of progress in this field.Fundamental research into the physics of UHD has been reported at a steady rate over the past 60 years. Reported research of high quality as per SAPEH scoring appears to be still the exception rather than standard.Considering the importance of a fundamental understanding of what makes a UHD preparation, results of this study suggest that it may be beneficial to this field of fundamental research if grant challenges are approached in strategic way similar to other grant challenges in science.
Schulte, J. 2015, 'Observations on entanglement, non-locality and ultra-high dilutions.', Homeopathy : the journal of the Faculty of Homeopathy, vol. 104, no. 4, pp. 316-321.
Fundamental research into the scientific basis of the manufacture of ultra-high dilutions and their working in applications has evolved over the past twenty years since our last critical analysis of the field was published in 1994. New contenders from the realm of physics (entanglement, non-locality) have entered the scene. The vast majority within the community of the application of ultra-high dilutions are not physicists. This paper attempts to elucidate the concepts of entanglement, non-locality and their application in ultra-high dilution research (UHD).A selected study on the activity of fundamental research into UHD is performed to gain insight into trends of development activity of fundamental research in this area. In an attempt to nurture further development of theoretical models in fundamental research in UHD, an attempt is made to made recent theoretical concepts more accessible to the larger community including practitioners, policy makers and beneficiaries of UHD.Fundamental research in UHD had a period of prolific activity and recognition at the turn of the millennium until about ten years ago. Since then, research output as well as its recognition receded sharply suggesting that a period of reflection and consolidation may be in progress.The study and the knowledge gained from more recent theoretical models in UHD and entanglement suggest that there may be some benefit in stocktaking of what we really know about the fundamental workings of UHD as well as identifying or developing models that include measurable predictors that go beyond metaphorical descriptors.
Schulte, J. & Endler, P.C. 2015, 'Update on preliminary elements of a theory of ultra high dilutions.', Homeopathy : the journal of the Faculty of Homeopathy, vol. 104, no. 4, pp. 337-342.
The different mechanisms: A. of the interaction between the molecular mother substance and the solvent water or ethanol B. of the storage of molecule-specific information in the solvent. C. the physiological basis of the sensitivity of the living organism towards an ultra high dilution (UHD). D. the mechanism of the interaction of the test dilution with the organism are largely unknown. Several ideas have been postulated, and experiments to test them carried out in physics and in biology.The authors revisited a 1994 contribution on 'preliminary elements of a theory on UHDs' and updated it with regard to more recent literature and research findings.Although the experimental basis can still be questioned in most cases, remarkable fundamental observations have been made to explain the effects of UHDs. For some topics in question, it appears that information specific properties of the diluted substance to be transferred is stored by means electromagnetic fields. The interaction between the UHD and the organism seems to be electromagnetic in nature. The transmission of information from (bio-)molecules to the UHD is of special interest. Again, electromagnetic actions and vector potential fields appear to be implicated.The mechanisms of information storage and transfer in UHDs are far from fully understood, but progress has been made at experimental and theoretical levels.
Schulte, J. 2015, 'Experimental physical methods and theories--then and now.', Homeopathy : the journal of the Faculty of Homeopathy, vol. 104, no. 4, pp. 305-310.
A first evaluation of fundamental research into the physics and physiology of Ultra high dilutions (UHDs) was conducted by the author in 1994(1). In this paper we revisit methods and theories from back then and follow their paths through their evolution and contribution to new knowledge in UHD research since then.Physical methods and theories discusses in our anthology on UHD in 1994(1) form the basis for tracing ideas and findings along their path of further development and impact on new knowledge in UHD.Experimental approaches to probe physical changes in homeopathic preparations have become more sophisticated over past two decades, so did the desire to report results to a scientific standard that is on par with those in specialist literature. The same cannot be said about underlying supporting theoretical models and simulations.Grant challenges in science often take a more targeted and more concerted approach to formulate a research question and then look for answers. A concerted effort to focus on one hypothesized physical aspect of a well-defined homeopathic preparation may help aligning experimental methods with theoretical models and, in doing so, help to gain a deeper understanding of the whole body of insights and data produced.
Rathner, J.A., van Reyk, D. & Crane, J.W. 2013, 'Editorial', International Journal of Innovation in Science and Mathematics Education, vol. 21, no. 3.
Zhang, F., Lidbury, B.A., Schulte, J., Yates, B., Bridgeman, A. & Rodger, J. 2010, 'Integrating language learning practises in first year science disciplines', The International Journal of Learning, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 481-502.
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Student retention and progression rates are a matter of concern for most institutions in the higher education sector (Burton & Dowling, 2005;. Simpson, 2006;. Tinto & Pusser, 2006) in Australia. There is also a substantial body of literature concentrating on the first year experience at university (for example, in the Australian context, see Krause, Hartley, James, McInnis, & Centre for the Study of Higher Education. University of Melbourne, 2005). One of the particular concerns is that the diversity of the student body is rapidly increasing. Of course, with diversity comes with differentiated level of preparation for academic study within the student body.
Zhang, F., Lidbury, B.A., Schulte, J., Yates, B., Bridgeman, A. & Rodger, J. 2010, 'Integrating language learning practises in first year science disciplines', The International Journal of Learning, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 481-502.
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Student retention and progression rates are a matter of concern for most institutions in the higher education sector (Burton & Dowling, 2005;. Simpson, 2006;. Tinto & Pusser, 2006) in Australia. There is also a substantial body of literature concentrating on the first year experience at university (for example, in the Australian context, see Krause, Hartley, James, McInnis, & Centre for the Study of Higher Education. University of Melbourne, 2005). One of the particular concerns is that the diversity of the student body is rapidly increasing. Of course, with diversity comes with differentiated level of preparation for academic study within the student body.
Schulte, J. & Vaseashta, A. 2008, 'Applications of Nanotechnologies in Environmental Protection and Pollution, Part 2: Materials Characterization and development', NANO, vol. 3, no. 5, pp. 311-312.
Schulte, J. & Vaseashta, A. 2008, 'Applications of Nanotechnologies in Environmental Protection and Pollution, Part1: Sensing, Remediation, Toxicology and Control', NANO, vol. 3, no. 4, pp. 203-204.
SCHULTE, J.U.R.G.E.N. & VASEASHTA, A.S.H.O.K. 2008, 'GUEST EDITORIAL — APPLICATIONS OF NANOTECHNOLOGIES IN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AND POLLUTION, PART 2: MATERIALS CHARACTERIZATION AND DEVELOPMENT', Nano, vol. 03, no. 05, pp. 311-312.
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SCHULTE, J.U.R.G.E.N. & VASEASHTA, A.S.H.O.K. 2008, 'GUEST EDITORIAL — APPLICATIONS OF NANOTECHNOLOGIES IN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AND POLLUTION, PART 1: SENSING, REMEDIATION, TOXICOLOGY, AND CONTROL', Nano, vol. 03, no. 04, pp. 203-204.
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Schulte, J. 2007, 'nanotechnology In Environmental Protection And Pollution Sustainable Future, Environmental Cleanup And Energy Solutions', Science And Technology Of Advanced Materials, vol. 8, no. 1-Feb, pp. 11-11.
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Friedrichs, S. & Schulte, J. 2007, 'Environmental, health and safety aspects of nanotechnology - implications for the R&D in (small) companies', Science And Technology Of Advanced Materials, vol. 8, no. 1-2, pp. 12-18.
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The growth of nanotechnology has led to an unprecedented research and development effort in both the public and the private sectors; world wide, an increasing number of laboratories, fabrication and manufacturing plants develop or apply novel nanometre-sized materials for applications ranging from large-scale industrial materials to electronic components and heathcare and medical products; an increasing number of start-ups have veen launched to establish their nanotechnology-based products in a trillion-dollar market. Very little, however, is known about the inetraction of man-made nanostructured materials and living organisms, as studies of nanotoxicology are gaining increasing interest, but are still in their infacny. Despite the formation of many ofcus and lobbying groups, proper legislation of the environmental, health and safety aspects of nanotechnology wil tka eyears to be implemented, In the menatime, it is of utmost importance tat companies working with nanometre-sized matter take appropriate precautions to protect their staff, the environment and customer. Toxicology tests and agency approval of new nanometre-sized materials are prohibitively expensive, but, even if working on a tight budget, nanotechnology companies can acheive an ethical and safe business conduct via a number of possible routes.
Schulte, J. & Dutta, J. 2005, 'Nanotechnology in environmental protection and pollution', Science and Technology of Advanced Materials, vol. 6, no. 3-4 SPEC. ISS., pp. 219-220.
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Krishna, G., Schulte, J., Cornell, B.A., Pace, R.J. & Osman, P.D. 2003, 'Tethered bilayer membranes containing ionic reservoirs: Selectivity and conductance', Langmuir, vol. 19, no. 6, pp. 2294-2305.
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Ion channels, such as gramicidin A, selectively facilitate the transport of ions across biological and synthetic membranes. The conductance properties of ion channels are frequently characterized in synthetic bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs). The instability of BLMs has seriously limited the range of applications for these structures, and tethered bilayer lipid membranes (tBLMs) have addressed the problem through tethering many of the membrane components to a solid surface. In the present study, thin gold substrates have been used to tether thiol- and disulfide-terminated membrane components to form a tBLM electrode to provide a reservoir for ions. This study reports on the ion selectivity and apparent permeability of gramicidin channels in such tethered bilayer membranes. The investigations using electrical impedance spectroscopy indicated that the magnitude of ionic conductance varies substantially in reservoirs with different chemical structures.
Krishna, G., Schulte, J., Cornell, B.A., Pace, R.J., Wieczorek, L. & Osman, P.D. 2001, 'Tethered Bilayer Membranes Containing ionic Reservoirs : the Interfacial Capacitance', Langmuir, vol. 17, pp. 4858-4866.
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Masens, C.D., Schulte, J., Phillips, M. & Dligatch, S. 2000, 'Ultra Flat Gold Surfaces for Use in Chemical Force Microscopy: Scanning Probe Microscopy Studies of the Effect of Preparation Regime on Surface Morphology', Microscopy & Microanalysis, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 113-120.
Schulte, J., Ushio, J. & Maruizumi, T. 2000, 'Non-equilibrium molecular orbital calculations of Si/SiO2 Interfaces', Thin Solid Films, vol. 369, no. 1-2, pp. 285-288.
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A non-equilibrium statistical molecular orbital approach has been developed to analyze non-equilibrium configurations in Si/SiO2 heterostructures, improvement of which is essential for realization of superior semiconductor devices. The non-equilibrium statistics is discussed and results obtained in conjunction with molecular orbital calculations are being presented.
Schulte, J., Schevschenko, P. & Radchik, A. 1999, 'Nonlinear field effects in quadrupole mass filters', Review of Scientific Instrument, vol. 70, no. 9, pp. 1-6.
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The performance of a quadrupole mass filter (QMF) generally degrades when using electrodes of circular cross section in place of mathematical ideal hyperbolic electrodes. The circular cross section of electrodes produces nonlinear resonances resulting in distortion and peak splitting in mass spectra. In addition, resonances reduce the actual working cross section, resulting in limited ion yield. In this article we study nonlinear resonances and intensities of resonance lines passing through the tip of the stability diagram of the QMF. We have found that balancing of multipole terms, rather than eliminating individual multipole terms, improves the sensitivity of the QMF considerably. The theory for assessing intensities of nonlinear resonances is presented in detail along with rescaling laws to adjust current QMF parameter settings. A general formula is presented from which the location and intensity of nonlinear can be derived, which then may be used for the design of special purpose QMFs.
Schulte, J., Shevchenko, P.V. & Radchik, A.V. 1999, 'Nonlinear field effects in quadrupole mass filters', Review of Scientific Instruments, vol. 70, no. 9, pp. 3566-3571.
The performance of a quadrupole mass filter (QMF) generally degrades when using electrodes of circular cross section in place of mathematical ideal hyperbolic electrodes. The circular cross section of electrodes produces nonlinear resonances resulting in distortion and peak splitting in mass spectra. In addition, resonances reduce the actual working cross section, resulting in limited ion yield. In this article we study nonlinear resonances and intensities of resonance lines passing through the tip of the stability diagram of the QMF. We have found that balancing of multipole terms, rather than eliminating individual multipole terms, improves the sensitivity of the QMF considerably. The theory for assessing intensities of nonlinear resonances is presented in detail along with rescaling laws to adjust current QMF parameter settings. A general formula is presented from which the location and intensity of nonlinear can be derived, which then may be used for the design of special purpose QMFs. © 1999 American Institute of Physics. [80034-6748(99)01609-3].
Schulte, J. 1999, 'Effects of potentization in aqueous solutions.', The British homoeopathic journal, vol. 88, no. 4, pp. 155-160.
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Over the past two decades, research into structure formation and structure conservation in water has created a significant interest among the homeopathy research community. The formation of sustained static and dynamic structures in aqueous solutions is thought to be synonymous with the possible storage of information in associated liquids. Prominent models and experiments considering this possibility are presented in this paper, and some of their subtleties, which were not given much room in the respective original publications, will be elucidated in more detail here.
Schulte, J. 1996, 'Nonpolynomial fitting of multiparameter functions', Physical Review E - Statistical Physics, Plasmas, Fluids, and Related Interdisciplinary Topics, vol. 53, no. 2.
A stochastic self-regulating simulated annealing optimization method is presented, and compared to other optimization methods such as the simplex, steepest descent, and the recently proposed fast fitting method by Penna [Phys. Rev. E 51, R1 (1995)]. The presented method converges faster towards an acceptable set of optimization parameters than the other methods, and it is less susceptible to local minima of nonconvex functions. Examples are shown for fitting a simple two parameter Gaussian function and a complicated multiple parameter three-body interaction potential function.
Ostoja-Starzewski, M. & Schulte, J. 1996, 'Bounding of effective thermal conductivities of multiscale materials by essential and natural boundary conditions', Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, vol. 54, no. 1, pp. 278-285.
We demonstrate the bounding of the effective properties of random multiscale microstructures by means of essential and natural boundary conditions. The proposed method involves moderate sized lattices, not modified in the boundary zone, thereby allowing much faster calculations than the method of periodic boundary conditions. In case of a random two-phase lattice, scaling laws have been found for a wide range of contrasts. In the case of a disk-inclusion composite having circular inclusions with graded interphases, the presence of a graded interphase dramatically changes the effective conductivity compared to that of a composite with perfect interfaces.
Venkatesh, R., Marlow, W.H., Lucchese, R.R. & Schulte, J. 1996, 'The effect of the nature of the interaction potential on cluster reaction rates', Journal of Chemical Physics, vol. 104, no. 22, pp. 9016-9026.
The effect of two different interaction potentials, a two-body and a many-body potential, on thermal cluster reaction rates was studied for 2-13 atom nickel clusters using the classical trajectory method. The reaction rates were computed for cluster-monomer and cluster-cluster collisions at T=1200 K, using the bulk and dimer parametrized Lennard-Jones (LJ) potentials and were compared with the rates previously obtained for these collisional events by using a more realistic many-body tight-binding second moment approximation (TB-SMA) potential. For cluster-monomer collisions, close agreement exists between the reaction cross section results for dimer fitted LJ (LJD) potential and TB-SMA potential suggesting that the cluster-monomer collisions may be dominated by pairwise interactions. The bulk fitted LJ potential (LJB) underestimates the sticking cross section results of the other two potentials for most cluster sizes. This discrepancy however appears to be due to the relatively smaller cluster binding energies obtained for this potential as a result of which a larger cross section for dissociation is observed. For cluster-cluster collisions, for most cluster sizes, no agreement exists between the reaction cross section results for the three potentials. The discrepancy between the cross section results for the LJ potentials and the TB-SMA potential appears to lie in the difference in the scaling of cluster energy with cluster coordination for these two types of potentials (i.e., linear for LJ vs square root dependence for TB-SMA). Some characteristics of the cross section results of both LJB and LJD potentials correlate with the relative cluster stability pattern for the LJ clusters. For TB-SMA case, no such correlation exists, which however is consistent with the smooth and featureless size distributions observed experimentally for nickel and other transition metals. The cut-off used in the TB-SMA potential appears to lead to a significant underestimation of the ...
SCHULTE, J., KNOSPE, O., SEIFERT, G. & SCHMIDT, R. 1995, 'C-60(+)+C-60 COLLISIONS .2. MASS AND ANGULAR-DISTRIBUTIONS', PHYSICS LETTERS A, vol. 198, no. 1, pp. 51-54.
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Schulte, J. 1995, 'The dynamics of fullerene multifragmentation', Supramolecular Science, vol. 2, no. 3-4, pp. 135-140.
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SCHULTE, J. 1995, 'MULTIFRAGMENTATION OF FULLERENES - A MOLECULAR-DYNAMICS STATISTICAL TRAJECTORY ENSEMBLE STUDY OF A CROSS-BEAM EXPERIMENT', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MASS SPECTROMETRY AND ION PROCESSES, vol. 145, no. 3, pp. 203-210.
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Endler, P.C., Pongratz, W., Smith, C.W. & Schulte, J. 1995, 'Non-molecular information transfer from thyroxine to frogs with regard to homeopathic toxicology.', Veterinary and human toxicology, vol. 37, no. 3, pp. 259-260.
Schulte, J., Marlow, W.H. & Lucchese, R.R. 1994, 'On the influence of collision mass and interaction potential to the energy transfer in small thermal gas phase clusters', Journal of Applied Physics, vol. 75, pp. 7195-7199.
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SCHULTE, J. 1994, 'TIME-RESOLVED FRAGMENTATION CROSS-SECTION SIMULATION OF C-60(+)+C-60 COLLISIONS', PHYSICAL REVIEW B, vol. 50, no. 17, pp. 12312-12317.
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SCHMIDT, R., SCHULTE, J., KNOSPE, O. & SEIFERT, G. 1994, 'C+60+C60 COLLISIONS .1. MULTIFRAGMENTATION AND COLLECTIVE FLOW EFFECTS', PHYSICS LETTERS A, vol. 194, no. 1-2, pp. 101-105.
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SCHULTE, J. & SEIFERT, G. 1994, 'DFT-LDA MOLECULAR-DYNAMICS OF MOLECULAR COLLISION PROCESSES', CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS, vol. 221, no. 3-4, pp. 230-236.
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SEIFERT, G. & SCHULTE, J. 1994, 'ON THE FORMATION OF DEUTERIUM FULLERENE COMPLEXES IN COLLISIONS OF C-60 WITH D-2', PHYSICS LETTERS A, vol. 188, no. 4-6, pp. 365-370.
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Seifert, G. & Schulte, J. 1994, 'Molecular dynamics simulations of cluster collisions', Computational Materials Science, vol. 2, no. 3-4, pp. 585-588.
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Endler, P.C., Pongratz, W., Kastberger, G., Wiegant, F.A. & Schulte, J. 1994, 'The effect of highly diluted agitated thyroxine on the climbing activity of frogs.', Veterinary and human toxicology, vol. 36, no. 1, pp. 56-59.
We studied the influence of specially prepared highly diluted thyroxine on the spontaneous tendency of juvenile frogs, which were at the end of thyroxine-controlled metamorphosis, to leave the water and climb onto land. The test dilution with a thyroxine concentration beyond Avogadro's value (dilution thyroxine D30) and the reference (dilution water D30) were prepared according to directions from the literature on homeopathy. A few drops of these solutions were added to tap water of basins containing the frogs. The frogs' climbing activities were monitored immediately after adding the solutions. The hypothesis derived from a preliminary study was that there is less climbing activity in frogs treated with dilution thyroxine D30 than in a reference group. This hypothesis was proven. Climbing activity diminished under the influence of dilution thyroxine D30, with statistical significance both in comparison to the effect of the analogously prepared solvent (dilution water D30) as well as in comparison to control observations before the start of treatment. When in a later step of observation the dilution water D30-control group was treated with dilution thyroxine D30, the diminishing effect on activity also occurred.
Schulte, J. 1993, 'Thermal helium clusters at 3.2 Kelvin in classical and semiclassical simulations', Journal of Statistical Physics, vol. 70, no. 5/6, pp. 1343-1347.
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SCHULTE, J., LUCCHESE, R.R. & MARLOW, W.H. 1993, 'THE EFFECTS OF COLLISION MASS AND POTENTIAL ON THE ENERGY-TRANSFER IN THERMAL COLLISIONS OF GAS-PHASE CLUSTERS', JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS, vol. 99, no. 2, pp. 1178-1184.
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SCHULTE, J. 1991, 'ON THE STRUCTURE AND STABILITY OF AR-N AND AR-N+ CLUSTERS AT FINITE TEMPERATURE', ZEITSCHRIFT FUR PHYSIK D-ATOMS MOLECULES AND CLUSTERS, vol. 20, no. 1-4, pp. 147-151.
Kougias, F. & Schulte, J. 1990, 'Simulating the immune response to the HIV-1 virus with cellular automata', Journal of Statistical Physics, vol. 60, no. 1/2, pp. 263-273.
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Franke, G. & Schulte, J. 1989, 'Quantum mechanics and the structure of noble-gas clusters', Zeitschrift für Physik D Atoms, Molecules and Clusters, vol. 12, pp. 65-68.

Other

Schulte, J. 2016, 'Experiences with an Adaptive Learning Product'.
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NSW Learning Analytics Working Group Regional Meeting
Schulte, J. & Griffiths, N. 2016, 'PUTTING THE PROFESSIONAL INTO PRACTICE-BASED LEARNING'.
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International Conference on Teaching and Learning
Schulte, J. & Pardo, A. 2015, 'Scaling Instructor-driven Personal Support Actions'.
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Learning Analytics Workshop ALASI 2015: Australian Learning Analytics Summer Institute
Schulte, J. 2015, 'Gamification of learning within a problem solving context'.
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UTS Widening Participation - First Year Experience Forum 2015
Schulte, J. & Scott, A. 2015, 'Authentic assessment, original research and academic publishing for second year undergraduates'.
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UTS Teaching & Learning Forum 2015
Schulte, J. 2015, 'Adaptive Learning: Opportunities for Flexible and Deep Learning'.
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UTS Teaching & Learning Forum 2015