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Associate Professor Julie Jupp

Biography

Associate Professor Julie Jupp has broad interests in digital technologies and design management practices. As Coordinator of the Digital Technologies stream in the BA Construction Project Management degree she leads an interdisciplinary teaching team to deliver a program that combines the latest information on BIM technologies, processes, adoption and implementation strategies, integrated project delivery, and team communication.

Her research focuses on development and application of new tools and processes in the AEC sector, covering phenomena surrounding technology adoption and organisational innovation, models and theories of decision making and stakeholder management, intelligent decision support systems and BIM model compliance and certification.

Julie holds a PhD in Architecture (Design Computing) from the University of Sydney and undertook her Post-doctorate studies at Cambridge University’s Engineering Design Centre. She is the author of book chapters, journal articles and conference papers in the fields of computer aided design, design cognition, visual representation and reasoning, intelligent decision support, and product lifecycle management.

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Associate Professor, School of the Built Environment
PhD
 
Phone
+61 2 9514 8718

Research Interests

Associate Professor Julie Jupp is an active researcher in design computing, design cognition and design management.

Design Computing

  • Computational models of design decision making: social network analysis; task-based networks; multi-networks; intelligent decision support systems
  • Visual representation and reasoning: shape representation; qualitative representations; computer vision
  • Digital tools and methods: new technologies in architecture, engineering, construction, and facilities management
Design Cognition
  • Cognitive studies of designing: protocol studies of designing and visual reasoning; cognitive studies of design creativity
Design Management
  • Organisational and process management models of: technology adoption and integration, Green BIM design process and policy, design and construction process modelling, information management, organisational and interpersonal communication
  • Benchmarking and key performance indciators in: design and construction; health and safety; procurement

Can supervise: Yes

16137 Digital Built Environment - UG
16212 Digital Design and Construction 1 - UG
16470 Digital Design and Construction 2 - UG
16914 Human Resources and Communications Management - UG

Books

Jakovich, J., Schweitzer, J., Brookes, W.C., Edwards, M., Jupp, J.R., Kirchner, N.G. & Nikolova, N. 2011, U.lab - It's about you: An Emerging Interdisciplinary Framework for Innovation Projects, 1, DAB Documents Faculty of Design, Architecture & Building University of Technology, Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
Design thinking aims to capture designers' creativity-driven approach to innovation that can be applied to anything from physical products and intangible services, to formulating and solving complex social problems. Design thinking promotes a particular mind-set that takes the user experience, or a human-centred perspective, as point of departure. While research into the application of design thinking to business problems is well documented, the utilisation of design thinking in university innovation is limited to few cases, and requires better understanding of how to establish design thinking capacity in an academic collaboration context. This research establishes an interdisciplinary design thinking framework at the University of Technology, Sydney, that forms the basis for three experimental projects. New design thinking tools, such as '5X5' and 'faceboard', are developed and a novel public and university innovation program is tested over ten repeated scenarios. The design thinking framework can be adopted for practice and further research. This volume documents the first-steps taken by a cross-faculty university group towards developing an interdisciplinary innovation capacity. It demonstrates how through trialling the practices and methods of design thinking, a deep appreciation of designing, thinking, and practicing creativity emerges across non-design participants. Diverse disciplinary backgrounds and perspectives are illustrated as a source of opportunity to address complex teaching and research challenges. 'U.Lab - It's About You' is published by DAB Docs, University of Technology, Sydney.

Chapters

Jupp, J.R. & Gero, J.S. 2009, 'Let's Look at Style: Visuo-Spatial Representation and Reasoning in Design' in Argamon, S., Burns, K. & Dubnov, S. (eds), The Structure of Style, Algorithmic Approaches to Understanding Manner and Meaning, Springer, Germany, pp. 159-197.
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This chapter explores the perception and modeling of style in design relating to visuo-spatial representation and reasoning. We approach this subject via cognitive and contextual considerations significant to the role of style during designing. A designer's ability to represent and reason about design artifacts visually and spatially allows meaningful 'chunks' of design information to be utilized relative to the designer's task and context. Central to cognitive and contextual notions of style are two issues, namely the level of semantic interpretation, and the comparative method's degree of contextual sensitivity. This compound problem requires some explicit and cognitively plausible ordering principle and adaptive measure capable of allowing for dependencies in reasoning about similarities. This chapter first investigates the perception of style in relation to these modeling requirements before demonstrating and testing their implementation. We then discuss style in relation to design tasks and how they can be supported via the classification and retrieval of designs from large databases of visuo spatial information.

Conferences

Khallaf, M. & Jupp, J.R. 2016, 'Performance-based Design of Tall Building Envelopes using Competing Wind Load and Wind Flow Criteria', Procedia Engineering, International High- Performance Built Environment Conference – A Sustainable Built Environment Conference 2016 Series, Sydney.
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This paper investigates performance-based tall building design and the development of an architectural and urban design method that focus on the effects of wind loads on- and wind flows around tall buildings. The paper provides an overview of related buildings codes and city development design guidelines that define the requirements of structural faade wind loading and urban ventilation. A review of performance-based design methods for the generation, analysis and optimization of buildings is also presented. Within this frame, an approach to performancebased tall building envelope design is proposed. The approach is aimed at addressing wind loading and wind impact requirements based on generative parametric modelling and performance analysis that integrates physical parameters at the architectural and urban scales and performance criteria can support filtering and optimization relative to prevailing wind conditions.
Jupp, J.R. 2016, '4D BIM for Environmental Planning and Management', http://www.sbe16sydney.be.unsw.edu.au/Proceedings/33648.pdf, International High- Performance Built Environment Conference – A Sustainable Built Environment Conference 2016 Series, Sydney.
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For more than a decade research has shown that 4D Building Information Modelling (BIM) can improve construction planning, scheduling and production control as well as the onsite management of safety, workspaces and waste. The increasing use of 4D BIM in construction highlights opportunities for utilising these capabilities in new digital management systems replete with role reorganization, new practices and workflows, and not solely as a tool for constructability analysis and onsite monitoring of construction progress. Continued focus on construction-based environmental impacts provides an impetus to leverage 4D BIM to improve communication and information flow throughout environmental planning and management tasks. This paper explores how environmental planning and management can be supported by 4D capabilities. 4D modelling and analysis technologies combined with structured workflows are presented as the basis for developing a tailored framework for environmental planning and management. Five functional prerequisites necessary to the collaborative development and onsite monitoring of environmental management systems are identified before laying out the directions for future research.
Khallaf, M. & Jupp, J.R. 2016, 'Designing for Urban Microclimates: Towards Multidisciplinary Optimisation of Wind Flow for Architectural and Urban Design', Proceedings of the 34th eCAADe Conference, eCAADe, CumInCAD, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland, pp. 95-106.
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This paper presents the foundations of a multidisciplinary design optimisation method that addresses the problem of competing wind flow profiles within urban microclimates. The simultaneous integration of architectural and urban design parameters and their aerodynamic constraints are investigated. Differences in the height of tall buildings, which define the urban canopy layer are accounted for. The formulation that supports the simulation of aerodynamic forces at the architectural and urban scales includes multidisciplinary parameter specification of 2D and 3D building geometry, spatial morphology, spatial topology, wind flow settings, and wind flow compliance. The MDO framework and its development are discussed relative to their generative performance-based capacity and innovative approach to multidisciplinary wind flow optimization.
Boton, C., Rivest, L., Forgues, D. & Jupp, J.R. 2016, 'Comparing PLM and BIM from the Product Structure Standpoint', IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology, The 13th IFIP International Conference on Product Lifecycle Management, Springer, Columbia, South Carolina, USA, pp. 443-452.
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The increasing use of Building Information Modelling (BIM) across the construction industry highlights the potential for a common endpoint with manufacturing industries. Previous research work has shown that it is possible to improve BIM with the features and the best practices from Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) approach. This article provides a comparison between the PLM and BIM approaches from the standpoint of the Product Structure (PS) and the Bill Of Material (BOM). It discusses the need to explicit a structuring concept in the BIM approach in order be able to switch to an informationcentric management approach in construction projects instead of the current activity-based approach.
Kamardeen, I., Alkilani, S. & Jupp, J.R. 2015, 'Key performance indicators for construction contractors in developing countries: a case study of Jordan', In Proceedings of RICS COBRA AUBEA 2015, The Construction, Building and Real Estate Research Conference of the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors; The Australasian Universities' Building Educators Association Conference, Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors, Sydney, Australia.
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Benchmarking is regarded as a facilitator of performance improvement for construction contractors. In its implementation in developing countries, reliable performance measurement methods are required that are based upon carefully defined key performance indicators (KPIs). To date there has been little research on the identification of appropriate KPIs that consider the specific factors of contractors operating in this context. Taking Jordan as a case study, a questionnaire survey was distributed to a sample of 550 construction stakeholders, followed by Delphi interviews with seven key experts from the Jordanian construction industry. One-way ANOVA test and a Relative Importance Index analysis of the responses identified ten categories of KPIs and 50 corresponding indicators. The study thereby proposes a set of KPIs that are useful for developing a national benchmarking system capable of enhancing the performance of contractors in developing countries like Jordan.
Jupp, J.R. 2015, 'Towards a Theory of BIM Implementation: Understanding Levels of Adoption and Assimilation', RICS COBRA AUBEA 2015, The Construction, Building and Real Estate Research Conference of the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors; The Australasian Universities' Building Educators Association Conference, Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors, RICS, Sydney, Australia, pp. n.p.-n.p..
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This paper explores the contingent, authority-based processes surrounding the adoption and assimilation of building information modelling (BIM), in both project and organisational settings. The paper first explores traditional technology adoption and diffusion models and related construction IT (information technology) research. A number of gaps are identified and a new framework is proposed that combines insights from organisation management and information systems (IS) research on technology adoption, implementation and absorption. Using these insights, together with those identified in the construction IT research, the framework attempts to capture the project-based, socio-technical constructs that define the industry. The resulting theory describes the assimilation and feedback events surrounding BIM implementation and their influencing factors. The framework provides an approach for researchers to study and understand how BIM implementation occurs.
Jupp, J.R. & Wilkinson, S. 2015, 'Through-life Information Management For Commercial Property Practice: Benefits & Challenges of BIM', RICS COBRA AUBEA 2015, The Construction, Building and Real Estate Research Conference of the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors; The Australasian Universities' Building Educators Association Conference, Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors, Sydney, Australia.
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For any property process it is important to have reliable and accurate information about the building, its surrounding environment, and market. This paper describes the difficulties facing property professionals when sourcing, organizing and reusing built environment data through-life and the potential benefits of a Building Information Modeling (BIM) approach to help improve information management in the property domain. Based on a review of the literatures and findings from a stakeholder workshop the paper discusses the benefits and challenges to improving through-life information management. The review of the literature reveals the importance of identifying what information needs to be captured through-life, key attributes of BIM, and the role of structured data. Workshop findings reveal a number of important technical and socio-technical challenges facing property professionals, including the need for information standards, data quality and fidelity issues, security and privacy concerns, and the need for new digital skill sets and knowledge competencies.
Wilkinson, S. & Jupp, J.R. 2015, 'BIM and the Value Dimension: A Commercial Property Development and Management Perspective', Proceedings of RICS COBRA AUBEA 2015, The Construction, Building and Real Estate Research Conference of the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors; The Australasian Universities' Building Educators Association Conference, Sydney, Australia.
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BIM is integral to real-time information coordination between various disciplines within the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), informing decision-making and improving analysis and simulation. Whilst proponents of BIM claim a variety of client benefits, the potential of BIM from the diverse perspectives of the property domain has largely been overlooked, as has the broader scope of the property lifecycle. This trans-disciplinary scoping study explores the role of the 'value dimension' of BIM; that is, the processes that extend beyond the project lifecycle and the data that is used to assess risk, growth and depreciation through the life of the property. The findings of an Australian industry workshop identify the specific information requirements of property professionals before then mapping these with existing project-based BIM deliverables. The paper closes with a discussion of a model of BIM and the value dimension and a roadmap for future research.
Jupp, J.R. & Nepal, M. 2014, 'BIM and PLM: Comparing and learning from changes to professional practice across sectors', Product Lifecycle Management for a Global Market, 11th IFIP WG 5.1 International Conference, PLM 2014, Yokohama, Japan, pp. 41-51.
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This paper presents an analysis of PLM and BIM in relation to effects on professional practice. It draws on the experiences of both communities of practice to explain shifts in professional boundaries. A review of the literature explores the nature of changes triggered by PLM and BIM relative to new activities, roles and responsibilities, knowledge competencies, and relationships. The paper synthesises these changes and reflects PLM and BIM experiences against each other so as to discuss the continuing evolution of professional practice and identify lessons.
Jupp, J.R. & Singh, V. 2014, 'Similar concepts, Distinct solutions, Common problems: Learning from PLM and BIM deployment', Product Lifecycle Management for a Global Market, 11th IFIP WG 5.1 International Conference, PLM 2014, Yokohama, Japan, pp. 31-40.
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This paper describes the similarities and differences between Product Lifecycle Management and Building Information Modelling concepts, solutions and challenges, focusing on integration issues relative to aligning business processes (corporate and project level) and information systems. The paper presents a literature based discussion of the main methods, platforms, effects and criticisms, showing that the two concepts share fundamental similarities but are distinct in their scope/level of integration and approach to data, information and knowledge management. The paper highlights several common problems that also account for structural differences of each sector. The paper aims to provide guidance on issues critical to integration and PLM / BIM deployment and closes with a discussion of future research directions.
Jupp, J. 2014, 'Technology adoption and management innovation in construction', Computing in Civil and Building Engineering - Proceedings of the 2014 International Conference on Computing in Civil and Building Engineering, pp. 753-760.
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© ASCE 2014.This paper examines the adoption of object-based modeling software across design and construction team members during project delivery. Drawing on insights from sociology, management theory and innovation studies, the paper investigates changes surrounding technology adoption and subsequent management-based innovation. Using empirical data from a case study, analysis focuses on adoption of software, the evolution of new digital and social networks, and subsequent innovations in management. The paper has three main contributions. First, it identifies related literature and examines change processes surrounding software adoption and the management innovations that are triggered. Second, it explores rigidities in existing routines that challenge adoption and deployment, highlighting innovations that reconcile change conflicts. Third, it shows how the concept of management innovation in construction is valuable to an understanding IT adoption processes.
Gandhi, S. & Jupp, J. 2014, 'BIM and Australian green star building certification', Computing in Civil and Building Engineering - Proceedings of the 2014 International Conference on Computing in Civil and Building Engineering, pp. 275-282.
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© ASCE 2014.Nearly 80% of green certified structures in Australia are commercial office buildings. Attaining the highest certification often requires the application of design modelling and analysis tools, demanding greater levels of design coordination and management. Whilst the opportunities for green building certification to benefit from building information modelling (BIM) may be obvious, in Australia, the relationship is yet to be validated. This research seeks to address this gap by evaluating the application of BIM for green building certification. The authors present a case study of an Australian commercial office building. Project participants were interviewed and the as-built BIM model audited to analyse data against certification criteria. The results identify gaps in design management and modelling practices, as well as a lack of alignment between design activities and green building certification criteria. Gaps in internal project coordination were more pronounced than with external certification tasks. The study suggests the development of dedicated BIM execution and coordination plans for green building design and certification is required, and discusses the mapping of BIM management requirements with certification standards, criteria and processes.
Nepal, M., Jupp, J.R. & Aibinu, A. 2014, 'Evaluations of BIM: Frameworks and perspectives', Computing in Civil and Building Engineering (2014): Proceedings of the 2014 International Conference on Computing in Civil and Building Engineering, Orlando, Florida, USA..
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This paper examines the evaluation of BIM-enabled projects. It provides a critical review of the three main areas of measurement, namely technology, organization/people and process. Using two documented case studies of BIM implementation, the paper illustrates the benefits realized by project owners and contractors, and illustrates a lack of attention relative to contextual factors affecting the adoption and deployment of BIM. The paper has three main contributions. First, it identifies and discusses the lack of and difficulty surrounding standardized assessment methods for evaluating BIM-enabled projects. Second, it proposes a conceptual model that includes contextual attributes and demonstrates how the proposed framework reaches beyond simple evaluation to encompass the documentation of BIM's benefits, lessons learned, challenges and adopted solutions. Third, it shows how the framework can account for existing business processes, organizational process assets, and enterprise level factors. The paper aims to provide a conceptual basis for evaluation and a starting point for benchmarking.
Coorey, B.P. & Jupp, J.R. 2013, 'A Schema for Capturing and Comparing Parametric Spatial Data', Open Systems: Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia, CAADRIA 2013, CAADRIA and Centre for Advanced Studies in Architecture (CASA), Dept of Architecture, NUS, National University of Singapore, Singapore, pp. 509-518.
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In this paper, the authors consider the problem of architectural spatial performance indicators for assessing computer generated design, where identification and analysis of meaningful and relevant spatial qualities is the target of assessment. The paper presents a parametric spatial analysis schema and spatial database structure for the restricted, but still significant, domain of residential housing. A process for the capture and comparison of different types of architectural spatial data is described where analysis focuses on a series of 2D metric and topological spatial measures. The process is then demonstrated in our discussion of a descriptive scenario.
Gandhi, S. & Jupp, J.R. 2013, 'Green BIM and Green Star certification practices: Case studies in commercial high-rise office design', Proceedings: 38th AUBEA International Conference 20-22nd November 2013, 38th AUBEA International Conference, AUBEA2013, Auckland, New Zealand, pp. 1-10.
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With the goal of reducing a building's environmental footprint, environmental sustainable design (ESD) and green building certification (GBC) is having an increasing influence on design practice. The application of building information modelling (BIM) is also affecting traditional ways of working. Whilst sustainability is a key underpinning of both initiatives, the consequences to design practices of their combined implementation are not well understood. Projects looking to realise the value of their collective benefit persist against an array of implementation challenges and unspecified management requirements. Using a qualitative case study approach, the authors explore the application of BIM from the point of view of ESD consultants and a GBC certification authority. Case study interviews reveal a range of new design workflow and management requirements relating to the communication and coordination of model datasets. The paper closes with a discussion of these management requirements and presents a strategy for future work.
Jupp, J.R. 2014, 'BIM Investment: Understanding value, return and models of assessment', Proceedings: 38th AUBEA International Conference Webiste, Australasian Unversity Building Educators Association Conference, AUBEA2013, Auckland, pp. 1-10.
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As adoption of the BIM methodology (building information modelling) grows, so too do levels of investment in new technologies, processes and organisational change. However due to complexity at the project level, where BIM implementation (and integration) occurs, it can be difficult for firms to evaluate the benefits, costs and risks of investment. This paper reviews existing research surrounding BIM, its value, the return on investment (ROI) and models of assessment. The author draws on information systems (IS) and construction information technology (IT) research so as to explore the requirements of a BIM investment evaluation methodology. Difficulties in applying existing models are identified, revealing the need for a value chain approach that accounts for the project lifecycle. The paper describes the salient outcomes of interest linked to firm level adoption and project based implementation of BIM and discusses the implications relative to measuring their return.
Gandhi, S. & Jupp, J.R. 2013, 'Characteristics of Green BIM: Process and information management requirements', Product Lifecycle Management for Society, 10th IFIP Wg 5.1 Conference, PLM 2013, Springer, Nantes, France, pp. 596-605.
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In this paper, the authors explore the characteristics and requirements of digitally supported green? building design. Well planned, integrated and interdisciplinary digital design practices play a vital role in the iterative processes of sustainable building design. Unlike traditional ways of working, the management of design information and process integration in green building design involves a wider range and a larger number of consultants utilizing sophisticated environmental modelling and analysis systems. To understand the complexities surrounding information management in this context, the authors focus on issues relating to: 1) information exchange and model management, and 2) multidisciplinary design process coordination. Different aspects of sustainable design modelling methodologies are explored in relation to technology requirements, information exchange, and multi-disciplinary collaboration. Finally, the literature is synthesised in a conceptual roadmap framing the key factors identified by the study.
Jupp, J.R. 2013, 'Incomplete BIM implementation: Exploring challenges and the role of product lifecycle management functions', Product Lifecycle Management for Society, 10th IFIP Wg 5.1 International Conference, PLM 2013, Springer, Nantes, France, pp. 630-640.
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Implementing the BIM methodology relies on mastering new digital ways of working. However approaches to BIM often lack a holistic perspective that spans the whole building lifecycle. The omission of Product Lifecycle Management functions in the implementation of the BIM methodology can lead to failures in delivering the benefits of BIM to operations and diminish its value to clients with large property portfolios. In an empirical study, the paper presents an investigation into the current situation of BIM using an Australian commercial property development project. It explores implications of partial implementation for operations. Case study findings identify deficiencies in the project environment, management shortcomings associated with the specifics of client requirements and constraints, and difficulties in the transverse use of BIM and PLM platforms due to human interface problems.
Zaid Alkilani, S. & Jupp, J.R. 2012, 'Paving the road for sustainable construction in developing countries: a study of the Jordanian construction industry', Australasian Universities Building Educators Association (AUBEA), 37th Annual International Conference: Proceedings, 37th Annual International Conference, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia, pp. 337-346.
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There is an increasing pressure on governments of developing economies to support sustainable construction procurement. In exploring this issue, this research asks three related questions: (1) how is sustainable procurement perceived in developing economies, (2) how can government regulation influence its application, and (3) what is the role of performance measurement in stimulating sustainable procurement practices? Answers are sought via an investigation exploring the underlying issues and challenges facing the construction industry of a developing country looking to address sustainable procurement. Using primary and secondary data sources, this research presents a case study of the Jordanian construction industry. Findings show that whilst sustainable procurement practices are promoted, it is still in its infancy - in part due to ineffective procurement frameworks and a lack of performance measurement. Current government regulations and policies are identified as an underlying cause, discouraging the development and adoption of sustainable procurement methods. As the Jordanian construction industry shares characteristics with other developing economies, it is expected that the findings of this paper will be of interest to professionals in those construction industries attempting to initiate sustainable procurement via performance measurement.
Lee, J., Gu, N., Jupp, J.R. & Sherratt, S.M. 2012, 'Towards a formal evaluation of creativity in parametric design process: a pilot study', Proceedings of the Design Research Society Conference 2012 Volume 3, Design Research Society Conference, Design Research Society, Bangkok Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand, pp. 959-970.
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Parametric design has become an emerging research issue in the design domain. However, our current understanding of creativity in the parametric design processes is limited. This study presents a formal approach for describing and identifying cognitive thinking and activities for evaluating creativity in parametric design processes using protocol analysis. This coding scheme is based on the creative acts: Representation, Perception, and Searching for a solution. Also, it provides Geometry and Algorithm categories to capture the cognitive activity in the parametric design process. The effectiveness of this formal approach was examined in a pilot study. The percentage of coverage of geometric and algorithmic codes results in a better understanding of the parametric design process over a time period. The normalised value of the coverage percentage allows us to explore three levels of design cognition in terms of creativity. This research contributes to the development and verification of a formal approach for evaluating creativity in parametric designing. With this formal approach, this research provides a promising procedure, not yet available, of capturing cognitive activity and identifying creative patterns in the parametric design process
Jupp, J.R. & Gandhi, S. 2012, 'Clarifying the Role of Building Information Modeling in Green Building Certification', Proceedings of 37th Annual International Conference Australian Universities Building Educators Association, 37th AUBEA International Conference, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia, pp. 499-510.
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A new trend in improved green building certification (GBC) outcomes enabled by building information modelling (BIM) is emerging in the Architectural, Engineering and Construction (AEC) sector. Developing an integrated approach to GBC and BIM processes has the potential to not only further minimise the environmental impact of construction developments but also increase the efficiency of GBC processes and provide additional incentive to adopt BIM. This paper builds a theoretical framework for an integrated GBC-BIM system and serves as a backcloth for identifying possible investment needs to develop the approach. Benefits to clients, end-users, AEC practitioners, government, society and the environment are identified. Three uncertainties are recognised regarding the applicability and feasibility of an integrated approach, notably that it will require additional resources, and adaptive project structures to administer meaningful process integration.
Zaid Alkilani, S., Jupp, J.R. & Sawhney, A. 2012, 'Readying a developing economy for national performance measurement and benchmarking: A case study of the Jordanian construction industry', Proceedings of the XXVIII IAHS World Congress: Visions for the Future of Housing Mega Cities, IAHS Housing Istanbul, Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul, Turkey, pp. 541-548.
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In many developing countries, national construction performance measures and benchmarking processes are yet to be formulated, implemented and tracked. This inherent weakness of an economic sector has negative impacts on, productivity, efficiency and performance. This paper takes the Jordanian construction industry as a case study of a developing economy and highlights the significant challenges it faces in implementing performance measurement. Findings from this study reveal a number of specific and general characteristics, and the extent and severity of industry-based barriers. The paper identifies a range of requirements at the national level that must be met to move from a state of relative disarray to an industry ready for the successful implementation of performance measurement and benchmarking. The authors anticipate that the findings of this paper will be of interest to academics and professionals involved in other developing countries construction industries.
Jupp, J.R. 2012, 'Understanding Cognitive Activities in Parametric Design', Proceedings of the 15th CAAD Futures Conference, China.
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Forsythe, P.J., Jupp, J.R. & Sawhney, A. 2011, 'BIM in Tertiary Construction Project Management Education: A Program Wide Strategy', 36th Annual Conference for Australasian University Building Educators Association, Australasian Universities Building Educators Association, Institute of Sustainable Development & Architecture, Bond University, Gold Coast, Australia, pp. 192-211.
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This paper reports on the ongoing research and development of teaching and learning supported by Building Information Modelling (BIM) in the undergraduate Construction Project Management (CPM) Program at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS). At its heart, BIM is used to facilitate a more integrated and visual mode of teaching. It provides a new basis for developing problem based learning - one that has the potential to allow students to aggregate their learning around a central project whilst allowing problems to be scaled at different levels of complexity. This approach aims to better integrate and link individual subjects together as well as improve the development of core student attributes such as communication, understanding, decision making, collaboration and information gathering skills; very much mimicking the ongoing BIM driven transformation happening in the industry. The BIM models aim to be regularly used in various formats as students progress through their undergraduate degree Program - and we adopt the term 'vertical problems' to capture the way BIM models and problem based learning can be utilised throughout the Program. Here, lecturers are able to author 'sub- plots' that utilise BIM models in a way that best suits their specific subjects, e.g. cost, time, quality, sustainability subject areas. To this end, the paper reports on findings from the research, development and early implementation stages of a program wide teaching and learning proposition supported by BIM. This includes a typology that helps target varying degrees of BIM utilization and diffusion in given subjects and transitional requirements for both staff and students.
Coorey, B.P. & Jupp, J.R. 2011, 'Parametric modelling and design processes: Exploring synthesis and evaluation using a Function-Behaviour-Structure perspective', Circuit Bending, Breaking and Mending: Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia (CAADRIA2011), Association for Computer-Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia (CAADRIA) annual conference, The Association for Computer-Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia, The University of Newcastle, Australia, pp. 39-48.
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In an attempt to extend our understanding of the design process in the context of computational parametric design tools, this paper explores the relationship between and interaction of synthesis and evaluation. In establishing the importance of their coupling in parametric design the paper then explores its consequence on the design process relative to existing models of designing. A tension between designing as planning, search and exploration in parametric design is highlighted together with a conceptual framework, which draws from a situated Function-Behaviour-Structure model of design. The purpose of the framework is to facilitate these different modes of designing and is targeted at the use of parametric tools.
Jupp, J.R. 2011, 'Decision Processes in Engineering Design: A Network Perspective of Stakeholders and Task Interactions', Proceeding of the 18th International Conference on Engineering Design, International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED 11, Danmarks Tekniske Universitet, Danmarks Tekniske Universitet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
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In recent years, there has been significant attention given to developing decision support methods and tools for engineering design. While advances in the formal, mathematical modeling and statistical mechanics based models have been impressive, this has not been the case for research attempting to reach beyond normative models to examine the cognitive and social factors that influence decision-making. In general advances have provided for either a top-down or bottom-up approach to decision-making; ignoring the requirements for both participant and task connectedness and dependencies. This paper describes an integrated modeling framework that uses a multi-network perspective of decision-making. The utility and extensibility of this framework are considered in discussion by way of examples from construction engineering design.
Jupp, J.R. 2010, 'A network theoretic perspective of decision processes in complex construction projects', Proceedings of 2010 International Conference on Construction & Real Estate Management, International Conference on Construction & Real Estate Management, China Architecture & Building Press, Brisbane, Australia, pp. 141-147.
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This paper proposes an approach to modelling and visualising decision processes in large complex construction projects by incorporating a network perspective. Computer modelling and visualisation of decision processes as social and task-entity networks makes possible the identification of key participants, critical tasks, latent networks, vulnerabilities and dynamics that impact upon complex decision situations. New advances in network theory can help reveal the ways in which social, organisational, political and technological relationships shape decision outcomes. By conceiving decision processes as a complex system and modelling this system using network-theoretic principles, it is possible to include a tremendous amount of information that has remained untapped by conventional qualitative, game-theoretic, and statistical approaches. This research contributes to the understanding of the strategic implications of decision processes as complex systems of interacting actors and problem tasks, and provides the technological means for supporting them. The approach has been verified through the development of an experimental network-theoretic system.
Jupp, J.R., Eckert, C. & Clarkson, P.J. 2009, 'DIMENSIONS OF DECISION SITUATIONS IN COMPLEX PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT', ICED 09 - THE 17TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ENGINEERING DESIGN, VOL 3: DESIGN ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT, pp. 239-250.
Jupp, J.R., Sosa, R. & Gero, J.S. 2005, 'Generating innovative designs using qualitative spatial reasoning', CAADRIA 2005 - The Association for Computer-Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia: Digital Opportunities, pp. 300-311.
In this paper we present a generative system supported by qualitative spatial reasoning. The approach incorporates qualitative modelling in an evolutionary system to automate the design of novel solutions assessed as compatible with a set of existing designs. The system is presented through an application of door design and demonstrates how development guidelines aimed at preserving a building or streetscape's visual character can be met by novel designs. The results presented in this paper illustrate the generation of novel designs that intuitively capture key characteristics of the corpus of existing designs at a qualitative level. This approach provides the basis for new kinds of design tools.

Journal articles

Wilkinson, S.J. & Jupp, J. 2016, 'Exploring the value of BIM for corporate real estate', Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 18, no. 4.
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Jupp, J.R. & Singh, V. 2016, 'A PLM perspective of BIM research initiatives', International Journal of Product Lifecycle Management, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 180-197.
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Jupp, J.R. 2016, 'Cross industry learning: a comparative study of product lifecycle management and building information modelling', International Journal of Product Lifecycle Management, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 258-258.
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Awad, R., Chambers, J. & Jupp, J.R. 2014, 'Bringing 'Active Learning' Modules into Design Education: A Manifesto for a Socially Engaged Architecture', The International Journal of Diversity in Education, vol. 13, no. 3, pp. 55-64.
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In post-disaster settings and in countries undergoing economic transition, architects have largely been disassociated from social development and the wider concerns of reconstruction. In these situations, equity and diversity concerns have been too frequently overshadowed by private sector interests. Researchers of architecture and architecture education have noted these failings and have called for architects to engage more strongly with epistemological and ethical questions in education and practice. This paper argues for the inclusion of `active learning' modules within the architecture discipline which integrate the technical and practical education of undergraduate students in post-disaster risk management and reconstruction. The growth of university-community service-based learning modules that link architecture schools with NGOs in post-disaster and development settings offer educational opportunities that can equip young architects with the skills they need to operate as global citizens. This paper provides practical recommendations for a more socially engaged architecture, placing the emphasis on architects as future mediators and educators. It offers an effective means of rethinking architectural practice and education, challenging the master narrative of architecture and raising important questions about the relevance of architectural design in a development context.
Coorey, B.P. & Jupp, J.R. 2014, 'Generative spatial performance design system', Artificial Intelligence For Engineering Design, Analysis And Manufacturing, vol. 28, no. 3, pp. 277-283.
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Architectural spatial design is a wicked problem that can have a multitude of solutions for any given brief. The information needed to resolve architectural design problems is often not readily available during the early conceptual stages, requiring proposals to be evaluated only after an initial solution is reached. This 'solution-driven' design approach focuses on the generation of designs as a means to explore the solution space. Generative design can be achieved computationally through parametric and algorithmic processes. However, utilizing a large repertoire of organiational patterns and design precedent knowledge together with the precise criteria of spatial evaluation can present design challenges even to an experienced architect. In the implementation of a parametric design process lies an opportunity to supplement the designer's knowledge with computational decision support that provides real-time spatial feedback during conceptual design. This paper presents an approach based on a generative multiperformance framework, configured for generating and optimising architectural designs based on a precedent design. The system is constructed using a parametric modeling environment enabling the capture of precedent designs, extraction of spatial analytics, and demonstration of how populations can be used to drive the generation and optimization of alternate spatial solutions. A pilot study implementing the complete workflow of the system is used to illustrate the benefits of coupling parametric modeling with structured precedent analysis and design generation.
Zaid Alkilani, S., Jupp, J.R. & Sawhney, A. 2013, 'Readying a developing economy for national performance measurement and benchmarking: A case study of the Jordanian construction industry', International Journal for Housing Science and Its Applications, vol. 37, no. 1, pp. 11-21.
In many developing countries, national construction performance measures and benchmarking processes are yet to be formulated, implemented and tracked. This inherent weakness of an economic sector has negative impacts on, productivity, efficiency and performance. This paper takes the Jordanian construction industry as a case study of a developing economy and highlights the significant challenges it faces in implementing performance measurement. Findings from this study reveal a number of specific and general characteristics, and the extent and severity of industry-based barriers. The paper identifies a range of requirements at the national level that must be met to move from a state of relative disarray to an industry ready for the successful implementation of performance measurement and benchmarking. The authors anticipate that the findings of this paper will be of interest to academics and professionals involved in other developing countries construction industries.
Awad, R., Chambers, J. & Jupp, J.R. 2013, 'Volunteer Tourism and Architecture Students: What motivates and can best prepare them?', Journal of Pedagogic Development, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 6-12.
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This paper explores student attitudes toward volunteering in the context of university-led building development programs, raising questions about the practice of volunteering and its contribution to community development. Focusing on students undertaking tertiary education in Western countries, this literature based study firstly explores the perceptions and motivations behind volunteering, and secondly discusses its developmental impact on low-income communities.
Forsythe, P.J., Jupp, J.R. & Sawhney, A. 2013, 'Building Information Modelling in Tertiary Construction Project Management Education: A Programme-wide Implementation Strategy', Journal for Education in the Built Environment, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 16-34.
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This paper reports on the on-going development of teaching and learning supported by Building Information Modelling (BIM) in the undergraduate Construction Project Management Programme at the University of Technology Sydney. BIM is a model-driven approach to designing, constructing, operating and maintaining buildings and civil engineering facilities. The model that forms the core of the BIM approach is a smart, shared and computable three-dimensional model of the building or the civil engineering facility. At its heart, BIM and Virtual Construction Models (VCMs) are used to facilitate a more integrated and visual mode of teaching. The approach provides a new basis for developing problem based learning - one that has the potential to allow students to aggregate their learning around a central project whilst enabling problems to be scaled at different levels of complexity. This approach aims to better integrate and link individual subjects together as well as improve the development of core student attributes such as communication, understanding, decision making, collaboration and information gathering skills; very much mimicking the on-going technology driven transformation happening in industry. The VCMs aim to be regularly used in various formats as students progress through their undergraduate degree programme - and we adopt the term `vertical problems' to capture the way models and problem based learning are being utilised, where staff author `sub-plots' that utilise information models in a way that best suits their specific subjects, e.g. cost, time, quality, sustainability subject areas. To this end, the article reports on findings from the research, development and early implementation stages of a programme-wide teaching and learning proposition supported by BIM. This includes a typology that helps target varying degrees of model utilisation and diffusion in given subjects and transitional requirements for both staff and students.
Jupp, J.R. & Awad, R. 2013, 'Developing Digital Literacy in Construction Management Education: A Design Thinking Led Approach', Journal of Pedagogic Development, vol. 3, no. 3, pp. 24-30.
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Alongside the digital innovations in AEC (Architectural, Engineering and Construction) practice, are calls for a new type of digital literacy, including a new information-based literacy informed by creativity, critical analysis and the theoretical and practical knowledge of the construction profession. This paper explores the role of design thinking and the promotion of abductive problem situations when developing digital literacies in construction education. The impacts of advanced digital modelling technologies on construction management practices and education are investigated before an examination of design thinking, the role of abductive reasoning and the rise of normative models of design thinking workflows. The paper then explores the role that design thinking can play in the development of new digital literacies in contemporary construction studies. A three-part framework for the implementation of a design thinking approach to construction is presented. The paper closes with a discussion of the importance of models of design thinking for learning and knowledge production, emphasising how construction management education can benefit from them.
Zaid Alkilani, S., Jupp, J.R. & Sawhney, A. 2013, 'Issues of construction health and safety in developing countries: a case of Jordan', Australasian Journal of Construction Economics and Building, vol. 13, no. 3, pp. 141-156.
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The construction industry is widely regarded as one of the most significant interms of its impact on health and safety (H&S). Recent findings suggestthat in developing countries H&S awareness and performance is low. In this paper,the current state of H&S on construction sites in Jordan was explored usinga two-part investigation. The first part introduces the area of research in aliterature based study of on-site safety. The second part is a case study onthe Jordanian construction industry and its current H&S practices. Primary datawas collected from field visits, expert interviews and semi-structuredquestionnaires. Supporting secondary data was collected from archival studiesand related research literature. The research findings highlight a lack of governmentcommitment exemplified by regulations, policies and legal constraints thatlimit the operational efficiency of those government departments responsiblefor H&S management, and hindering the development of good H&S practice.Research results also highlight the key constraints of good H&S practice fromthe perspective of construction contractors.The study concludes with discussion ofpotential solutions toimprove H&S performance on construction sites in Jordan.
Zaid Alkilani, S. & Jupp, J.R. 2012, 'Paving the Road for Sustainable Construction in Developing Countries: A Study of the Jordanian Construction Industry', AJCEB Conference Series, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 84-93.
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There is an increasing pressure on governments of developing economies to support sustainable construction procurement. In exploring this issue, this research asks three related questions: (1) how is sustainable procurement perceived in developing economies, (2) how can government regulation influence its application, and (3) what is the role of performance measurement in stimulating sustainable procurement practices? Answers are sought via an investigation exploring the underlying issues and challenges facing the construction industry of a developing country looking to address sustainable procurement. Using primary and secondary data sources, this research presents a case study of the Jordanian construction industry. Findings show that whilst sustainable procurement practices are promoted, it is still in its infancy - in part due to ineffective procurement frameworks and a lack of performance measurement. Current government regulations and policies are identified as an underlying cause, discouraging the development and adoption of sustainable procurement methods. As the Jordanian construction industry shares characteristics with other developing economies, it is expected that the findings of this paper will be of interest to professionals in those construction industries attempting to initiate sustainable procurement via performance measurement.
Dong, A. & Jupp, J. 2012, 'Intelligent decision support and modeling', Artificial Intelligence for Engineering Design, Analysis and Manufacturing: AIEDAM, vol. 26, no. 4, pp. 371-373.
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Jupp, J.R. & Macmillan, S. 2010, 'Promoting Teamwork and Sustainable Design', The Structural Engineer, vol. 88, no. 2, pp. 16-19.
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We often take the built environment for granted without realising the benefits it brings. It clearly influences our quality of life; well designed schools contribute to educational attainment, hospitals to patient outcomes, offices to productivity, public open space to recreation and well-being, while attractive towns and cities generate civic pride and tourism. The converse is also true; more policing and healthcare are needed where the built environment is poor. Alongside the issue of social outcomes is the increasingly important risk of environmental impact, including climate change. We urgently need to be providing facilities that minimise resource use in their construction, minimise energy and water requirements, and limit damage to the natural world. The Interdisciplinary Design for the Built Environment (IDBE) masters course aims to equip all its students with the skills needed to meet these challenges. An underlying principle of the course is that this demands effective interdisciplinary understanding and collaborative working. The course aims to help members of multi-disciplinary teams to work together effectively, harnessing their knowledge and expertise in the design and delivery of an integrated product.
Jupp, J.R. & Gero, J.S. 2006, 'Visual style: Qualitative and context-dependent categorization', Ai Edam-Artificial Intelligence For Engineering Design Analysis And Manufacturing, vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 247-266.
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Style is an ordering principle by which to structure artifacts in a design domain. The application of a visual order entails some explicit grouping property that is both cognitively plausible and contextually dependent. Central to cognitive-contextual notions are the type of representation used in analysis and the flexibility to allow semantic interpretation. We present a model of visual style based on the concept of similarity as a qualitative context-dependent categorization. The two core components of the model are semantic feature extraction and self-organizing maps (SOMs). The model proposes a method of categorizing two-dimensional unannotated design diagrams using both low-level geometric and hi-h-level semantic features that are automatically derived from the pictorial content of the design. The operation of the initial model, called Q-SOM, is then extended to include relevance feedback (Q-SOM:RF). The extended model can be seen as a series of sequential processing stages, in which qualitative encoding and feature extraction are followed by iterative recategorization. Categorization is achieved using an unsupervised SOM, and contextual dependencies are integrated via cluster relevance determined by the observer's feedback. The following stages are presented: initial per feature detection and extraction, selection of feature sets corresponding to different spatial ontologies, unsupervised categorization of design diagrams based on appropriate feature subsets, and integration of design context via relevance feedback. From our experiments we compare different outcomes from consecutive stages of the model. The results show that the model provides a cognitively plausible and context-dependent method for characterizing visual style in design.
Jupp, J.R. & Gero, J.S. 2006, 'A qualitative feature-based characterization of 2D architectural style', Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, vol. 57, no. 11, pp. 1537-1550.
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Architectural plans are design diagrams that describe building layout where space is planned according to design requirements. Style in architecture is generally characterized as common features appearing in a particular class of building design. This research seeks to address how to recognize architectural design style from a 2D plan diagram. We explore this question in a computational encoder-analyzer (E-A) model for 2D plans, where a characterization of 2D style is based on qualitative spatial representation and information theoretic measures. In a preliminary study of a prominent architect's plans, we demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach. We conclude by discussing practical applications of automated plan recognition and classification in design support tools.

Reports

Wilkinson, S.J. & Jupp, J.J. Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) 2015, Building Information Modelling and the Value Dimension, pp. 1-54, London.
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