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Professor John Daly

Biography

Professor John Daly PhD, RN, FACN, FAAN is the current Dean of the Faculty of Health and Head of the UTS/World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Development  at the University of Technology, Sydney. He was previously Dean of the Faculty of Nursing, Midwifery and Health at UTS (appointed 2008).

Professor Daly is an active professional and academic leader, educator, administrator, consultant, researcher, author and editor. He has  published widely on leadership in nursing and health, nursing education, cardiovascular health, role transition in nursing, aged care, cross-cultural nursing and nursing workforce issues. Professor Daly is a former Chair of the Global Alliance for Leadership in Nursing Education and Science (GANES), a former Chair of the Council of Deans of Nursing and Midwifery (Australia and New Zealand) and former Editor-In-Chief of  Collegian: The Australian Journal of Nursing Practice, Scholarship & Research (the refereed journal of the Australian College of Nursing which is published by Elsevier) a position he held for 9 years.

Professor Daly  has served on many committees and working parties over many years with local, national and international organizations including: NSW Health, The Health-Science Alliance, Sydney Alliance for Healthcare, Research & Training (SAHRT),  the Council of Deans of Nursing & Midwifery (Australia and New Zealand),the World Health Organization, Sigma Theta Tau International(STTI), and the International Network for Doctoral Education in Nursing. He is a member of the Board of Directors of AccessUTS and the Board of the Randwick Health & Medical Research Institute.

In 2013 Professor Daly was elected to Fellowship in the American Academy of Nursing (FAAN). In July 2014 he was invested as Secretary-General for the Global Network of World Health Organization Collaborating Centres for Nursing & Midwifery(www.globalnetworkwhocc.com). In addition he  was the only Australian nurse academic appointed to the STTI Global Advisory Panel on the Future of Nursing(GAPFON) in 2014. He continues to play an active leadership role in academic publishing having been appointed to the position of Editor-In-Chief  of the Journal of Nursing Management (Wiley,Oxford) in August, 2014.

In 2008 Professor Daly was awarded the title Emeritus Professor by the University of Western Sydney for distinguished service to the university and contributions to the discipline and profession of nursing at national and international levels. He is currently a Conjoint Professor in the School of Public Health and Community Medicine at the University of New South Wales, an Adjunct Professor in the School of Nursing & Midwifery, at Curtin University, Western Australia, a Visiting Professor at Huazhong University of Science & Technology (HUST), Wuhan, China, and an Adjunct Professor in the School of Nursing at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, USA.

Professional


Secretary-General, Global Network of World Health Organization Collaborating Centres for Nursing & Midwifery

Member, Global Advisory Panel on the Future of Nursing(GAPFON), STTI
Member, Board of Directors, Randwick Health & Medical Research Institute
Company Director, AccessUTS

Member, Editorial Board, Pacific Rim International Journal of Nursing Research
Member, Advisory Committee, WHO Collaborating Centre for Community Health Services, School of Nursing, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong
Member, External Advisory Committee, World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Nursing & Midwifery Education & Research Capacity Building, School of Nursing, Midwifery & Nutrition, James Cook University, Queensland
Member, Executive Committee, Global Network of World Health Organization Collaborating Centres for Nursing and Midwifery

Membership of learned societies
Australian College of Nursing
American Heart Association
Sigma Theta Tau International
American Academy of Nursing

Image of John Daly
Dean, Faculty of Health
Director, WHO Collaborating Centre for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Development (WHO or WHOCC)
Core Member, Health Services and Practice Research Strength
RN, B.HSc (RMIHE), BA (UOW), GradCertEdMgmt, MEd (Hons)(UOW), PhD(SCU)
 
Phone
+61 2 9514 5045
Fax
+61 2 9514 5049
Room
KG05.03.14

Research Interests

Leadership in healthcare
Cardiovascular health
Palliative care
Aged care
Nursing education
Global health

Can supervise: Yes

Leadership
Research
Cardiovascular health

Books

Daly, J., Speedy, S. & Jackson, D.E. 2009, Contexts of nursing, 3, Elsevier, Sydney.
Chang, E. & Daly, J. 2008, Transitions in nursing: Preparing for professional practice, 2nd ed., Elsevier, Sydney.
This text is an important book for undergraduate nurses and recent graduates as they move from student nurse to graduate nurse. As with the 1st edition, this book has been written by a breadth of academics and clinical nurse practitioners. It deals with all the professional issues nursing students need to consider as they prepare to move from university to the workplace of the graduate nurse. Among the many topics, the book deals with issues involving transition from student to practicing nurse, the Australian health care system, organisational structure, workplace culture, professional nursing development, applying for jobs, reflective practice, clinical governance and occupational health and safety. With an ever increasing focus on professional issues in nursing, this is an outstanding and valuable book that will help educate and prepare nurses for practice. It will be of great use to senior undergraduate nurses, newly registered nurses, nurses in management and leadership positions and nurse educators in both tertiary and clinical sectors. - Provides nursing students with all they need to know to tackle the transition from student to graduate - High profile contributors, including many new ones who have been selected for their expertise in specific areas. - Maintains the popular structure, format and style of the 1st edition with additions such as cases and OH&S content and increased and updated content on IR
Daly, J., Speedy, S. & Jackson, D.E. 2006, Contexts of nursing, 2nd ed., Elsevier, Sydney.
Daly, J., Speedy, S., Jackson, D.E. & Darbyshire, P. 2002, Contexts of nursing: An introduction (UK/European adaptation), Blackwell Publishing, Oxford.
Contexts of Nursing: An Introduction offers a comprehensive overview of the fundamental ideas and perspectives underpinning the practice of contemporary nursing. The book is an essential resource for any program that addresses professional nursing, theory and knowledge. Each chapter focuses on a foundational area of study. Among these are philosophical, ethical, legal, theoretical, professional, technological, and research aspects of nursing. Ideas regarding nursing practice are considered, including nursing practice with individuals, communities and groups with special needs. There is a chapter on becoming a critical thinker and another on maximising learning opportunities and preparing for professional practice. * Introductory textbook for all diploma and degree Foundation program nursing students * A concise yet comprehensive overview of professional nursing studies * Outstanding pedagogical features including learning objectives, keywords, reflective questions and recommended reading * The Australian edition of this book is the highest selling nursing book ever published in Australasia * Painstakingly adapted to make it invaluable to every UK student nurse * Contributions from some of the top nursing names.

Chapters

Chang, E. & Daly, J. 2012, 'Managing the transition from student to graduate nurse' in Chang, E. & Daly, J. (eds), Transitions in Nursing 3e, Churchill Livingstone, Australia, pp. 1-16.
Nursing attracts people from many walks of life, motivated largely by a concern and a desire to understand and help people confronted by a range of actual or potential health problems and challenges.
Daly, J., Elliott, D. & Chang, E. 2010, 'Research in nursing: Concepts and processes' in Daly, J., Speedy, S. & Jackson, D. (eds), Contexts of nursing 3e, Churchill Livingstone, Sydney, pp. 128-144.
Daly, J. & Davidson, P.M. 2010, 'Reciprocal and supportive mentoring (Chapter 77)' in Rollins Gantz, N. (ed), 101 global leadership lessons for nurses: Shared legacies from leaders and their mentees, Sigma Theta Tau International, Indianapolis, USA, pp. 407-411.
101 Global Leadership Lessons for Nurses covers the daily challenges facing health care leaderscommunications, negotiations, resource management, and work-life balance, to name a fewwith the unique feature of a mentor-mentee team authoring each chapter. These established and emerging mentors and mentees come from every corner of the globe and share their lessons learned, providing a rich legacy for nurses everywhere. 101 Global Leadership Lessons for Nurses offers: - An alphabetical subject order for quick topic access. - Authors from 32 countries spanning six continents. - A wealth of resources, with topics ranging from academic-service partnerships to writing for professional journals, and 99 other topics in between. - Reflective questions at the end of each chapter to help you integrate ideas into your professional life.
Daly, J., Elliott, D. & Chang, E. 2009, 'Research in nursing: Concepts and processes (Chapter 9)' in Daly, J., Speedy, S. & Jackson, D. (eds), Contexts of nursing, 3rd Ed, Churchill- Livingston, Elsevier, Sydney, pp. 129-144.
Daly, J., Jackson, D.E. & Nay, R. 2009, 'Visionary leadership for a 'greying' health system (Chapter 28)' in Nay, R. & Garratt, S. (eds), Older people: Issues and innovations in care (3rd Ed), Elsevier, Sydney, pp. 468-495.
Daly, J., Speedy, S. & Jackson, D.E. 2009, 'Introducing Nursing... a career for life (Chapter 1)' in Daly, J., Speedy, S. & Jackson, D. (eds), Contexts of Nursing 3rd Ed, Churchill- Livingston, Elsevier, Sydney, pp. 1-14.
Jackson, D.E., Daly, J. & Davidson, P.M. 2008, 'Interviews' in McKenna, H., Watson, R., Keady, J. & Cowman, S. (eds), Nursing research: Designs and methods, Elsevier, Edinburgh, pp. 281-288.
Chang, E. & Daly, J. 2008, 'Managing the transition from student to graduate nurse (Chapter 1)' in Chang, E. & Daly, J. (eds), Transitions in nursing: Preparing for professional practice (2nd Ed), Elsevier, Sydney, Australia, pp. 1-15.
Thompson, D.R., Daly, J., Elliott, D. & Chang, E. 2006, 'Research in nursing: concepts and processes' in Daly, J., Speedy, S. & Jackson, D. (eds), Contexts of Nursing: an Introduction, Churchill Livingstone, Sydney, Australia, pp. 114-128.
Davidson, P.M., Leung, D. & Daly, J. 2006, 'Cardiovascular health breakdown (Chapter 5)' in Chang, E., Daly, J. & Elliott, D. (eds), Pathophysiology Applied to Nursing Practice, Elsevier, Sydney, pp. 105-137.
Davidson, P.M., Leung, D. & Daly, J. 2006, 'Cardiac health breakdown (Chapter 5)' in Chang, E., Daly, J. & Elliott, D. (eds), Pathophysiology applied to nursing practice, Elsevier, Sydney, pp. 105-137.
Anders, R., Daly, J., Thompson, D., Elliott, D. & Chang, E. 2005, 'Research in nursing (Chapter 8)' in Professional nursing: Concepts, issues and challenges, Springer, New York, pp. 153-174.
Anders, R., Daly, J., Thompson, D.R., Elliott, D. & Chang, E. 2005, 'Research in Nursing (Chapter 8)' in Daly, J., Speedy, S., Jackson, D., Lambert, V. & Lambert, C. (eds), Professional nursing: Concepts, issues and challenges, Springer Publishing Company, New York, pp. 153-174.
Daly, J., Chang, E., Hancock, K. & Thompson, D. 2004, 'The context of nursing and health care research' in Crookes, P. & Davies, S. (eds), Research into practice, Bailliere Tindall, Edinburgh, UK.
Daly, J., Chang, E., Hancock, K. & Crookes, P. 2004, 'Leading and managing change in nursing (Chapter 11)' in Daly, J., Speedy, S. & Jackson, D. (eds), Nursing leadership, Churchill Livingstone, Sydney, pp. 183-196.
Jackson, D.E., Daly, J. & Chang, E. 2002, 'Approaches in qualitative research (Chapter 9)' in Schneider, Z., Elliott, D., LoBiondo-Wood, G. & Haber, J. (eds), Nursing research: Methods, critical appraisal and utilisation, Mosby, Sydney.
Thompson, D., Daly, J., Elliott, D. & Chang, E. 2002, 'Research in nursing: Concepts and processes (Chapter 8)' in Daly, J., Speedy, S., Jackson, D. & Darbyshire, P. (eds), Contexts of nursing (UK/European adaptation), Blackwell Publishing, Oxford, pp. 84-100.
Davidson, P.M., Daly, J. & romanini, J. 1996, 'QUM in intensive care (Chapter 7)' in Stein, I. (ed), Quality Use of Medicines in Nursing Practice: Professional Development Series No. 6, Royal College of Nursing, Deakin, ACT, pp. 87-103.

Conferences

Homer, C.S., Rumsey, M., Brodie, P.M., Dawson, A., Copeland, F.H. & Daly, J. 2013, 'Helping build foundations for improved maternal health in PNG', International Council of Nurses 25th Quadrennial Congress.
Gero, A., Fletcher, S.M., Rumsey, M., Thiessen, J., Kuruppu, N., Daly, J., Buchan, J. & Willetts, J.R. 2013, 'Disaster response and adaptive capacity in the Pacific'.
Fletcher, S., Gero, A., Rumsey, M., Willetts, J.R., Daly, J., Buchan, J., Thiessen, J. & Kuruppu, N. 2012, 'Understanding adaptive capacity to emergencies in the Pacific in the context of climate change'.

Journal articles

Jackson, D., Walter, G., Daly, J. & Cleary, M. 2014, 'Editorial: Multiple outputs from single studies: acceptable division of findings vs. 'salami' slicing', JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NURSING, vol. 23, no. 1-2, pp. 1-2.
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Davidson, P.M., Newton, P.J., Ferguson, C., Daly, J., Elliott, D., Homer, C., Duffield, C. & Jackson, D. 2014, 'Rating and ranking the role of bibliometrics and webometrics in nursing and midwifery', The Scientific World Journal, vol. 2014.
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Background. Bibliometrics are an essential aspect of measuring academic and organizational performance. Aim. This review seeks to describe methods for measuring bibliometrics, identify the strengths and limitations of methodologies, outline strategies for interpretation, summarise evaluation of nursing and midwifery performance, identify implications for metric of evaluation, and specify the implications for nursing and midwifery and implications of social networking for bibliometrics and measures of individual performance. Method. A review of electronic databases CINAHL, Medline, and Scopus was undertaken using search terms such as bibliometrics, nursing, and midwifery. The reference lists of retrieved articles and Internet sources and social media platforms were also examined. Results. A number of well-established, formal ways of assessment have been identified, including h- and c-indices. Changes in publication practices and the use of the Internet have challenged traditional metrics of influence. Moreover, measuring impact beyond citation metrics is an increasing focus, with social media representing newer ways of establishing performance and impact. Conclusions. Even though a number of measures exist, no single bibliometric measure is perfect. Therefore, multiple approaches to evaluation are recommended. However, bibliometric approaches should not be the only measures upon which academic and scholarly performance are evaluated. 2014 Patricia M. Davidson et al.
Rumsey, M., Fletcher, S.M., Thiessen, J., Gero, A., Kuruppu, N., Daly, J., Buchan, J. & Willetts, J. 2014, 'A qualitative examination of the health workforce needs during climate change disaster response in Pacific Island Countries', HUMAN RESOURCES FOR HEALTH, vol. 12.
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Gero, A., Fletcher, S.M., Rumsey, M., Thiessen, J., Kuruppu, N., Buchan, J., Daly, J. & Willetts, J.R. 2014, 'Disasters and climate change in the Pacific: Adaptive capacity of humanitarian response organisations', Climate and Development, vol. 1.
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Climate change is likely to affect the pattern of disasters in the Pacific and, by extension, the organizations and systems involved in disaster response. This research focused on how immediate humanitarian health-related needs following disasters are met using the concept of adaptive capacity to investigate the resilience of organizations and the robustness of the broader system of disaster response. Four case study countries (Cook Islands, Fiji, Samoa, and Vanuatu) were chosen for deeper investigation of the range of issues present in the Pacific. Key findings were that adaptive capacity was enhanced by strong informal communication and relationships as well as formal relationships, appropriate participation of traditional leaders and churches, and recognition and support for the critical role national disaster management offices play in disaster coordination. Adaptive capacity was found to be constrained by lack of clear policies for requesting international assistance, lack of coordinated disaster assessments, and limited human resources for health in disaster response. Limitations in psychosocial support and Australian medical services to meet specific needs were observed. Finally, the research revealed that both Pacific and Australian disaster-response agencies would benefit from a strengthened 'future' focus to better plan for uncertainty and changing risks.
McDermid, F., Peters, K., Jackson, D. & Daly, J. 2014, 'Conducting qualitative research in the context of pre-existing peer and collegial relationships.', Nurse Res, vol. 21, no. 5, pp. 28-33.
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To highlight issues and challenges faced in recruitment and interviewing during a study that sought to explore the transition of nurses into academic life and the associated ethical implications.
Mannix, J., Wilkes, L. & Daly, J. 2014, 'Pragmatism, persistence and patience: A user perspective on strategies for data collection using popular online social networks', COLLEGIAN, vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 127-133.
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Daly, J. 2014, 'It is more than cosmetic: Why accuracy counts with post-nominal letters', COLLEGIAN, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 1-1.
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Jackson, D., Daly, J. & Saltman, D.C. 2014, 'Aggregating case reports: a way for the future of evidence-based health care?', Clin Case Rep, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 23-24.
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Kennedy, M.S., Barnsteiner, J. & Daly, J. 2014, 'Honorary and ghost authorship in nursing publications.', J Nurs Scholarsh, vol. 46, no. 6, pp. 416-422.
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The purposes of this study were to (a) assess the prevalence of articles with honorary authors and ghost authors in 10 leading peer-reviewed nursing journals between 2010 to 2012; (b) compare the results to prevalence reported by authors of articles published in high-impact medical journals; and (c) assess the experiences of editors in the International Academy of Nursing Editors with honorary and guest authorship.
Davidson, P.M., Daly, J. & Hill, M.N. 2013, 'Editorial: Looking to the future with courage, commitment, competence and compassion', Journal of Clinical Nursing, vol. 22, no. 19-20, pp. 2665-2667.
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Jackson, D., Daly, J., Mannix, J., Potgieter, I. & Cleary, M. 2013, 'Editorial: An overview of data-based papers on undergraduate nurse education recently published in Contemporary Nurse: Progress, challenges and the need for a strategic agenda', CONTEMPORARY NURSE, vol. 45, no. 2, pp. 146-151.
McDermid, F., Peters, K., Daly, J. & Jackson, D. 2013, ''I thought I was just going to teach': Stories of new nurse academics on transitioning from sessional teaching to continuing academic positions', CONTEMPORARY NURSE, vol. 45, no. 1, pp. 46-55.
Mannix, J., Wilkes, L. & Daly, J. 2013, 'Attributes of clinical leadership in contemporary nursing: An integrative review', CONTEMPORARY NURSE, vol. 45, no. 1, pp. 10-21.
Cleary, M., Walter, G., Jackson, D. & Daly, J. 2013, 'Dealing with peer-review: What is reasonable and what is not?', COLLEGIAN, vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 123-125.
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Dignam, D., Duffield, C., Stasa, H., Gray, J., Jackson, D. & Daly, J. 2012, 'Management and leadership in nursing: an Australian educational perspective', JOURNAL OF NURSING MANAGEMENT, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 65-71.
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Davidson, P.M., Mitchell, J.A., DiGiacomo, M., Inglis, S.C., Newton, P.J., Harman, J. & Daly, J. 2012, 'Cardiovascular disease in women: Implications for improving health outcomes', Collegian, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 5-13.
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Objective: To collate data on women and cardiovascular disease in Australia and globally to inform public health campaigns and health care interventions. Design: Literature review. Results: Women with acute coronary syndromes show consistently poorer outcomes than men, independent of comorbidity and management, despite less anatomical obstruction of coronary arteries and relatively preserved left ventricular function. Higher mortality and complication rates are best documented amongst younger women and those with ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction.Sex differences in atherogenesis and cardiovascular adaptation have been hypothesised, but not proven.Atrial fibrillation carries a relatively greater risk of stroke in women than in men, and anticoagulation therapy is associated with higher risk of bleeding complications.The degree of risk conferred by single cardiovascular risk factors and combinations of risk factors may differ between the sexes, and marked postmenopausal changes are seen in some risk factors.Sociocultural factors, delays in seeking care and differences in self-management behaviours may contribute to poorer outcomes in women.Differences in clinical management for women, including higher rates of misdiagnosis and less aggressive treatment, have been reported, but there is a lack of evidence to determine their effects on outcomes, especially in angina.Although enrolment of women in randomised clinical trials has increased since the 1970s, women remain underrepresented in cardiovascular clinical trials. Conclusions: Improvement in the prevention and management of CVD in women will require a deeper understanding of women's needs by the community, health care professionals, researchers and government. 2011 Royal College of Nursing, Australia.
McKenna, H., Daly, J., Davidson, P., Duffield, C. & Jackson, D. 2012, 'RAE and ERA-Spot the difference', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING STUDIES, vol. 49, no. 4, pp. 375-377.
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McDermid, F., Peters, K., Jackson, D. & Daly, J. 2012, 'Factors contributing to the shortage of nurse faculty: A review of the literature', NURSE EDUCATION TODAY, vol. 32, no. 5, pp. 565-569.
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Gallagher, R., Kirkness, A., Zelestis, E., Hollams, D., Kneale, C., Armari, E., Bennett, T., Daly, J. & Tofler, G. 2012, 'A Randomised Trial of a Weight Loss Intervention for Overweight and Obese People Diagnosed with Coronary Heart Disease and/or Type 2 Diabetes', ANNALS OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE, vol. 44, no. 1, pp. 119-128.
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Jackson, D.E. & Daly, J. 2011, 'All things to all people: Adversity and Resilience in Leadership', Nurse Leader, vol. June, pp. 21-30.
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To lead is to live dangerously because when leadership counts, when you lead people through difficult change, you challenge what people hold dear - their daily habits, tools, loyalties, and ways of thinking - with nothing more to offer perhaps than a possibility. And people resist in all kinds of creative and unexpected ways that can get you taken out of the game: pushed aside, undermined, or eliminated (Heifetz R, Linsky M, Leadership on the Line, 2002).
Davidson, P.M., Daly, J., Leung, D., Ang, E., Paull, G., DiGiacomo, M., Hancock, K., Cao, Y., Du, H. & Thompson, D.R. 2011, 'Health-seeking beliefs of cardiovascular patients: A qualitative study', International Journal of Nursing Studies, vol. 48, no. 11, pp. 1367-1375.
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Objectives: The study aims were to (a) describe the experiences of Chinese Australians with heart disease following discharge from hospital for an acute cardiac event; (b) identify patterns and cultural differences of Chinese Australians following discharge from hospital; and (c) illustrate the illness/health seeking behaviors and health beliefs of Chinese Australians. Design: Qualitative study. Methods: Interview data were obtained from the following sources: (a) focus groups of Chinese community participants without heart disease; (b) interviews with patients recently discharged from hospital following an admission for an acute cardiac event; and (c) interviews with Chinese-born health professionals working in Australia. Qualitative thematic analysis was undertaken. Results: Study themes generated from the data were: (1) linking traditional values and beliefs with Western medicine; (2) reverence for health professionals and family; and (3) juxtaposing traditional beliefs and self-management. Conclusions: Considering the influence of cultural values in developing health care plans and clinical decision making is important. 2011 Elsevier Ltd.
Digiacomo, M., Davidson, P.M., Zecchin, R., Lamb, K. & Daly, J. 2011, 'Caring for others, but not themselves: implications for health care interventions in women with cardiovascular disease.', Nurs Res Pract, vol. 2011, p. 376020.
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Cardiovascular disease is the largest killer of women internationally and women often suffer inferior outcomes following an acute cardiac event as compared to men. A gendered approach to investigating cardiovascular disease in women incorporates the unique social, cultural, and economic circumstances that being a woman brings to the health encounter. The multiple roles enacted by many women may be important factors in this health discrepancy. In order to more fully understand the impact of the roles of women on health, a questionnaire was administered to participants of the Heart Awareness for Women group cardiac rehabilitation program which assessed women's role perceptions followed by discussions. We found that caregiving can be both positive and negative. It gives a sense of purpose, meaning, and community connection as well as burden and conflict. Emphasis must be placed on promoting strategies in women to achieve a balance between caregiving responsibilities and prioritisation of cardiovascular health.
Daly, J., Davidson, P.M., Duffield, C., Campbell, T. & Ward, R. 2011, 'Interdisciplinary, cross-institutional collaborations: The Academic Health Sciences Centre as a key to addressing complex health problems and advancing research-based health care', COLLEGIAN, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 1-2.
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Davidson, P.M., DiGiacomo, M., Thompson, S.C., Abbott, P.A., Davison, J., Moore, L., Daly, J., McGrath, S., Taylor, K. & Usherwood, T. 2011, 'Health workforce issues and how these impact on Indigenous Australians', Journal of Australian Indigenous Issues, vol. 14, no. 4, pp. 69-84.
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Indigenous Australians suffer a disproportionate burden of iII health estimated to be 2.5 times higher than other Australians. A number of complex and multifaceted factors impact not only on health inequity but also imbalance in the health workforce. Addressing workforce issues for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous health workers is vital in decreasing the gap in health and social outcomes for Indigenous Australians. It is widely recognised that the capacity of the lndigenous health workforce is a crucial factor in responding effectively to Indigenous health needs. Using the typology of workforce imbalances proposed by Zurn and colleagues, this paper critically analyses issues within Australia impacting on the health workforce, arguing that it is impossible to consider workforce issues for Indigenous health without regard for global, sociodemographic, cultural, geographic and economic factors.
Davidson, P.M., Homer, C.S.E., Duffield, C. & Daly, J. 2011, 'A moment in history and a time for celebration: The performance of nursing and midwifery in Excellence in Research for Australia', Collegian, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 43-44.
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Davidson, P.M. & Daly, J. 2011, 'An open mind, discussion, debate and the testing of new ideas: The way of the future', Collegian, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 137-138.
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Daly, J. & Jackson, D.E. 2010, 'Improving the workplace: The pivotal role of nurse leaders.', Advances in Contemporary Nursing, vol. 36, no. 12, pp. 82-85.
Chang, E., Daly, J., Johnson, A., Harrison, K., Easterbrook, S., Bidewell, J., Stewart, H., Noel, M. & Hancock, K. 2009, 'Challenges for professional care of advanced dementia', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING PRACTICE, vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 41-47.
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Johnson, A., Chang, E., Daly, J., Harrison, K., Noel, M., Hancock, K. & Easterbrook, S. 2009, 'The communication challenges faced in adopting a palliative care approach in advanced dementia', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING PRACTICE, vol. 15, no. 5, pp. 467-474.
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Davidson, P., Digiacomo, M., Zecchin, R., Clarke, M., Paul, G., Lamb, K., Hancock, K., Chang, E., Daly, J. & Invest, H.A.W.P. 2008, 'A cardiac rehabilitation program to improve psychosocial outcomes of women with heart disease', JOURNAL OF WOMENS HEALTH, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 123-134.
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Huntington, A., Bidewell, J., Gilmour, J., Chang, E., Daly, J., Wilson, H., Lambert, V.A. & Lambert, C.E. 2008, 'The relationship between workplace stress, coping strategies and health status in New Zealand nurses', The Journal of Occupational Health and Safety: Australia and New Zealand, vol. 24, no. 2, pp. 131-141.
This study was part of an international project examining workplace stress among nurses and their coping strategies, and the relationship between stress, coping and health in the Asia-Pacific region. The aim of the present study was to identify dominant workplace stressors for New Zealand nurses, their most used coping strategies, and variables that best predict their mental and physical health. Postal surveys were sent to 190 randomly selected New Zealand nurses employed in clinical areas. Workload was the most common stressor, while 'planful' problem solving, seeking social support, and self controlling were the most frequently used ways of coping. The link between stressors such as workload and reduced mental health is concerning, especially as effective coping strategies such as problem solving are already predominantly used by nurses. The findings suggest that nurses' mental health could benefit from a workload that minimises stress, and from increased support in the workplace and encouragement of planned problem solving
Goddard, L., Davidson, P.M., Daly, J. & Mackey, S. 2008, 'People with an intellectual disability in the discourse of chronic and complex conditions: An invisible group?', Australian Health Review, vol. 32, no. 3, pp. 405-414.
People with an intellectual disability and their families experience poorer health care compared with the general population. Living with an intellectual disability is often challenged by coexisting complex and chronic conditions, such as gastrointestinal and respiratory conditions. A literature review was undertaken to document the needs of this vulnerable population, and consultation was undertaken with mothers of children with disabilities and with professionals working within disability services for people with an intellectual disability and their families. Based on this review, there is a need to increase the profile of people with an intellectual disability in the discourse surrounding chronic and complex conditions. Strategies such as guideline and competency development may better prepare health professions to care for people with disabilities and chronic and complex care needs and their families.
Halcomb, E.J., Davidson, P.M., Griffiths, R. & Daly, J. 2008, 'Cardiovascular disease management: time to advance the practice nurse role?', AUSTRALIAN HEALTH REVIEW, vol. 32, no. 1, pp. 44-55.
Daly, J., Clark, D.J.M., Lancaster, J., Bednash, G.P. & Orchard, C. 2008, 'The global alliance for nursing education and scholarship: Delivering a vision for nursing education', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING STUDIES, vol. 45, no. 8, pp. 1115-1117.
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Griffiths, R. & Daly, J. 2008, 'Towards a culturally competent nurse workforce (Editorial)', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 28, no. 1, pp. 98-100.
Jackson, D. & Daly, J. 2008, 'Nursing and pre-registration nursing education under the spotlight again', COLLEGIAN, vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 1-2.
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Goddard, L., Davidson, P.M., Daly, J. & Mackey, S. 2008, 'People with an intellectual disabilitiy in the discourse of chronic and complex conditions: an invisible group?', Australian Health Review, vol. 32, no. 3, pp. 405-414.
People with an intellectual disability and their families experience poorer health care compared with the general population. Living with an intellectual disability is often challenged by coexisting complex and chronic conditions, such as gastrointestinal and respiratory conditions. A literature review was undertaken to document the needs of this vulnerable population, and consultation was undertaken with mothers of children with disabilities and with professionals working within disability services for people with an intellectual disability and their families. Based on this review, there is a need to increase the profile of people with an intellectual disability in the discourse surrounding chronic and complex conditions. Strategies such as guideline and competency development may better prepare health professions to care for people with disabilities and chronic and complex care needs and their families
Davidson, P.M., DiGiacomo, M., Zecchin, R., Clarke, M., Paul, G., Lamb, K., Hancock, K., Chang, E. & Daly, J. 2008, 'A cardiac rehabilitation program to improve psychosocial outcomes of women with heart disease', Journal of Women's Health, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 123-134.
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Background and aims: Heart disease in women is characterised by greater disability and a higher rate of morbidity and early death after an acute coronary event compared with men. Women also have lower participation rates than men in cardiac rehabilitation. This study sought to describe development of a nurse-directed cardiac rehabilitation program tailored to the needs of women following an acute cardiac event to address their psychological and social needs. Methods: The Heart Awareness for Women program (HAFW) commenced in 2003 with phase I involving development of program elements and seeking validation through consumers and clinical experts. The program was then trialed in an 8-week program in a convenience sample of 6 women. Phase II applied the revised program using action research principles focusing on enabling clinical staff to implement the ongoing program. A total of 54 women participated in this phase, 48 of whom completed baseline questionnaires. A mixed-method evaluation, using questionnaires, interviews, and observation, assessed the impact of the intervention on psychological and social aspects of womens recovery following an acute coronary event. Results: Women welcomed the opportunity to discuss their individual stories, fears, and challenges and to derive support from contact with other women. Via health professional facilitation, women were able to develop strategies collectively to address risk factor modification and achieve optimal cardiovascular health. No statistically significant changes in depression, anxiety, stress, cardiac control, role integration, or perceived social support were found; however, descriptive and qualitative findings revealed decreases in anxiety and an increased sense of social support.
Cleary, M., Walter, G., Jackson, D.E. & Daly, J. 2008, 'Editorial: Dealing with peer-review: What is reasonable and what is not?', Collegian, vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 123-125.
Factors to consider when submitting articles to peer-reviewed journals
Halcomb, E.J., Davidson, P.M., Yallop, J., Griffiths, R. & Daly, J. 2007, 'Strategic directions for developing the Australian general practice nurse role in cardiovascular disease management.', Contemp Nurse, vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 125-135.
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Practice nursing is an integral component of British and New Zealand primary care, but in Australia it remains an emerging specialty. Despite an increased focus on the Australian practice nurse role, there has been limited strategic role development, particularly relating to national health priority areas. This paper reports the third stage of a Project exploring the Australian practice nurse role in the management of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This stage involved a consensus development conference, undertaken to identify strategic, priority recommendations for practice nurse role development. 1. Practice nurses have an important role in developing systems and processes for CVD management; 2. A change in the culture of general practice is necessary to promote acceptance of nurse-led CVD management; 3. Future research needs to evaluate specific models of care, incorporating outcome measures sensitive to nursing interventions; 4. Considerable challenges exist in conducting research in general practice; and 5. Changes in funding models are necessary for widespread practice nurse role development. The shifting of funding models provides evidence to support interdisciplinary practice in Australian general practice. The time is ripe, therefore, to engage in prospective and strategic planning to inform development of the practice nurse role.
Brookes, K., Davidson, P.M., Daly, J. & Halcomb, E.J. 2007, 'Role theory: A framework to investigate the community nurse role in contemporary health care systems', CONTEMPORARY NURSE, vol. 25, no. 1-2, pp. 146-155.
Davidson, P.M., Macdonald, P., Moser, D.K., Ang, E., Paull, G., Choucair, S., Daly, J., Gholizadeh, L. & Dracup, K. 2007, 'Cultural diversity in heart failure management: Findings from the DISCOVER Study (Part 2)', CONTEMPORARY NURSE, vol. 25, no. 1-2, pp. 50-61.
Davidson, P.M., Dracup, K., Phillips, J., Daly, J. & Padilla, G. 2007, 'Preparing for the worst while hoping for the best - The relevance of hope in the heart failure illness trajectory', JOURNAL OF CARDIOVASCULAR NURSING, vol. 22, no. 3, pp. 159-165.
Davidson, P.M., Dracup, K., Phillips, J., Padilla, G. & Daly, J. 2007, 'Maintaing hope in transition - A Theoretical framework to guide interventions for people with heart failure', JOURNAL OF CARDIOVASCULAR NURSING, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 58-64.
Daly, J. & Bryant, R. 2007, 'Professional organisations and regulatory bodies: Forging and advancing the role of nurses in Australian primary care', CONTEMPORARY NURSE, vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 27-29.
Daly, J. 2007, 'Another step forward for Collegian (Editorial)', Collegian, vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 2-2.
Chang, E.M.L., Bidewell, J.W., Huntington, A.D., Daly, J., Johnson, A., Wilson, H., Lambert, V.A. & Lambert, C.E. 2007, 'A survey of role stress, coping and health in Australian and New Zealand hospital nurses', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING STUDIES, vol. 44, no. 8, pp. 1354-1362.
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Davidson, P.M., Elliott, D. & Daly, J. 2006, 'Clinical leadership in contemporary clinical practice: implications for nursing in Australia.', J Nurs Manag, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 180-187.
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Leadership in the clinical practice environment is important to ensure both optimal patient outcomes and successive generations of motivated and enthusiastic clinicians.
Phillips, J., Davidson, P.M., Jackson, D., Kristjanson, L., Daly, J. & Curran, J. 2006, 'Residential aged care: the last frontier for palliative care', JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, vol. 55, no. 4, pp. 416-424.
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Daly, J., Chang, E. & Jackson, D. 2006, 'Quality of work life in nursing: some issues and challenges.', Collegian, vol. 13, no. 4, p. 2.
Daly, J. 2006, 'Positioning Collegian for the future (Editorial)', Collegian, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 2-2.
Phillips, J.L., Davidson, P.M., Jackson, D., Kristjanson, L., Bennett, M.L. & Daly, J. 2006, 'Enhancing palliative care delivery in a regional community in Australia.', Aust Health Rev, vol. 30, no. 3, pp. 370-379.
Although access to palliative care is a fundamental right for people in Australia and is endorsed by government policy, there is often limited access to specialist palliative care services in regional, rural and remote areas. This article appraises the evidence pertaining to palliative care service delivery to inform a sustainable model of palliative care that meets the needs of a regional population on the mid-north coast of New South Wales. Expert consultation and an eclectic literature review were undertaken to develop a model of palliative care service delivery appropriate to the needs of the target population and resources of the local community. On the basis of this review, a local palliative care system that is based on a population-based approach to service planning and delivery, with formalized integrated network agreements and role delineation between specialist and generalist providers, has the greatest potential to meet the palliative care needs of this regional coastal community.
Chang, E.M., Daly, J., Hancock, K.M., Bidewell, J.W., Johnson, A., Lambert, V.A. & Lambert, C.E. 2006, 'The relationships among workplace stressors, coping methods, demographic characteristics, and health in Australian nurses', JOURNAL OF PROFESSIONAL NURSING, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 30-38.
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Hancock, K., Chang, E., Johnson, A., Harrison, K., Daly, J., Easterbrook, S., Noel, M., Luhr-Taylor, M. & Davidson, P.M. 2006, 'Palliative care for people with advanced dementia: Illuminating evidence-based practice needs', Alzheimer's Care Quarterly, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 49-57.
AB The aims of this article are to (1) identify the barriers associated with palliative care for persons with advanced dementia, (2) argue the need for increased collaboration and partnerships between aged care and palliative key providers, and (3) discuss the need for the development and evaluation of evidence-based guidelines for care. Studies addressing these issues are discussed. A key finding of the material reviewed for this article underscores the importance of the development, implementation, and evaluation of guidelines that are empirically based, developed collaboratively, and incorporated into models of care for people with advanced dementia
Halcomb, E., Daly, J., Davidson, P., Elliott, D. & Griffiths, R. 2005, 'Life beyond severe traumatic injury: an integrative review of the literature.', Aust Crit Care, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 17-24.
It is only recently that recognition of the serious and debilitating sequelae of trauma has prompted exploration of outcomes beyond survival, such as disability, health status and quality of life. This paper aims to review the literature describing outcomes following severe traumatic injury to provide clinicians with a greater understanding of the recovery trajectory following severe trauma and highlight the issues faced by those recovering from such injury. Electronic databases, published reference lists and the Internet were searched to identify relevant literature. The heterogeneous nature of published literature in this area prohibited a systematic approach to inclusion of papers in this review. Trauma survivors report significant sequelae that influence functional status, psychological wellbeing, quality of life and return to productivity following severe injury. Key themes that emerge from the review include: current trauma systems which provide inadequate support along the recovery trajectory; rehabilitation referral which is affected by geographical location and provider preferences; a long-term loss of productivity in both society and the workplace; a high incidence of psychological sequelae; a link between poor recovery and increased drug and alcohol consumption; and valued social support which can augment recovery. Future research to evaluate interventions which target the recovery needs of the severely injured patients is recommended. Particular emphasis is required to develop systematic, sustainable and cost-effective follow-up to augment the successes of existing acute trauma services in providing high quality acute resuscitation and definitive trauma management.
Davidson, P., Paull, G., Rees, D., Daly, J. & Cockburn, J. 2005, 'Activities of home-based heart failure nurse specialists: A modified narrative analysis', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CRITICAL CARE, vol. 14, no. 5, pp. 426-433.
Hancock, K., Davidson, P.M., Daly, J., Weber, D. & Chang, E. 2005, 'An exploration of the usefulness of motivational interviewing in facilitating secondary prevention gains in cardiac rehabilitation', Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention, vol. 25, no. 1, pp. 200-206.
Motivational interviewing is a client-centered, directive counseling approach aimed at promoting motivation in clients to change certain behaviors. Its effect is to reduce defensiveness and promote disclosure, engagement, and participation, thereby motivating the client to make behavioral changes. Motivational interviewing marries well with the principles of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) in terms of increasing motivation among CR clients, promoting a client-centered approach and in the cost- and time-effective practices of CR. Very little research has been conducted examining the effectiveness of motivational interviewing in enhancing CR outcomes.
Ketefian, S., Davidson, P.M., Daly, J., Chang, E. & Srisuphan, W. 2005, 'Issues and challenges in international doctoral education in nursing (solicited paper)', Nursing and Health Sciences, vol. 7, no. 3, pp. 150-156.
Education is a driving force in improving the health and welfare of communities globally. Doctoral education of nurses has been identified as a critical factor for provision of leadership in practice, scholarship, research, policy and education. Since the genesis of doctoral education in nursing in the USA in the 1930s, this movement has burgeoned to over 273 doctoral programs in over 30 countries globally. The present article seeks to identify the issues and challenges in nursing doctoral education globally, and those encountered by doctoral program graduates in meeting the challenges of contemporary health care systems. Information was derived from a comprehensive literature review. Electronic databases and the Internet, using the Google search engine, were searched using the key words 'doctoral education'; 'nursing'; 'International Network for Doctoral Education in Nursing'; 'global health'; 'international research collaboration'. Doctoral education has been a critical force in developing nurse leaders in education, management, policy and research domains. An absence of consensus in terminology and of accurate minimum data sets precludes comparison and debate across programs. The complexity and dynamism of contemporary globalized communities render significant challenges in the conduct of doctoral programs. Addressing funding issues and faculty shortages are key issues for doctoral programs, especially those in developing countries, to achieve an identity uniquely their own
Chang, E., Hancock, K., Harrison, K., Daly, J., Johnson, A., Easterbrook, S., Noel, M., Luhr-Taylor, M. & Davidson, P.M. 2005, 'Palliative care for end-stage dementia: A discussion of the implications for education of health care professionals', NURSE EDUCATION TODAY, vol. 25, no. 4, pp. 326-332.
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Chang, E.M., Hancock, K.M., Johnson, A., Daly, J. & Jackson, D. 2005, 'Role stress in nurses: review of related factors and strategies for moving forward.', Nurs Health Sci, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 57-65.
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The aim of this paper was to review the literature on factors related to role stress in nurses, and present strategies for addressing this issue based on the findings of this review while considering potential areas for development and research. Computerized databases were searched as well as hand searching of articles in order to conduct this review. This review identified multiple factors related to the experience of role stress in nurses. Role stress, in particular, work overload, has been reported as one of the main reasons for nurses leaving the workforce. This paper concludes that it is a priority to find new and innovative ways of supporting nurses in their experience of role stress. Some examples discussed in this article include use of stress education and management strategies; team-building strategies; balancing priorities; enhancing social and peer support; flexibility in work hours; protocols to deal with violence; and retention and attraction of nursing staff strategies. These strategies need to be empirically evaluated for their efficacy in reducing role stress.
Halcomb, E.J., Davidson, P.M., Daly, J.P., Griffiths, R., Yallop, J. & Tofler, G. 2005, 'Nursing in Australian general practice: directions and perspectives.', Aust Health Rev, vol. 29, no. 2, pp. 156-166.
Primary health care services, such as general practices, are the first point of contact for many Australian health care consumers. Until recently, the role of nursing in Australian primary care was poorly defined and described in the literature. Changes in policy and funding have given rise to an expansion of the nursing role in primary care. This paper provides a review of the literature and seeks to identify the barriers and facilitators to implementation of the practice nurse role in Australia and identifies strategic directions for future research and policy development.
Davidson, P., Rees, D.M., Brighton, T.A., Enis, J., McCrohon, J., Elliott, D., Cockburn, J., Paull, G. & Daly, J. 2004, 'Non-valvular atrial fibrillation and stroke: implications for nursing practice and therapeutics.', Aust Crit Care, vol. 17, no. 2, pp. 65-73.
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac rhythm disturbance and is increasing in prevalence due to the ageing of the population, and rates of chronic heart failure. Haemodynamic compromise and thromboembolic events are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality in Australian communities. Non-valvular AF is a significant predictor for both a higher incidence of stroke and increased mortality. Stroke affects approximately 40,000 Australians every year and is Australia's third largest killer after cancer and heart disease. The burden of illness associated with AF, the potential to decrease the risk of stroke and other embolic events by thromboprophylaxis and the implications of this strategy for nursing care and patient education, determine AF as a critical element of nursing practice and research. A review of the literature was undertaken of the CINAHL, Medline, EMBASE and Cochrane Databases from 1966 until September 2002 focussing on management of atrial fibrillation to prevent thrombotic events. This review article presents key elements of this literature review and the implications for nursing practice.
Davidson, P.M., Macdonald, P., Ang, E., Paull, G., Choucair, S., Daly, J., Moser, D.K. & Dracup, K. 2004, 'A case for consideration of cultural diversity in heart failure management--Part 1: Rationale for the DISCOVER Study.', Contemp Nurse, vol. 17, no. 3, pp. 204-210.
Heart failure is a condition increasing in prevalence and responsible for high health care utilization, morbidity and mortality. Randomised controlled trials of nurse-coordinated interventions have determined self-care and the incorporation of the patient and their family in care planning as critical elements of service delivery. Coping with a chronic illness, such as heart failure, forces the individual to adjust to changed physical, social and emotional functioning and to modify their lifestyle accordingly. Clinicians increasingly use models of care that focus care delivery on the community setting. In order to develop strategies to assist patients and their families with self-care it is important that clinicians understand the health-care seeking behaviours of all individuals targeted in the community. Australia is a culturally diverse nation, yet evaluations of models of care have been undertaken largely in individuals from predominately Anglo-Celtic origins. The end result of this approach is failure to understand the full range of diverse perspectives that individuals hold that can have an impact on self-care behaviours. Consideration of cultural diversity should extend beyond language to a broader appreciation of cultural values, health seeking beliefs and engagement of culturally unique communities. The 'Understanding the cultural experiences of individuals with chronic heart failure (CHF) in South East Health (DISCOVER) Study' seeks to uncover information on the health patterns, information needs and the adjustment process for overseas-born individuals with heart failure. Such information will assist clinicians to tailor health care service delivery and ensure the delivery of appropriate, quality care. This manuscript provides the background, rationale and methods for this study.
Brookes, K., Davidson, P., Daly, J. & Hancock, K. 2004, 'Community health nursing in Australia: a critical literature review and implications for professional development.', Contemp Nurse, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 195-207.
Increasing emphasis on community-based mandates an examination of the community health nurse (CHN).
Jackson, D. & Daly, J. 2004, 'Current challenges and issues facing nursing in Australia', NURSING SCIENCE QUARTERLY, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 352-355.
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Halcomb, E., Davidson, P., Daly, J., Yallop, J. & Tofler, G. 2004, 'Australian nurses in general practice based heart failure management: implications for innovative collaborative practice.', Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 135-147.
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The growing global burden of heart failure (HF) necessitates the investigation of alternative methods of providing co-ordinated, integrated and client-focused primary care. Currently, the models of nurse-coordinated care demonstrated to be effective in randomized controlled trials are only available to a relative minority of clients and their families with HF. This current gap in service provision could prove fertile ground for the expansion of practice nursing [The Nurse in Family Practice: Practice Nurses and Nurse Practitioners in primary health care. 1988, Scutari Press, London: Impact of rural living on the experience of chronic illness. Australian Journal of Rural Health, 2001. 9: 235-240].
Halcomb, E., Daly, J., Jackson, D. & Davidson, P. 2004, 'An insight into Australian nurses' experience of withdrawal/withholding of treatment in the ICU.', Intensive Crit Care Nurs, vol. 20, no. 4, pp. 214-222.
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The success of biotechnology has created moral and ethical dilemmas concerning end-of-life care in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Whilst the competent individual has the right to refuse or embrace treatment, ICU patients are rarely able to exercise this right. Thus, decision-making is left to medical professionals and family/significant others.
Lambert, V.A., Lambert, C.E., Daly, J., Davidson, P.M., Kunaviktikul, W. & Shin, K.R. 2004, 'Nursing education on women's health care in Australia, Japan, South Korea, and Thailand.', J Transcult Nurs, vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 44-53.
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Only within the last 3 decades have a select number of countries addressed issues surrounding the all-inclusive health and well-being of women. This factor has had a major influence on nursing education within these countries and the subsequent development of curricula. Because the preparation of nurses is pivotal in shaping a society's health care agenda, this article compares and contrasts demographic characteristics, curricular frameworks, the role of the nurse, quality control of nursing curricula, and the focus of nursing courses related to women's health care among the countries of Australia, Japan, South Korea, and Thailand. Recommendations based on infant mortality rates, life expectancy, leading causes of death, and country-based health care issues are provided to inform and guide the future focus of nursing education courses on women's health care within these countries.
Davidson, P., Cockburn, J., Daly, J. & Sanson Fisher, R. 2004, 'Patient-centered needs assessment: rationale for a psychometric measure for assessing needs in heart failure.', J Cardiovasc Nurs, vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 164-171.
Determining an individual's unique perspective of an illness experience remains a challenge for clinicians, administrators, and researchers. A range of concepts and psychometric measures have been developed and evaluated to capture this information. These include patient satisfaction, quality of life, and utility measures. Needs assessment as a tool for evaluating perceptions of health status and determining patient satisfaction and treatment plans has been explored in oncology. Studies have demonstrated that a high proportion of patients have unmet needs in relation to activities of daily living, information sources, and comfort. Heart failure (HF), a condition with significant individual and societal burden, mirrors the illness of experience of cancer, as individuals process issues related to prognosis, treatment regimens, and decreased functional status. A needs-based assessment of health status, expectations, and perceptions is patient-centered and has the capacity to not only evaluate current health status but also plan and project care plans. Needs assessment is a dynamic construct rather than a point in time consistent with other assessment modalities, such as quality of life. Multidimensional needs assessment allows for planning and projection of needs, not only on an individual but also a population basis. Implicit in the exploration of needs is an expectation of level of care to be provided, from both the provider and recipient of care. In many instances a misalignment may exist between services and resources available to the individual. This article seeks to provide a theoretical justification for the development of a needs assessment instrument for patients with HF and to discuss the rationale of this method of assessment to create better alignment and resources with patients needs and expectations.
Davidson, P.M., Hancock, K., Daly, J., Cockburn, J., Moser, D., Goldston, K., Elliott, D., Webster, J., Speerin, R., Wade, V., Clarke, M., Anderson, M., Newman, C. & Chang, E. 2003, 'A cardiac rehabilitation program to enhance the outcomes of older women with heart disease: development of the group rehabilitation for older women (GROW) program', Journal of the Australasian Rehabilitation Nurses Association, vol. 6, no. 4, pp. 8-15.
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Davidson, P.M., Daly, J., Hancock, K. & Jackson, D. 2003, 'Australian women and heart disease: trends, epidemiological perspectives and the need for a culturally competent research agenda.', Contemp Nurse, vol. 16, no. 1-2, pp. 62-73.
Heart disease commonly manifests as acute coronary syndromes (unstable angina pectoris, or myocardial infarction) and heart failure (HF). These conditions are major causes of morbidity and mortality in Australia and internationally. Australian faces particular challenges in health care delivery given the cultural and ethnic diversity of society and unique issues related to rurality. These factors have significant implications for health care delivery. Following an acute cardiac event women have poorer outcomes: higher mortality rates, higher incidence of complications and greater psychological morbidity compared with men. Language barriers, socioeconomic factors, psychological trauma related to migration and alternate health seeking behaviors and varying perceptions of risk are likely to impact adversely on health outcomes. Self-management in chronic cardiovascular disease underscores the importance of models of care that incorporate aspects related to self-care and promotion of adherence to primary and secondary prevention initiatives. Implicit in this statement is the inclusion of the individual in negotiating and developing their care plan. Therefore health professionals need to be aware of the patient's needs, values, beliefs and health seeking behaviours. These factors are strongly influenced by culture and ethnicity. The cultural diversity of Australian society mandates cultural competence in health care. This paper presents an overview of nursing science related to women and heart disease in Australia and suggests directions for culturally-competent research and development and evaluation of models of care to improve health outcomes for all Australians.
Wade, V., Jackson, D. & Daly, J. 2003, 'Coronary heart disease in Aboriginal communities: towards a model for self-management.', Contemp Nurse, vol. 15, no. 3, pp. 300-309.
Coronary heart disease (CHD) is one of the main causes of death and disability in the Aboriginal population, and is the major cause of the twenty-year gap in life expectancy of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians. This paper explores Aboriginal health in relation to CHD, and suggests self-management as a culturally acceptable therapeutic and sustainable ideology from which positive outcomes may be achieved.
Davidson, P.M., Daly, J., Hancock, K., Moser, D., Chang, E. & Cockburn, J. 2003, 'Perceptions and experiences of heart disease: a literature review and identification of a research agenda in older women.', Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs, vol. 2, no. 4, pp. 255-264.
Following diagnosis of heart disease women have poorer health related outcomes compared with men. Nursing science lacks well-evaluated interventions to address the specific rehabilitative needs of older women with heart disease. This paper seeks to inform the development of nursing intervention studies by a review of published studies on the experiences and rehabilitative needs of older women with heart disease.
Davidson, P., Hancock, K., Leung, D., Ang, E., Chang, E., Thompson, D.R. & Daly, J. 2003, 'Traditional Chinese Medicine and heart disease: what does Western medicine and nursing science know about it?', Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs, vol. 2, no. 3, pp. 171-181.
Interest in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is growing rapidly beyond China. This interest is driven by a combination of factors including recognition of potential benefits of TCM; dissatisfaction with the traditional Western medical model; an increasing commitment to holistic care and increasing evidence for the interaction of psychological factors and outcomes of disease and treatment and health consumer demand.
Davidson, P.M., Meleis, A., Daly, J. & Douglas, M.M. 2003, 'Globalisation as we enter the 21st century: reflections and directions for nursing education, science, research and clinical practice.', Contemp Nurse, vol. 15, no. 3, pp. 162-174.
The events of September 11th, 2001 in the United States and the Bali bombings of October 2002 are chastening examples of the entangled web of the religious, political, health, cultural and economic forces we experience living in a global community. To view these forces as independent, singular, linearly deterministic entities of globalisation is irrational and illogical. Understanding the concept of globalisation has significant implications not only for world health and international politics, but also the health of individuals. Depending on an individual's political stance and world-view, globalisation may be perceived as an emancipatory force, having the potential to bridge the chasm between rich and poor or, in stark contrast, the very essence of the divide. It is important that nurses appreciate that globalisation does not pertain solely to the realms of economic theory and world politics, but also that it impacts on our daily nursing practice and the welfare of our patients. Globalisation and the closer interactions of human activity that result, have implications for international governance, policy and theory development as well as nursing education, research and clinical practice. Nurses, individually and collectively, have the political power and social consciousness to influence the forces of globalisation to improve health for all. This paper defines and discusses globalisation in today's world and its implications for contemporary nursing education, science, research and clinical practice.
Davidson, P., Introna, K., Daly, J., Paull, G., Jarvis, R., Angus, J., Wilds, T., Cockburn, J., Dunford, M. & Dracup, K. 2003, 'Cardio respiratory nurses' perceptions of palliative care in nonmalignant disease: Data for the development of clinical practice', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CRITICAL CARE, vol. 12, no. 1, pp. 47-53.
Jackson, D.E., Mannix, J. & Daly, J. 2003, 'Nursing staff shortages: Issues in Australian residential aged care', Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 44-47.
This paper explores the current nursing shortage, looks ahead to identify future threats to a viable nursing workforce in residential aged care, and raises some issues for future consideration.
Chang, E. & Daly, J. 2003, 'Establishing innovative partnerships to advance development of aged care nursing', Geriaction, vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 25-30.
This paper seeks to locate issues for aged care service provision and development in Australia in the broader context of changes in the health care system overall in the last decade. Issues that arise out of these changes are discussed, as well as factors that have impacted on and affected aged care services. Issues that need to be addressed in the area of research for aged care services and in particular nursing practice are also discussed. The authors' perspective is that research endeavour directed towards development practice in this field is best conducted using a collaborative model which addresses nationally identifiable research priorities and issues in aged care. This paper presents some of the authors' experiences in establishing collaborative partnerships for development of aged care research and practice development. Challenges and benefits that we have identified through our shared work and in one large funded research project are presented, as well as some of the challenges, which need to be considered in collaborative work.
McMurray, A. & Daly, J. 2003, 'Response to recommendation 20 from the National Review of Nursing Education: To build faculty practice into the workload and performance expectations of nurse academics (Invited submission)', Collegian, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 6-7.
Kirschling, J., Amarsi, Y., Chang, E., Chernomas, W., Daly, J., Gamel, C., De, J.A., Kim, S., Mintes, D.G.J., Tsai, S. & Wong, T. 2003, 'Nursing education across the globe: Challenges and opportunities for the future', Reflections on Nursing Leadership, vol. Autumn, pp. 20-24.
Davidson, P.M., Introna, K., Cockburn, J., Daly, J., Dunford, M., Paull, G. & Dracup, K. 2002, 'Synergizing acute care and palliative care to optimise nursing care in end-stage cardiorespiratory disease.', Aust Crit Care, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 64-69.
Advances in the practice of medicine and nursing science have increased survival for patients with chronic cardiorespiratory disease. Parallel to this positive outcome is a societal expectation of longevity and cure of disease. Chronic disease and the inevitability of death creates a dilemma, more than ever before, for the health care professional, who is committed to the delivery of quality care to patients and their families. The appropriate time for broaching the issue of dying and determining when palliative care is required is problematic. Dilemmas occur with a perceived dissonance between acute and palliative care and difficulties in determining prognosis. Palliative care must be integrated within the health care continuum, rather than being a discrete entity at the end of life, in order to achieve optimal patient outcomes. Anecdotally, acute and critical care nurses experience frustration from the tensions that arise between acute and palliative care philosophies. Many clinicians are concerned that patients are denied a good death and yet the moment when care should be oriented toward palliation rather than aggressive management is usually unclear. Clearly this has implications for the type and quality of care that patients receive. This paper provides a review of the extant literature and identifies issues in the end of life care for patients with chronic cardiorespiratory diseases within acute and critical care environments. Issues for refinement of acute and critical care nursing practice and research priorities are identified to create a synergy between these philosophical perspectives.
Chang, E., Daly, J., Bell, P., Brown, T., Allan, J. & Hancock, K. 2002, 'A continuing educational initiative to develo nurses' mental health knowledge and skills in rural and remote areas', NURSE EDUCATION TODAY, vol. 22, no. 7, pp. 542-551.
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Daly, J. & Jackson, D.E. 2002, 'Commentary on Long, T. & Johnson, M. Research in Nurse Education Today: Do we meet our aims and scope? (By invitation)', Nurse Education Today, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 94-95.
Daly, J., Sindone, A.P., Thompson, D.R., Hancock, K., Chang, E. & Davidson, P. 2002, 'Barriers to participation in and adherence to cardiac rehabilitation programs: a critical literature review.', Prog Cardiovasc Nurs, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 8-17.
Despite the documented evidence of the benefits of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) in enhancing recovery and reducing mortality following a myocardial infarction, only about one third of patients participate in such programs. Adherence to these programs is an even bigger problem, with only about one third maintaining attendance in these programs after 6 months. This review summarizes research that has investigated barriers to participation and adherence to CR programs. Some consistent factors found to be associated with participation in CR programs include lack of referral by physicians, associated illness, specific cardiac diagnoses, reimbursement, self-efficacy, perceived benefits of CR, distance and transportation, self-concept, self-motivation, family composition, social support, self-esteem, and occupation. Factors associated with non-adherence include being older, female gender, having fewer years of formal education, perceiving the benefits of CR, having angina, and being less physically active during leisure time. However, many of the studies have methodologic flaws, with very few controlled, randomized studies, making the findings tentative. Problems in objectively measuring adherence to unstructured, non-hospital-based programs, which are an increasingly popular alternative to traditional programs, are discussed. Suggestions for reducing barriers to participation and adherence to CR programs, as well as for future research aimed at clearly identifying these barriers, are discussed.
Daly, J., Davidson, P., Chang, E., Hancock, K., Rees, D. & Thompson, D.R. 2002, 'Cultural aspects of adjustment to coronary heart disease in Chinese-Australians: a review of the literature', JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, vol. 39, no. 4, pp. 391-399.
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Davidson, P., Stewart, S., Elliott, D., Daly, J., Sindone, A. & Cockburn, J. 2001, 'Addressing the burden of heart failure in Australia: the scope for home-based interventions.', J Cardiovasc Nurs, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 56-68.
The growing burden of heart failure (HF) challenges health practitioners to implement and evaluate models of care to facilitate optimal health related outcomes. Australia supports a publicly funded universal health insurance system with a strong emphasis on primary care provided by general practitioners. The burden of chronic HF, and a social and political framework favoring community-based, noninstitutionalized care, represents an ideal environment in which home-based HF programs can be implemented successfully. Cardiovascular nurses are well positioned to champion and mentor implementation of evidence-based, patient-centered programs in Australian communities. This paper describes the facilitators and barriers to implementation of best practice models in the Australian context. These include the challenge of providing care in a diverse, multicultural society and the need for clinical governance structures to ensure equal access to the most effective models of care.
Davidson, P., Daly, J., Romanini, J. & Elliott, D. 2001, 'Quality use of medicines (QUM) in critical care: an imperative for best practice.', Aust Crit Care, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 122-126.
Quality use of medicines (QUM) as a discrete concept is gaining increasing importance in Australia and is supported by a policy platform which has federal government and health professional support. The QUM movement is also supported by a strong consumer base and this lobby group has been responsible for endorsement as a major health initiative. However, the importance of QUM to achievement of optimal patient outcomes has not achieved sufficient recognition in the critical care literature. Implicit in the discussion of QUM is the rational, ethical, safe and effective use of drugs within a best practice framework. Successful implementation of QUM requires appropriate infrastructure and the commitment and cooperation of medical, nursing and pharmacy staff. Support, education and training provide the prerequisites of knowledge, skills and awareness for quality use of medicines for all groups. An emphasis upon evidence based practice and the prevalence of polypharmacy in contemporary health care systems requires examination of factors that are barriers to best practice. QUM in critical care areas requires appropriately skilled staff who are competent to manage patients with a wide range of selected drugs, often in highly stressful situations. In many situations in critical care, the role of the critical care nurse is one of patient advocate. It is important to note that the delivery of critical care is not limited to a discrete setting and is inclusive of management at the trauma scene, assessment and delivery of care in the emergency department, through to intensive, coronary care and high dependency units. This paper presents a discussion of the concept of QUM and its relevance in the critical care context. Key theoretical, policy and research considerations for establishment of QUM in critical care are reviewed and discussed. This paper seeks to describe key issues in QUM and endorse the need for a research agenda in critical care.
Jackson, D., Mannix, J. & Daly, J. 2001, 'Retaining a viable workforce: a critical challenge for nursing.', Contemp Nurse, vol. 11, no. 2-3, pp. 163-172.
Nursing is facing a crisis nationally and internationall, with Australia, the United States, New Zealand, Canada, the United Kingdom and Western Europe experiencing critical shortages of nurses. Problems with recruitment, retention and an ageing workforce means that attempts to ensure a viable nursing workforce must be placed at the top of the professional agenda. Strategies currently used to manage the crisis, such as overseas recruitment, are not sustainable and are ethically dubious. The demographic timebomb is ticking and up to half the current nursing workforce will reach retirement age by 2020. It is vital that there are adequate numbers of skilled and qualified nurses to take their places. Nursing and nurses are facing unprecedented challenges and pressures in the workplace. Job satisfaction is threatened as nurses are pressured to do more with less, Nursing productivity has increased phenomenally over the past ten years in response to increased demands and decreasing numbers of staff. The nursing workplace has disturbingly high levels of occupational violence, and many nurses operate within a culture of blame and scapegoating. There is evidence that organizational change is imposed upon nurses with little or no consultation and the literature reveals that this has a direct and negative effect on job satisfaction and on retention of nurses. This paper explores some of the critical issues that nursing must confront to be successful in establishing and maintaining a vigorous, dynamic and viable workforce.
Daly, J., Elliott, D., Cameron-Traub, E., Salamonson, Y., Davidson, P., Jackson, D., Chin, C. & Wade, V. 2000, 'Health status, perceptions of coping, and social support immediately after discharge of survivors of acute myocardial infarction.', Am J Crit Care, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 62-69.
The period immediately after discharge from the hospital after an acute myocardial infarction is a stressful and vulnerable time about which little is known.
Jackson, D., Daly, J., Davidson, P., Elliott, D., Cameron-Traub, E., Wade, V., Chin, C. & Salamonson, Y. 2000, 'Women recovering from first-time myocardial infarction (MI): a feminist qualitative study', JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, vol. 32, no. 6, pp. 1403-1411.
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Daly, J., Jackson, D., Davidson, P.M., Wade, V., Chin, C. & Brimelow, V. 1998, 'The experiences of female spouses of survivors of acute myocardial infarction: a pilot study of Lebanese-born women in south-western Sydney, Australia', JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, vol. 28, no. 6, pp. 1199-1206.
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Reports

Gero, A., Fletcher, S.M., Thiessen, J., Willetts, J.R., Rumsey, M., Daly, J., Buchan, J. & Kuruppu, N. National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility (NCCARF) 2013, Understanding the Pacific's adaptive capacity to emergencies in the context of climate change: Country Report- Cook Islands, pp. 1-33, Australia.
Gero, A., Fletcher, S.M., Rumsey, M., Thiessen, J., Kuruppu, N., Buchan, J., Daly, J. & Willetts, J.R. National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility 2013, Disaster response and climate change in the Pacific, pp. 1-216, Sydney.
Disasters, and therefore disaster response, in the Pacific are expected to be affected by climate change. This research addressed this issue, and focused on the immediate humanitarian needs following a disaster, drawing upon adaptive capacity as a concept to assess the resilience of individual organisations and the robustness of the broader system of disaster response. Four case study countries (Fiji, Cook Islands, Vanuatu and Samoa) were chosen for deeper investigation of the range of issues present in the Pacific. The research process was guided by a Project Reference Group, which included key stakeholders from relevant organisations involved in Pacific disaster response to guide major decisions of the research process and to influence its progression
Gero, A., Fletcher, S.M., Thiessen, J., Willetts, J.R., Rumsey, M., Daly, J., Buchan, J. & Kuruppu, N. Institute for Sustainable Futures, and WHO Collaborating Centre, UTS 2013, Understanding the Pacific's adaptive capacity to emergencies in the context of climate change: Country Report - Vanuatu, pp. 1-36, Sydney.
Fletcher, S.M., Gero, A., Thiessen, J., Willetts, J.R., Rumsey, M., Daly, J., Buchan, J. & Kuruppu, N. Institute for Sustainable Futures, and WHO Collaborating Centre, UTS 2013, Understanding the Pacific's adaptive capacity to emergencies in the context of climate change: Country Report - Fiji, pp. 1-35, Sydney.
Fletcher, S.M., Gero, A., Thiessen, J., Willetts, J.R., Rumsey, M., Daly, J., Buchan, J. & Kuruppu, N. National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility (NCCARF) 2013, Understanding the Pacific's adaptive capacity to emergencies in the context of climate change: Country Report- Samoa, pp. 1-30, Australia.
Disasters, and therefore disaster response, in the Pacific are expected to be affected by climate change. This research addressed this issue, and focused on the immediate humanitarian needs following a disaster, drawing upon adaptive capacity as a concept to assess the resilience of individual organisations and the robustness of the broader system of disaster response. Four case study countries (Fiji, Cook Islands, Vanuatu and Samoa) were chosen for deeper investigation of the range of issues present in the Pacific. The research process was guided by a Project Reference Group, which included key stakeholders from relevant organisations involved in Pacific disaster response to guide major decisions of the research process and to influence its progression. Given the complexity of issues involved, including the contested definitions of adaptive capacity, the research team developed a conceptual framework to underpin the research. This framework drew upon concepts from a range of relevant disciplines including Earth System Governance, climate change adaptation, health resources, resilience in institutions and practice theory. Objective and subjective determinants of adaptive capacity were used to assess the `disaster response system, comprised of actors and agents from government and non-government sectors, and the governance structures, policies, plans and formal and informal networks that support them.
Fletcher, S.M., Gero, A., Thiessen, J., Willetts, J.R., Rumsey, M., Daly, J., Buchan, J. & Kuruppu, N. Institute for Sustainable Futures, and WHO Collaborating Centre, UTS 2013, Understanding the Pacific's adaptive capacity to emergencies in the context of climate change: Country Report - Samoa, pp. 1-30, Sydney.
Gero, A., Fletcher, S.M., Rumsey, M., Thiessen, J., Kuruppu, N., Buchan, J., Daly, J. & Willetts, J.R. Institute for Sustainable Furtures and WHO Collaborating Centre, UTS 2013, Disaster response systems in the Pacific: Policy Brief for Pacific Island Countries, pp. 1-4, Sydney.
Fletcher, S.M., Rumsey, M., Thiessen, J., Gero, A., Kuruppu, N., Buchan, J., Daly, J. & Willetts, J.R. Institute for Sustainable Futures, and WHO Collaborating Centre, UTS 2013, Disaster response systems in the Pacific: Policy Brief for Regional Organisations, pp. 1-4, Sydney.
Fletcher, S.M., Rumsey, M., Thiessen, J., Gero, A., Kuruppu, N., Buchan, J., Daly, J. & Willetts, J.R. Institute for Sustainable Futures, and WHO Collaborating Centre, UTS 2013, Disaster response systems in the Pacific: Policy Brief, pp. 1-4, Sydney.
Fletcher, S.M., Gero, A., Rumsey, M., Willetts, J.R., Daly, J., Buchan, J., Kuruppu, N. & Thiessen, J. WHO Collaborating Centre and the Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2012, Review of Australia's Overseas Disaster and Emergency Response, pp. 1-30, Sydney.
Gero, A., Willetts, J.R., Daly, J., Buchan, J., Rumsey, M., Fletcher, S.M. & Kuruppu, N. Institute for Sustainable Futures and WHO Collaborating Centre, UTS 2012, Background Review: Disaster Response System of Four Pacific Island Countries, pp. 1-66, Sydney, Australia.
Gero, A., Willetts, J.R., Daly, J., Buchan, J., Rumsey, M., Fletcher, S.M. & Kuruppu, N. Institute for Sustainable Futures and WHO Collaborating Centre, UTS 2012, Projected climate change impacts in the Pacific: A summary, pp. 1-22, Sydney, Australia.