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Jenna Price

Biography

Jenna Price is a Fairfax columnist and joined UTS Journalism in 2008.

She began her journalism career as co-editor of NEWSWIT, the forerunner to the UTS student newspaper Vertigo; and also co-edited Listening Post, which was published by 2SER. She completed her journalism cadetship at the Sydney Morning Herald before becoming a reporter; and soon after was appointed editor of Column 8; and later Good Living, The Guide; and Metro and was appointed sections editor under the editorship of Eric Beecher.

For those who believe student editors don't understand mainstream,take a good look at NEWSWIT. It began the Short Black column in 1980 and Price took it with her to Good Living, during her time as editor of Good Living. Short Black still exists today. During this time, she broadcast a series of food reviews on what is now called 702. With Leo Schofield, she edited the first two editions of the Good Food Guide as well as writing her own restaurant column, Entrees; and in 2009, she returned to the pages of the Good Food Guide to honour the publication's 25th anniversary.

In 1985, Price began the Agenda features page which focussed on the way Australians lived their lives; and started a column called Relations, where readers wrote about their own vivid experiences in their families. Her enthusiasm for reader stories could easily be seen to be the beginning of what media analysts today might call user generated content. She was also a columnist in Spectrum.

In 1987, she was seconded to be features editor at the Times On Sunday.

She returned to reporting fulltime in 1990 and remained a reporter with the Sydney Morning Herald until 1994 when she joined the Canberra Times as its Sydney correspondent, writing news and features.

This was an extraordinary opportunity to cover an entire city - but there were a handful of memorable moments. She covered the Sydney Olympics from the point of view of the spectators; the Pope's Mass at Randwick Racecourse; the visit of Bill and Hillary Clinton; and all state and Federal elections between 1994 and 2007. She says the story she liked doing best was the dissection of claims made by Helen Garner in The First Stone; although chasing Bill Clinton across the tarmac at Sydney Airport came close.

In 1999, she began writing her own column in the Canberra Times. it focussed on the Olympics then but has since covered a range of topics from the appalling way governments treat refugees to the death of broadcast television. She is still an occasional news reporter for the Canberra Times because once a reporter, always a reporter - and has also anonymously contributed to Crikey - but you will never know which bits.

She taught journalism as a casual academic at both UTS and the University of Sydney for several years before joining UTS fulltime in 2008. She is the coordinator of NewsDay. She edited Festival News with the help of student chiefs-of-staff in 2008; and aMUSE in 2009, with independent coverage of the Sydney Writers Festival.

In 2013, she was awarded her Master of Arts by research, examining how journalism students become journalists. That year she was also awarded an Office of Learning and Teaching citation for outstanding contribution to student learning.

She is married with three children.

Professional

Member of the MEAA
Member of the NTEU
Journalism Education Association vice president (conference) 2010 and 2014

Image of Jenna Price
Senior Lecturer, Journalism Program
Core Member, CCS - Cosmopolitan Civil Societies
BA (Communications) (NSWIT), MA (UTS)
 
Phone
+61 2 9514 1681

Research Interests

How students turn into journalists
Attributes of journalism
Social media
How students develop the appropriate graduate attributes for their profession
Reflexivity (how thinking about what we do improves our practice)

Reporting skills for both undergraduates and postgraduates
Features development
Professional practice

Books

Schofield, L. & Price, J. 1985, Sydney Morning Herald Good Food Guide, 2, Anne O'Donovan Pty Ltd, Hawthorne, Victoria.
Schofield, L., Dale, D.L. & Price, J. 1984, The Sydney Morning Herald Good Food Guide, 1, Anne O'Donovan Pty Ltd, Hawthorne, Victoria.

Chapters

Price, J. 2013, 'The Writing on the Walls' in Jane Caro (ed), Destroying the Joint: Why Women Have to Change the World, University of Queensland Press, St Lucia, pp. 128-148.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS

Conferences

Price, J. 2011, 'That's what friends are for: creating an online community of, and for, first year students to increase retention', ascilite 2011, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania.
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Non traditional outputs

Price, J. 2013, 'Gendered Violence (portfolio)', Canberra Times and others, Canberra.
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Portfolio of newpaper articles
Price, J. 2013, 'Destroy the joint (portfolio)', Canberra Times and others, Canberra.
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Portfolio of newpaper articles
Price, J. 2013, 'Paygap Research (portfolio)', Canberra Times and others, Canberra.
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Portfolio of newpaper articles
Price, J. 2013, 'Gendered Language (portfolio)', Canberra Times and others, Canberra.
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Portfolio of newpaper articles
Price, J. 2013, 'Peeling back the layers, sexist ads don't work', Canberra Times.
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Price, J. 2013, 'Badly chosen words no predictor of life to come', Canberra Times.
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Price, J. 2013, 'Unreality TV mantrap exposes the sexual divide', Canberra Times.
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Brown, S. 2013, 'No stats support adjectival stoning of Gillard', Canberra Times, pp. 1-2.
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Price, J. 2013, 'No Stats Support Adjectival Stoning Of Julia Gillard', Canberra Times, Fairfax, pp. 1-2.
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Price, J. 2013, 'Gillard And Gender: Has She Been Vindicated?', The Conversation, The Conversation, pp. 1-2.
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Price, J. 2013, 'New GM Boss Puts Another Crack In That Resilient Glass Ceiling/(Alt Title) Let's Motor Through The Glass Ceiling Together', Sydney Morning Herald/Canberra Times, Fairfax, pp. 1-2.
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Price, J. 2013, 'Cut Mansplaining: Gender Pay Gap Wide As Ever', The Canberra Times.
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Price, J. 2013, 'Boys Club Is A Very Bad Look For Tony Abbott', The Canberra Times, Fairfax, pp. 1-2.
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Price, J. 2013, 'Batman Needs A Woman', The Canberra Times, Fairfax, pp. 1-2.
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Price, J. 2013, 'It's Simple Really, Women Can And Women Do', The Canberra Times, Fairfax, pp. 1-2.
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Price, J. 2013, 'Men, Stay Away From The Shallow Glories Of Law And Politics. Those Roles Are...', Fairfax, pp. 1-2.
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Price, J. 2013, 'Equality? Sisters Still Got To Do It For Ourselves', The Canberra Times, Fairfax, pp. 1-1.
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Journalism
Price, J. 2013, 'What Julia will leave behind', The Canberra Times, Fairfax, pp. 1-2.
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Price, J. 2013, 'It Is Really Vital For More Women To Get Involved In The Back Room, The Engine...'.
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Price, J. 2013, 'Students Who Took Gap Years Achieved More Across The First Four...', Canberra Times, Fairfax, pp. 1-2.
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Price, J. 2013, 'My Fear Is That We Are Still Producing Young Women Who Put Families First...', The Canberra Times, Fairfax, pp. 1-2.
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Price, J. 2013, 'We Found That 51 Percent Of Employers Involved Hadn't Met Their Obligations.', pp. 1-2.
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Price, J. 2013, 'Can We Move From A Nation Which Only Pays Women Slightly More Than 80 Percent Of...', The Canberra Times, pp. 1-2.
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Price, J. 2013, 'Sexual Assault, Too Often, Begins In The Home', The Canberra Times, Fairfax.
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Price, J. 2013, 'The Alice: Problematic But Never Sad For Long', The Canberra Times, Fairfax, pp. 1-2.
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Price, J. 2013, 'Unity calls as Nigella can't stand alone', The Canberra Times, Fairfax, pp. 1-2.
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Price, J. 2013, 'Risks Are Real, Even If Porn Not A Big, Bad Wolf', The Canberra Times, Fairfax, pp. 1-2.
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Price, J. 2013, 'Law Needs To Catch Up With Crimes Against Consent', pp. 1-2.
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Price, J. 2013, 'Intimate Terrorists Iron Fist In Velvet Glove', The Canberra Times, Fairfax.
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Price, J. 2013, 'Support Crucial If Victims Are To Stand Up', The Canberra Times, Fairfax, pp. 1-2.
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Price, J. 2013, 'Caroline Criado-Perez forces social media to wake', The Canberra Times, pp. 1-2.
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Price, J. 2013, 'What we can learn from the #Kaysermaleinsider', Daily Life, pp. 1-2.
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Price, J. 2013, 'Some opinions on opinions', The Canberra Times, pp. 1-2.
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Price, J. 2012, 'I just wouldn't feel honest to myself as a woman, or to my daughters,friends and colleagues who are women.', Canberra Times, Canberra Times, pp. 1-2.
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Price, J. 2012, 'Misogynists And Nut Jobs: Gillard Stares Down Blogosphere', The Conversation, The Conversation, pp. 1-2.
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Price, J. 2012, 'Female leaders need more respect', Canberra Times, Fairfax, pp. 1-1.
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Price, J. 2012, 'The Past Ten Years Have Seen Almost No Change For Women In The Top Ranks In...', Fairfax, pp. 1-2.
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Price, J. 2012, 'What He Really Means Is We Don'T Make The Appropriate Calculations To Make The Money...', The Canberra Times, pp. 1-2.
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Price, J. 2012, 'The answer to pay equity? Cross-dressing', pp. 1-2.
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Price, J. 2012, 'We've Learned To Look Slyly And Not To Touch. Can You Imagine The Reaction If A', The Canberra Times, Fairfax, pp. 1-2.
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Price, J. 2012, 'Surely With Most Porn You Get A Siren Alert. You Know What You Are Getting And', The Canberra Times, Fairfax, pp. 1-2.
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Price, J. 2012, 'Depressing facts about sexual harassment', The Canberra Times, pp. 1-2.
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Price, J. 2012, 'The night still needs reclaiming', The Canberra Times, Fairfax, pp. 1-2.
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Price, J. 2012, 'There is no way for decent Australians to imagine that it's okay for private schools', The Canberra Times, Fairfax, pp. 1-2.
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Price, J. 2012, 'I have an idea that there is still some risky behaviour which is why', The Canberra Times, Fairfax, pp. 1-2.
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Price, J. 2012, 'We no longer clearly understand the distance between public and private.', The Canberra Times, Fairfax, pp. 1-2.
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Price, J. 2012, 'It's absolutely no good telling young women that they should be more careful.', The Canberra Times, Fairfax, pp. 1-2.
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Price, J. 2012, 'A very naughty parrot: ACMA sends Alan Jones back to school', The Conversation, pp. 1-2.
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Price, J. 2012, 'I'm trying to take a photo of what has recently become known as lady parts.', The Canberra Times, Fairfax.
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Price, J. 2012, 'Way to destroy the joint Alan', Walkley Magazine, pp. 1-4.
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Price, J. 2008, 'Downturn Impacts', Australian Politics, Canberra Times, Canberra, Australia.
portfolio in 2009003814
Price, J. 2008, 'Summits and the Masses', Australian Politics, Canberra Times, Canberra, Australia.
portfolio in 2009003814
Price, J. 2008, 'Wages, Taxes & Childcare', Australian Politics, Canberra Times, Canberra, Australia.
portfolio in 2009003814
Price, J. 2008, 'Relocation and Connections', Canberra Times, Canberra Times, Canberra, Australia.
Price, J. 2008, 'Family Matters', Social Politics, Canberra Times, Canberra, Australia.
portfolio in 2009003814
Price, J. 2008, 'Health, Sex and Ageing', Social Politics, Canberra Times, Canberra, Australia.
portfolio in 2009003814
Price, J. 2007, 'Politics, Environment & Australian Elections', Australian Politics, Canberra Times, Canberra, Australia.
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Price, J. 2007, 'Maternal and Family Health', Tuesday Talk, Canberra Times, Canberra, Australia.
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Price, J. 2007, 'Life, Labour and Loyalty', Australian Politics, Canberra Times, Canberra, Australia.
Price, J. 2007, 'Politics and Human Rights', Tuesday Talk, Canberra Times, Canberra, Australia.
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Price, J. 2007, 'Election Issues', Australian Politics, Canberra Times, Canberra, Australia.
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Price, J. 2007, 'Social Politics (Columns)', Tuesday Talk, Canberra Times, Canberra, Australia.
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Background As the news has the power to set the public agenda, significant gaps in the news media can contribute to policy neglect. The has author identified a significant gap in the newsmedia - there are columnists who write about their personal lives and columnists who write about their political opinions, but rarely are the two linked together. To address this gap, the author has for 11 years written a weekly column in the Canberra Times linking personal experience to government policy. The research question being addressed is: how can journalists use personal and domestic experiences to question and illuminate government policies? Contribution The column draws on 30 years of researching and reporting social issues and interviews with stakeholders. This research is linked with the author's own personal experience to create new insights of national significance and bring the personal domestic space into the public sphere. The research for these columns follows a grounded theory approach allowing important themes to emerge from the data. The author receives a high level of reader interaction through emails and this also delivers fresh themes; readers draw on their experience, responding to my column in ways in which create an ongoing public conversation. The objective is to move away from media practices and discourse which trivialize domestic life to practice which foregrounds the domestic and inserts it into arguments about the development of public policy. Significance This column develops a different perspective on Australian cultural, social and political life in a daily newspaper which reaches the nation's key policy makers and politicians.
Price, J. 2007, 'Voice of a Hero (Disability Articles)', Asperger's Syndrome, Canberra Times, Canberra, Australia.
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'DISABILITY These articles represent an original contribution to knowledge specifically in the public debate about disabilities. I used advanced journalism methods, including researched interviews and analysis of the available literature, in this case, representation of the experience of disability and its effect on families - in newspapers and broadcast media. Much of the journalism about disabilities focuses on negative experiences. People with disabilities are regularly represented as "the other" in the media and in society. My research also found that those who fight the system are labeled as troublemakers, or as greedy. The research question being addressed is: how do people with disabilities inform medical practitioners and who advocates for them about their disabilities? My interview with Mark Haddon, the author of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime, marked the "mainstreaming" of autism in the media. After new statistics released by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare showed an increase in those affected by autism spectrum disorders,my research asked the question: Can the current school system cater for students who have autism spectrum disorders? And how well can those students do? I also interviewed what those in the Danish School of Journalism call "consequence experts", those families who were able to assert their right to have their autistic children educated in the public system, to give them a voice in the debate. This research revealed families who were able to integrate autistic children into the public education system with minimal impact on the system and it also showed that parents given a range of options had agency which enabled them to make appropriate choices. My research also enabled a boy with Down Syndrome to have his case heard in the public sphere. These articles filled a gap in media representation.
Price, J. 2007, 'Howard's Way (Indigenous Articles)', Australian Politics, Canberra Times, Canberra, Australia.
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'INDIGENOUS TALKING BLACK - Representing indigenous voices in the mainstream media Background When the Howard Government decided to implement the Northern Territory Intervention in 2006, the media representation of Aboriginal communities was largely restricted to coverage of the politics of Noel Pearson and those sympathetic to his position. Most reportage focused on non-indigenous sources. The aim of the Howard's Way feature was to speak to indigenous sources who either worked in remote communities or who were working on support programs themselves, even if not in remote communities. The research question being addressed is: what do indigenous people really think about the Australian government's intervention? Contribution These articles represent an original contribution to knowledge by seeking new ways to give indigenous voices access to mainstream media. It applies techniques borrowed from oral history researchers, advanced journalism methodologies, including researched interviews, surveys and analysis of the available literature, in this case, representation of the range of indigenous position on the intervention in newspapers, journals and broadcast. Over 70 short interviews were conducted with indigenous groups around Australia, searching for fresh voices in the indigenous debates. Of those, 20 were selected for more extensive interviews revealing key concerns about the NT intervention policy which had not been previous adequately publicly understood or analysed. Six women and five men were the focus of the feature and the voices of community leaders Gracelyn Smallwood and Shane Namanurki wre brought into the public sphere through these processes. The response to the feature and further developments gave rise to fresh reports and columns. Significance This research added to public discourse and understanding about a crucial policy move in indigenous politics in Australia.
Price, J. 2007, 'Not the Powerbrokers (APEC Articles)', Canberra Times, Canberra Times, Canberra Times.
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The author published ten pieces of journalism in the Canberra Times and challenged the dominant discourse by using extensive interviewing, surveys and analysis to develop fresh understanding of the political dynamic behind the protests. Mainstream news media focused on politicians and powerbrokers; and Government spin which claimed Sydney would be unaffected began with John Howard and Anne Fullwood on youtube claiming that violent protestors would disrupt the event. The question asked was: What were the dissenting voices at APEC? These ten pieces of journalism explored new ways of giving dissenting political voices access to mainstream media I used advanced journalism research methods, including researched interviews, surveys and analysis of the available literature, in this case, representation of the range of those opposing APEC's position - and even existence - in print and broadcast [yes]. A successful way of repressing dissent in the mainstream media is to black them out. Repressing dissent can be as simple as blacking dissenters out of the media.The aim of my stories and columns about the protesters at APEC was to give a voice to those ignored in the most of the mainstream media. Contribution I focused on protest for the duration of APEC and developed a number of significant stories on its impact in Australia, varying from serious breaches of human rights to impact on local business. By developing sources in community groups my journalistic research brought into the public sphere an understanding of how police strategies - including the impoundment of a protest bus - were containing both the protestors - and the motivating ideologies behind the protests. Significance This research developed new knowledge about the protests and gave voice to the protestors who had been marginalized in the mainstream media. The articles filled a gap in media representation
Price, J. 2006, 'A Politics of Health', Mad World, Canberra Times, Canberra, Australia.
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Price, J. 2006, 'Energy Consumption and Reportage', Mad World, Canberra Times, Canberra, Australia.
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Price, J. 2006, 'Grief and Heartbreak', Mad World, Canberra Times, Canberra, Australia.
Price, J. 2006, 'Relationships, Rights & Responsibilities', Mad World, Canberra Times, Canberra, Australia.
Price, J. 2006, 'Youth Concerns', Front Up, Canberra Times, Canberra, Australia.
Price, J. 2006, 'Transition to Adulthood', Mad World, Canberra Times, Canberra, Australia.
Price, J. 2006, 'Stemming the Tide (Stem Cell Research Articles)', The Canberra Times, The Canberra Times, Canberra, ACT.
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Background In 2006, political and religious voices were gaining more coverage than scientists in the stem cell debate. This investigation, consisting of features and a news story in the Canberra Times, focussed on representing neglected scientific voices. Contribution The series represented an original contribution to knowledge by investigating how scientists perceive the construction of the stem cell debate, using advanced journalism methods of in-depth interviews, surveys and analysis of available media and scholarly literature. A review of media publications showed claims of spinal cord fixes were matched by fears stem cells were the 'work of the devil'. My research intervened in this debate by asking: what do scientists themselves think about the value of stem cells to society? I approached nearly 100 university and institute based stem cell scientists for interviews. 50 responded of whom 21 were selected. My research revealed that a significant section of the scientific community did want their views on stem cells aired in the media but that most supported stem cell research, although a handful called for strict guidelines. Significance Using more extensive interviewing than other media, my research revealed that most scientists resented the fact that their research had become a political football on a cultural battleground. They accused politicians of distorting scientific argument; accused media of providing little rational or scientific argument in newspapers and none on mainstream television or radio. These articles filled a gap in media representation and provided groundwork for deepening community understanding of the way in which the public debate about stem cells was conducted.
Price, J. 2003, 'A portrait of you - exploring a national arts story at a local level', Canberra Times, Canberra Times, Canberra Times.
Price, J., 'Mirabella and gender: vicious attacks show nothing's changed', The Conversation.
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Price, J., 'I Thought To Myself, I Might Rock Up To The Next Meeting Of The Advertising Standards Bureau', Canberra Times, pp. 1-2.
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