UTS site search

Associate Professor Hermine Scheeres

Biography

Hermine Scheeres has worked in higher education; technical and further education and secondary education in Australia, England, Mexico and Argentina. Her current positions include: Co-ordinator of the BA Organisational Learning and the Grad Dip Literacy and Numeracy. She is a member of UTS Academic Board, Deputy Chair of the Board of the Faculty of Education, a member of the UTS Equity Reference Committee and Co-editor of the Journal Literacy and Numeracy Studies: an international journal in the education and training of adults. Hermine has developed curriculum and professional development courses and materials for organisations and institutions including: NSW State Rail; Kelloggs Australia; TAFE (equivalent) teachers in Mexico; English Language teachers in Argentina; Adult Literacy teachers across Australia; and the NSW Board of Secondary School Education (HSC). She has also worked as a consultant, adviser and trainer for government departments and industry.

Professional

Editor, Literacy and Numeracy Studies: An international journal for the education and training of adults (co-editor 1997-2005).

Editorial Boards, Studies in Continuing Education; TESOL in Context.

International Conference Organising and Planning Committees: Researching Work and Learning (2005), Discourses on Discourse (2001), Working Knowledge (2000), Text and Talk at Work (2000 - Symposium Organiser) Women, Culture and Universities - Winds of Change (1998).

EEO and Affirmative Action Committee UTS (since 1992).

Member, VETAB Accreditation Panels for courses from Australian Centre for Languages (ACL) Adult Migrant English Service (AMES), University of Western Sydney.

Invited professional development presenter for industry, Australian and UK universities, professional associations, NSW TAFE, AMES.

Image of Hermine Scheeres
Research Fellow, ADMIN Research Office
DipEd (STC), GradDipTESOL (SCAE), MA (Syd), PhD
 
Phone
+61 2 9514 3894

Research Interests

Workplaces as cultures and the changing and multiple identities of workers across contexts from industry to the academy.

The relationship between socio-political contexts, and theories and practices relevant to adult education and training, with particular reference to culture, communication and discourse.

Hermine supervises research students and teaches in both undergraduate and postgraduate programs. Her main teaching areas are: Language, Culture and Communication; Discourse and Power; Socio-Political Contexts of Adult Education; Workplace Communication and Literacy.

Books

Slade, D.M., Manidis, M., McGregor, J., Scheeres, H., Chandler, E., Stein-Parbury, J., Dunston, R., Herke, M. & Matthiessen, C.M. 2015, Communicating in Hospital Emergency Departments, Springer, Heidelberg New York Dordrecht London.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site

Chapters

Manidis, M. & Scheeres, H. 2012, 'Towards understanding workplace learning through theorising practice: at work in hospital emergency departments' in Practice, Learning and Change, Springer Netherlands, pp. 103-118.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Price, O., Johnsson, M.C., Scheeres, H.B., Boud, D.J. & Solomon, N. 2012, 'Learning organizational practices that persist and perpetuate: A Schatzkian view' in Hager, P., Lee, A. & Reich, A. (eds), Practice, learning and change: Practice-theory perspectives on professional learning, Springer, Dordrecht, The Netherlands, pp. 233-247.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
In this chapter, we connect and challenge two conventional assumptions in workplace learning research and organizational change research: that learning can be understood isolated from its interrelationship with work and that managing change is a process to revert organizations back to desirable forms of stability. We believe the nexus of learning and change in organizational work lies in unpacking the apparent paradox between how work practices regularly get carried forward (persist and perpetuate), yet also adapted (change) by workers to achieve the purposes of work. We draw significantly from the theoretical writings of Schatzki and argue that practice theory has much to contribute in conceptualizing more dynamic views of organizing, work and learning. We illustrate our use of Schatzkian concepts by discussing how workers at an Australian utility company using safety practices to learn how to become new kinds of safe workers.
Price, O., Boud, D.J. & Scheeres, H.B. 2012, 'Creating work: employee-driven innovation through work practice reconstruction' in Bonnafous-Boucher, M., Hasse, C., Høyrup, S., Lotz, M. & Møller, K. (eds), Employee-driven Innovation: A New Approach to Innovation, Palgrave Macmillan, London, pp. 77-91.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Considerations of employee-driven innovation generally posit innovation as an advance in the substantive products, services and/or processes of an organisation. More broadly, innovation can also refer to anything that seeks to do something new, or address a concern that would not otherwise be met. Employees contribute to innovation in many ways: they can generate and/or implement a product or service; they can generate and/or implement new technologies; however, they can also influence the ways in which an organisation adapts and evolves over time in more subtle ways through instigating work practice changes. Although these more subtle changes may not appear under the banner of organisational innovation they nevertheless contribute to the creation and application of new organisational processes, practices and outputs. They may also never be part of the conscious and explicit agenda of the organisation or be something that managers have a strong role in initiating. However, their effects can be cumulative and substantial.
Chappell, C.S., Scheeres, H.B., Boud, D.J. & Rooney, D.L. 2009, 'Working out work: integrated development practices in organizations' in Field, J., Gallacher, J. & Ingram, R. (eds), Researching transitions in lifelong learning, Routledge, Abingdon, UK, pp. 175-188.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
NA
Iedema, R.A. & Scheeres, H.B. 2009, 'Organisational discourse analysis' in Bargiela-Chiappini Francesca (ed), The Handbook of Business Discourse, Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh, pp. 80-91.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
This chapter provides an overview of the changes and innovations that we see in contemporary business organisations and their implications for employees. These changes and innovations involve new technologies, restructured product lines or services, and new managerial, professional and occupational tasks and responsibilities. What the research that is reviewed in this chapter suggests is that these developments manifest most dramatically in how employees relate to one another, what they say to one another, how much they say to one another, and how frequently they (have to) communicate with each other (Adler 2001; Child and McGrath 2001). For that reason, the focus ofthe chapter is on how changes within business organisations impact on employees in those organisations - not on the discourses of how people do business with one another across organisations.
Rhodes, C.H., Scheeres, H.B. & Iedema, R.A. 2008, 'Triple Trouble: Undecidability, Identity and Organisational Change' in Coulthard & Iedema (eds), Identity Trouble, Palgrave Macmillan, Houndmills Basingstoke, UK, pp. 229-249.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Chappell, C.S., Scheeres, H.B. & Solomon, N. 2007, 'Working on Identities' in FARRELL, L. & FENWICK, T. (eds), Educating the global workforce Knowledge, knowledge work and knowledge workers, Routledge, London & New York, pp. 167-177.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
The book considers the challenges of understanding and providing work-related education arising from the rapid expansion of the global economy.
Rhodes, C.H., Iedema, R.A. & Scheeres, H.B. 2007, 'Identity, Surveillance and Resistance' in Pullen, A., Beech, N. & Sims, D. (eds), Exploring Identity: Concepts and Methods, Palgrave Macmillan, Houndmills, pp. 83-99.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Scheeres, H.B. & Solomon, N. 2006, 'The moving subject: Shifting work(ers) across and beyond organisational boundaries' in Billett, S., Fenwick, T. & Somerville, M. (eds), Work Subjectivity and Learning, Springer, Dordrecht, The Netherlands, pp. 87-104.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Scheeres, H.B. & Solomon, N. 2000, 'Research partnerships at work: new identities for new times' in Garrick, J. & Rhodes, C. (eds), Research & Knowledge at Work, Routledge, London, UK, pp. 178-199.
Scheeres, H.B. & Solomon, N. 2000, 'Whose text: methodological dilemmas in colloborative research practice' in Lee, A. & Poynton, C. (eds), Culture & Text, Allen & Unwin, Sydney Australia, pp. 114-131.
Scheeres, H.B., Solomon, N., Chappell, C.S. & Farrell, L.E. 2000, 'The organization of Identity: four cases' in Symes, C. & McIntyre, J. (eds), Working Knowledge: The new vocationalism & higher education, Open University Press, UK, pp. 135-152.
Brosnan, D., Scheeres, H.B. & Slade, D.M. 2000, 'Cross-cultural Training in the Workplace' in Griff Foley (ed), Understanding Adult Education and Training, Allen and Unwin, Sydney, pp. 206-217.

Conferences

Manidis, M. & Scheeres, H.B. 2010, 'Emergency Department Consultations: the complexity of ethnographic and discursive representation', COMET 2010 (Communication, Medicine and Ethics) Conference, Boston.
This paper presented ethnographic and discourse analysis findings based on a three year study into five Australian emergency departments.
Price, O., Scheeres, H.B. & Johnsson, M.C. 2009, 'On practices that persist and perpetuate: learning work in an Australian utility', Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Researching Work and Learning, 6th International Conference on Researching Work and Learning, Roskilde University, Roskilde University, pp. 1-10.
This paper applies Schatzki's conceptualisation of practice to challenge conventional notions of organisational change as target stable phenomena. It illustrates practice concepts by analysing research findings from an Australian utility company.
Rooney, D.L. & Scheeres, H.B. 2008, 'An enterprising phoenix: learning through challenge and excitement in times of change', International Conference on Organizational Learning, Knowledge and capabilities, Danish School of Education, University of Aarhus, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Price, O., Rooney, D.L., Scheeres, H.B. & Boud, D.J. 2007, 'That's (not) my job: inventing and developing work practices in an adult education organisation', Proceedings of 37th Annual Standing Conference on University Teaching and Research in the Education of Adults (SCUTREA), Annual Standing Conference on University Teaching and Research in the Education of Adults (SCUTREA), SCUTREA, Belfast, Northern Ireland, pp. 388-395.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
This paper draws empirical data to explore how workers in one organization are 'inventing' and continue to develop what constitutes their work, ie making up their jobs. Doing so troubles accounts of common work-practices that pre-suppose stable organizational contexts, pre-designed jobs and agent- less workers.
Chappell, C.S., Boud, D.J., Scheeres, H.B. & Rooney, D.L. 2007, 'Working Out work: Integrated Development Practices in Organisations', The times they are a-changin' researching transitions in lifelong learning, The times they are a-changin' researching transitions in lifelong learning, CRLL, Centre for Research in Lifelong Learning University of Stirling Scotland, pp. 1-7.
The paper reports on the initial findings of the ARC project Beyond Training & Learning Integrated Development Projects in Organisations
Scheeres, H.B., Price, O., Boud, D.J. & Chappell, C.S. 2007, 'Re-presenting organisational practices as learning practices', Conference Proceedings, Researching work and learniing, Researching Work and Learning, Division for Lifelong Learning, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town, South Africa, pp. 738-743.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
The growth of knowledge work and the construction of the knowledge worker (Drucker 1993) have activated widespread interest in learning in organisations. In this contemporary context, investigations and characterisations of learning (at) work and work as learning, formal versus informal learning and so on, have drawn learning out of its educational, training or institutionally-oriented 'home' to situate it within business practices. New manifestations of learning can be linked to organisational practices such as, for example, coaching and mentoring, and perhaps less obviously to practices of performance management, teamwork, career development, and the like. These organisational practices are creating new meanings and understandings for learning at work and are therefore producing different learning experiences, and workers, from those of the past. We are interested in how and if these organisational practices promote learning while they simultaneously enact organisational functions.
Otsuji, E. & Scheeres, H.B. 2006, 'Performing language and identities in a transcultural context', Cultural Literacies and Multi-lingual Literacy Workshop, UTS.
Rhodes, C.H., Iedema, R.A. & Scheeres, H.B. 2005, 'Being at work: Immaterial labor, affectualization and the presencing of identity', Responsible Management in an Uncertain World - EURAM 2005 Conference, EURAM Conference, European Academy of Management, Munich, Germany, pp. 1-21.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Iedema, R.A., Rhodes, C.H. & Scheeres, H.B. 2004, 'Observance and Surveillance: The ethics and aesthetics of identity (at) work', Organizational discourse: Artefacts, Archetypes and Architexts, 6th International Conference on Organizational Discourse, Kings College, London, Amsterdam, Holland.

Journal articles

Rooney, D.L., Manidis, M. & Scheeres, H. 2016, 'Making spaces for consuming practices', Vocations and Learning, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 167-184.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
This empirically driven paper is about workplace learning with specific focus on the 'work' of consuming practices. By consuming we refer to the eating, and the drinking, and (at times) to the smoking that workers, in most organisations, do on a daily basis. Indeed, it is the quotidian nature of consuming, coupled with its absence from workplace learning research that make them noteworthy practices to explore. In using the term practice we draw on the recent tranche of practice based theorisations: notably Schatzki (1996, Organization Studies, 26(3), 465-484, 2005, Organization Studies, 27(12), 1863-1873, 2006) and Gherardi (Human Relations, 54(1), 131-139, 2001, 2006, Learning Organization, 16(5), 352-359, 2009). The paper frames consuming practices as 'dispersed' (general) practices and, illustrated through empirical data from multiple projects, we progressively outline how these contribute to the learning of 'integrative' (specialized work) practices. Our overall aim is to (re)position consuming practices from prosaic, to having much relevance for research on workplace learning.
Rooney, D.L., Manidis, M. & Scheeres, H. 2016, 'Making spaces for consuming practices', Vocations and Learning.
View/Download from: Publisher's site
This empirically driven paper is about workplace learning with specific focus on the 'work' of consuming practices. By consuming we refer to the eating, and the drinking, and (at times) to the smoking that workers, in most organisations, do on a daily basis. Indeed, it is the quotidian nature of consuming, coupled with its absence from workplace learning research that make them noteworthy practices to explore. In using the term practice we draw on the recent tranche of practice based theorisations: notably Schatzki (1996, Organization Studies, 26(3), 465-484, 2005, Organization Studies, 27(12), 1863-1873, 2006) and Gherardi (Human Relations, 54(1), 131-139, 2001, 2006, Learning Organization, 16(5), 352-359, 2009). The paper frames consuming practices as 'dispersed' (general) practices and, illustrated through empirical data from multiple projects, we progressively outline how these contribute to the learning of 'integrative' (specialized work) practices. Our overall aim is to (re)position consuming practices from prosaic, to having much relevance for research on workplace learning.
Slade, D., Manidis, M., McGregor, J., Scheeres, H., Chandler, E., Stein-Parbury, J., Dunston, R., Herke, M. & Matthiessen, C.M. 2015, 'Communicating in hospital emergency departments'.
de Silva Joyce, H., Slade, D., Bateson, D., Scheeres, H., McGregor, J. & Weisberg, E. 2015, 'Patient-centred Discourse in Sexual and Reproductive Health Consultations', Discourse & Communication, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 275-292.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Manidis, M. & Scheeres, H. 2013, 'Practising knowing: Emergence (y) teleologies', Educational Philosophy and Theory, vol. 45, pp. 1230-1251.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Manidis, M., Iedema, R.A. & Scheeres, H.B. 2012, 'Information Transfer in Emergency Rooms', Focus on Patient Safety, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 3-6.
This article presents data from a three-year study on how clinicians transfer and work with information in emergency departments.
Scheeres, H.B., Solomon, N., Boud, D.J. & Rooney, D.L. 2010, 'When is it OK to learn at work? The learning work of organisational practices', Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 22, no. 1-2, pp. 13-26.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
The purpose of this paper is to examine the use of "learning" through what we have termed "integrated development practices". These are common organisational practices that both enhance organisational effectiveness and contribute to organisational and employee learning. <B>Design/methodology/approach</B> - The paper analyses the ways in which learning and being a learner were talked about and enacted with regard to one of the integrated development practices identified in a study of four different organisations - safety practices, and how learning and being a learner regarding safety were legitimate in one of the organisations. Data are drawn from semi-structured interviews with members of a variety of workgroups in one major division of the organisation. Findings - Interviewees' responses reflected that learning was fully embedded as an accepted part of a necessary function of the organisation. This use of a learning discourse is discussed in the light of findings from an earlier study on informal learning at work that suggested that learning and the identity of being a learner were sometimes resisted in the everyday culture of work.Originality/value - Using the theorisations of practice of Schatzki and the lifelong education framework of Delors the paper discusses the implications of these findings to examine when it is acceptable to articulate learning as part of work and be identified as a learner at work.
Price, O., Scheeres, H.B. & Boud, D.J. 2009, 'Re-making jobs: Enacting and learning work practices', Vocations and Learning, vol. 2, no. 3, pp. 217-234.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
This paper takes up understandings of organisations where practices constitute and frame past and present work, as well as future work practice possibilities. Within this view, work practices, and thus organisations,are both perpetuated and varied through employees' enactments of work. Using a practice lens, we are particularly interested in the ways workers simultaneously maintain and alter practices in their workplace' we characterise this as re-making one's job. This perspective challenges ways in which managers often depict jobs and everyday work' as rational, linear and easily describable. We suggest that workers at various levels of responsibility contribute more to the formation of organisational practices than is often assumed. The processes of re-making jobs and remaking organisational practices create tensions that we posit as sites for learning.
Scheeres, H., Slade, D., Manidis, M., McGregor, J., Matthiessen, C. & others 2008, 'Communicating in hospital emergency departments'.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Iedema, R.A., Mallock, N.A., Sorensen, R., Manias, E., Tuckett, A., Perrott, B., Brownhill, S., Piper, D.A., Hor, S., Hegney, D., Scheeres, H.B. & Jorm, C.M. 2008, 'The National Open Disclosure Pilot: Evaluation of a policy implementation initiative', The Medical Journal of Australia, vol. 188, no. 7, pp. 397-400.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Objective: To determine which aspects of open disclosure work for patients and health care staff, based on an evaluation of the National Open Disclosure Pilot. Design, setting and participants: Qualitative analysis of semi-structured and open-ended interviews conducted between March and October 2007 with 131 clinical staff and 23 patients and family members who had participated in one or more open disclosure meetings. 21 of 40 pilot hospital sites, in New South Wales, South Australia, Victoria and Queensland, were included in the evaluation. Participating health care staff comprised 49 doctors, 20 nurses, and 62 managerial and support staff. In-depth qualitative data analysis involved mapping of discursive themes and subthemes across the interview transcripts. Results: Interviewees broadly supported open disclosure; they expressed uncertainty about its deployment and consequences, and made detailed suggestions of ways to optimise the experience, including careful pre-planning, participation by senior medical staff, and attentiveness to consumers experience of the adverse event. Conclusion: Despite some uncertainties, the national evaluation indicates strong support for open disclosure from both health care staff and consumers, as well as a need to resource this new practice.
Slade, D., Scheeres, H., Manidis, M., Iedema, R., Dunston, R., Stein-Parbury, J., Matthiessen, C., Herke, M. & McGregor, J. 2008, 'Emergency communication: the discursive challenges facing emergency clinicians and patients in hospital emergency departments', Discourse & Communication, vol. 2, pp. 271-298.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Scheeres, H.B. 2007, 'Talk and texts at work: Beyond language and literacy skills', Literacy and Numeracy Studies, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 5-18.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
In this paper I discuss changing work practices in post-bureaucratic organisations (Heckscher and Donellon 1994, Iedema 2003) as a move from a focus on how those in control formulate what is to happen at the level of work, towards requiring workers to verbalise how they see themselves as being able to contribute to the organisation. Workers are increasingly asked to talk about their work, and to negotiate their understandings of their work with others in the workplace they are becoming discourse workers. This discourse work is integral to the increasing textualisation of work. These work practices are imbued with tensions as workers try to make sense of, and learn, new ways of being a worker, and an important site of this struggle and learning is working in teams.
Rhodes, C.H. & Scheeres, H.B. 2006, 'Between cultures: values, training and identity in a manufacturing firm', Journal Of Organizational Change Management, vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 223-236.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to critically scrutinize the use of training interventions as a means of implementing corporate culture change and to assess the implications of such programs for employee identity. Design/methodology/approach - The
Iedema, R.A., Rhodes, C.H. & Scheeres, H.B. 2006, 'Surveillance, resistance, observance Exploring the teleo-affective volatility of workplace interaction', Organization Studies, vol. 27, no. 8, pp. 1111-1130.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Central to the critical study of contemporary management practice has been an understanding of the possibilities for worker subjugation framed in terms of the disciplinary practices of surveillance and responses to it in terms of compliance and resistanc
Iedema, R.A., Rhodes, C.H. & Scheeres, H.B. 2005, 'Presencing identity: organizational change and immaterial labor', Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 327-337.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Purpose - To examine Hardt and Negri's discussions of immaterial labor in relation to personal identity and sociality at work in a context of the postmodernization of the global economy. Design/methodology/approach - Hardt and Negri's discussions of imma
Rhodes, C.H. & Scheeres, H.B. 2004, 'Developing people in organisations: working (on) identity.', Studies in Continuing Education, vol. 26, no. 2, pp. 175-193.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Iedema, R.A. & Scheeres, H.B. 2003, 'From doing work to talking work: Renegotiating knowing, doing, and identity', Applied Linguistics, vol. 24, no. 3, pp. 316-337.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Scheeres, H.B. 2003, 'Learning to talk: from manual work to discourse work as self-regulating practice', Journal of workplace learning, vol. 15, no. 7/8, pp. 332-338.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Scheeres, H.B. & Iedema, R.A. 2002, 'Organizing and businessing identity: rethinking/reframing pedagogies', Teaching English for International Business, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 36-49.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Scheeres, H.B. 2001, 'Producing core values in an Australian workplace; language, literacy and identity', Literacy and Numeracy Studies, vol. 11, no. 2, pp. 41-54.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS

Other

Manidis, M., Iedema, R.A. & Scheeres, H.B. 2012, 'Information Transfer in ERs'.

Reports

Slade, D.M., Joyce, H., Nesbitt, C., Scheeres, H. & Solomon, N. Department of Immigration, Technology and Regional Development 1995, Effective Communication in the Restructured Workplace, Volume 4: The Spoken and Written Language of Training, Canberra.