Dr Graham Massey

Biography

Graham Massey has a PhD in Marketing from the University of New South Wales, and has research interests in the area of marketing implementation. Graham’s main research focus concerns cross-functional working relationships (CFRs) between Marketing Managers and Sales Managers, and also between Marketing Managers and R&D Managers during new product development projects. Key areas of interest include identifying and quantifying the factors that contribute to effective or ineffective CFRs between these functional managers. Variables investigated include the levels of cognition-based and affect-based trust, organisational structure, power and dependence, the managerial use of various influence tactics, communication behaviours, and the role of individual differences between the functional managers. The effects of these factors on relationship quality variables such as interpersonal conflict and relationship effectiveness are investigated quantitatively using structural equation modelling, on data provided by Marketing Managers, Sales Managers, and R&D Managers.

Graham has published in a number of leading international journals, and in 2006 was awarded an Emerald Literati Network Award for Excellence for the Outstanding Paper of 2005 in the European Journal of Marketing: “Antecedents of Conflict in Marketing’s Cross-functional Relationship with Sales.” In addition Graham was awarded the Best Paper in the Selling and Sales Management track at the UK Academy of Marketing Conference, 2008, at Aberdeen Business School. Graham has articles published in the European Journal of Marketing, Industrial Marketing Management, Journal of Business and Industrial Marketing, Journal of Product and Brand Management, Australasian Marketing Journal, Asia-Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, and the International Review of Business Research Papers. In addition Graham has co-written a chapter on Marketing/Sales CFRs published in The Oxford Handbook of Strategic Sales and Sales Management (with Ken Le Meunier-FitzHugh), published various case studies in marketing, and a number of Working Papers via Penn State’s Institute for the Study of Business Markets, and the UTS Marketing Discipline Group.

Graham has presented his work at a range of international conferences, including the Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy (ANZMAC), Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management (ANZAM), the UK Academy of Marketing (AM), the International Marketing and Purchasing Group (IMP), the European Group for Organizational Studies (EGOS), the European Marketing Academy (EMAC), and the International Congress of Hotel and Tourism Marketing and Management (ICHTMM).

Graham is a Core Member of the UTS Key Research Centre CMOS (Centre of Management and Organisational Studies), and is on the Editorial Board of the Australasian Marketing Journal.

Image of Graham Massey
Senior Lecturer, Marketing Discipline Group
Core Member, Centre for Management and Organisation Studies
Project Officer, ATN - IDTC, Marketing Discipline Group
Senior Lecturer, Marketing Discipline Group
Project Officer, ATN - IDTC, Marketing Discipline Group
Core Member, Centre for Management and Organisation Studies
BCom (UoW), MCom (UOW), PhD (UNSW)
 
Phone
+61 2 9514 3480
Fax
+61 2 9514 3535
Room
CM05C.02.28

Research Interests

Marketing’s cross functional working relationships; marketing implementation, measurement of service quality, structural equation modelling.

Can supervise: Yes
Supervised students
Devika Rama (PhD Candidate in Marketing)

Marketing Research (Postgraduate)

Book Chapters

Le Meunier-FitzHugh, K. & Massey, G.R. 2011, 'The Importance of Effective Working Relationships between Sales and Marketing' in Cravens, D.W., LeMeunier-FitzHugh, K., and Piercy, N.F. (eds), The Oxford Handbook of Strategic Sales and Sales Management, Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK, pp. 539-570.
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Conference Papers

Massey, G.R. 2012, 'The effectiveness of communication between marketing managers and sales managers during NPD projects', 2012 ANZMAC Conference, Adelaide, December 2012 in Proceedings of ANZMAC 2012, ed (anon), Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy, Adelaide, Australia, pp. 1-7.
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This paper examines the effectiveness of communication between Marketing Managers and Sales Managers during NPD projects, under conditions of interdependence and psychological distance. The results suggest that different types of communication have differential effects, and that some managers+ communication strategies may be suboptimal during NPD projects. Moreover, managerial communication during NPD is often at odds with the normative view in the literature, that greater communication is necessary during NPD because such projects are intra-firm information processing sub-systems, aimed at reducing uncertainty, and enhancing project effectiveness.
Waller, D.S. & Massey, G.R. 2011, 'A study of personal beliefs of advertising and attitudes towards advertisements: Pollay and Mittal (1993) revisited', Australia and New Zealand Communication Association Conference, Hamilton, New Zealand, July 2011 in Proceedings of Australia and New Zealand Communication Association Conference, ed Henderson, A, ANZCA, Hamilton, New Zealand, pp. 1-12.
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This study involves a survey of university students and focuses on the personal beliefs and uses of advertising identified in Pollay and Mittal+s (1993) seminal paper, i.e., Product Information, Social Role/Image, and Hedonic/Pleasure. Our results suggest that respondents+ attitudes towards advertisements is most strongly driven by the Hedonic/Pleasure factor of advertising, followed by its Product Information role, but is unaffected by the Social Role/Image function of advertising. Our structural equation modelling results suggest that there has been an increase in the importance of the Hedonic/Pleasure role of advertising since Pollay and Mittal+s (1993) original study. In addition, the measurement diagnostics for these three constructs from our modelling suggest that there may be a need to revisit these items, and to develop and validate new and better measures of them.
Massey, G.R. 2011, 'The effects non-coercive influence tactic use in marketing manager/sales manager working relationships during NPD', ANZMAC, Perth, Australia, November 2011 in Proceedings of ANZMAC 2011, ed MacCarthy, M. and Sanders, D., ANZMAC2011 Conference, Perth, Australia, pp. 1-7.
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This paper examines the effects of five non-coercive influence tactics (rational persuasion, consultation, collaboration, ingratiation, and inspirational appeals) on interpersonal conflict and perceived relationship effectiveness. The context of this research is working relationships between Marketing Managers and Sales Managers during NPD projects. The results suggest that the most useful influence tactic for managers during NPD is rational persuasion. This is consistent with the view that NPD projects are information processing sub-systems within the firm, aimed at reducing uncertainty. In addition, not all of the influence tactics have positive outcomes, as two of these tactics (ingratiation and inspirational appeals) appear to increase rather than reduce conflict.
Massey, G.R. & Kyriazis, E. 2010, 'An empirical test of the information processing and socio-political perspectives in new product development projects', Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference, Christchurch, New Zealand, November 2010 in Proceedings of the Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference 2010, ed Ballantine, P; Finsterwalder, J, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand, pp. 1-7.
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New product development research draws on a range of different theories, though no overarching theory explaining NPD success has emerged. Atuahene-Gima and Evangelista (2000) however identified an underlying dichotomy in existing theories: economically rational approaches, and socio-political approaches. In this paper we test a model which reflects this dichotomy, and using data from 184 NPD projects, we provide empirical evidence that that this multi-lens theoretical approach has great potential to better understand factors driving NPD outcomes.
Massey, G.R. 2009, 'The effects of power, influence, and interdependence on the effectiveness of marketing manager/sales manager working relationships', Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia, November 2009 in ANZMAC 2009 Conference Proceedings, ed Tojib, D, Promaco Conventions, Melbourne, Australia, pp. 1-8.
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This paper examines three contextual drivers of relationship effectiveness between Marketing Managers and Sales Managers. Specifically, how the power of the Sales unit, the manifest influence of the Sales Manager, and the level of interdependence between these managers influences conflict, and the perceived effectiveness of that relationship. Our results show that the greater the Sales unit power, the greater the conflict between these managers, and the lower the relationship effectiveness. In addition, where a Sales Manager has high influence, this is associated with greater effectiveness in Marketing/Sales relationships, but not with lower conflict. In contrast, the level of interdependence between these managers does not affect either conflict, or the perceived effectiveness of this important working relationship.
Massey, G.R. & Dawes, P.L. 2008, 'Power, Interdependence, and Influence in Marketing Manager/Sales Manager Working Relationships', AM2008, Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen Business School, Scotland, July 2008 in Academy of Marketing Annual Conference Proceedings, ed Donaldson, W; Turnbull, A., Academy of Marketing, Aberdeen, Scotland, pp. 1-8.
Kyriazis, E. & Massey, G.R. 2008, 'The effects of formal and informal communication between marketing and R&D managers during new product development projects', British Academy of Marketing, Aberdeen, Scotland, July 2008 in Proceedings of the 2008 British Academy of Marketing Conference, ed Turnbull, A; Donaldson, W;, Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen, Scotland, pp. 1-9.
Effective cross-functional integration between Marketing and R&D functions is considered essential to achieve key NPD outcomes. To achieve this integration, functional specialists need to communicate effectively with one another to achieve their respective task goals. This paper examines the role of two forms of interpersonal communication, formal and informal, on three key NPD outcome variables+NPD success, perceived relationship effectiveness, and interpersonal collaboration. The relationships between these variables are tested in a structural model using PLS. Data was collected from 184 R&D Managers in Australia who worked on NPD projects. Our results show that both formal and informal communication have a positive effect on NPD success and on Marketing Manager/R&D Manager working relationships. This study provides empirical support for the proposition that whilst formal communication between managers is important in NPD projects, managers should also be aware that informal communication should also be encouraged, as it has strong positive effects on NPD project outcomes.
Massey, G.R. & Dawes, P.L. 2007, 'The Effects of Power and Dependence Asymmetry on Marketing/Sales Working Relationships', Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand, December 2007 in Proceedings of the Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference, ed M. Thyne, K.R. Deans, and J. Gnoth, ANZMAC, New Zealand, pp. 1-9.
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Rama, D. & Massey, G.R. 2007, 'The Impact of Communication Quality and Frequency on Organisational Learning during New Product Development', Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand, December 2007 in Proceedings of the Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference, ed M. Thyne, K.R. Deans, and J. Gnoth, ANZMAC, New Zealand, pp. 1-9.
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Kyriazis, E. & Massey, G.R. 2006, 'Politics and collaboration during NPD projects', Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference, Brisbane, Australia, December 2006 in Advancing Theory, Maintaining Relevance - Proceedings of the 2006 ANZMAC Conference, ed Ali, Y; van Dessel, M, ANZMAC, Brisbane, Australia, pp. 1-9.
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Massey, G.R. & Dawes, P.L. 2006, 'The effects of influence tactics, manifest influence, and interpersonal trust on working relationships between marketing managers and sales managers', Biennial Conference of the Academy of World Business, Marketing and Management Development, Cedex, France, July 2006 in Business Across Boarders in the 21st Century: Proceedings of the 2nd Biennial Conference of the Academy of World Business, Marketing and Management Development, ed Ogunmokun, G; Gabbay, R; Rose, J, AWBMAMD, Perth, Australia, pp. 845-857.
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Massey, G.R. & Kyriazis, E. 2006, 'Communication and conflict between marketing and R&D during new product development projects', Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference, Brisbane, Australia, December 2006 in Advancing Theory, Maintaining Relevance - Proceedings of the 2006 ANZMAC Conference, ed Ali, Y; van Dessel, M, ANZMAC, Brisbane, Australia, pp. 1-9.
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Kyriazis, E. & Massey, G.R. 2005, 'The effects of organisational structure, interpersonal trust and communication during new product development projects', Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference, Fremantle, Australia, December 2005 in Broadening the Boundaries - ANZMAC 2005 Conference Proceedings, ed Purchase, S, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia, pp. 67-75.
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Kyriazis, E. & Massey, G.R. 2005, 'The effects of structure, communication, and trust between marketing and R&D during new product development', Academy of Marketing Conference, Dublin, Ireland, July 2005 in Marketing: Building Business, Shaping Society - 2005 Academy of Marketing Conference Proceedings, ed -, The Academy of Marketing, Helensburgh, UK, pp. 1-13.
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Massey, G.R. & Dawes, P.L. 2005, 'Functional and dysfunctional interpersonal conflict in the context of marketing & sales relationships', Engineering Mathematics and Applications Conference, Milan, Italy, May 2005 in Rejuvenating Marketing: contamination, innovation, integration - Proceedings of the 34th EMAC Conference, ed -, European Marketing Academy, Milan, Italy, pp. 1-10.
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Massey, G.R. & Dawes, P.L. 2004, 'Managing effectiveness in working relationships between marketing managers and sales managers: contextual, structural and process effects.', Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference, Wellington, New Zealand, November 2004 in Conference Proceedings of the 2004 Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference: "Marketing Accountabilities and Responsibilities", ed Wiley, J; Thirkell, P, ANZMAC, Wellington, pp. 1-8.
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Kyriazis, E. & Massey, G.R. 2004, 'The causal ordering of key cross-functional relationship dimensions: a replication study using the marketing/R&D relationship.', Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference, Wellington, New Zealand, November 2004 in Conference Proceedings of the 2004 Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference: "Marketing Accountabilities and Responsibilities", ed Wiley, J; Thirkell, P, ANZMAC, Wellington, pp. 1-10.
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Massey, G.R. & Dawes, P.L. 2003, 'Functional conflict and the effectiveness of marketing manager/sales manager working relationships', Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference, Adelaide, Australia, December 2003 in A Celebration of Ehrenberg and Bass: Marketing Knowledge, Discoveries and Contribution, ed Kennedy, R, ANZMAC, Adelaide, Australia, pp. 1846-1853.
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Journal Articles

Massey, G.R., Waller, D.S., Wang, P.Z. & Lanasier, E.V. 2013, 'Marketing to Different Asian Communities: The Importance of Culture for Framing Advertising Messages, and for Purchase Intent', Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 25, no. 1, pp. 8-33.
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Purpose + The purpose of this paper is to show that culture has differential effects on purchase intent, using respondents from four very different cultural groups within Indonesia, and two different advertisements (one ethical, another unethical). Design/methodology/approach + The study uses survey methods and a highly structured questionnaire to collect data from respondents in four cultural groups. In total, 100 responses were received from each of these groups within Indonesia (Bali, Batak, Java, and Minang). Data were analyzed using partial least squares. Findings + The results suggest that when advertising to culturally conservative groups, caution is required. Such groups have lower purchase intent when they do not like the advertisement. Moreover, other variables such as attitude towards the advertiser may become salient drivers of purchase intent for such groups if the advertisement is perceived to be unethical. Importantly, neither of these factors are salient for more permissive cultures, regardless of whether the advertisement is perceived to be ethical or unethical. In addition the authors identify a set of +universal paths+ by which advertisement-related factors, and company-related factors indirectly influence purchase intent for both permissive and conservative cultures, regardless of the perceived ethicality of the advertisement.
Massey, G.R. 2012, 'All quiet on the western front? Empirical evidence on the "war" between marketing managers and sales managers', Australasian Marketing Journal, vol. 20, pp. 268-274.
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A common assumption in the literature is that ineffective relationships and conflict between Marketing Managers and Sales Managers and their respective departments is endemic. This article challenges that assumption via an exhaustive review of the large sample quantitative studies of this important working relationship. The analysis reveals that the assumption is unsustainable in the light of the evidence, and that Marketing Manager/Sales Manager relationships are generally effective. This is encouraging news for these managers and their firms, as recent work has established that effective Marketing/Sales relationships are positively associated with superior value creation and market performance.
Le Meunier-FitzHugh, K., Massey, G.R. & Piercy, N.F. 2011, 'The impact of aligned rewards and senior manager attitudes on conflict and collaboration between sales and marketing.', Industrial Marketing Management, vol. 40, no. 7, pp. 1161-1171.
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This research was carried out using five case studies and a survey to discover how sales and marketing managers are rewarded and if alignment of rewards can improve collaboration between sales and marketing and/or reduce inter-functional conflict. In addition, it examined the role of senior managers' support for coordination on sales/marketing collaboration. The results reveal that organizations which use aligned rewards can increase sales/marketing collaboration through such reward structures, but not reduce interfunctional conflict. In addition, senior managers' support for coordination is vital, as it increases sales/ marketing collaboration, and strongly reduces inter-functional conflict. This is important because interfunctional conflict has a strong negative impact on collaboration between sales and marketing in business to business firms.
Ekinci, Y., Dawes, P.L. & Massey, G.R. 2008, 'An extended model of the antecedents and consequences of consumer satisfaction for hospitality services', European Journal of Marketing, vol. 42, no. 1/2, pp. 35-68.
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Purpose + The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of self-congruence on consumer satisfaction with services and to develop and test a conceptual model of the antecedents and consequences of consumer satisfaction in the hospitality industry. Design/methodology/approach + The conceptual framework consists of the following constructs: actual self-congruence, ideal self-congruence, desires congruence, service quality, consumers' overall attitude to a service firm, and intention to return. Moreover, 12 hypotheses were developed and tested. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis were used to test the validity of the measures, while PLS was used in hypotheses testing. Data were collected from 185 consumers who had recently visited a restaurant or hotel. Findings + Strong support was found for 11 of the 12 hypotheses. Findings reveal that ideal self-congruence and desires congruence have positive effects on consumer satisfaction. In contrast, it is shown that actual self-congruence is not related to consumer satisfaction. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the two dimensions of service quality + physical quality and staff behaviour + have a positive impact on both desires congruence and consumer satisfaction. Importantly, consumer satisfaction is found to be a better indicator of the consumers' overall attitude to the service firm than service quality. The study confirms that consumer satisfaction mediates the relationship between the two service quality dimensions, ideal self-congruence, and intention to return
Massey, G.R. & Dawes, P.L. 2007, 'Personal Characteristics, Trust, Conflict, And Effectiveness In Marketing/sales Working Relationships', European Journal Of Marketing, vol. 41, no. 9/10, pp. 1117-1145.
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Purpose - The key objective of this research is to test how two trust dimensions (cognition-based trust and affect-based trust) mediate the effects of three personal characteristics (psychological distance, the marketing manager's sales experience, and t
Massey, G.R. & Kyriazis, E. 2007, 'Interpersonal Trust Between Marketing And R&D During New Product Development Projects', European Journal Of Marketing, vol. 41, no. 9/10, pp. 1146-1172.
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Purpose - The primary objective of this research is to test a model examining interpersonal trust between marketing managers and R&D managers during new product development projects. Design/methodology/approach - In this study interpersonal trust as a bi
Massey, G.R. & Dawes, P.L. 2007, 'The Antecedents And Consequence Of Functional And Dysfunctional Conflict Between Marketing Managers And Sales Managers', Industrial Marketing Management, vol. 36, no. 8, pp. 1118-1129.
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Focusing on the working relationship between Marketing Managers and Sales Managers, our study examines two dimensions of interpersonal conflict: dysfunctional conflict and functional conflict. Drawing on relevant theory, we include three communication va
Rama, D. & Massey, G.R. 2007, 'The Impact of Communication Behaviours on New Product Development Speed and Organisational Learning', International Review of Business Research Papers, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 162-182.
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The purpose of this research is to understand how communication behaviours influence new product development (NPD) speed and organisational learning. Through the use of structural equation modelling, this research tests a model examining the effects of communication behaviours (i.e. communication quality, bi-directional communication, and communication frequency) on NPD speed and organisational learning, and also the effect of organisational learning on NPD speed. The results indicate that communication behaviours had no direct effect on NPD speed; however, each communication behaviour had a significant positive effect on organisational learning, particularly communication quality. Moreover, the results indicate a strong direct relationship between organisational learning and NPD speed. These findings suggest that to increase NPD speed, importance needs to be placed on improving organisational learning within the firm. In addition, our findings suggest that three useful means to improve organisational learning involve improving the quality of communication exchanged between managers within the firm, increasing bidirectional communication, and communication frequency between managers responsible for NPD.
Dawes, P.L. & Massey, G.R. 2006, 'A study of relationship effectiveness between marketing and sales managers in business markets', The Journal of Business and Industrial Marketing, vol. 21, no. 6, pp. 346-360.
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Purpose + The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a structural model of the factors that explain the level of perceived relationship effectiveness between marketing managers and sales managers. Design/methodology/approach + The model integrates trust-based and power/influence/interdependence-based models of relationship effectiveness. The data were collected from 113 sales managers in the UK and Australia. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to test the validity of the measures, while AMOS Version 4 was employed to estimate the model using structural equation modelling with observed variables. Findings + The study found, on average, that the perceived level of relationship effectiveness between sales managers and marketing managers is surprisingly high. The findings clearly demonstrate the potency of interpersonal trust (both cognition-based and affect-based) in building effective cross-functional relationships (CFRs) and also show how interdependence affects both dimensions of trust and the marketing manager's level of manifest influence. In addition, the findings indicate that, when marketing managers have greater manifest influence, the CFR is more effective. Importantly, evidence is provided regarding the consequences of marketing managers using the two influence tactics of legalistic pleas and threats, in terms of their effects on trust and manifest influence. Finally, insights are given about the sequencing of these two influence tactics and how the power of the marketing unit indirectly affects relationship effectiveness.
Dawes, P.L. & Massey, G.R. 2005, 'Antecedents of conflict in marketing's cross-functional relationship with sales', European Journal of Marketing, vol. 39, no. 11/12, pp. 1327-1344.
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Other research activity

Massey, G.R. & Kyngdon, A. 2005, 'The measurement of interpersonal trust between peer managers: a test of a specific item bank using factor analysis and Rasch modelling (Mktg paper #05/3)'.
ISSN 1326-7426
Massey, G.R. & Kyriazis, E. 2005, 'Interpersonal trust between marketing and R&D during new product development projects: antecedents and consequences (Mktg paper #05/2)'.
ISSN 1326-7426
Massey, G.R. & Dawes, P.L. 2005, 'Functional and dysfunctional interpersonal conflict in marketing/sales cross-functional relationships (Mktg paper #05/1)'.
ISSN 1326-7426
Dawes, P.L. & Massey, G.R. 2003, 'Marketing's cross-functional relationship with sales in Australian and UK firms: a model and empirical test'.