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Ed Langham

Biography

Ed is an environmental scientist with experience spanning public and private sectors, focusing broadly on the energy component of climate change mitigation.

His research interests within the Institute for Sustainable Futures relate to sustainable design in the built environment and reducing carbon intensity of the energy sector through demand management and the integration of cleaner energy supply.

In recent years Ed has worked in the International Development field within the Fiji Department of Energy, on energy efficiency awareness campaigns, and rolling out the national mandatory appliance energy efficiency standards and labelling programme. He subsequently worked as Renewable Energy Advisor to the Samoa electricity utility, developing clean energy options both for off-grid rural development and for decarbonising and improving energy security of the diesel-reliant national electricity grid. Ed has also worked as a sustainable building design consultant covering residential and commercial sectors, and administered the Solar PV Rebate Program with the NSW Government’s Sustainable Energy Development Authority (SEDA).

Ed also holds a Master of International Environmental Law, with a focus on legal frameworks for climate change mitigation.

Image of Ed Langham
Research Principal, Institute for Sustainable Futures
Core Member, ISF - Institute for Sustainable Futures
B.Sc(Env), M.IntEnvLaw
Download CV  (PDF, 396KB)
Phone
+61 2 9514 4971

  • Sustainable building design and urban environments
  • Energy efficiency/demand management
  • Renewable energy policy and implementation
  • Climate change implications and policy
  • Energy and development in Asia Pacific
  • Geographic Information Systems for resource management

Conferences

Kelly, Rutovitz, J., Langham, E. & McIntosh, L. 2016, 'The network value of distributed generation', Australian Utility Week 2016, Sydney.
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Giurco, D., Langham, E., Warnken, M. & Cohen, B. 2009, 'Future scenarios in the Latrobe Valley: Contrasting impacts with life cycle thinking', 15th Annual Sustainable Development Conference, Utrecht.

Journal articles

Langham, E. & Cooper, C. 2013, 'What Australia could learn from a US energy uprising?', The Conversation, vol. 19 Nov.
Giurco, D., Cohen, B., Langham, E. & Warnken, M. 2011, 'Backcasting energy futures using industrial ecology', Technological Forecasting and Social Change, vol. 78, no. 5, pp. 797-818.
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Backcasting has been widely used for developing energy futures. This paper explores the potential for using industrial ecology to guide the development of energy futures within a backcasting framework. Building on the backcasting work of Robinson [1], a seven step method is presented to embed industrial ecology principles within the development and assessment of future scenarios and transition paths toward them. The approach is applied to the case of backcasting regional energy futures in the Latrobe Valley, near Melbourne, Australia. This region has substantial brown coal deposits which are currently mined and used in coal-fired power stations to generate electricity. Bounded by a sustainability vision for the region in a carbon-constrained world, regional industrial ecologies in 2050 were backcast around three themes: bio-industries and renewables (no coal usage); electricity from coal with carbon capture and storage (low to high coal usage); and coal to products such as hydrogen, ammonia, diesel, methanol, plastics and char (demonstrating medium to high overall coal use relative to current levels). Potential environmental, technological, socio-political and economic impacts of each scenario across various life cycle stages were characterised. Results offer a platform for regional policy development to underpin deliberation on a preferred future by the community, industry and other stakeholders. Industrial ecology principles were found to be useful in backcasting for creatively articulating alternative futures featuring industrial symbiosis. However, enabling the approach to guide implementation of sustainable transition pathways requires further development and would benefit from integration within the Strategic Sustainable Development framework of Robèrt et al. [2].

Reports

Rutovitz, J., Langham, E., Teske, S., Atherton, A. & McIntosh, L. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2016, Virtual trials of Local Network Charges and Local Electricity Trading: Summary Report, pp. 1-35, Sydney, Australia.
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Kelly, S., Rutovitz, J., Langham, E. & McIntosh, L. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2016, An Economic Impact Analysis of Local Generation Network Credits in New South Wales, pp. 1-77, Sydney, Australia.
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McIntosh, L., Langham, E., Rutovitz, J. & Atherton, A. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2016, Methodology for calculating a local network credit, pp. 1-58, Sydney, Australia.
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Langham, E., Rutovitz, J. & McIntosh, L. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2016, Towards a method to calculate a local network credit, pp. 1-40, Sydney, Australia.
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Rutovitz, J., Atherton, A., McIntosh, L., Langham, E. & Downes, J. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2016, Local Electricity Trading: Issues for Retailers, pp. 1-26, Sydney, Australia.
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Rutovitz, J., Atherton, A., McIntosh, L., Teske, S. & Langham, E. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2016, Virtual trial of Local Network Credits and Local Electricity Trading: Byron Shire Council, Sydney, Australia.
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Rutovitz, J., McIntosh, L., Atherton, A., Teske, S. & Langham, E. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2016, Virtual trial of Local Network Credits and Local Electricity Trading: Wannon Water, Sydney, Australia.
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Rutovitz, J., Teske, S., Atherton, A., McIntosh, L. & Langham, E. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2016, Virtual trial of Local Network Credits and Local Electricity Trading: Willoughby Council, Sydney, Australia.
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Rutovitz, J., Atherton, A., Teske, S., McIntosh, L. & Langham Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2016, Virtual trial of Local Network Credits and Local Electricity Trading: Winton Shire Council, Sydney, Australia.
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Rutovitz, J., McIntosh, L., Langham, E. & Atherton, A. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2016, Virtual trial of Local Electricity Trading and Local Network Credits: a community solar farm, Sydney, Australia.
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McIntosh, L., Rutovitz, J. & Langham, E. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2015, Renewable power options enabled by Local Electricity Trading., pp. 1-31, Sydney, Australia.
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The paper is prepared as part of an Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA) funded research project led by the Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF) at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS), Facilitating Local Network Charges and Virtual Net Metering and a project funded by the Victorian Government Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP), Virtual Renewable Power Stations. A key task in the ISF project is to run five virtual trials of Local Electricity Trading (LET)1 and local network charges, one of which will take place in the Moira Shire and Swan Hill Rural City Council areas in regional Victoria. The Moira and Swan Hill trial will examine either the business model for a one-to-many (Community Power Station) or for a many-to-one (also called a Virtual Power Station, or VPS). Both of these models are likely to be enabled if Local Electricity Trading becomes commonly available. The primary interest of the Councils is to improve the resilience of the local economy by retaining energy spending within the area, to increase the capacity of local renewable energy generation and to enable local residents and businesses to participate in the renewable energy generation. The purpose of this paper is to assist the Councils to choose which model to take forward into a trial.
Rutovitz, J., Langham, E., Atherton, A. & McIntosh, L. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2015, Building a Level Playing Field for Local Energy: Local Network Charges and Local Electricity Trading Explained, pp. 1-21, Sydney, Australia.
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McIntosh, L., Rutovitz, J. & Langham, E. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2015, Local Network Charges and Local Electricity Trading: Market Scan, pp. 1-42, Sydney, Australia.
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This report provides an overview of current literature and information relating to local network charges, local electricity trading (also called virtual net metering or VNM), and virtual power stations. The focus is information particularly relevant to Australia, as well as global precedents in each area.
Langham, E., Downes, J., Brennan, T., Fyfe, J., Mohr, S.H., Rickwood, P. & White, S. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2014, Smart Grid, Smart City, Customer Research Report, Sydney, Australia.
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Prepared by the UTS: Institute for Sustainable Futures as part of the AEFI consortium for Ausgrid and EnergyAustralia
Ison, N., Ross, K., Cooper, C., Brennan, T., Langham, E., Wynne, L., Riedy, C. & Downes, J. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2013, Our energy future: Renewable energy master plan, pp. 1-133, Sydney.
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Langham, E., Cooper, C. & Ison, N. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2013, Virtual net metering in Australia: Opportunities and barriers, pp. 1-19, Sydney, Australia.
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Langham, E., Ison, N., Brennan, T., Downes, J., Boronyak, L.J. & White, S. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2013, Smart Grid, Smart City: Analysis and Reporting. Stakeholder Engagement Report, Sydney, Australia.
Langham, E., Dunstan, C., Cooper, C., Moore, D.D., Mohr, S.H. & Ison, N. Institute for Sustainable Futures 2012, Decentralised Energy Costs and Opportunities for Victoria, pp. 1-136, University of Technology, Sydney.
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Rutovitz, J., Langham, E., Ison, N. & Dunstan, C. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2011, Parkes Shire Council: Distributed energy plan - report, pp. 1-64, Sydney.
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Parkes Shire Council (PSC) is investigating the options to reduce energy use and generate local energy from renewable or low carbon sources, with the aim of delivering significant financial and environmental benefits. To this end, PSC commissioned the Institute for Sustainable Futures to produce a Distributed Energy Plan to form part of PSCs Sustainable Water and Energy Plan (SWEP). ISF undertook a high level assessment of the energy options by assigning indicative costs and comparing them with projected increases in NSW electricity prices, and assessing risks and benefits in the Parkes context. Six options were selected for further investigation in consultation with PSC. Implementing the proposed Distributed Energy Plan could provide significant economic, social and environmental benefit to both PSC and the wider Parkes community, enabling PSC to invest more in other essential community services and programs. It will directly reduce councils own emissions and costs, and increase the profile of sustainable and low carbon technologies. An important element of the plan is to ensure that the Parkes community is informed about the energy actions implemented, enabling businesses, organisations and residents to learn from the Councils experience. There may be potential in the future to facilitate community implementation of distributed energy, for example by arranging or facilitating bulk purchase cooperatives, so that residents can gain access to the same cost effective solutions as PSC itself.
Rutovitz, J., Langham, E., Ison, N. & Dunstan, C. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2011, Parkes Shire Council: Distributed energy plan - information sheet, pp. 1-2, Sydney.
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Rutovitz, J., Ison, N., Langham, E. & Paddon, M. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2011, Electrical trades in the green economy: analysis of the NSW energy sector to 2020, pp. 1-60, Sydney, Australia.
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Dunstan, C., Boronyak, L.J., Langham, E., Ison, N., Usher, J., Cooper, C. & White, S. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2011, Think small: The Australian decentralised energy roadmap: Issue 1, December 2011, pp. 1-110, Sydney, Australia.
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Dunstan, C. & Langham, E. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2010, Close to home: potential benefits of decentralised energy for NSW electricity consumers, pp. 1-46, Sydney, Australia.
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Daly, J.G., Glassmire, J., Langham, E. & Paddon, M. Sustainable Tourism Cooperative Research Centre 2010, Clean technology applications in tourism accommodation, pp. 1-184, Griffith.
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This manual provides information and guidance on clean energy technologies and approaches for tourist accommodation. The main goal in producing the manual is to promote clean energy in small to medium accommodation establishments and to assist the future development of regional and rural accommodation in APEC economies. The overall aim is to raise awareness among APEC economies about the opportunities for application and use of clean energy.
Daly, J.G., Glassmire, J., Langham, E. & Paddon, M. Sustainable Tourism Cooperative Research Centre 2010, Clean technology in tourist accommodation: a best practice manual, Gold Coast, Australia.
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Langham, E., Dunstan, C., Walgenwitz, G., Denvir, P., Lederwasch, A.J. & Lander, J. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS and Energetics 2010, Building Our Savings: Reduced infrastructure costs from improving building energy efficiency, pp. 1-146, Sydney, Australia.
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Meeting Australia's energy needs sustainably will be a major challenge for the next decade. Electricity consumption is forecast to increase by over 20 percent in the next 10 years, while peak electrical demand is increasing even more rapidly, with almost 30 percent growth forecast from 2010 to 2020. Natural gas consumption is forecast to rise by almost 50 percent and gas peak demand is set to increase by around 40 percent by 2020. An unprecedented level of energy sector capital expenditure has been proposed to meet this growth in total and peak demand. Over $46 billion in electricity network infrastructure alone is planned over just the next five years. Electricity generation and gas infrastructure will add significantly to this figure. This unprecedented expenditure is resulting in dramatic increases in consumer energy tariffs
Fane, S.A. & Langham, E. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2009, Water reuse feasibility project: water conservation and reuse opportunities, pp. 1-128, Sydney, Australia.
Leichhardt Municipal Council (LMC) has identified sustainability in the use and reuse of water as presenting not only an opportunity to save money and improve amenity in the local area, but also as a means by which to reduce environmental impacts. In line with this, the Council commissioned the Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF) at the University of Technology, Sydney and HydroScience Consulting to conduct a study of sustainable water use and potential water reuse opportunities. The overall goal of the study is to provide innovative, practical, well-researched water management strategies to reduce potable mains water consumption and reduce the quantity and improve the quality of stormwater runoff within the Leichhardt local government area (LGA). This report represents the principal output of the study and comprises the following two parts: * Part A: .Water Conservation and Reuse Opportunities Study. which identifies and prioritises a number of water conservation and reuse opportunities for particular target sites in the Leichhardt LGA. * Part B: .Water Sensitive Urban Design Opportunities Study. which investigates how LMC can apply Water Sensitive Urban Design (WSUD) principles and associated tools throughout the Leichhardt LGA. Additional outputs from the project include: * An interim report by ISF on water conservation and reuse opportunities; * An interim report by HydroScience Consulting WSUD opportunities; * A series of rainwater tank models for use in sizing tanks for residential and nonresidential applications; and * A series of GIS layers for use in identifying WSUD opportunities.
Abeysuriya, K., Langham, E. & Fane, S.A. Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS 2009, Water reuse feasibility project: water sensitive urban design opportunities, pp. 1-146, Sydney, Australia.
Giurco, D., Langham, E. & Chong, J. Barwon Water 2007, Long-term water savings following restrictions: An analysis of the Greater Geelong supply region, Sydney.