Professor Debra Jackson

Biography

Professor Debra Jackson RN PhD is Professor of Nursing and Associate Head of the World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Development, in the Faculty of Health. 

Professor Jackson is a committed and experienced mentor and supervisor of developing researchers, scholars and leaders. She has supervised 30 research students to completion, including 16 PhDs, 3 Masters and 8 BHons; is current primary supervisor for 8 research degree candidates; and has examined numerous theses for national and international universities. In 2007 she won the Vice Chancellors Award for Outstanding Research Higher Degree Supervision (UWS). In addition to being an active supervisor of doctoral students, she teaches into the coursework Masters level programs.

Professor Jackson is a member of Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing (Xi Omicron). She leads research programs in adolescent and family health, with a particular focus on parenting; and workforce development and adversity with a particular focus on leadership and workplace culture.  A key objective of her work is to enhance the well-being of vulnerable and socially marginalised groups and through the development of sustainable and culturally sensitive supportive interventions.

Professor Jackson is an experienced writing mentor and coach and has published widely, with over 350 publications including journal articles, books and book chapters. She has co-edited three widely used text books, two of which are into their 3rd editions. She is Editor-in-Chief of Clinical Case Reports, Editor of Journal of Clinical Nursing, Managing Editor of Contemporary Nurse, and sits on the Editorial Boards of Journal of Child Health Care, Nursing Inquiry, and Nursing and Health Sciences.

Professional

Editor - Journal of Clinical Nursing
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1365-2702

Managing Editor - Advances in Contemporary Nursing
http://www.contemporarynurse.com/page/45/editorial-board

Editor-in-Chief - Clinical Case Reports
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)2050-0904

Editorial Board - Nursing and Health Sciences
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1442-2018

International Editorial Board - Journal of Child Health Care
http://www.uk.sagepub.com/journalsProdDesc.nav?prodId=Journal201572&ct_p=boards&crossRegion=antiPod

Editorial Board - Nursing Inquiry
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1440-1800/homepage/EditorialBoard.html

Member -  Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing (Xi Omicron)

Member - International Network of Doctoral Education in Nursing (INDEN)

Member - International Council on Women’s Health Issues (ICOWHI)

Member - International Network of Nurse Editors (INANE)

Image of Debra Jackson
Director, HDR Research Students, Faculty of Health
Core Member, Health Services and Practice Research Strength
Core Member, Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM)
Member, WHO Collaborating Centre for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Development (WHO or WHOCC)
B Health Science in Nursing, Master of Nursing, Doctors of Philosophy
 
Phone
+61 2 9514 4817
Fax
+61 2 9514 4835
Room
CB10.07.236

Research Interests

case study, feminist research, survey methods, health services management (including Nursing management), leadership, mental health, mixed methods, nursing education and practice, paediatric, child and adolescent nursing, story telling, women's, community and family health

Can supervise: Yes

Registered at level 1

Research areas: case study, feminist research, survey methods, health services management (including Nursing management), leadership, mental health, mixed methods, nursing education and practice, paediatric, child and adolescent nursing, story telling, women's, community and family health

Research degree supervision
Research methods
Leadership in health care
Issues in the Australian health care system

Book Chapters

Jackson, D.E., McDonald, G. & Wilkes, L. 2011, 'Thriving in the workplace: learning from Innovative practices' in Margaret McAllister and John B Lowe (eds), The Resilient Nurse, Springer Publishing Company, LLC, New York US, pp. 105-114.
Nurses need to thrive in workplacce that are often challemging and even personaIly harmful (Jackson, 2008a; Jackson, Claire, & Mannix, 2002; Jack.son and Daly, 2004). These issues are extensively documented in the literature and have been related to the reasons for nonretention of nurses in the workplace (Jackson, Mannix, & Daly, 2003; Stordeur, D'Hoore, & the NEXT Study Group 2006). In order to establish a successful career, nurses need to learn to manage these elements of the workplace environment and develop personal strategies that are meaningful to them as practitioners of their own resilience. This chapter focuses on the importance of resilience in dealing with workplace adversity. Professional support networks are presented as one innovative strategy that can be applied to help support the development of resilience in nurses and midwives experiencing workplace adversity. In the following story, Kylie, a new nursing graduate, reminds us of some of the inherent potential challenges of the nursing work place.
Borbasi, S., Jackson, D.E. & Lockwood, c. 2010, 'Undertaking a clinical audit' in Mary Courtney and Helen McCutcheon (eds), Using Evidence to guide nursing practice, Elsevier Australia, Sydney, Australia, pp. 113-130.
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Daly, J., Jackson, D.E. & Nay, R. 2009, 'Visionary leadership for a 'greying' health system (Chapter 28)' in Nay, R; Garratt, S (eds), Older people: Issues and innovations in care (3rd Ed), Elsevier, Sydney, pp. 468-495.
Daly, J., Speedy, S. & Jackson, D.E. 2009, 'Introducing Nursing... a career for life (Chapter 1)' in J. Daly, S. Speedy & D. Jackson (eds), Contexts of Nursing 3rd Ed, Churchill- Livingston, Elsevier, Sydney, pp. 1-14.
Jackson, D.E. & Borbasi, S. 2009, 'Nursing care and nurse caring: issues, concerns, debates' in J. Daly, S. Speedy & D. Jackson (eds), Contexts of Nursing 3rd Ed, Churchill- Livingston, Elsevier, Sydney, Australia, pp. 80-94.
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Jackson, D.E. & O'Brien, L. 2009, 'The effective nurse' in Elder, Ruth: Evans, Katie: Nivette, Debra (eds), Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, Elsevier Australia, Australia, pp. 2-11.
Jackson, D.E., Daly, J. & Davidson, P.M. 2008, 'Interviews' in McKenna, H; Watson, R; Keady, J; Cowman, S (eds), Nursing research: Designs and methods, Elsevier, Edinburgh, pp. 281-288.
clare, j. & Jackson, D.E. 2008, 'On gender in nursing: a discussion of issues and directions' in Chang, E; Daly, J (eds), Transitions in nursing: Preparing for professional practice, Elsevier, Sydney, Australia, pp. 180-193.
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Jackson, D.E. & Edgecombe, G. 2008, 'Caring for children and adolescents in the community' in Kralik, D; van Loon, A; (eds), Community nursing in australia, Blackwell Publishing, Victoria, Australia, pp. 212-224.
Jackson, D.E. & Borbasi, S. 2008, 'Qualitative research: the whole picture' in Borbasi, S; Jackson, D; Langford, R W; (eds), Navigating the Maze of Nursing Research: An Interactive Learning Adventure, Elsevier Australia, Sydney, Australia, pp. 153-178.
Qualitative research is used to examine subjective research experiences by using nonstatistical methods of analysis.
Borbasi, S., Hengstberger-Sims, C. & Jackson, D.E. 2008, 'Quantitative research: summing it up' in Borbasi, S; Jackson, D; Langford, R W (eds), Navigating the Maze of Nursing Research: An Interactive Learning Adventure, Elsevier Australia, Sydney, Australia, pp. 103-152.
Quantitative research approaches are systematic logical processes used to answer questions about measurable concepts. Quantitative projects can be classified in numerous ways, including through the stated goals of a specific research project or by the choice of research design. The research process is a circular one comprising an orderly series of five phases that move the researcher from the formulation of researchable problems to the discovery of probable answers.
Jackson, D.E. & Borbasi, S. 2006, 'Nursing care and nurse caring : issues, concerns, debates' in Daly J, Speedy S, Jackson D (eds), Contexts of nursing, Churchill Livingstone, Sydney, Australia, pp. 73-85.
Sinfield, M., Jackson, D.E. & Borbasi, S. 2006, 'Ageing and Health Breakdown' in Chang, E; Daly, J; Elliott, D (eds), Pathophysiology applied to nursing practice, Elsevier, Sydney, Australia, pp. 404-424.
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Australia and New Zealand, along with the rest of the world, have ageing populations. People are living longer than ever before due to various factors, including improved health services, and scientifIc and medical developments that have led to improvements ill pharmacology as well as other technologies that promote longevity. In addition, increasing consumerism has resulted in all enhanced awareness of the role of diet, exercise and general health maintenance ~nnong people in general, including older people. These factors, coupled with a declining birth rate, mean that Australia's population will continue to age at least until the middle of the century. From a health perspective, people are considered old once they are 65 years and old, old when over 85 years.
Borbasi, S., Jackson, D.E. & Lockwood, c. 2005, 'Undertaking a clinical audit' in Courtney, M; (eds), Evidence for Nursing Practice, Elsevier Australia, Sydney, australia, pp. 148-167.
Jackson, D.E., Mannix, J., Brown, N. 2001, 'Establishing and maintaining a professional profile: issues to consider in the first year of practice.' in Chang, E. & Daly, J. (eds), Transitions in nursing. Preparing for professional practice, Maclennan and Petty, Sydney, pp. 230-244.

Books

Daly, J., Speedy, S. & Jackson, D.E. 2009, Contexts of nursing, 3, Elsevier, Sydney.
Borbasi, S. & Jackson, D.E. 2008, Navigating the Maze of nursing research: an interactive learning adventure, Mosby, Melbourne, Australia.
Daly, J., Speedy, S. & Jackson, D.E. 2006, Contexts of nursing, 2nd ed., Elsevier, Sydney.
McMurray, A. & Jackson, D.E. 2006, Advances in Contemporary Nursing and Interpersonal Violence, EContent Management Pty Ltd, Australia.
Jackson, D.E. & Darbyshire, P. 2006, Advances in Contemporary Community & Family Health Care, Econtent Management Pty Ltd, Australia.
Daly, J., Speedy, S., Jackson, D.E., Lambert, V. & Lambert, C.E. 2005, Professional nursing: Concepts, issues and challenges, Springer, New York.
Daly, J., Speedy, S. & Jackson, D.E. 2004, Nursing leadership, Elsevier, Sydney.
Daly, J., Speedy, S., Jackson, D.E. & Darbyshire, P. 2002, Contexts of nursing: An introduction (UK/European adaptation), Blackwell Publishing, Oxford.
Contexts of Nursing: An Introduction offers a comprehensive overview of the fundamental ideas and perspectives underpinning the practice of contemporary nursing. The book is an essential resource for any program that addresses professional nursing, theory and knowledge. Each chapter focuses on a foundational area of study. Among these are philosophical, ethical, legal, theoretical, professional, technological, and research aspects of nursing. Ideas regarding nursing practice are considered, including nursing practice with individuals, communities and groups with special needs. There is a chapter on becoming a critical thinker and another on maximising learning opportunities and preparing for professional practice. * Introductory textbook for all diploma and degree Foundation program nursing students * A concise yet comprehensive overview of professional nursing studies * Outstanding pedagogical features including learning objectives, keywords, reflective questions and recommended reading * The Australian edition of this book is the highest selling nursing book ever published in Australasia * Painstakingly adapted to make it invaluable to every UK student nurse * Contributions from some of the top nursing names.
Daly, J., Speedy, S. & Jackson, D.E. 2000, Contexts of nursing: An introduction, MacLennan & Petty, Sydney.

Conference Papers

Dawson, A., Pritchard, C., Dean, S.J., Robertson, J. & Jackson, D.E. 2013, 'Collaborative approaches to addressing the complex needs of women with post traumatic stress disorder and substance use disorder.', PHAA National Social Inclusion and Complex Needs Conference, Canberra, ACT, Australia, April 2013 in PHAA National Social Inclusion and Complex Needs Conference, Public Health Association, Curtin ACT, pp. 28-28.
In Australia, the health, social and economic burden of alcohol and drug dependence is profound. Women's substance use problems are highly stigmatized and often not acknowledged. Pregnant and parenting women face particular societal condemnation and encounter multiple systemic barriers that delay treatment seeking with women fearing consequences for them and their children. Rates of comorbid post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorder (SUD) are higher for women than men and are associated with trauma related to sexual abuse and family violence. Little research has been undertaken internationally or in Australia to determine the most effective treatment for women with PTSD and SUD. Given the high incidence of PTSD co morbidity, it is critical that treatment models accommodate the complex needs of these women and draw upon integrated services requiring multiple service providers and professionals. This paper reports on the trial of a unique program for women with SUD and PTSD at Jarrah House, a residential medical detoxification and rehabilitation NGO program for women and their children. Early findings show encouraging increases in client quality of life scores and insight into how the program has empowered women to make life changes and plan their recovery supported by various providers.
Dean, S.J., Dawson, A. & Jackson, D.E. 2013, 'Towards gender responsive treatment for substance abuse disorder: issues for consideration when providing services.', 8th International Conference on Interdisciplinary Social Sciences., Prague, Czech Republic., July 2013.
In Australia the health, social and economic burden of female alcohol and drug dependence is profound. Women's substance use problems are more stigmatized, less likely to be acknowledged than men's, pregnant and parenting women face particular societal condemnation and encounter multiple systemic treatment barriers and they often delay seeking treatment services for fear of the consequences for them and their children. This particularly applies for Government agencies and women often feel more supported in seeking treatment programs in the NGO sector. International studies have documented high rates of comorbid post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD) and substance abuse disorders for men and for women although the rates appear to be higher for women and typically stem from different trauma. The relationship between PTSD and substance abuse disorders tells us very different stories in men and women and the social determinants and coocurring life problems are often very different with women experiencing issues with children more frequently than men. There is very little research internationally or Australia to determine what is the best type of treatment for women with PTSD and substance use disorders. Given the high incidence of this comorbidity, treatment models that do not address this critical issue may not be successful. This paper reports on a unique program being trialled in a residential medical detoxification and rehabilitation program for women and their children in NSW. Jarrah House is part of the NGO sector and it's mission is to promote the empowerment, health and well-being of women and children by providing an effective and therapeutic gender responsive drug and alcohol treatment service. The program being trialled is an integrated program addressing both trauma and substance use and is the focus of this paper.
Dean, S.J., Jackson, D.E. & Dawson, A. 2012, 'The Impact of Short Term Residential Treatment Programs for Women Withdrawing from Alcohol and Other Drugs in Australia', International Council on Women's Health Issues (ICOWHI), Bangkok, Thailand., November 2012.
Objectives: To determine the impact of short term residential treatment programs for women withdrawing from alcohol and other drugs in Australia. Methods: In this first phase of a longitudinal study of women (n=80) in a residential treatment program in NSW women were invited to complete questionnaires to measure quality of life, psychological health and confidence in their ability to abstain at the commencement of the 21 day program following a physical detoxification; after the 21 day program had concluded; and again at 42 days if they repeated the program cycle. The women completed questionnaires on quality of life, WHO-8: EUROHIS, psychological health Kessler -10 Plus and confidence to abstain from alcohol and other drugs. Results: Preliminary results indicate that outcomes were positive on all scales after completing the 21 day program with no marked difference when women repeated the program and remained in the program for a further 21 days. Conclusion: Residential treatment programs specifically for women withdrawing from alcohol and other drugs are scarce in Australia and in fact internationally. There are huge waiting lists for these types of services. Given the long waiting lists for treatment services, the chance of relapse following women making the initial call to self refer to a program and the long wait for admission to a service, the fact that women are often separated from their children, communities and social supports, taken out out of employment, the high cost of residential treatments particularly if they involve clinical input for detoxification, it would seem pertinent that more data are available on time in treatment as a predictor of outcomes. Whilst some literature seems to suggest that the longer time spent in treatment is a good predictor of good outcomes for some client groups there is little information available on the impact of short term programs as a predictor of good outcomes (Ross et al 2004). Results from this study will be used to identify models of good practice, develop good practice guidelines, evaluation criteria and criteria for funding.

Journal Articles

Cleary, M., Jackson, D.E. & Hungerford, C. 2014, 'Mental Health Nursing in Australia: Resilience as a means of sustaining the specialty', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, vol. 35, no. 1, pp. 33-40.
As a concept, resilience is continuing to attract considerable attention and its importance across various life domains is increasingly recognised. Few studies, however, have defined or considered the notion of the group or collective resilience of a profession, including the capacity of that profession to withstand adversity and continue to develop positively in the face of change. This article considers the notion of resilience from the perspective of the specialty of mental health nursing, including the ways the specialty has adapted and continues to develop to changes experienced since deinstitutionalisation. Insights are drawn from a national Delphi study undertaken in Australia to develop a Scope of Practice for Mental Health Nurses, with responses used as a springboard to consider the impact of the perceived loss of professional identity on the collective resilience of the profession. Recommendations for a way forward for the profession are considered, including the ways in which a collective professional resilience could be developed to sustain and strengthen the professional identity of mental health nursing in Australia and across the globe.
Jackson, D.E., Walter, G., Daly, J. & Cleary, M. 2014, 'Editorial: Multiple outputs from single studies: acceptable division of findings vs. 'salami' slicing', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 23, no. 1-2, pp. 1-2.
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In this information age, transgressions in publishing ethics can readily occur and many people are concerned that these behaviours are on the rise. The term `salami slicing+ is considered to be a publication transgression, carrying connotations of inappropriate practice and referring to publishing an excessive number of papers from a single study.
Green, J.A., Wyllie, A.M. & Jackson, D.E. 2014, 'Electronic portfolios in nursing education: A review of the literature', Nurse Education in Practice, vol. 14, no. 1, pp. 4-8.
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As health professionals, nurses are responsible for staying abreast of current professional knowledge and managing their own career, professional growth and development, and ideally, practices to support these activities should start during their student years. Interest in electronic or e-portfolios is gathering momentum as educationalists explore their potential as a strategy for fostering lifelong learning and enhancing on-going personal and professional development. In this paper, we present an overview of e-portfolios and their application to nurse education, highlighting potential benefits and considerations of usage. We argue that the e-portfolio can represent an authentic means of assessing cognitive, reflective and affective skills. Furthermore, the e-portfolio provides a means through which nurses can record and provide evidence of skills, achievements, experience, professional development and on-going learning, not only for themselves, but for the information and scrutiny of registration boards, employers, managers and peers.
Jackson, D.E., Wilkes, L. & Luck, L. 2014, 'Cues that predict physical violence in the hospital setting: Findings from an observational study', Collegian, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 65-70.
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Background: The prevalence of violent acts in the health care environment has been the cause of increasing concern. Several cues associated with violence towards nurses in the acute care setting have been identified qualitatively. However, larger scale observational studies to deter-mine the potential of these cues to predict physical violence, are lacking in the acute health setting. Purpose: To report an observational study determining whether particular behavioural cues are predictive of patient-to-nurse physical violence. Method: Non-participant structured observations. Discussion: Clinical observation (n = 1150 h) resulted in 1501 observed cues for violence in 220patients; 36 of whom were observed to become violent. Five (5) behavioural cues were found to predict violent acts. Conclusions: Findings suggest five behavioural cues could be used to assess potential physical violence. Additional research needs to be undertaken to further validate the efficacy of these cues in the acute hospital setting.
Jackson, D.E., Hutchinson, M., Peters, K., Luck, L. & Saltman, D. 2013, 'Understanding avoidant leadership in health care: findings from a secondary analysis of two qualitative studies', Journal of Nursing Management, vol. 21, no. 3, pp. 572-580.
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To illuminate ways that avoidant leadership can be enacted in contemporary clinical settings.
Hutchinson, M. & Jackson, D.E. 2013, 'Transformational leadership in nursing: towards a more critical interpretation', Nursing Inquiry, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 11-22.
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Transformational leadership in nursing: towards a more critical interpretation Effective nurse leadership is positioned as an essential factor in achieving optimal patient outcomes and workplace enhancement. Over the last two decades, writing and research on nursing leadership has been dominated by one conceptual theory, that of transformational leadership. This theoretical framework has provided insight into various leader characteristics, with research findings presented as persuasive evidence.
Cleary, M., Horsfall, J. & Jackson, D.E. 2013, 'Teaching Mental Health Nursing is, at the Very Least, a Craft, an Art, and a Science', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, vol. 34, pp. 136-137.
Saltman, D., Jackson, D.E., Newton, P.J. & Davidson, P.M. 2013, 'In pursuit of certainty: can the systematic review process deliver?', BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making, vol. 13, no. 25.
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There has been increasing emphasis on evidence-based approaches to improve patient outcomes through rigorous, standardised and well-validated approaches. Clinical guidelines drive this process and are largely developed based on the findings of systematic reviews (SRs). This paper presents a discussion of the SR process in providing decisive information to shape and guide clinical practice, using a purpose-built review database: the Cochrane reviews; and focussing on a highly prevalent medical condition: hypertension. Methods We searched the Cochrane database and identified 25 relevant SRs incorporating 443 clinical trials. Reviews with the terms `blood pressure+ or `hypertension+ in the title were included. Once selected for inclusion, the abstracts were assessed independently by two authors for their capacity to inform and influence clinical decision-making. The inclusions were independently audited by a third author. Results Of the 25 SRs that formed the sample, 12 provided conclusive findings to inform a particular treatment pathway. The evidence-based approaches offer the promise of assisting clinical decision-making through clarity, but in the case of management of blood pressure, half of the SRs in our sample highlight gaps in evidence and methodological limitations. Thirteen reviews were inconclusive, and eight, including four of the 12 conclusive SRs, noted the lack of adequate reporting of potential adverse effects or incidence of harm. Conclusions These findings emphasise the importance of distillation, interpretation and synthesis of information to assist clinicians. This study questions the utility of evidence-based approaches as a uni-dimensional approach to improving clinical care and underscores the importance of standardised approaches to include adverse events, incidence of harm, patient+s needs and preferences and clinician+s expertise and discretion.
Cleary, M., Siegfried, N., Jackson, D.E. & Hunt, G.E. 2013, 'Making a difference with research: Measuring the impact of mental health research', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 103-105.
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In a perfect world, all research is of a high quality and has social benefits and impact, improves health-care quality, and achieves positive consumer outcomes (Smith 2001).
Cleary, M., Ferguson, C., Jackson, D.E. & Watson, R. 2013, 'Social media and the new e-professionalism', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 45, no. 2, pp. 1-5.
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In today's internet age there is an expectation that we not only become acquainted with social media, but that we use it; and wisely too. This expectation is reinforced by the proliferation of social media use by government agencies which, increasingly, have active social media profiles, and use Twitter and other forms of social media as an essential aspect of their communication strategy. Social-media savvy professionals have access to reports and information very quickly as many reports are released on Twitter and are immediately accessible and downloaded....
Peters, K., Murphy, G. & Jackson, D.E. 2013, 'Events Prior to Completed Suicide: Perspectives of Family Survivors', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, vol. 34, no. 5, pp. 309-316.
Relatively little is known about the experiences of those bereaved by suicide, particularly in the weeks leading to the death of a loved one. This study used a qualitative methodology to explore the perspectives of close survivors of a completed suicide.
Cleary, M., Horsfall, J., Jackson, D.E., Muthulakshmi, P. & Hunt, G.E. 2013, 'Recent graduate nurse views of nursing, work and leadership', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 22, no. 19-20, pp. 2904-2911.
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Aims and objectives. To assess recent nurse graduates of a large university and seeks their views of university preparation, requisite nursing skills and qualities, workplace transition, supports received, nurse leadership and role models, and career development and retention.
Wilkes, L. & Jackson, D.E. 2013, 'Enabling research cultures in nursing: insights from a multidisciplinary group of experienced researchers', Nurse Researcher, vol. 20, no. 4, pp. 28-34.
To identify characteristics of enabling and disabling research cultures.
Hutchinson, M., Jackson, D.E., Haigh, C. & Hayter, M. 2013, 'Editorial: Five years of scholarship on violence, bullying and aggression towards nurses in the workplace: what have we learned?', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 22, no. 7-8, pp. 903-905.
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Workplace violence in its various forms is a continuing concern for nurses. Few nurses are completely untouched by this violence, with many being exposed to violence and aggression in their day-to-day work.
Jackson, D.E., Cleary, M. & Mannix, J. 2013, 'Ethical sensitivity: Shaping the everyday work environment', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 44, no. 1, pp. 2-4.
Ethical behaviours are much discussed and their importance is widely acknowledged (Cleary, Horsfall, Jackson, & Hunt, 2012). While many ethical guideline documents and codes of conduct aim to promote ethical conduct in the workplace (Cleary, Walter, Andrew, & Jackson, in press), their efficacy is questionable, given the continued reports in the literature of workplace violations and poor collegial behaviours (Hutchinson, Jackson, Vickers, & Wilkes, 2006a; Jackson et al., 2010b).
Dawson, A., Jackson, D.E. & Cleary, M. 2013, 'Mothering on the Margins: Homeless Women with an SUD and Complex Mental Health Co-Morbidities', Issues in Mental Health, vol. 34, no. 4, pp. 288-293.
Substance use disorder (SUD) and co-morbid mental health conditions are a serious and growing issue associated with 14% of the global health burden, and affecting family social wellness and the future potential of children (World Health Organization [WHO], 2008). Women with co-occurring substance use and mental health disorders are at particular risk as they may have dependent children and are vulnerable to poverty, family dysfunction, violence, and homelessness. In 2001, the World Health Report called for interconnected primary health and community-based interventions and human resource development to address mental health and SUD (WHO, 2001). Gender-based approaches have been highlighted as essential in order to engage women in treatment tailored to their needs (United Nations Of?ce on Drugs and Crime [UNODC], 2004). In this column, we provide an epidemiological overview of this vulnerable group of mothers and examine current progress and opportunities for improving health and social outcomes for these women.
Peters, K. & Jackson, D.E. 2013, 'New graduate nursing unemployment: A threat to the future health care workforce', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 44, no. 2, pp. 130-132.
Few would argue against the essential need for a strong, responsive and well educated health workforce. Yet providing it continues to cause challenges, and the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) website makes the point that though the health workforce `has been growing at a faster rate than the population, patient demand for health services has been increasing at an even faster rate+.1 The nursing shortage is by no means a new phenomenon nationally and internationally, with strategies to improve recruitment and retention rates having thus far only limited success. One such government strategy has been the provision of additional funding for universities to increase enrolments into their undergraduate nursing courses. In fact in 2010, new enrolments in Australian undergraduate nursing programmes increased by 9.2% (Nursing Review, 2011). Despite this tactic resulting in increased numbers of new graduates eligible to practice as nurses, as a strategy, it may not address the on-going challenge of providing the Australian community with a skilled nursing workforce due to a decrease in positions offered to graduate nurses by both public and private hospitals. This mismatch between the number of positions offered in new graduate programmes and the number of nurses graduating from university has led to the unemployment of a substantial amount of nursing graduates.
Hayman, B., Wilkes, L., Jackson, D.E. & Halcomb, E. 2013, 'De Novo Lesbian Families: Legitimizing the Other Mother', Journal of GLBT Family Studies, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 273-287.
This study aimed to explore the experiences of other mothers in de novo or planned lesbian-led families in Australia to elaborate on one theme: legitimizing our families. Little is known or understood about how lesbians construct mothering within their families. Even less is understood about the experiences of the often marginalized and invisible other mother; that is, the non-birth mother in lesbian families. Fifteen self-identified lesbian couples participated in semistructured, in-depth interviews (as couples) using a story-sharing approach, undertook journaling, and completed a demographic data collection sheet. To be included in the study, participants had to have planned, conceived, birthed, and be raising their children together. A process of constant comparative analysis was used to analyse the data and generate themes and subthemes. Legitimizing our families was described by participants in terms of several subthemes, including the following: the role of the other mother in planning, conception, pregnancy, and birth; symbols of family connection; and negotiating health care. Other mothers participating in the study were acutely aware that people in society generally did not perceive them as genuine parents. This finding was consistent with the concepts of Others and Othering. To this end, other mothers sought to legitimize their role within their families by establishing symbols and using ceremonies, names, and other methods of formal recognition to justify their role as an authentic mother and signify legitimate de novo family connections.
Jackson, D.E., Daly, J., Mannix, J., Potgieter, I.L. & Cleary, M. 2013, 'An overview of data-based papers on undergraduate nurse education recently published in Contemporary Nurse: Progress, challenges and the need for a strategic agenda', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 45, no. 2, pp. 146-151.
The history of nurse education is strongly grounded in the apprenticeship-style of training that pre-dated the delivery of nurse education in the higher education sector. The apprenticeship model was essentially premised on a belief that students of nursing learned by being exposed to the clinical environment, and being supported to learn on-the-job (Mannix et al. 2006). Because of this and despite the many dedicated nurse teachers who worked within hospital-based schools of nursing, for many years, nurse education was barely problematised; nor was it the subject of particular debate, scrutiny or interrogation. The move to transfer nurse education raised the profile of nurse education as an issue for debate and discussion in the literature, and the transfer itself has been the catalyst for a strong and growing discourse on issues around nurse education. Several specialist journals focus on nurse education, and tend to embrace undergraduate, postgraduate and continuing educational issues. Even general journals such as Contemporary Nurse attract quite a number of papers that focus on nurse education and related matters. However, despite the energies and focus on educational issues, concerns are still regularly raised about the nature and quality of nurse education (Jackson & Daly 2008), particularly in the media (see for example 2011, 2013). In this editorial, we consider data-based papers recently published in the journal on undergraduate nurse education (see Table 1), contemplate some of the strengths and weaknesses of this combined discourse, and recommend some ways forward.
Hunt, G.E., Jackson, D.E., Watson, R. & Cleary, M. 2013, 'A citation analysis of nurse education journals', Journal of Advanced Nursing, vol. 69, no. 7, pp. 1441-1445.
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Demonstrates how to identify a core set of journals that frequently publish in a particular field and rank them using various bibliometric indicators rather than the JIF in isolation and to list the top 10 articles that have received the most number of citations. The nurse education field is used to illustrate how this method can be used to rank like journals to help readers identify a more inclusive family of journals relevant to their particular field and interests.
Trajkovski, S., Schmied, V., Vickers, M. & Jackson, D.E. 2013, 'Implementing The 4d Cycle Of Appreciative Inquiry In Health Care: A Methodological Review', Journal of Advanced Nursing, vol. 69, no. 6, pp. 1224-1234.
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Aim. To examine and critique how the phases of the 4D cycle (Discovery, Dream, Design, and Destiny) of appreciative inquiry are implemented in a healthcare context. Background. Appreciative inquiry is a theoretical research perspective, an emerging research methodology and a world view that builds on action research, organizational learning, and organizational change. Increasing numbers of articles published provide insights and learning into its theoretical and philosophical underpinnings. Many articles describe appreciative inquiry and the outcomes of their studies; however, there is a gap in the literature examining the approaches commonly used to implement the 4D cycle in a healthcare context. Design. A methodological review following systematic principles. Data sources. A methodological review was conducted including articles from the inception of appreciative inquiry in 1986 to the time of writing this review in November, 2011. Key database searches included CINAHL, Emerald, MEDLINE, PubMed, PsycINFO, and Scopus. Review methods. A methodological review following systematic principles was undertaken. Studies were included if they described in detail the methods used to implement the 4D cycle of appreciative inquiry in a healthcare context. Results. Nine qualitative studies met the inclusion criteria. Results highlighted that appreciative inquiry application is unique and varied between studies. The 4D phases were not rigid steps and were adapted to the setting and participants. Conclusion. Overall, participant enthusiasm and commitment were highlighted suggesting appreciative inquiry was mostly positively perceived by participants. Appreciative inquiry provides a positive way forward shifting from problems to solutions offering a new way of practicing in health care and health research.
Ogunsiji, O., Wilkes, L., Peters, K. & Jackson, D.E. 2013, 'Knowledge, Attitudes And Usage Of Cancer Screening Among West African Migrant Women', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 22, no. 7-8, pp. 1026-1033.
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Aims and objectives To explore West African migrant women's knowledge, attitude and usage of cancer screening in Australia. Background Despite strong evidence that cancer screening saves lives through early detection and treatment, there is lack of empirical studies on West African migrant women's knowledge, attitude and usage of cancer screening in Australia. Design Qualitative naturalistic inquiry. Methods Twenty-one West African migrant women who consented to participate in the study were recruited through a snowballing technique. These women were engaged in face-to-face audiotaped in-depth interviews which lasted for about 90 minutes. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed. Results The following three themes emerged from the data: knowledge of cancer screening, attitude towards cancer screening and usage of cancer screening Irrespective of the women's place of birth in Africa, twenty of the participants had no knowledge of cancer screening prior to migration, and most had a negative attitude towards screening. Women who had given birth after migrating to Australia were more likely to have had cervical cancer screening. Women who had passed their child-bearing years or had not presented to healthcare facilities for medical issues were more likely to be unaware of cancer screening. Conclusions Improved health promotion strategies that provide accessible information and education to West African migrant women regarding cancer screening are required to enhance the uptake of such screening in this migrant group. Relevance to clinical practice Nurses who encounter West African migrant women in their day-to-day practice have the opportunity to provide this group with education related to the importance of cancer screening.[
East, L. & Jackson, D.E. 2013, 'Editorial: Sexuality and sexual health: Nurses' crucial role', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 44, no. 1, pp. 47-49.
Discusses the crucial role of nurses in sexuality and sexual health, in particular in the area of reducing the prevalence of STIs in the community.
Dawson, A. & Jackson, D.E. 2013, 'The primary health care service experiences and needs of homeless youth: A narrative synthesis of current evidence', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 44, no. 1, pp. 62-75.
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Homeless youth are a growing, vulnerable population with specific primary health care (PHC) requirements. There are no systematic reviews of evidence to guide the delivery of PHC interventions to best address the needs of homeless youth in Australia. We present a narrative synthesis of peer reviewed research designed to determine: (1) the PHC services homeless youth access; (2) experiences of services, reported outcomes and barriers to use; and, (3) the PHC service needs of homeless youth. Findings show that homeless youth access a variety of services and delivery approaches. Increased PHC use is associated with youth who recognise they need help. Street-based clinic linked services and therapy and case management alongside improved housing can positively impact upon mental health and substance use outcomes. Barriers to service use include knowledge; provider attitudes, financial constraints and inappropriate environments. Findings support targetted, co-ordinated networks of PHC and housing services with nurses working alongside community workers.
Hayman, B., Wilkes, L., Halcomb, E. & Jackson, D.E. 2013, 'Marginalised mothers: Lesbian women negotiating heteronormative healthcare services', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 44, no. 1, pp. 120-127.
Lesbian mothers share mainstream existence with other mothers by virtue of their motherhood, but remain marginalised by their non-heterosexual identity. This paper will draw on the qualitative findings of a recent Australian study that examined the experiences of lesbian mothers. Using a story-sharing method, data were collected using three methods; a demographic data sheet, in-depth semi-structured interviews and journaling. The findings demonstrated that participants experienced various forms of homophobia when interfacing with healthcare services and providers and included exclusion, heterosexual assumption, inappropriate questioning and refusal of services. Strategies used to avoid homophobia included screening and crusading.
Hutchinson, M., Jackson, D.E., Walter, G. & Cleary, M. 2013, 'Coercion and the Corruption of Care in Mental Health Nursing: Lessons from a Case Study', Issues in Mental Health, vol. 34, no. 6, pp. 476-480.
Given that a large number of nurses experience or witness bullying and other forms of counterproductive behaviours in their work teams, the likely flow-on effect of these behaviours in relation to patient care warrants attention. In this column, we analyse a case study of coercive bullying that involved nurses within a mental health unit and identify the corrupting impact of this behaviour upon patient care. For the patient affected, his family, and the staff implicated, the chain of events had devastating consequences.
Dawson, A., Brooks, L., Carter, B., Larman, G. & Jackson, D.E. 2013, 'Stigma, health and incarceration: Turning the tide for children with a parent in prison', Journal of Child Health Care, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 3-5.
Children affected by parental imprisonment are vulnerable to a range of suboptimal health and social outcomes. The incarceration of a parent has a profound effect on children who may have already been exposed to a range of life adversity issues. Parental imprisonment is a growing global concern, not least because of the impact of social, economic and ethnic inequities upon incarceration but because the influence of mass imprisonment `extends far beyond parents to entire families and neighborhoods+ (Wakefield and Wildeman, 2011: 806). Parental incarceration results in enforced separation of parents and children, infrequent and restricted contact and inconsistent caregiving arrangements that may pose further risk to child outcomes (Kobak and Madsen, 2008). This separation is not associated with the level of community support provided for other forms of separation such as the death of a parent (Phillips and Gates, 2011). Indeed, loss associated with parental imprisonment not only separates the child from their parent but often separates them from friends and community. It is a loss that extends well beyond the parent simply being absent (Geller et al., 2012).
Cleary, M., Jackson, D.E., Watson, R. & Chan, S.W. 2013, 'Quality Doctoral Programmes: Views From The East Asian Forum Of Nursing Scholars', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 22, no. 7-8, pp. 1198-1200.
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Mannix, J., Wilkes, L. & Jackson, D.E. 2013, 'Marking out the clinical expert/clinical leader/clinical scholar: Perspectives from nurses in the clinical arena', BMC Nursing, vol. 12, no. 1, pp. 1-8.
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Background Clinical scholarship has been conceptualised and theorised in the nursing literature for over 30 years but no research has captured nurses+ clinicians+ views on how it differs or is the same as clinical expertise and clinical leadership. The aim of this study was to determine clinical nurses+ understanding of the differences and similarities between the clinical expert, clinical leader and clinical scholar. Methods A descriptive interpretative qualitative approach using semi-structured interviews with 18 practising nurses from Australia, Canada and England. The audio-taped interviews were transcribed and the text coded for emerging themes. The themes were sorted into categories of clinical expert, clinical leader and clinical scholarship as described by the participants. These themes were then compared and contrasted and the essential elements that characterise the nursing roles of the clinical expert, clinical leader and clinical scholar were identified. Results Clinical experts were seen as linking knowledge to practice with some displaying clinical leadership and scholarship. Clinical leadership is seen as a positional construct with a management emphasis. For the clinical scholar they linked theory and practice and encouraged research and dissemination of knowledge.
Wilkes, L., Mannix, J. & Jackson, D.E. 2013, 'Practicing nurses' perspectives of clinical scholarship: a qualitative study', BMC Nursing, vol. 12, no. 21, p. 1.
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There is a scarcity of research published on clinical scholarship. Much of the conceptualisation has been conducted in the academy. Nurse academics espouse that the practice of nursing must be built within a framework of clinical scholarship. A key concept of clinical scholarship emerging from discussions in the literature is that it is an essential component of enabling evidence+based nursing and the development of best practice standards to provide for the needs of patients/clients. However, there is no comprehensive definition of clinical scholarship from the practicing nurses. The aim of this study was to contribute to this definitional discussion on the nature of clinical scholarship in nursing.
Jackson, D.E., Andrew, S. & Cleary, M. 2013, 'A reason, a season or a lifetime? The importance of positive collegial relationships and networks in establishing career sustainability and resilience', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 45, no. 1, pp. 2-3.
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Positive collegial relationships can not only mitigate the negative effects of a noxious or unhappy working environment, but are fundamental to the development of a successful career.
Jackson, D.E., Power, T.J., Dean, S.J., Potgieter, I.L. & Cleary, M. 2013, 'Supporting parents and parenting: An overview of data-based papers recently published in Contemporary Nurse', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 46, no. 2.
Hutchinson, M. & Jackson, D.E. 2013, 'Hostile clinician behaviours in the nursing work environment and implications for patient care: a mixed-methods systematic review', BMC Nursing, vol. 12, no. 25, pp. 1-12.
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Although there is a sizeable body of evidence regarding the nature of hostile behaviours among clinicians in the nursing workplace, what is less clear is the nature of the relationship between these behaviours and patient care. To inform the development of appropriate intervention strategies we examine the level of evidence detailing the relationships between hostile clinician behaviours and patient care.
McDermid, F., Peters, K., Daly, J. & Jackson, D.E. 2013, ''I thought I was just going to teach': Stories of new nurse academics on transitioning from sessional teaching to continuing academic positions', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 45, no. 1, pp. 46-55.
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Currently many nursing faculties and schools employ high numbers of sessional teachers to meet the demands of teaching. Sessional teachers are a source for future continuing academic staff; however, there is little exploration on the experiences of sessional teachers as they transition into the full-time nurse academic role. A qualitative study of 14 registered nurse participants used a story-telling approach to explore the experiences of sessional teachers as they transitioned into full-time and continuing academic roles. Findings revealed that participants had only a very limited understanding of the requirements of the academic role when appointed to it. Thematic analysis revealed two major themes. These were: `Uncertainty: Dealing with role expectation' and `Mitigating lack of confidence'. The implications of this paper contributes to and enhances knowledge of the transition experiences of sessional teachers and provides new evidence to suggest that adequate support processes are essential for sessional staff transitioning into permanent, full-time academic positions.
McDonald, G., Jackson, D.E., Wilkes, L. & Vickers, M. 2013, 'Personal resilience in nurses and midwives: Effects of a work-based educational intervention', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 45, no. 1, pp. 134-143.
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Nurses and midwives commonly face a variety of challenges and difficulties in their everyday work. Stress, pressure, fatigue and anxiety are acknowledged sources of workplace adversity, which causes decreased perceptions of health and wellbeing. This study reports the effects of a work-based, educational intervention to promote personal resilience in a group of 14 nurses and midwives working in a busy clinical environment. The intervention encouraged participants to focus on the key characteristics of a resilient person and the elements that assisted them in their maintenance of personal resilience. The intervention also explored potential strategies for the future. Opportunities were provided for experiential learning, creative self-expression and exposure to new ideas. Primary effects of the intervention were found to benefit the participants in personal and professional areas; by enhanced confidence, self-awareness, assertiveness and self-care. This intervention had implications for the education and practice of nurses and midwives in terms of building and maintaining their personal resilience, especially those exposed to workplace adversity.
Trajkovski, S., Schmied, V., Vickers, M. & Jackson, D.E. 2013, 'Using appreciative inquiry to transform health care', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 45, no. 1, pp. 95-100.
Amid tremendous changes in contemporary health care stimulated by shifts in social, economic and political environments, health care managers are challenged to provide new structures and processes to continually improve health service delivery. The general public and the media are becoming less tolerant of poor levels of health care, and health care professionals need to be involved and supported to bring about positive change in health care. Appreciative inquiry (AI) is a philosophy and method for promoting transformational change, shifting from a traditional problem-based orientation to a more strength-based approach to change, that focuses on affirmation, appreciation and positive dialog. This paper discusses how an innovative participatory approach such as AI may be used to promote workforce engagement and organizational learning, and facilitate positive organizational change in a health care context.
Cleary, M., Horsfall, J., Muthulakshmi, P. & Jackson, D.E. 2013, 'A good day in nursing: Views of recent Singaporean graduates', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 45, no. 1, pp. 126-133.
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This paper arises from the analysis of data from a large Singapore-based survey and a complementary qualitative series of 17 individual interviews. Some results from both arms of the research have been previously analysed and are reported elsewhere. Answers to a series of questions within the questionnaire and the structured interviews have been drawn together under the umbrella of investigating of recent Singaporean graduates+ views about the characteristics of a good nurse, a good day at work, and how they uphold ethical standards. Overall five themes emerged, these are: caring for others; respectful interpersonal interaction; rational clinical decision-making; the harsh reality of the workplace; and personal qualities (not easily influenced by formal education). Interviewees believed that potential nursing students should be made aware of the harsh realities they will face on graduation, which may seem counter-intuitive. However, graduates recalled their own struggles and perseverance and toughness to simply survive the early months as a key component of transition shock, indicating that an earlier awareness may be beneficial.
Hayter, M., Haigh, C. & Jackson, D.E. 2013, 'Representations of sexuality: A snapshot of five years of scholarship in the Journal of Clinical Nursing', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 22, no. 23-24, pp. 3237-3238.
Sexual health care is an area of practice that can be both rewarding and challenging. There is general acceptance that adequately addressing health concerns and risk in relation to sexuality is essential to the provision of holistic care; however, integrating this domain into practice can represent challenges (Hayter et al. 2012). Furthermore, human sexuality is multidimensional incorporating biological, social, emotional, psychological, cultural and spiritual dimensions, so that in addition to having an understanding of the physiological, there is also a need to understand the many other facets that influence human sexuality and sexual behaviour. We have gathered a snapshot of papers published in the journal over the past five years. We hope this review provides a stimulating perspective on `where we are' now and also helps to move the research agenda in this key area of nursing practice forward.
Cleary, M., Escott, P., Jackson, D.E. & Hungerford, C. 2013, 'Consumers as partners in writing projects: lessons learnt from mental health', Nurse Author & Editor (online), vol. 23, no. 4, pp. e1-e3.
In Australia, there have been national directives to involve consumers in all aspects of delivering a mental health service since the early 1990s as part of a National Mental Health Strategy. Consumer consultants, peer support workers and service-user representatives now play an integral role in the planning, delivery and evaluation of mental health services (Cleary, Horsfall, Hunt, Escott & Happell 2011). The role of the consumer consultant or peer support worker can be summed up by the adage: Nothing about us without us. Consumer involvement adds a unique and an important dimension to the mental health discourses. As people who have `walked the walk' of experiencing mental health issues, and then engaged with services in their journey to recovery, their insights remind us of the crucial need to truly hear and authentically engage with consumers and look for the consumer+s strengths and potential. Furthermore, our written discourses and the language used reflect and strongly influence our discipline and the practices with it. By authentically engaging with and including consumers as co-authors in our work, we are helping to position the concerns, views, and needs of patients and service users as central to our concerns and to ensure that the service-user perspective remains at the heart of our discourses.
Cleary, M., Walter, G. & Jackson, D.E. 2013, 'Editorial: Is that for real? Curriculum vitae padding', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 22, no. 17-18, pp. 2363-2365.
In this editorial, we address the thorny topic of curriculum vitae (CV) padding. The term refers to the practice of misrepresenting one's achievements or contributions to a particular field, with the aim of inflating one's record or role(s) for the purpose of securing an unfair advantage over others in competitive endeavours.
Cleary, M., Walter, G., Horsfall, J. & Jackson, D.E. 2013, 'Promoting integrity in the workplace: A priority for all academic health professionals', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 45, no. 2, pp. 264-268.
The performance-driven culture of universities challenges faculty to meet workplace expectations. In this paper, we draw on the literature to identify key aspects of, and requirements for, promoting integrity in the academic workplace. Integrity is a crucial personal characteristic that can exert a powerful influence in any setting. Any threat to integrity in the workplace can result in a toxic and corrupt environment that may be deleterious to faculty and students. Such an environment can act to prevent faculty from speaking up about ethical issues or workplace concerns, which can result in failure to identify areas for improvement, continuation of suboptimal practices, and problematic professional relationships. The aim of this paper, therefore, is to present an overview of the concept of integrity in the academic workforce and to discuss some of the issues and dimensions, in the hope of creating greater awareness. This is essential if health professional faculties are to recruit and retain staff and create optimal working environments conducive to facilitating high quality outcomes.
Blythe, S.L., Halcomb, E., Wilkes, L. & Jackson, D.E. 2013, 'Caring for vulnerable children: Challenges of mothering in the Australian foster care system', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 44, no. 1, pp. 87-98.
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Foster carers have a significant responsibility in caring for vulnerable children. In order to support and facilitate foster carers it is important to understand how they perceive and fulfi l this responsibility. A qualitative storytelling study, informe
Jackson, D.E., Andrew, S. & Cleary, M. 2013, 'A reason, a season or a lifetime? The importance of positive collegial relationships and networks in establishing career sustainability and resilience', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 45, no. 1, pp. 2-3.
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Peters, K. & Jackson, D.E. 2013, 'New graduate nursing unemployment: A threat to the future health care workforce', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 44, no. 2, pp. 130-132.
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Jackson, D.E., Cleary, M. & Mannix, J. 2013, 'Ethical sensitivity: Shaping the everyday work environment', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 44, no. 1, pp. 2-4.
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East, L. & Jackson, D.E. 2013, 'Sexuality and sexual health: Nurses' crucial role', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 44, no. 1, pp. 47-49.
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Weaver, R., Salamonson, Y., Koch, J. & Jackson, D.E. 2013, 'Nursing on television: student perceptions of television's role in public image, recruitment and education', Journal Of Advanced Nursing, vol. 69, no. 12, pp. 2635-2643.
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AimsTo explore nursing students' perceptions of how their profession is portrayed on medical television programmes. BackgroundRecruitment and retention in nursing have been linked to the image of the profession in society. Images of nursing in popular me
Jackson, D.E., Hutchinson, M., Luck, L. & Wilkes, L. 2013, 'Mosaic of verbal abuse experienced by nurses in their everyday work', Journal Of Advanced Nursing, vol. 69, no. 9, pp. 2066-2075.
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Aims. To report observational data collected as part of a multi-phased study examining violence in the health sector. The findings presented detail the nature of verbal abuse experienced by nurses during their everyday interactions with patient, their fa
Cleary, M., Siegfried, N., Jackson, D.E. & Hunt, G.E. 2013, 'Making a difference with research: Measuring the impact of mental health research', International Journal Of Mental Health Nursing, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 103-105.
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Dawson, A., Brookes, L., Carter, B., Larman, G. & Jackson, D.E. 2013, 'Stigma, health and incarceration: Turning the tide for children with a parent in prison', Journal Of Child Health Care, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 3-5.
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Cleary, M., Walter, G., Jackson, D.E. & Daly, J. 2013, 'Dealing with peer-review: What is reasonable and what is not?', Collegian, vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 123-125.
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Davidson, P.M., DiGiacomo, M. & Jackson, D.E. 2013, 'Enriching doctoral education with student diversity', Advances in Nursing Doctoral Education and Research, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 10-16.
This article seeks to identify factors to be considered in embracing perspectives of diversity in doctoral programs from the perspective of the extant literature and personal reflec-tion of experienced supervisors
Virdun, C., Gray, J.E., Sherwood, J., Power, T.J., Phillips, A.B., Parker, N.J. & Jackson, D.E. 2013, 'Working together to make Indigenous health care curricula everybody's business: a graduate attribute teaching innovation report', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 46, no. Special Issue, pp. 97-104.
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Previously there has been commitment to the idea that Indigenous curricula should be taught by Indigenous academic staff, whereas now there is increasing recognition of the need for all academic staff to have confidence in enabling Indigenous cultural competency for nursing and other health professional students. In this way, Indigenous content can be threaded throughout a curriculum and raised in many teaching and learning situations, rather than being siloed into particular subjects and with particular staff. There are many sensitivities around this change, with potential implications for Indigenous and non-Indigenous students and staff, and for the quality of teaching and learning experiences. This papers reports on a collaborative process that was used to reconceptualise how Indigenous health care curricula would be positioned throughout a program and who would or could work with students in this area. Effective leadership, establishing a truly collaborative environment, acknowledging fears and perceived inadequacies, and creating safe spaces for sharing and learning were crucial in effecting this change.
Blythe, S.L., Wilkes, L., Jackson, D.E. & Halcomb, E. 2013, 'The challenges of being an insider in storytelling research', Nurse Researcher, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 8-13.
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Aim: To describe the challenges related to being an 'insider' researcher in a study that uses a feminist-informed storytelling research design and to discuss practical strategies to manage these challenges. Background: The positioning of the researcher in qualitative research has numerous methodological implications. Often, qualitative researchers share similar experiences or characteristics with their participants. Such an 'insider' position provides challenges for the researcher in conducting the research. Understanding these challenges and planning how to manage them is beneficial for the researcher and for the conduct of the project. Data sources: This paper is based on the research team's experience of undertaking a feminist-informed storytelling study exploring the experiences of Australian women providing long-term foster care. Review methods: This paper provides a discussion of the methodology used in the investigation. Discussion: Four challenges resulting from the insider status of the primary researcher were identified as affecting the research: assumed understanding, ensuring analytic objectivity, dealing with emotions and participants' expectations. Strategies to address these challenges include: 'participant probing', 'researcher reflexivity', review by an 'outsider' researcher. Identifying the risk, debriefing, making the aims and use of study outcomes clear, and acknowledging participants' expectations. Methods to implement these strategies are described. Conclusion: The use of an insider researcher was beneficial to our study design and helped with recruitment and rapport, enabling collaboration and the generation of stories rich in content. By identifying the challenges associated with insider research and using strategies to mitigate them, researchers can effectively use an insider position in conjunction with a storytelling research design. Implications for future research/practice: Further investigation of the insider in different qualitative research designs would be useful in identifying challenges and benefits specific to those designs.
Cleary, M., Horsfall, J. & Jackson, D.E. 2013, 'Role models in mental health nursing: The good, the bad, and the possible', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, vol. 34, no. 8, pp. 635-636.
Role models are valuable assets in any mental health setting. However, given the sophistication of skills and attributes associated with ideal role models it is evident that many senior nurses will only provide partial opportunities for those less experienced than them. As the needs of novices fluctuate, the qualities required of a role model change, and the potential for timely inspiration and opportunities for enhanced self-belief will also alter.
Cleary, M., Jackson, D.E. & Walter, G. 2013, 'Editorial: Research data ownership and dissemination: Is it too simple to suggest that 'possession is nine-tenths of the law'?', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 22, no. 15-16, pp. 2087-2089.
The expression `Possession is nine-tenths of the law', derived from the Roman law, `Uti possidetis, ita possideatis' (`as you possess, thus may you possess'), is applicable in many spheres of life. When it comes to ownership of research data, however, the matter is more complex and warrants, in our opinion, careful examination.
Hutchinson, M. & Jackson, D.E. 2013, 'Transformational leadership in nursing: Towards a more critical interpretation', Nursing Inquiry, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 11-22.
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Effective nurse leadership is positioned as an essential factor in achieving optimal patient outcomes and workplace enhancement. Over the last two decades, writing and research on nursing leadership has been dominated by one conceptual theory, that of transformational leadership. This theoretical framework has provided insight into various leader characteristics, with research findings presented as persuasive evidence. While elsewhere there has been robust debate on the merits of the transformational model of leadership, in the nursing literature, there has been little critical review of the model and the commonly used assessment instruments. In this article, we critically review more than a decade of nursing scholarship on the transformational model of leadership and its empirical evidence. Applying a critical lens to the literature, the conceptual and methodological weaknesses of much nursing research on this topic, we question whether the uncritical adoption of the transformational model has resulted in a limited interpretation of nursing leadership. Given the limitations of the model, we advocate embracing new ways of thinking about nursing leadership.
Wilkes, L., Mannix, J. & Jackson, D.E. 2012, ''I am going to be a dad': experiences and expectations of adolescent and young adult expectant fathers', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 21, no. 1-2, pp. 180-188.
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Aim. To explore the experiences of prospective adolescent fathers regarding their impending fatherhood. Background. Several studies indicate adolescent fatherhood is associated with multiple risk factors. Despite this, it is well documented that these young males have a potentially vital role in the lives of their child/ren and partners. Adolescent pregnancy has often been viewed with a particular emphasis on the mother and relatively little is known about the experiences and expectations of young males facing imminent fatherhood. Design. Narrative methods were used to collect qualitative data. Method. Narratives were elicited through in-depth interviews with seven adolescent expectant fathers aged 16-22 years. Results. Impending fatherhood presented these young men with mixed emotions and many challenges. The pregnancies were all unplanned and though participants were all willing to face the responsibilities associated with fatherhood, they also reported feeling ill-prepared for the challenges that lay ahead. Impending fatherhood had caused the young men to reflect on the quality of fathering they had received themselves. The young men were hoping to provide their own infant with a better quality of fathering than they had experienced. Conclusions. Nurses and midwives are ideally placed to provide support to young men facing impending fatherhood to better prepare them to meet the demands of their forthcoming role. Relevance to clinical practice. Prenatal classes should include specific sessions for prospective fathers and provide opportunities to assist young men to discuss their thoughts and concerns about impending fatherhood. It could also be useful to encourage young expectant fathers to engage in discussions with their own fathers and grandfathers. For those young men who do not have effective relationships with their own fathers, it could be useful to organise mentoring with experienced mature men who have successfully engaged in the fatherhood role.
Dignam, D.M., Duffield, C.M., Stasa, H., Gray, J.E., Jackson, D.E. & Daly, J. 2012, 'Management and leadership in nursing: an Australian educational perspective', Journal of Nursing Management, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 65-71.
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Aim: In this article, we present an Australian perspective on issues influencing management and leadership education in nursing. Background: Nurse leaders and managers work in a context of high pressure, uncertainty and rapid change, and face unprecedented challenges on a daily basis. Evaluation and Key Issues: In the present paper, we reflect on the issues and challenges facing providers of management education for nursing, and consider these challenges in relationship to current trends and imperatives. Conclusions: Collaborative approaches between educational and clinical settings are needed to ensure quality, relevant educational support for managers and leaders, and enhance curriculum integrity. Implications for Nursing Management: There is a need for contemporaneous and relevant research to inform innovative models of collaborative education.
Horsfall, J., O'Hara-Aarons, M., Mannix, J., Jackson, D.E., Cleary, M. & Hunt, G.E. 2012, 'Views and experiences of mental health nurses working with undergraduate assistants in nursing in an acute mental health setting', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 184-190.
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Undergraduate nurses are employed as assistants in nursing (AIN) in inpatient mental health settings; however, there is a paucity of published research exploring registered nurses' (RN) views about the AIN role in these settings. This qualitative study documents the views and experiences of RN working with undergraduate AIN. Fifty structured face-to-face interviews were analysed, and the results are discussed in three sections.
Hayman, B., Wilkes, L., Jackson, D.E. & Halcomb, E. 2012, 'Story-sharing as a method of data collection in qualitative research', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 21, no. 1-2, pp. 285-287.
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Aim: The aim of this article is to demonstrate the use of storysharing as a practical and valuable method of data collection in qualitative research interviews. The benefits and limitations of the method will be evaluated and discussed.
Jackson, D.E., Walter, G., Watson, R., Cleary, M. & Hunt, G.E. 2012, 'Editorial: Location, location, location - the position of authors in scholarly publishing', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 21, pp. 809-811.
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East, L., Jackson, D.E., O'Brien, L. & Peters, K. 2012, 'Stigma and stereotypes: Women and sexually transmitted infections', Collegian, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 15-21.
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Sexually transmitted infections have long been associated with stigma and stereotypes due to their very nature. Throughout history sexually transmitted infections have been associated with female prostitution and deviant immoral behaviour making women who contract these infections particularly vulnerable to being stigmatised and stereotyped. Although the stigma attached to such infections has previously been documented in the literature, the aim of this research was to gain in depth insight into young Australian women++s experiences of having a sexually transmitted infection from a feminist perspective. Findings from this study provide insight into the onerous effects stigma can have on women with these infections and sheds light on how these effects can influence self-perceptions, fear of rejection and feelings of unworthiness. These findings can provide nurses with greater understanding and insight into the effects of stigma on women++s experiences of having a sexually transmitted infection. Having this understanding and insight has the potential to promote therapeutic care and minimise the stigma that may be felt among women who have contracted this type of infection.
Elmir, R., Jackson, D.E., Schmied, V. & Wilkes, L. 2012, 'Between life and death: Women's experiences of coming close to death, and surviving a severe postpartum haemorrhage and emergency hysterectomy', Midwifery, vol. 28, pp. 228-235.
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Objective: to describe women's experiences of having an emergency hysterectomy following a severe postpartum haemorrhage. Design: a qualitative research approach was used to guide this study. Data were collected through semi-structured, tape recorded face to face, email internet and telephone interviews. Setting: three States in Australia: New South Wales, Victoria and Western Australia. Participants: twenty-one Australian women who experienced a severe post partum followed by an emergency hysterectomy participated in the study. The median age of participants at time of interview was 42 years and the median time since having the hysterectomy was four years. Findings: a process of inductive analysis revealed the major theme, 'between life and death' and three sub-themes, 'being close to death: bleeding and fear', 'having a hysterectomy: devastation and realisation' and 'reliving the trauma: flashbacks and memories'. Conclusion: formulating a plan of care for women identifiably at risk of PPH and ensuring appropriate follow-up counselling is made, is key to help reduce the emotional and psychological symptoms experienced by these women in the aftermath of severe postpartum haemorrhage and hysterectomy.
Cleary, M., Horsfall, J., Jackson, D.E. & Hunt, G.E. 2012, 'Ethical Conduct In Nurse Education: Creating Safe Staff-Student Boundaries', Nurse Education Today, vol. 32, no. 3, pp. 320-324.
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This article synthesises principles and ideas from relevant literature on professional boundaries and applies them to higher education settings with the intention of contributing to contemporary debates on appropriate, respectful, and ethical conduct in
Power, T.J., Jackson, D.E., Weaver, R., Wilkes, L. & Carter, B. 2012, 'Autobiography As Genre For Qualitative Data: A Reservoir Of Experience For Nursing Research', Collegian, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 39-43.
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This paper is concerned with the use of published literary autobiographies that contain first-hand accounts of illness narratives, to explore their usefulness as a form of qualitative data to generate knowledge that can inform nursing practice. There is
Mcdonald, G., Jackson, D.E., Wilkes, L. & Vickers, M.H. 2012, 'A Work-Based Educational Intervention To Support The Development Of Personal Resilience In Nurses And Midwives', Nurse Education Today, vol. 32, no. 4, pp. 378-384.
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A work-based educational programme was the intervention used in a collective case study aiming to develop, strengthen and maintain personal resilience amongst fourteen nurses and midwives. The participants attended six, monthly workshops and formed a participatory learning group. Post-intervention, participants reported positive personal and professional outcomes, including enhanced self-confidence, self-awareness, communication and conflict resolution skills. They strengthened relationships with their colleagues, enabling them to build helpful support networks in the workplace. The intervention used new and innovative ways of engaging nurses and midwives exhibiting the effects of workplace adversity fatigue, pressure, stress and emotional labour. Participants were removed from their usual workplace environment and brought together to engage in critical reflection, experiential learning and creativity whilst also learning about the key characteristics and strategies of personal resilience. Participants' experiences and skills were valued and respected; honest airing of the differences within the group regarding common workplace issues and concerns was encouraged. The new contribution of this intervention for nursing and midwifery education was supporting the learning experience with complementary therapies to improve participants' wellbeing and reduce stress.
Hunt, G.E., Watson, R., Jackson, D.E. & Cleary, M. 2012, 'A bibliometric review of the Journal of Advanced Nursing, 1976-2010', Journal Of Advanced Nursing, vol. 68, no. 3, pp. 492-495.
In this article, we look back at some of the achievements of the JAN and the key papers in the last 35-year history based on a citation analysis. In a previous editorial, Tierney (2011a) mentioned that they extracted data from WoS to identify the top 100 papers published in JAN since the year 2000. She noted that this list contained five papers that have accumulated over 100 citations each; the top one by Hasson et al (2000) was a methodological paper on the Delphi technique. Thirty papers were cited over 50 times. It has previously been suggested that a paper receiving ten citations in a nursing journal is a good paper, 50 citations means it is a very good paper, and 100 or more citations for a single article means it is an excellent paper (Hack et al. 2010). In this editorial, we wanted to make a more comprehensive examination of highly cited papers appearing in JAN and identify the top ten articles receiving the most citations. We used two databases (Web of Science-WoS and MEDLINE) to examine the journals performance according to various bibliometric indicators from December 2011. The findings suggest that JAN has grown substantially over the last three and a half decades based on the increased number of citations it has attracted. Figure 1 shows the number of citations to all articles in 5-year periods and shows the exponential growth of citations received.
Cross, W., Hayter, M., Jackson, D.E. & Cleary, M. 2012, 'Editorial: Meeting the health care needs associated with poverty, homelessness and social exclusion: the need for an interprofessional approach', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 21, pp. 907-908.
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Watson, R., Cleary, M., Jackson, D.E. & Hunt, G.E. 2012, 'Open access and online publishing: a new frontier in nursing?', Journal of Advanced Nursing, vol. 68, no. 9, pp. 1905-1908.
Saltman, D., Kidd, M., Jackson, D.E. & Cleary, M. 2012, 'Transportability of tertiary qualifications and CPD: A continuing challenge for the global health workforce', BMC Medical Education, vol. 12, no. 51, pp. 1-6.
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In workforces that are traditionally mobile and have long lead times for new supply, such as health, effective global indicators of tertiary education are increasingly essential. Difficulties with transportability of qualifications and cross-accreditation are now recognised as key barriers to meeting the rapidly shifting international demands for health care providers. The plethora of mixed education and service arrangements poses challenges for employers and regulators, let alone patients; in determining equivalence of training and competency between individuals, institutions and geographical locations. This paper outlines the shortfall of the current indicators in assisting the process of global certification and competency recognition in the health care workforce. Using Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) data we highlight how International standardisation in the tertiary education sector is problematic for the global health workforce. Through a series of case studies, we then describe a model which enables institutions to compare themselves internally and with others internationally using bespoke or prioritised parameters rather than standards. The mobility of the global health workforce means that transportability of qualifications is an increasing area of concern. Valid qualifications based on workplace learning and assessment requires at least some variables to be benchmarked in order to judge performance.
Deacon, M., Jackson, D.E., Andrew, S., Chan, S.W. & Cleary, M. 2012, 'Stigma in mental illness: A continuing concern', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 41, no. 1, pp. 48-50.
Kelleher, L., Cleary, M. & Jackson, D.E. 2012, 'Compulsory participation in a child protection and family enhancement program: Mother's experiences', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 41, no. 1, pp. 101-110.
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The purpose of this study was to examine the experiences of parents who were directed by child protection authorities to attend a tertiary level child protection and family enhancement program.
Jackson, D.E., Andrew, S. & Cleary, M. 2012, 'Family and community health nursing: Challenges and moving forward', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 41, no. 1, pp. 141-144.
Jackson, D.E., Cleary, M. & Walter, G. 2012, 'Editorial: Research ideas and academic integrity: consideration of some key issues', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 21, no. 11-12, pp. 1497-1498.
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Research and academic settings are unique. The `publish or perish+ ethos creates high expectations for staff, who are expected to publish on a regular basis in high quality, international, peer reviewed journals to demonstrate academic success and meet performance measures. Considerable value is also placed on writing research grants and collaborating with others in national and international research programs. While there has been much written on research ethics and the ethics of writing, including on the subject of plagiarism, there has been less of a focus on the development of ideas, and who owns these.
McDermid, F., Peters, K., Jackson, D.E. & Daly, J. 2012, 'Factors contributing to the shortage of nurse faculty: A review of the literature', Nurse Education Today, vol. 32, no. 5, pp. 565-569.
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The aim of this paper is to provide a critical review of the literature, identify issues relevant to the nurse faculty shortage and provide direction for further research.
Trajkovski, S., Schmied, V., Vickers, M. & Jackson, D.E. 2012, 'Neonatal nurses' perspectives of family-centred care: a qualitative study', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 21, pp. 2477-2487.
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The aim of this study is to explore neonatal nurses' perspectives of their role in faciliatating family centred care in the neonatal intensive care unit.
Andrew, S., Cleary, M. & Jackson, D.E. 2012, 'Facing a New Frontier: Safety in cyberspace and challenges for nursing', Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, vol. 50, no. 8.
Cyberbullying, cyberharassment, cyberstalking and grooming for sexual exploitation are some of the risks associated with cyberspace
Jackson, D.E., Andrew, S. & Cleary, M. 2012, 'Telling our stories: Writing for publication to enhance reflective and contextualised family and community practice', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 41, no. 1, pp. 2-4.
Elmir, R., Jackson, D.E., Schmied, V. & Wilkes, L. 2012, '"Less Feminine and Less a Woman": The impact of unplanned postpartum hysterectomy on women', International Journal of Childbirth, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 51-60.
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This article is a report of the women++s experiences of unplanned emergency hysterectomy following severe postpartum hemorrhage (PPH).
Hayman, B., Wilkes, L., Jackson, D.E. & Halcomb, E. 2012, 'Exchange and equality during data collection: relationships through story sharing with lesbian mothers', Nurse Researcher, vol. 19, no. 4, pp. 6-10.
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To explore how reciprocity is achieved through a method of self-disclosure, namely story sharing.
Horsfall, J., O'Hara-Aarons, M., Cleary, M. & Jackson, D.E. 2012, 'Mental health nurses' perceptions of good work in an acute setting', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, vol. 2012, no. 21, pp. 471-479.
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Findings contribute to a discussion of good nursing work in acute mental health settings, as well as self-perceptions of optimism and hopefulness, which are important contributors to positive, supportive health-care settings and patient recovery.
Horsfall, J., Jackson, D.E., O'Hara-Aarons, M., Cleary, M. & Hunt, G.E. 2012, 'Patients' views and experiences of pro re nata medication in acute mental health settings', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, vol. 21, no. 6, pp. 533-539.
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In the present study, we interviewed 40 patients in acute inpatient mental health settings regarding their experience of, and views about, receiving pro re nata (PRN) medication. Patient requests for PRN were primarily to relieve anxiety or to aid sleep, and the majority of the participants (80%) could describe a situation where this medication was very helpful. From the perspective of patients, interactions surrounding the immediate administration of PRN medication were inadequate, in that half of the interviewees were simply told to take the medication, and three-quarters said that, in their experience, formal consent was not commonly sought. Three-quarters of respondents came up with alternatives to PRN, and half wanted more information about the medication itself. These findings could contribute to improved nursing assessment for PRN medication need, administration, and monitoring.
Mackey, S., Jackson, D.E., Walter, G., Happell, B. & Cleary, M. 2012, 'Editorial: 'Face' and its cultural dimensions: some considerations for nurse educators', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 21, pp. 1797-1798.
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Wilkes, L., Jackson, D.E., Miranda, C. & Watson, R. 2012, 'The role of clinical trial nurses: An Australian perspective', Collegian, vol. 19, no. 4, pp. 1-8.
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Over the past two decades, the number of clinical trials conducted globally has increased thereby increasing demand for nurses working as Clinical Trial Nurses (CTNs), sometimes known as Clinical Research Nurses. The role and professional issues for these nurses in Australia has not been empirically formulated. Sixty-seven clinical trial nurses were surveyed nationally using a modified version of the Clinical Trials Nursing Questionnaire (CTNQ). Findings revealed the complex CTN role can include the coordination of the trials on one or more sites. This involves all domains listed in the questionnaire from protocol development, ethics approval applications, recruitment and consenting of participants in trials, to administering or assisting with treatments within the bounds of their practice code and the evaluation of protocols. Professional issues documented were: being undervalued in the nursing workforce, having no formal educational preparation for the role and minimal recognition in publications emanating from research in which they were involved. These nurses bring their practice knowledge to benefit research outcomes that may contribute to improving patient/client care.
Ogunsiji, O., Wilkes, L., Jackson, D.E. & Peters, K. 2012, 'Beginning Again: West African Women's Experiences of Being Migrants in Australia', Journal of Transcultural Nursing, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 279-286.
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Settling in a new country exposes immigrants to various health risk factors, and the existing literature alludes to immigrant women being more vulnerable than men. This article highlights some of the difficulties faced by West African women while settling into life in Australia. A qualitative design was used to explore the experiences of West African immigrant women living in Sydney, Australia. Data were collected using audiotaped face-to-face interviews, and narratives were transcribed verbatim and thematically analyzed. Twenty-one West African women participated in this study. The findings revealed the many challenges that participants faced after immigrating to their new country, and these are presented under the following themes: beginning again and experiencing loneliness and isolation. Participants encountered difficulties in developing social networks and obtaining employment, and as a result, they felt lonely and isolated. Therefore, nurses and health care professionals need to incorporate screening for precursors of emotional and social well-being issues when caring for this population.
Mackey, S., Hunt, G.E., Jackson, D.E., Thompson, D., Cleary, M. & Walter, G. 2012, 'Reputations: a critical yet neglected area of scholarly enquiry (editorial)', Journal of Advanced Nursing, vol. 68, pp. 2137-2139.
Jackson, D.E., Hayter, M., Carter, B. & Nyamathi, A. 2012, 'Revisiting the concept of vulnerability: Recognising strength and resilience in the context of risk and susceptibility', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 42, no. 2, pp. 142-144.
Hayter, M., Jackson, D.E., Carter, B. & Nyamathi, A. 2012, 'The three developmental phases of addressing sexuality in nursing care: Where do we go from here?', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 42, no. 2, pp. 187-189.
Nyamathi, A., Jackson, D.E., Carter, B. & Hayter, M. 2012, 'Creating culturally relevant and sustainable research strategies to meet the needs of vulnerable populations', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 42, no. 2, pp. 243-246.
Carter, B., Jackson, D.E., Hayter, M. & Nyamathi, A. 2012, 'Editorial: Children out of place: Vulnerability and risk in the countryside?', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 42, no. 2, pp. 298-300.
Nurses and other health care professionals working with children in research and practice espouse and embed children+s rights views and perspectives (Carter 2009, Pelander and Leino-Kilpi 2004, Mattsson et al. 2011, Carter 2011) into their work. We practice in such a way that we respect and honour their abilities to be competent decision makers and we acknowledge their active agency and citizenship (Pelander and Leino-Kilpi 2004, Carter 2009). Beliefs which underpin our practice are focused on supporting resilience, promoting confidence, self esteem and well-being...
Weaver, R. & Jackson, D.E. 2012, 'Tragic heroes, moral guides and activists: Representations of maternal grief, child death and tragedy in Australian newspapers', Health Sociology Review, vol. 21, no. 4, pp. 432-440.
Newspapers are a highly influential media that reflect and powerfully influence the views and cultural practices of individuals and societies.
Elmir, R., Schmied, V., Wilkes, L. & Jackson, D.E. 2012, 'Separation, Failure And Temporary Relinquishment: Women's Experiences Of Early Mothering In The Context Of Emergency Hysterectomy', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 21, no. 7-8, pp. 1119-1127.
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Aim. To describe the experiences of women who have had an emergency hysterectomy following a severe postpartum haemorrhage and the impact on their early mothering experiences. Background. Postpartum haemorrhage and subsequent hysterectomy is a traumatic
Blythe, S.L., Jackson, D.E., Halcomb, E. & Wilkes, L. 2012, 'The Stigma Of Being A Long-term Foster Carer', Journal of Family Nursing, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 234-260.
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Stigma is a powerful social phenomenon with insidious health implications. Understanding stigma as it applies to various populations is imperative for nurses as it enables nurses to enhance individual patient care and nurses are well positioned to influe
Dawson, A., Jackson, D.E. & Nyamathi, A. 2012, 'Children of incarcerated parents: Insights to addressing a growing public health concern in Australia', Children and Youth Services Review, vol. 34, no. 12, pp. 2433-2441.
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In Australia, the children of incarcerated parents are a growing and vulnerable population at risk for life adversity and social inequity. There is little understanding of these children's experiences, perceived risks, reported outcomes and needs. There is also a lack of knowledge regarding evidence-based interventions that can address the multiple risk factors to which these children may be exposed. The aim of this study was to provide insight into the multiple perspectives of children with incarcerated parents, their carers, parents and service providers so that social and health programs may be tailored to best serve their needs. We undertook an integrative literature review of qualitative research studies using a narrative synthesis methodology to explore the effect of parental incarceration upon the social and health outcomes of children and perceptions of interventions designed to support them. Findings revealed that children of incarcerated parents grieved their parent's absence which they reported had a profound effect on their behavior and resulted in exposure to discrimination, violence and abuse. However, resiliency was manifested by a number of coping strategies that could be harnessed to better support the children and young adults of incarcerated parents. Rigorous and innovative intervention studies are required to better inform comprehensive evidence-based policy and practice.
East, L., Jackson, D.E., O'Brien, L. & Peters, K. 2011, 'Condom Negotiation: Experiences Of Sexually Active Young Women', Journal of Advanced Nursing, vol. 67, no. 1, pp. 77-85.
Aim. This paper is a report of a study of sexually active young women's experiences of negotiating condom use both before and after diagnosis of a sexually transmitted infection. Background. The male condom is the most efficient method in preventing and
Mohan, S., Wilkes, L. & Jackson, D.E. 2011, 'Coronary heart disease in Asian Indians: Perspectives of family members', Advances in Contemporary Nursing, vol. 23, no. 2, pp. 189-201.
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Despite the high prevalence rate and significant mortality and morbidity from coronary heart disease in Asian Indians (irrespective of their religious background), very few studies have reported on family members++ experiences of caring for a person with coronary heart disease.This paper reports on family members++ experiences of coronary heart disease in Asian Indians residing in Australia, and is part of a larger study that explored the experiences and/or understanding of coronary heart disease in Asian Indians from the perspective of patients, family members and ++healthy++ participants. Using a constructivist approach semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with five family members. Findings are represented under the following main categories: 1.A period of complexity for family members; 2.Indian culture: Its influence on health/health behaviour and illness experience; 3.Impact of migration and societal discrimination; 4.Disappointment with health care services and the health system; and 5.Strategies to prevent cardiac illness and attain optimal health. Cultural factors had both positive and negative influences not only on the illness experience but also on health behaviour and attitude.The impact of Indian culture in relation to coronary heart disease needs to be understood not only at the cultural level by providing culturally sensitive health care, but also by educating Asian Indians to change their health attitude and behaviour and improve their lifestyle.Asian Indians need education and advice to become more resilient and adaptable to a Western society and also to become aware of the acculturative effects of aWestern lifestyle.
Peters, K., Jackson, D.E., Andrew, S., Halcomb, E. & Salamonson, Y. 2011, 'Burden versus benefit: Continuing nurse academics' experiences of working with sessional teachers', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 38, no. 1, pp. 35-44.
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Sessional teachers are taking an increasing role in classroom teaching in Schools of Nursing. However, there is a paucity of literature reporting the experiences of, and impact on, career academics working with or alongside the burgeoning numbers of sessional teachers. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of continuing academics working with sessional teachers.
Weaver, R. & Jackson, D.E. 2011, 'Evaluating an academic writing program for nursing students who have English as a second language', Advances in Contemporary Nursing, vol. 38, no. 1-2, pp. 130-138.
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Academic writing skills are essential to the successful completion of preregistration nursing programs, yet the development of such skills is a challenge for many nursing students, particularly those who speak English as a second language (ESL). It is vital to develop and evaluate strategies that can support academic writing skills for ESL nursing students.
Jackson, D.E. & Cleary, M. 2011, 'Practical advice to support mid-career doctoral students in nursing: Some considerations for academic supervisors', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 38, no. 1-2 Special Issue, pp. 171-179.
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Mid-career students who undertake doctoral studies have often achieved standing and success in their careers and may already hold quite senior leadership positions in the sector. In view of this, mid-career students may struggle with the transition to student, particularly if they have not studied for a number of years and have multiple pressures on their time. Supervisors, on the other hand, operate within cultures of performance based indicators, and are under pressure to facilitate timely student completions.
Salamonson, Y., Andrew, S., Clauson, J., Cleary, M., Jackson, D.E. & Jacobs, S. 2011, 'Linguistic diversity as sociodemographic predictor of nursing program progression and completion', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 38, no. 1-2 Special Issue, pp. 84-93.
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Attrition from undergraduate nursing programs continues to warrant investigation particularly in the climate of nursing shortages and fiscal reflection on academic institutional programs. This three-year study used a prospective longitudinal survey design to determine entry characteristics of students, attrition, progression and completion in an undergraduate program.
Jackson, D.E. & Saltman, D.C. 2011, 'Preparing health professionals for community-based practice: some issues for consideration', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 38, no. 1-2, pp. 201-203.
Changes to models of health care delivery and chronic disease management have shifted the focus of care from in-patient hospital settings to the community. This provides an impetus for educationalists to facilitate adequate student clinical exposure to the range of community based and interdisciplinary health care options and service models.
Edenborough, M., Wilkes, L., Jackson, D.E. & Mannix, J. 2011, 'Development and validation of the Child-to-Mother violence scale', Nurse Researcher, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 63-76.
This article describes the development and tests the reliability and validity of a new survey instrument, the Child-to-Mother Violence Scale (CMVS). This instrument was devised specifically to measure data regarding the incidence, perpetrators, targets, experiences and influences on child-to-mother violence as the first phase of a larger study that investigated child-to-mother violence in the western suburbs of Sydney, Australia.
McCloughen, A., O'Brien, L. & Jackson, D.E. 2011, 'Nurse leader mentor as a mode of being: findings from an Australian Hermeneutic Phenomenological Study', Journal Of Nursing Scholarship, vol. 43, no. 1, pp. 97-104.
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The purpose of this study is to develop an interpretation of Australian nurse leaders' understandings and experiences of mentorship for nurse leadership. The study aimed to explore experiential meanings and understandings that Australian nurse leaders apply to their mentoring relationships; determine whether mentoring relationships contribute to nurse leader development in Australia; and identify how Australian nurse leaders conceptualize mentorship.
Jackson, D.E., Hutchinson, M., Everett, B., Mannix, J., Peters, K., Weaver, R. & Salamonson, Y. 2011, 'Struggling for legitimacy: nursing students' stories of organisational aggression, resilience and resistance', Nursing Inquiry, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 102-110.
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There is a considerable body of literature scrutinising and theorising negative and hostile behaviour such as violence and interpersonal conflict in the nursing workplace. However, relatively little empirical work has examined the experiences of undergraduate nursing students in the context of negative workplace cultures, and even fewer studies have explored how students develop and enact strategies to counter hostile behaviours in the clinical workplace. Based on qualitative analysis of open-ended survey questions, this study explored undergraduate students' experiences of negative behaviours in the clinical environment to identify strategies used to manage and resist such behaviours. While dominant individuals in the clinical environment sought to enforce and uphold their version of legitimacy - one where students were relegated to complete subordination - the tenacity and resourcefulness of students was evident in their attempts to counter this oppression with acts of resistance. Our findings provide new and valuable insights into organisational aggression and acts of resistance in the nursing workplace. The resistance offered by these students draws attention to the struggles for legitimacy within institutions. In drawing attention to organisational aggression as a mechanism by which students are 'othered' through pejorative behaviour, homogenisation, and de-authentication, and the dynamics of resistance offered by these student nurses, we provide an alternative explanation of nursing socialisation.
Jackson, D.E., Peters, K., Hutchinson, M., Edenborough, M., Luck, L. & Wilkes, L. 2011, 'Exploring confidentiality in the context of nurse whistle blowing: issues for nurse managers', Journal of Nursing Management, vol. 19, pp. 655-663.
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Aim The aim of this paper is to reveal the experiences and meaning of confidentiality for Australian nurses in the context of whistle blowing. Background Despite the ethical, legal and moral importance of confidentiality within the health-care context, little work has addressed the implications of confidentially related to whistle-blowing events. Methods: The study used qualitative narrative inquiry. Eighteen Australian nurses, with first-hand experience of whistle blowing, consented to face-to-face semistructured interviews. Results Four emergent themes relating to confidentiality were identified: (1) confidentiality as enforced silence; (2) confidentiality as isolating and marginalizing; (3) confidentiality as creating a rumour mill; and (4) confidentiality in the context of the public's 'right to know'. Conclusions The interpretation and application of confidentiality influences the outcomes of whistle blowing within the context of health-care services. Conversely, confidentially can be a protective mechanism for health-care institutions. Implications for nursing management It is beholden upon nurse manager to carefully risk manage whistle-blowing events. It is important that nurse managers are aware of the consequences of their interpretation and application of confidentiality to whistle-blowing events, and the potentially competing outcomes for individuals and the institution.
East, L., Jackson, D.E., Peters, K. & O'Brien, L. 2011, 'Response to Hayter M (2010) Commentary on East L, Jackson B, Peters K & O'Brien L (2010) Disrupted sense of self: young women and sexually transmitted infection. Journal of Clinical Nursing 19, 2952-2953', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 20, pp. 2378-2379.
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Cleary, M., Horsfall, J., O'Hara-Aarons, M., Jackson, D.E. & Hunt, G.E. 2011, 'The views of mental health nurses on continuing professional development', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 20, pp. 3561-3566.
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Aims and objectives. To determine clinical mental health nurses+ views and preferences about continuing professional development. Background. Participation in continuing professional development is now expected for nurse and midwifery registration. However, it is unclear how clinically based mental health nurses view continuing professional development and its relevance to career intentions. Design. Qualitative. Method. Semi-structured face-to-face interviews with mental health nurses (n = 50) drawn from inpatient mental health units. Results. The most prominent factor identified through this research is that the majority of the fifty participants valued continuing professional development and sought more opportunities to participate. They particularly favoured in-house locally based sessions targeting patient-related clinical skills enhancement. Importantly, this interest in continuing professional development was not confined to new graduates needing to consolidate their skills. Work-based flexibility, the types of courses available and opportunities for study leave were also identified as important factors. Of the 50 nurses interviewed, 40% expressed a desire for continuing professional development vis-a` -vis remaining in the service; 30% of nurses responded to the same question with an emphasis on the importance of collegial support amongst peers and management; and 30% of the nurses indicated their primary focus for continuing professional development was to further their tertiary studies. Conclusions. These results are not only timely given the requirements around continuing professional development, but are also important to drive improvements in quality continuing professional development where needs are prioritised, discussed and agreed on.
Jackson, D.E. 2011, 'Editorial: People not paper: challenging document dependence and audit addiction in contemporary health care', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 20, pp. 301-302.
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Jackson, D.E. & Watson, R. 2011, 'Editorial: Workplace learning: A continuing concern in nurse education', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 38, no. 1-2, pp. 3-5.
O'Reilly, R., Luck, L., Wilkes, L. & Jackson, D.E. 2011, 'Child protection workers: What they do', International Journal of Multiple Research Approaches, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 122-138.
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Child protection organisations face the challenge of ensuring provision of adequate child protection, while maintaining a stable workforce. It is essential therefore, to appreciate the daily work demands of Child Protection Workers (CPWs). This paper draws from a larger case study which aimed to investigate CPW work practices and the challenges they cause for the workers. Specifi cally, this paper describes what CPWs do in their daily work. A mixed methods approach to data collection and analysis was used in the study where 15 CPWs participated in both observations and interviews. The results demonstrated that while the majority of worker job tasks are client focused, the time spent by CPWs on non-therapeutic job tasks and worker actions are substantial, and the ability to multitask was revealed as a vital CPW skill. Findings suggest a need for child protection policy makers, organisations and other key stakeholders to consider implementing time effective and efficient strategies for managing the challenges that multi-tasking presents to CPWs.
Cleary, M., Walter, G. & Jackson, D.E. 2011, '"Not Always Smooth Sailing": Mental Health Issues Associated with the Transition from High School to College', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, vol. 32, pp. 250-254.
Students who transition from high school to college are often excited by the new phase of their lives. However, they are exposed to circumstances and expectations which place them at risk for psychiatric disorders or that may exacerbate pre-existing problems. In this paper, we discuss risk factors and other issues associated with students transitioning to college or university life, identify challenges for health professionals, and suggest possible strategies to improve the mental health of young adults on college campuses. Academic staff and health care providers need to be aware of how best to engage and assist students during an important phase of their life. Processes and care pathways also need to be easily understood, user friendly, and appropriately resourced. It is anticipated that staff, students, and industry health care providers will benefit from a greater awareness of some of the mental health issues that may occur in higher education.
Murphy, G., Peters, K., Jackson, D.E. & Wilkes, L. 2011, 'A qualitative meta-synthesis of adult children of parents with a mental illness', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 20, no. 23-24, pp. 3430-3442.
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Aims and objectives. This article presents a qualitative meta-synthesis that explores the experiences of adult children of parents with a mental illness. Background. There has been growing interest in the experiences of children whose parents have mental illness. However, little literature explores the experiences of adult children. Design. Qualitative meta-synthesis. Method. A review of English language literature search engines was undertaken and identified 905 relevant articles. Articles were excluded if they used quantitative methodology, had other methodological issues or had a focus on parental drug/alcohol issues. Twelve articles were identified as using qualitative or mixed methods studies, which were reviewed using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (Public Health Resource Unit 2006). Following this, seven studies were included in the metasynthesis. The main findings and themes identified by the original study authors were extracted from the results and discussions sections and further categorised into four main themes using content analysis methods.
East, L., Jackson, D.E., O'Brien, L. & Peters, K. 2011, 'Healthcare experiences of women who have been diagnosed with a sexually transmitted infection', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 20, pp. 2259-2265.
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Aim. This paper reports the healthcare experiences of women who have been diagnosed with a sexually transmitted infection. Background. The incidence of sexually transmitted infections is increasing throughout the globe on an annual basis. To effectively curb this trend and reduce the spread of these infections, effective education and treatment is essential. Design. This study used a feminist approach. Methods. Ten women participated in this study. Interviews were conducted online and transcripts were thematically analysed. Results. Findings from this study revealed that the women generally characterised their healthcare experiences as negative. Some women perceived being negatively judged by healthcare professionals and felt they were not provided with sufficient information or support when diagnosed with a sexually transmitted infection. Conclusion. This paper reveals how healthcare professionals have the ability to exacerbate the adversity felt by women diagnosed with a sexually transmitted infection and how providing appropriate therapeutic care can assist young women who have been diagnosed with these types of infections. Relevance to clinical practice. Nurses and other healthcare professionals can better serve patients by providing motional and therapeutic support and information about the possible effects and long-term sequelae of sexually transmitted infections. Further, by providing sufficient information and support, the negative effects of having a sexually transmitted infection can be reduced and women++s ability to cope with a sexually transmitted infection can be enhanced.
Salamonson, Y., Bourgeois, S., Everett, B., Weaver, R., Peters, K. & Jackson, D.E. 2011, 'Psychometric testing of the abbreviated Clinical Learning Environment Inventory (CLEI-19)', Journal of Advanced Nursing, vol. 67, no. 12, pp. 2668-2676.
Aim. This paper is a report of a test of the psychometric properties of a 19-item version of the Clinical Learning Environment Inventory. Background. Although the clinical learning environment provides the 'real-life' context essential for preparing nursing students for their professional role, the quality of student learning is influenced by the quality of the clinical placement. Methods. Nursing students completed an abbreviated (19-item) form of the Clinical Learning Environment Inventory to rate their perception of the clinical learning environment. Descriptive statistics, principal component analysis, discriminant validity and Cronbach++s alpha reliabilities were computed.
Jackson, D.E. & Daly, J. 2011, 'All things to all people: Adversity and Resilience in Leadership', Nurse Leader, vol. June, pp. 21-30.
To lead is to live dangerously because when leadership counts, when you lead people through difficult change, you challenge what people hold dear - their daily habits, tools, loyalties, and ways of thinking - with nothing more to offer perhaps than a possibility. And people resist in all kinds of creative and unexpected ways that can get you taken out of the game: pushed aside, undermined, or eliminated (Heifetz R, Linsky M, Leadership on the Line, 2002).
Cleary, M., Horsfall, J., Deacon, M. & Jackson, D.E. 2011, 'Leadership and Mental Health Nursing', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, vol. 32, no. 10, pp. 632-639.
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This discussion paper argues for the critical importance of successful leadership for effective mental health nursing, observing that nursing leadership has long been regarded problematically by the profession. Using empirical and theoretical evidence we debate what leadership styles and strategies are most likely to result in effective, recovery-orientated mental health nursing. Models of transformational and distributed leadership are found to be highly congruent with mental health nursing values, yet the literature suggests it is a type of leadership more often desired than experienced. We note how the scholarly literature tends to ignore the 'elephant in the room' that is organizational power; and we question whether transformational leadership pursued within a specific clinical context can influence beyond those confines. Nevertheless it is within these contexts that consumers experience nursing, effective or otherwise, thus we should advocate what is known about effective leadership whereever it is required.
Stevens, J., Dahlen, H., Peters, K. & Jackson, D.E. 2011, 'Midwives' and doulas' perspectives on the role of the doula in Australia: A qualitative study', Midwifery, vol. 27, no. 4, pp. 509-516.
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Objective: to explore midwives' and doulas' perspectives of the role of the doula in Australia. Background: doulas are relatively new in Australia; nevertheless demand for them is increasing. Research has not previously explored the role of a doula in Australia. This research aimed to answer the question: What are midwives+ and doulas+ perspectives of the role of a doula in Australia. Design: qualitative study using focus groups that were digitally recorded , transcribed and the data analysed using thematic analysis. Setting: New South Wales` Australia Participants: 11 midwives and six doulas Findings: the key theme that emerged was that `the broken maternity system' is failing women and midwives. The system is preventing midwives from providing woman- centred care. As a result, doulas are 'filling the gap' and midwives feel that doulas are 'taking our role'. Doulas fill the gap by providing continuity of care, advocating for women, protecting normal birth and by providing breast-feeding advice ancl emotional support in the community. Midwives are concerned that doutas are taking the caring part of their role from them and want the 'broken' maternity system fxed. Midwives described that doulas take their role from them by changing the relationship between themselves and labouring women, by reducing their role to obstetric nurses` by overstepping the doula role boundaries, and by holding the power at births. Implications for practice: despite the conflict reported between midwives and doulas, both groups identified that they see the potential for future collaboration. Taking into account the continued employment of doulas, it is important to improve collaboration between midwives and doulas for the sake of childbearing women.
Cleary, M., Horsfall, J. & Jackson, D.E. 2011, 'Mental Health Nursing: Transitions from clinical roles to academia', Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, vol. 47, no. 2, pp. 93-97.
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Internationally, as the current generation of nurse academics reach retirement, nursing is facing an academic workforce shortage (Allan & Aldebron, 2008; Anderson, 2009; Potempa, Redman, & Landstrom, 2009). In order to meet workforce requirements, the higher education sector will need to recruit considerable numbers of new academic staff. In this paper, some challenges facing mental health nurses transitioning to academic life are identified and possible strategies to ameliorate or prevent foreseeable difficulties are suggested. All parties, new and existing faculty, will benefit from a greater awareness of barriers and developing entry protocols to enhance the transition experience and reduce early workplace stressors.
Elmir, R., Schmied, V., Jackson, D.E. & Wilkes, L. 2011, 'Interviewing people about potentially sensitive topics', Nurse Researcher, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 12-16.
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Aim This paper explores the challenges of interviewing people about sensitive topics. It uses existing literature and the first author++s experience of interviewing women traumatised by having an emergency hysterectomy following a severe postpartum haemorrhage. It also highlights the strategies that can assist interviews. Background Interviewing participants about sensitive topics requires skill and special techniques. Certain research topics have the potential to cause participants and researchers distress and discomfort. Identifying ways to prevent vicarious traumatisation and researcher burnout is imperative to the integrity of the research. Data sources Twenty one Australian women took part in in-depth, tape-recorded, face-to-face, email, internet and telephone interviews. Review methods This is a methodology paper on the first author++s experience of interviewing women on potentially sensitive topics. Conclusion Some participants may find telling their stories to be cathartic, providing them with a sense of relief. Implementing techniques that may be helpful in initiating the interview process can be challenging.
Cleary, M., Horsfall, J., Mannix, J., O'Hara-Aarons, M. & Jackson, D.E. 2011, 'Valuing teamwork: Insights from newly-registered nurses working in specialist mental health services', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, vol. 20, pp. 454-459.
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In this qualitative study, the experiences of a small cohort of registered nurses (RN) during the first 2 years of mental health employment were documented. A total of 13 semistructured interviews were completed from within a specialist mental health setting. Eleven issues were identified: (i) teamwork; (ii) experiential learning; (iii) self-development; (iv) confidence; (v) listening; (vi) rapport; (vii) keen observation; (viii) patience; (ix) empathy; (x) learning from colleagues; and (xi) maintaining a positive approach towards patients. The nurses focused on the here-and-now circumstances, rather than on future plans, or past preparation, and were able to elucidate the qualities and skills that they brought to their clinical work. Participants were most proud of achievements that bridged the personal and professional, such as self-development, working closely with patients to develop rapport, experiential learning, and teamwork. Findings highlight the importance of teamwork to newly-graduated RN entering the mental health environment. It is known that teamwork can convey a sense of belonging and help create an environment in which applied experiential clinical learning can occur. Therefore, it is important that efforts are made to facilitate team building and opportunities for teamwork when new graduates are transitioning into the mental health clinical practice environment.
Hunt, G.E., Cleary, M., Jackson, D.E., Watson, R. & Thompson, D.R. 2011, 'Editorial: Citation analysis - focus on leading Australian nurse authors', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 20, pp. 3273-3275.
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Indices such as the h-index are being used increasingly in nursing (Thompson & Watson 2010, Hunt & Cleary 2011). Publication analyses of Canadian (Hack et al. 2010) and UK nurses (Thompson & Watson 2010) have previously been undertaken, and we now present an Australian-based nursing citation analysis. Hack et al. (2010) observed that nurses with an h-index of 10+14 indicated an excellent publication record, so we sought to identify nurses working in Australia with an h-index of 10 or more.
Peters, K., Luck, L., Hutchinson, M., Wilkes, L., Andrew, S. & Jackson, D.E. 2011, 'The emotional sequelae of whistleblowing: findings from a qualitative study', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 20, no. 19-20, pp. 2907-2914.
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Whistleblowing has the potential to have a negative impact on individuals physical and emotional well-being. However, few empirical studies have been conducted using qualitative methods to provide an in-depth exploration of the emotional consequences for those involved in whistleblowing incidents.
Power, T.J., Jackson, D.E., Weaver, R. & Carter, B. 2011, 'Social support for mothers in illness: a multifaceted phenomenon', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 40, no. 1, pp. 27-40.
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Background: Many women privilege the mothering role over other areas of their lives, and for ill women, it can be difficult to relinquish maternal responsibility. Not being able to mother in their usual way can have consequences for women's wellbeing and view of themselves as `good' mothers. Method: In this study, twenty-seven mothers of dependent children were interviewed about their experiences of illness, and the social support they received. Results: Despite their illnesses, participants in this study continued to feel they were primarily responsible for the wellbeing and care of their children, and were distressed if they were unable to adequately fulfil the primary carer role. As participants sometimes found it difficult to care for their children, help with childcare emerged as an important element of social support. Seeking assistance with care for children revealed a tension between support that was accessible and support that was acceptable. Conclusion: Mothering while ill is difficult and women facing illness may need encouragement to accept help to continue to meet their maternal responsibilities. Nurses are in an excellent position to encourage women to identify and draw upon sources of support to assist them in maintaining their mothering role while ill.
Messum, D., Wilkes, L. & Jackson, D.E. 2011, 'Employability Skills: essential requirements in health manager vacancy advertisements', Asia Pacific Journal of Health Management, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 22-28.
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Background: Common understandings of what constitutes employability skills (ES), for graduate entry level jobs in health services management, are not well articulated. The Australian Department of Science and Training (DEST) provides a generic profile only which changes over time. In health, this is compounded by endemic reform. What is agreed is that a degree is not enough. Recruitment and personnel policies/practices have been found inconsistent, and wish lists for ES unreliable. In addition, different levels of managers in an organisation require different attributes for the same position. Higher education shows interest in generic skills because of pressure from employers.
Peters, K., Jackson, D.E. & Rudge, T. 2011, 'Surviving the adversity of childlessness: Fostering resilience in couples', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 40, no. 1, pp. 130-140.
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In contemporary Western society, infertility has the capacity to impact greatly on couples, emotionally and socially.
Jackson, D.E. & Saltman, D. 2011, 'Recognising the impact of social exclusion: The need for advocacy and activism in healthcare', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 40, no. 1, pp. 57-59.
Social exclusion has been identified as an issue of concern in Australia and internationally, and describes the inability to fully engage in society because of social characteristics that reduce opportunities for successful social engagement
Wilkes, L., Peters, K., Weaver, R. & Jackson, D.E. 2011, 'Nurses Involved In Whistleblowing Incidents: Sequelae For Their Families', Collegian, vol. 18, no. 3, pp. 101-106.
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Nurses involved in whistleblowing often face economic and emotional retaliation, victimization and abuse. Yet for many nurses, one major part of their whistleblowing experience is the negative impact it has on their families. This paper reports findings
Cleary, M., Hunt, G.E. & Jackson, D.E. 2011, 'Demystifying Phds: A Review Of Doctorate Programs Designed To Fulfil The Needs Of The Next Generation Of Nursing Professionals', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 39, no. 2, pp. 0-0.
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Commonly, the expression 'PhD' evokes a level of trepidation amongst potential candidates from both the clinical and academic spheres. In contemporary settings, a Doctor of Philosophy is highly regarded and increasingly necessary for a successful academi
McKenna, H., Daly, J., Davidson, P.M., Duffield, C.M. & Jackson, D.E. 2011, 'RAE and ERA-Spot the difference', International Journal of Nursing Studies, vol. 49, pp. 375-377.
It is a given that university research underpins economic and social developments. In 2010, it was reported that -3.5 Billion of publicly funded research generates -45 Billion a year in job creation and new products (THE, 2010). However, the benefits are not limited to industrial innovation and products. In the United Kingdom (UK), the Arts and Humanities Research Council asserted that for every -1 spent on arts and humanities research each year, the UK reaps up to -10 in immediate benefit and another -15--20 in the long term (Owens, 2010). Similar metrics have been provided in Australia with similar returns on investment for research dollars spent. In Australia it has been estimated that there is a $5 AUD return for every $1 AUD invested in health and medical research (National Health & Medical Research Council, 2003).
Ogunsiji, O., Wilkes, L., Jackson, D.E. & Peters, K. 2011, 'Suffering and smiling: West African immigrant women's experience of intimate partner violence', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 21, no. 11-12, pp. 1659-1665.
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This study reports the intimate partner violence experiences of West African women living in Australia.
Wilkes, L. & Jackson, D.E. 2011, 'Trends in publication of research papers by Australian-based nurse authors', Collegian, vol. 18, no. 3, pp. 125-130.
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Analysis of Australian nursing research output is becoming more important as academic institutions move into implementing quality programs of research output. Notable in determining research quality is the publication of research papers in journals with a high ranking within the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) or Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA). This paper reports an analysis of Australian nurse researcher output in journals highly ranked by the ISI and ERA. Research abstracts were analysed for topic, sources of data, location of research and methodological paradigm. A total of 530 articles from five Australian and from five USA and UK journals were analysed. There was an increase in output from the period of prior analyses in 2000. Practice issues are the most common topic followed closely by nurse education. While most studies used nurses as sources of data there were more studies in which consumers of nursing care were the point of inquiry. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were utilised. Given the importance of rationalising nursing practice and adding new knowledge to evidence based care, it is imperative for the nursing profession to disseminate research findings. Failure to do this may result in poor return in investment outcomes for the future of nursing in Australia and internationally.
Jackson, D.E., Peters, K., Andrew, S., Salamonson, Y. & Halcomb, E. 2011, '"If you haven't got a PhD, you're not going to get a job": The PhD as a hurdle to continuing academic employment in nursing', Nurse Education Today, vol. 31, pp. 340-344.
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This paper is drawn from a larger study that sought to identify and examine issues around the employment of sessional academic staff in baccalaureate nurse education. Twelve sessional teachers and 12 continuing academics participated in the interviews. Examination of the data revealed the PhD was perceived as a hurdle to continuing employment in nurse education in the university sector. In the current climate, sessional teachers continue to be an essential part of the nursing academic workforce and are necessary to meet the teaching and learning demands associated with implementing nursing curricula. Findings suggest a need for scrupulous processes in relation to the recruitment of sessional staff, and highlight the difficulties that sessional teachers may have in securing continuing academic employment. We provide recommendations to facilitate the appointment of appropriate individuals into sessional roles and highlight the need to mentor and support sessional teachers wishing to pursue a career as nurse academics. Questions are raised about how nursing can plan for future academic workforce needs in a context of an aging academic workforce, the demand for doctoral training for nurse academics, and widespread casualisation of the nursing academic workforce.
Salamonson, Y., Koch, J., Weaver, R., Everett, B. & Jackson, D.E. 2010, 'Embedded Academic Writing Support For Nursing Students With English As A Second Language', Journal Of Advanced Nursing, vol. 66, no. 2, pp. 413-421.
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Abstract Aim. This paper reports a study which evaluated a brief, embedded academic support workshop as a strategy for improving academic writing skills in first-year nursing students with low-to-medium English language proficiency. Background. Nursing students who speak English as a second language have lower academic success compared with their native English-speaking counterparts. The development of academic writing skills is known to be most effective when embedded into discipline-specific curricula. Methods. Using a randomized controlled design, in 2008 106 students pre-enrolled in an introductory bioscience subject were randomized to receive either the intervention, a 4-day embedded academic learning support workshop facilitated by two bioscience (content) nursing academics and a writing and editing professional, or to act as the control group. The primary focus of the workshop was to support students to work through a mock assignment by providing progressive feedback and written suggestions on how to improve their answers. Results. Of the 59 students randomized to the intervention, only 28 attended the workshop. Bioscience assignment results were analysed for those who attended (attendees), those randomized to the intervention but who did not attend (nonattendees), and the control group. Using ANOVA, the results indicated that attendees achieved statistically significantly higher mean scores (70.8, SD: 6.1) compared to both control group (58.4, SD: 3.4, P = 0.002) and non-attendees (48.5, SD: 5.5, P = 0.001). Conclusion. A brief, intensive, embedded academic support workshop was effective in improving the academic writing ability of nursing students with low-to-medium English language proficiency, although reaching all students who are likely to benefit from this intervention remains a challenge.
Salamonson, Y., Koch, J., Weaver, R., Everett, B. & Jackson, D.E. 2010, 'Embedded Academic Writing Support For Nursing Students With English As A Second Language', Journal of Advanced Nursing, vol. 66, no. 2, pp. 413-421.
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Title. Embedded academic writing support for nursing students with English as a second language. Aim. This paper reports a study which evaluated a brief, embedded academic support workshop as a strategy for improving academic writing skills in first-year
Daly, J. & Jackson, D.E. 2010, 'Improving the workplace: The pivotal role of nurse leaders.', Advances in Contemporary Nursing, vol. 36, no. 12, pp. 82-85.
Salamonson, Y., Halcomb, E., Andrew, S., Peters, K. & Jackson, D.E. 2010, 'A Comparative Study of Assessment Grading and Nursing Students' Perceptions of Quality in Sessional and Tenured Teachers', Journal Of Nursing Scholarship, vol. 42, no. 4, pp. 423-429.
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Purpose: Although the global nursing faculty shortage has led to increasing reliance upon sessional staff, limited research has explored the impact of these sessional staff on the quality of teaching in higher education. We aim to examine differences in (a) student satisfaction with sessional and tenured staff and (b) assessment scores awarded by sessional and tenured staff in students' written assignments. Design: A comparative study method was used. Participants were recruited from students enrolled in the three nursing practice subjects across the 3 years of the baccalaureate program in an Australian university during the second semester of 2008. Methods: This study collected student data via an online version of the Perceptions of Teaching and Course Satisfaction scale and compared the grades awarded by sessional and tenured academics for a written assessment in a single assignment in each of the nursing practice subjects. Of the 2,045 students enrolled in the nursing practice subjects across the 3 years of the bachelor of nursing (BN) program, 566 (28%) completed the online teaching and course satisfaction survey, and 1,972 assignment grades (96%) were available for analysis. Findings: Compared with tenured academics, sessional teachers received higher rating on students' perception on teaching satisfaction by students in Year 1 (p = .021) and Year 2 (p = .002), but not by students in Year 3 (p = .348). Following the same trend, sessional teachers awarded higher assignment grades to students in Year 1 (p < .001) and Year 2 (p < .001) than tenured academics, with no significant disparity in grades awarded to students in Year 3.
McCloughen, A., O'Brien, L. & Jackson, D.E. 2010, 'More Than Vision Imagination As An Elemental Characteristic Of Being A Nurse Leader-Mentor', Advances in Nursing Science, vol. 33, no. 4, pp. 285-296.
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Mentoring relationships are dynamic alliances that can be used as a supportive mechanism for growing nurse leaders and promoting the future of the nursing profession. This article explores imagination as one of the central meanings of being a mentor for
Jackson, D.E., Peters, K., Andrew, S., Edenborough, M., Halcomb, E., Luck, L., Salamonson, Y., Weaver, R. & Wilkes, L. 2010, 'Trial And Retribution: A Qualitative Study Of Whistleblowing And Workplace Relationships In Nursing', Advances in Contemporary Nursing, vol. 36, no. 1-2, pp. 34-44.
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This paper reports a study aiming to present and describe the effects of whistleblowing episodes on nurses' workplace relationships. Eighteen participants with direct experience of whistleblowing were recruited into the study, which was informed by a qua
Mcdonald, G., Vickers, M.H., Mohan, S., Wilkes, L. & Jackson, D.E. 2010, 'Workplace Conversations: Building And Maintaining Collaborative Capital', Advances in Contemporary Nursing, vol. 36, no. 1-2, pp. 96-105.
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Heavy, pressured workloads are a feature of health workplaces internationally, presenting challenges to communication and contributing to tension and negative emotions. This paper explores supportive and unsupportive workplace conversations between nurse
Wilkes, L., Jackson, D.E., Mohan, S. & Wallis, M. 2010, 'Close Observation By 'Specials' To Promote The Safety Of The Older Person With Behavioural Disturbances In The Acute Care Setting', Advances in Contemporary Nursing, vol. 36, no. 1-2, pp. 131-142.
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This paper reports a two-phased pilot study that explored the concept of 'specialling' older patients with challenging behaviours in acute ward situations. Previous research suggests that the nursing workforce is not equipped with the skills and resource
Jackson, D.E., Peters, K., Andrew, S., Edenborough, M., Halcomb, E., Luck, L., Salamonson, Y. & Wilkes, L. 2010, 'Understanding Whistleblowing: Qualitative Insights From Nurse Whistleblowers', Journal of Advanced Nursing, vol. 66, no. 10, pp. 2194-2201.
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P>Aim. This paper is a report of a study conducted to explore the reasons behind the decision to blow the whistle and provide insights into nurses' experiences of being whistleblowers. Background. Whistleblowing is a stigmatized and hidden activity that
Elmir, R., Schmied, V., Wilkes, L. & Jackson, D.E. 2010, 'Women's Perceptions And Experiences Of A Traumatic Birth: A Meta-Ethnography', Journal of Advanced Nursing, vol. 66, no. 10, pp. 2142-2153.
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P>Aim. This study presents the findings a meta-ethnographic study reporting women's perceptions and experiences of traumatic birth. Background. Childbirth is viewed by many as a life transition that can bring a sense of accomplishment. However, for some
Power, T.J., Wilkes, L., Carter, B. & Jackson, D.E. 2010, 'Mothering Disrupted By Illness: A Narrative Synthesis Of Qualitative Research', Journal of Advanced Nursing, vol. 66, no. 7, pp. 1435-1445.
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Title. Mothering disrupted by illness: a narrative synthesis of qualitative research. Aim. This paper is a report of a literature review of qualitative empirical research investigating women's experiences of mothering disrupted by illness. Background. As
O'reilly, R., Wilkes, L., Luck, L. & Jackson, D.E. 2010, 'The Efficacy Of Family Support And Family Preservation Services On Reducing Child Abuse And Neglect: What The Literature Reveals', Journal of child health care, vol. 14, no. 1, pp. 82-94.
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Globally, child protection services are under-resourced and unable to meet the demands associated with the increasing numbers of families who are being exposed to child abuse and neglect. Family support and family preservation interventions are the metho
Cleary, M., Hunt, G.E., Walter, G. & Jackson, D.E. 2010, 'Fostering Real-World Clinical Mental Health Research', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 19, no. 23-24, pp. 3453-3458.
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Aims and objectives. In this article, we identify key aspects for enhancing real-world research in mental health care clinical settings and broadly discuss some practicalities and issues that must be considered beforehand. Background. Practice which is e
Mcdonald, G., Mohan, S., Jackson, D.E., Vickers, M.H. & Wilkes, L. 2010, 'Continuing Connections: The Experiences Of Retired And Senior Working Nurse Mentors', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 19, no. 23-24, pp. 3547-3554.
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Aims and objectives. This paper reports the benefits and challenges of a mentoring programme through which retired and senior nurses continued to support and nurture nurses and midwives currently working in the health system. Background. Nursing has an a
Elmir, R., Jackson, D.E., Beale, B. & Schmied, V. 2010, 'Against all odds: Australian women's experiences of recovery from breast cancer', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 19, no. 17-18, pp. 2531-2538.
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Aim. The aim of this study was to generate insight into younger women++s experiences of recovery from breast cancer-related breast surgery and to contribute to the knowledge base for clinicians practising in this field. Background. Despite the abundance of literature concerning the impact of breast cancer and breast loss on older women over 50 years of age, fewer studies have been conducted specifically with women younger than 50 years focusing on the recovery from breast cancer and related breast surgery. The effects of breast cancer on younger women differ to those of older women; younger women may have difficulty coming to terms with loss of fertility, perceived loss of femininity, sexuality and may experience body image disfigurement. Younger women may face these issues as a result of the treatment and surgery they have received to confine the breast cancer and attempt to improve their chances of survival. Design. A phenomenological qualitative methodology was used to capture the true essence and lived experience of four Australian women under the age of 50, who had undergone surgery as a result of being diagnosed with breast cancer. Methods. Tape-recorded semi-structured face-to-face interviews. Results. Thematic analysis revealed four major themes. These were ++It absolutely encompassed me,++ ++Being overwhelmed,++ ++Living with fear and uncertainty++ and ++Finding strength within.++ Conclusions. Findings of this study shed light on the experiences of recovery from breast cancer-related surgery in women under 50. Relevance to clinical practice. This research study will assist clinicians in understanding the needs of younger women undergoing breast cancer-related breast surgery, who may require counselling in relation to fertility and relationship issues and assistance in coping with the demands of work and home life.
Hutchinson, M., Vickers, M.H., Wilkes, L. & Jackson, D.E. 2010, 'A Typology Of Bullying Behaviours: The Experiences Of Australian Nurses', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 19, no. 15-16, pp. 2319-2328.
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Aim and objective. This study sought to explore the nature of bullying in the Australian nursing workplace. Background. While there is widespread concern about the extent and consequences of bullying among nurses, to date, there have been no published re
East, L., Jackson, D.E., Peters, K. & O'Brien, L. 2010, 'Disrupted Sense Of Self: Young Women And Sexually Transmitted Infections', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 19, no. 13-14, pp. 1995-2003.
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Aim. This article is an exploration of young women's experiences of having a sexually transmitted infection. Background. Sexually transmitted infections are prevalent worldwide and have serious physical and psychological sequelae. Although some aspects o
Power, T.J., Jackson, D.E. & O'Brien, L. 2010, 'Nurses' Management of adolescent sleep disturbance: a qualitative study', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 19, no. 3-4, pp. 324-331.
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Aims and objectives. To evaluate nurses' knowledge of adolescent sleep and sleep disturbance and the strategies they employ to facilitate sleep in adolescent patients. Background. Sleep disturbance in adolescents is common and associated with potentially
Hutchinson, M., Wilkes, L., Jackson, D.E. & Vickers, M.H. 2010, 'Integrating individual, work group and organizational factors: testing a multidimensional model of bullying in the nursing workplace', Journal of Nursing Management, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 173-181.
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Aim The aim of the present study was to test a multidimensional model of bullying in the nursing workplace. Background This paper is part of a larger study of bullying in the Australian nursing workforce. While a number of studies have documented the fre
Halcomb, E., Andrew, S., Peters, K., Salamonson, Y. & Jackson, D.E. 2010, 'Casualisation Of The Teaching Workforce: Implications For Nursing Education', Nurse Education Today, vol. 30, no. 6, pp. 528-532.
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Internationally, nursing faculty shortages have been reported and there is a potential for them to worsen into the next decade as existing faculty age. To, in part, address this issue, across disciplines there is clearly an international trend towards th
Andrew, S., Halcomb, E., Jackson, D.E., Peters, K. & Salamonson, Y. 2010, 'Sessional Teachers In A BN Program: Bridging The Divide Or Widening The Gap?', Nurse Education Today, vol. 30, no. 5, pp. 453-457.
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Casualisation of the academic workforce has resulted in an increase in the employment of sessional teachers in Bachelor of Nursing (BN) programs. Many of these teachers are drawn from specialty clinical areas and continue to work clinically while teachin
Hutchinson, M., Vickers, M., Jackson, D.E. & Wilkes, L. 2010, 'Bullying as circuits of power: an Australian nursing perspective', Administrative Theory & Praxis, vol. 32, no. 1, pp. 25-47.
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It is not possible to understand bullying without considering the concept of power, and yet power has received little systematic attention in the literature on bullying. Framed largely as a manifestation of conflict, or as a consequence of organizational characteristics that trigger unwitting individuals to engage in abusive acts, superficial and clich+d understandings of the power dynamics involved in bullying are commonplace. The focus on conflict-based understandings offers limited insights into less readily observable forms of power that manifest within institutions. In this article, we draw upon Cleggs (1989a) circuits of power framework to map out an alternative understanding of workplace bullying one that moves beyond the link with conflict. We employ a multidimensional model of bullying and offer interview exemplars from our study of bullying in the Australian nursing workplace. The analysis reveals the complex flows of power associated with bullying and suggests that commonly accepted assumptions and frameworks about workplace bullying have provided limited insight into the phenomenon, while potentially masking inappropriate manifestations of power within institutions.
East, L., Jackson, D.E., O'Brien, L. & Peters, K. 2010, 'Storytelling: an approach that can help to develop resilience', Nurse Researcher, vol. 17, no. 3, pp. 17-25.
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Stories convey values and emotions, and can reveal the differences and similarities between people++s experiences. Elucidating personal stories involves sharing which can help form bonds and supportive networks. With reflection, these can help to develop resilience. While the literature recognises the potential cathartic and therapeutic benefits associated with storytelling in research, links between the development of personal resilience and storytelling for research purposes have not been drawn. This paper argues that storytelling aids the development of personal resilience and provides opportunities to celebrate the hardiness of research participants who contribute to knowledge by recounting their stories of difficulty and adversity.
Wilkes, L., Mohan, S., Luck, L. & Jackson, D.E. 2010, 'Issues in research:development of a violence tool in the emergency hospital setting', Nurse Researcher, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 70-82.
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Violence against nurses is an on-going issue in healthcare settings, and is regularly documented in the literature. Assessing the potential for violence against nurses in the emergency department is essential to maintain their safety. The aim of this study was to develop a violence assessment tool by refining a list of predictive cues identified from both a previous study and existing literature. Using the Delphi technique, a panel of 11 expert nurse academics and clinicians developed a 37-item questionnaire and used three rounds of Delphi to refine the violence assessment questionnaire. The resulting tool comprises 17 cues of potential violence that can be easily observed and requires no prior knowledge of the perpetrators' medical history.
Jackson, D.E. & Haigh, C. 2010, 'Editorial: Nursing workforce and workplaces: contemporary concerns and challenges', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 36, no. 1-2, pp. 3-5.
Haigh, C., Hayter, M., Jackson, D.E. & Watson, R. 2010, 'Editorial: How many roads? Building and sustaining collaborative relationships in an increasingly global environment', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 19, no. 19-20, pp. 2671-2672.
Wilkes, L., Jackson, D.E., Mohan, S. & Wallis, M. 2010, 'Close observations by "specials" to promote the safety of the older person with behavioural disturbances in the acute care setting', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 36, no. 1-2, pp. 131-142.
This paper reports a two-phased pilot study that explored the concept of `specialling+ older patients with challenging behaviours in acute ward situations. Previous research suggests that the nursing workforce is not equipped with the skills and resources required to provide quality care for these patients. The hospital in which this study was conducted, instigated a model where these patients were closely observed by `specials+. Phase 1 of the study involved a retrospective analysis of de-identified `Specials+ Observation Charts+ and `Request for Patient Special+ forms of patients aged 65 years and above, over 12 months in 2006. Phase 2 involved in-depth interviews with the nurses caring for these patients. Findings revealed inadequacy of the forms, gaps in service provision for this vulnerable group of patients and the need for education of specials and ward staff, with suggestions to improve care for this patient group. Findings suggest the necessity to design and structure the observation forms more efficiently. It is important to formulate clear assessment criteria for these patients and incorporate in-service education programmes for `specials+ and ward staff and adequately prepare and support them to meet the challenges of caring for older persons with behavioural disturbances in ward situations.
Jackson, D.E., Darbyshire, P., Luck, L. & Peters, K. 2009, 'Intergenerational Reflections On Doctoral Supervision In Nursing', Advances in Contemporary Nursing, vol. 32, no. 1-2, pp. 84-92.
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Increasing numbers of nurses seek to undertake doctoral education as nursing continues to develop as a discrete area of clinical and theoretical scholarship. Effective supervision is a crucial aspect of doctoral education and has been identified as essen
Luck, L., Jackson, D.E. & Usher, K. 2009, 'Conveying Caring: Nurse Attributes To Avert Violence In The ED', International journal of nursing practice, vol. 15, no. 3, pp. 205-212.
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Violence towards nurses in Emergency Department's is a world wide problem that some contend is increasing in severity and frequency, despite the many strategies implemented to prevent violent events. This paper presents the findings of an instrumental ca
Power, T.J., Jackson, D.E. & O'Brien, L. 2009, 'Mad, Sad And Hormonal: The Gendered Nature Of Adolescent Sleep Disturbance', Journal of child health care, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 7-18.
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Up to 40 percent of adolescents experience some form of sleep difficulty, with adolescent girls often reporting higher levels of sleep disturbance and daytime fatigue than boys. This article explores the literature surrounding female adolescent sleep dis
Sgorbini, M., O'Brien, L. & Jackson, D.E. 2009, 'Living With Hepatitis C And Treatment: The Personal Experiences Of Patients', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 18, no. 16, pp. 2282-2291.
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Aim. The purpose of the study was to explore the issues surrounding chronic hepatitis C, combination therapy and its impact on personal relationships to enhance understanding of the experiences of patients living with hepatitis C. This paper focuses on t
O'reilly, R., Peters, K., Beale, B. & Jackson, D.E. 2009, 'Women's Experiences Of Recovery From Childbirth: Focus On Pelvis Problems That Extend Beyond The Puerperium', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 18, no. 14, pp. 2013-2019.
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This study aimed to build understandings of women's recovery experiences in the presence of continued pelvic problems extending beyond the puerperium to provide nurses and other health care professionals with information to enhance current practice. Trau
Power, T.J., Peters, K., O'Brien, L. & Jackson, D.E. 2009, 'Sleep In Adolescence: A Review Of Issues For Nursing Practice', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 18, no. 13, pp. 1819-1826.
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The aim of this review was to explore the literature to determine what is known about adolescent sleep, the causes and consequences of disturbed sleep in adolescence and the implications this has for nursing practice. Sleep disorders are relatively commo
Jackson, D.E. 2009, 'Mentored Residential Writing Retreats: A Leadership Strategy To Develop Skills And Generate Outcomes In Writing For Publication', Nurse Education Today, vol. 29, no. 1, pp. 9-15.
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There is an increasing expectation that academic and clinical nurses will contribute to disciplinary and professional discourses through scholarly writing. However, the difficulties and challenges associated with writing for publication mean that many pa
McCloughen, A., O'Brien, L. & Jackson, D.E. 2009, 'Esteemed Connection: Creating A Mentoring Relationship For Nurse Leadership', Nursing Inquiry, vol. 16, no. 4, pp. 326-336.
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Mentoring relationships occur across a range of nursing contexts and are shown to have multiple, favourable personal and professional outcomes. Specifically, mentoring has been associated with the development of nurse leaders. This study describes featur
Jackson, D.E. & Carter, B. 2009, 'Fear, failure, outrage and grief: the dissonance between public outrage and individual action', Journal of child health care, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 4-6.
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Recently the case of Baby P has galvanised public opinion in the United Kingdom. Awareness of the details of the tragic life and death of the toddler has resulted in an outpouring of community outrage and grief. However, the sad case of Baby P is not an isolated event. On the other side of the world, in New Zealand, a similarly dreadful fate befell toddler Nia Glassie. Before them have been other terrible and heart-rending cases of children abused by those who should have loved and cared for them, and failed by systems that should have been able to protect them.
Jackson, D.E. & Watson, R. 2009, 'Editorial: Lead us not', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 18, no. 14, pp. 1961-1962.
Leadership is a word that invites critique and interrogation; it is a term that is nebulous, in that it is widely used and rarely defined. Leadership tends to be presented as a panacea for all of the ills that we face. However, leadership is not necessarily a virtue. While it is generally presented in positive terms, one does not have to look very far back in history to find examples of leaders who led people and even whole nations to disaster.
Jackson, D.E. 2009, 'Editorial: Nursing on television: are we being served?', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 18, no. 16, pp. 2249-2250.
Few would argue that television has had a profound affect on modern life. As a source of popular information, it is unparalleled. In the Western world at least, there are few homes without television, and not many with only a single television. The modern (Western) home often has televisions in multiple living areas and bedrooms, and some models of refrigerator even feature an in-built television in the door, so that, even while foraging for sustenance, not a moment of television viewing needs to be missed. With the development of television reception capacity in mobile phones, today++s television viewer can potentially tune in wherever they are ++ on the train, at the beach, or at the mall.
Jackson, D.E. 2009, 'Editorial: Educating nurses for clinical practice', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 18, no. 8, pp. 1083-1084.
There is an increasing amount of literature focusing on the experience, quality and readiness for practice of newly graduated nurses (ie: Kelly & Ahern 2009, Wangensteen et al. 2008, Bjorkstrom et al. 2008). It is clear from the literature that undergraduate education programs (and their product) have an enormous influence both on the quality of the services that can be provided to patients and families and the nature of the nursing workplace itself (Watson 2006). Thus, the quality and nature of the undergraduate classroom and clinical learning experiences to which nurses are exposed are critical matters for the practice of clinical nursing.
Jackson, D.E. & Clinton, M. 2009, 'Epilogue: The value of a fourth year?', Advances in Contemporary Nursing, vol. 32, no. 1-2, pp. 215-216.
Above all, nursing is a practice discipline, and as such, is incredibly complex because it involves the synthesis and application of knowledge drawn from many areas. Nursing graduates are required to have high level skills across various domains of practice, and the challenges associated with adequate preparation of nurses within six short academic semesters calls for high quality, well resourced and effective education systems. The challenges facing those charged with preparing nurses are compounded by a student demographic that has radically altered over recent years - many entering nursing preparatory programs are not school leavers, rather they come to nursing as mature aged students, with a range of life experiences and varying degrees of literacy and numeracy (Walker 2009). Notwithstanding the concerns that are sometimes raised about the quality of graduates and their fitness for practice (Mannix, Wilkes, & Luck 2009), nursing graduates have been readily employed into the health sector.
Jackson, D.E. 2009, 'Editorial: The importance of optimism', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 18, no. 10, pp. 1377-1378.
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It is crucial to engage in discussion, reflection and robust critical debate about the problems and challenges that we are facing as a profession. However, it is also vitally important and necessary that we retain a sense of positivity and optimism about nursing and nursing work.
Jackson, D.E. & Watson, R. 2009, 'Editorial: Nurses and publications - the impact of the impact factor', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 18, pp. 2537-2538.
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Peters, K. & Jackson, D.E. 2009, 'Mothers' experiences of parenting a child with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder', Journal of Advanced Nursing, vol. 65, no. 1, pp. 62-71.
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Aim. This paper is a report of a study to explore the perceptions and experiences of mothers parenting a child with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Background. Previous quantitative studies have focussed on parenting styles and treatments, and highlight that attention deficit hyperactivity disorder has a negative impact on family functioning. However, fewer researchers have explored maternal experiences of parenting a child with this disorder. A narrative-based feminist approach can provide greater insights into complex issues related to mothering a child with this disorder. Method. Data were collected in 2007 with a volunteer sample of 11 mothers of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder via in-depth interviews. Analysis was completed by listening for self-evaluative statements, paying attention to meta-statements and by identifying both consistencies and incongruities within participant's narratives. Findings. Dominant issues identified were: It's been 10 years of being on edge: The caring responsibility as overwhelming; If I had my time over again, I wouldn't tell the truth: Stigmatized, scrutinized and criticized; What have I done? What did I do? How come I've got this child: Guilt and self-blame and He doesn't stand a chance: Mother as advocate. Conclusion. Mothering a child with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is stressful and demanding, and mothers felt marginalized. Media portrayal of this disorder contributes to confusion related to causes, diagnosis and treatment choices. More education for healthcare professionals is needed to enable them to give appropriate guidance and support to enhance outcomes for children and their parents.
Hutchinson, M., Wilkes, L., Jackson, D.E. & Vickers, M. 2009, ''The worse you behave, the more you seem, to be rewarded': bullying in nursing as organizational corruption', Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal, vol. 21, no. 3, pp. 213-229.
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This paper reports findings from the first, qualitative stage of a national sequential, mixed method study of bullying in the Australian nursing workplace. Twenty-six nurses who had experience of workplace bullying were recruited from two Australian public sector health care organizations. Examining the narrative data from the viewpoint of bullying being a corrupt activity we present an alternative perspective on group acts of bullying. By exploring bullying as corrupt behaviour, this paper challenges the assumption that bullying can be principally considered a series of isolated events stemming from interpersonal conflict, organizational pressures, or poor work design. Corruption in organizations has not previously been linked with or compared to bullying. In revealing themanner in which actors can engage in corrupt conduct that includes bullying, the findings from our study offer important implications for the management of workplace bullying as a serious and corrupt activity.
Clinton, M. & Jackson, D.E. 2009, 'Prologue: Challenges in nurse education: A shared international perspective', Advances in Contemporary Nursing, vol. 32, no. 1-2, pp. 6-8.
Jackson, D.E. & Daly, J. 2008, 'Nursing and pre-registration nursing education under the spotlight again (Editorial)', Collegian, vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 1-2.
Edenborough, M., Jackson, D.E., Mannix, J. & Wilkes, L. 2008, 'Living In The Red Zone: The Experience Of Child-To-Mother Violence', Child and Family Social Work, vol. 13, no. 4, pp. 464-473.
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Child-to-mother violence is an area of family violence that has received limited attention over the past 20 years but is a problem for many families. It is poorly understood in the community and this lack of understanding creates a basis for families and
Jackson, D.E. 2008, 'Servant Leadership In Nursing: A Framework For Developing Sustainable Research Capacity In Nursing', Collegian, vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 27-33.
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In the current professional climate, research activities are highly valued with nurses in all sectors actively encouraged to participate. However, working environments for many nurses are such that it can be difficult to privilege research activities in
Gabrielle, S., Jackson, D.E. & Mannix, J. 2008, 'Adjusting To Personal And Organisational Change: Views And Experiences Of Female Nurses Aged 40-60 Years', Collegian, vol. 15, no. 3, pp. 85-91.
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The Australian nursing workforce is ageing and there is a well-documented shortage of nurses. This global phenomenon means that retaining nurses in the workforce is gaining in importance as older nurses retire and leave nursing. The existing literature r
Mohan, S., Wilkes, L. & Jackson, D.E. 2008, 'Lifestyle Of Asian Indians With Coronary Heart Disease: The Australian Context', Collegian, vol. 15, no. 3, pp. 115-121.
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This paper aims to report lifestyle factors of Asian Indians in Australia in relation to coronary heart disease. This issue has not been previously explored in the Australian context. This study also seeks to identify factors that could inform health edu
East, L., Jackson, D.E., O'Brien, L. & Peters, K. 2008, 'The Benefits Of Computer-Mediated Communication In Nursing Research', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 83-88.
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Use of the Internet, and the opportunity to utilise computer-mediated communication (CMC) provides new alternatives for nurse researchers to collect data. The use of CMC for research purposes is advantageous for both researchers and participants. Through
Peters, K., Jackson, D.E. & Rudge, T. 2008, 'Research On Couples: Are Feminist Approaches Useful?', Journal of Advanced Nursing, vol. 62, no. 3, pp. 373-380.
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Title. Research on couples: are feminist approaches useful? Aim. This paper is an exploration of the utility and value of feminist approaches when undertaking narrative-based research with partner dyads (within both heterosexual and same sex partnerships
Phillips, J.L., Davidson, P.M., Jackson, D.E. & Kristjanson, L. 2008, 'Multi-Faceted Palliative Care Intervention: Aged Care Nurses' And Care Assistants' Perceptions And Experiences', Journal of Advanced Nursing, vol. 62, no. 2, pp. 216-227.
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Aim. This paper is a report of a study to describe residential aged care nurses' and care assistants' perceptions of a multi-faceted palliative care intervention to identify potential areas to be addressed during subsequent action research phases. Backgr
Gabrielle, S., Jackson, D.E. & Mannix, J. 2008, 'Older Women Nurses: Health, Ageing Concerns And Self-Care Strategies', Journal Of Advanced Nursing, vol. 61, no. 3, pp. 316-325.
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Aim. This paper is a report of a study of the health and ageing concerns and self-care strategies of older female Registered Nurses currently working in direct care-giving roles in acute public hospitals and community facilities. Background. Nursing is a
Jackson, D.E. & Peters, K. 2008, 'Use Of Drug Therapy In Children With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): Maternal Views And Experiences', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 17, no. 20, pp. 2725-2732.
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Aims and objectives. The aim of this paper is to explore maternal views and experiences of stimulant pharmacotherapy in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Background. The very nature of ADHD means that it exists in a climate o
Luck, L., Jackson, D.E. & Usher, K. 2008, 'Innocent Or Culpable? Meanings That Emergency Department Nurses Ascribe To Individual Acts Of Violence', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 17, no. 8, pp. 1071-1078.
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The purpose of the study was to explore the meaning(s) that emergency department nurses ascribe to acts of violence from patients, their family and friends and what impact these meaning(s) have upon how they respond to such acts. Violence in the health s
Hutchinson, M., Wilkes, L., VICKERS, M. & Jackson, D.E. 2008, 'The development and validation of a bullying inventory for the nursing workplace', Nurse Researcher, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 19-29.
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An Australian study of bullying that provides a putative model for further testing in nursing and other contexts.
Wilkes, L., Jackson, D.E. & Power, T.J. 2008, 'The experiences of family members placing a relative into residential care: The move', Geriaction, vol. 26, no. 2, pp. 5-13.
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This paper reports on an extensive literature review that focuses on family members' experiences of placing an older relative into residential care. Specific issues in the literature associated with the decision making process, including the decision to place a relative into a nursing home, are discussed. The search for a nursing home through to relocation of a relative into the facility and family members' emotional journeys through the entire relocation process are described. Placing a relative into a nursing home is a complex issue with family members being vulnerable after placement and often experiencing distress, loneliness, guilt and role confusion with unrelenting doubts about the placement decision and concern for their relatives' wellbeing. There is a clear need to pursue this research topic in the Australian context
Wilkes, L., Jackson, D.E. & Power, T.J. 2008, 'Placing a relative into a nursing home: family members experiences after the move. A review of the literature', Geriaction, vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 24-29.
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This paper reports on existing literature on family members' experiences after placing their aged relative in a nursing home. The literature reports that family members commonly experience feelings of guilt, failure and concern for their older relative's wellbeing after they have been placed in a nursing home. In addition, factors such as dealing with guilt, coping with loneliness, loss of identity, role ambiguity and worry for wellbeing of the aged person and generic institutional care result in post placement carer stress. Very little support or counselling is provided to family members during and after placement in a nursing home. Despite a growing body of research that examines post placement stress for family members, there are not many support strategies or interventions to help family members cope with this stressful situation
Jackson, D.E. 2008, 'Editorial: Patient experiences, family participation and professional roles', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 17, no. 2, pp. 147-148.
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The author focuses on patient experiences, family participation and professional roles in clinical nursing. She states that patient experiences and family participation are important in clinical nursing because it serves as a source of information that will be used by nurses and midwives in providing a better care for their patients. She stresses out that the increase in demand in professional role expansion causes a lot of issues including the impact of these demands in work environment.
Jackson, D.E. 2008, 'Editorial: Organising care delivery: facilitator or impediment to supportive working relationships in nursing', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 17, no. 6, pp. 701-702.
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The author discusses the role of various care delivery models in proper development of workplace environment for nurses. He states that nurses have to face several difficulties, including bullying, resource shortages and emotional exhaustion, that affects the collegial relationship among nurses. He mentions several care delivery models, including primary nursing and case management, and their role in workplace relationships.
Jackson, D.E. 2008, 'What becomes of the whistleblowers?', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 17, no. 10, pp. 1261-1262.
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The author reflects on the issue concerning whistleblowing in the health care industry. She asserts that whistleblowing focuses on the disclosure of misconduct and breaches carried by health care organisation which affects the services it provide to the public. The author contends that effective measures in addressing the issue includes ensuring fairness between the parties involved. She stresses that strategies should be considered in clearly evaluating wrongdoings within the industry.
Jackson, D.E. 2008, 'Editorial: Collegial trust: crucial to safe and harmonious workplaces', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 17, no. 12, pp. 1541-1542.
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The article presents the author's comment on the helpful and effective collegial relationships at workplaces. According to the author, the quality of their working lives is at least partially contingent on the quality of the relationships they have with their colleagues in the workplace. It is stated that collegial trust is essential to a smooth and safe work environment and shapes the relationships with colleagues in the workplace.
Hutchinson, M., Jackson, D.E., Wilkes, L. & Vickers, M.H. 2008, 'A new model of bullying in the nursing workplace: Organizational characteristics as critical antecedents', Advances in Nursing Science, vol. 31, no. 2, pp. E60-E71.
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Providing a safe work environment where nurses can practice without fear or threat of aggression is acknowledged as a critical global issue for healthcare organizations. Although there has been growing recognition that workplace bullying is one of the most concerning forms of aggression experienced by nurses, to date, there has been little progress in developing explanatory models. In this article, we outline our recently validated model of bullying, which specifies organizational characteristics as critical antecedents. The model has important implications for the management of bullying, identifying that to be effective, interventions need to address features of workplace climate.
Jackson, D.E. 2008, 'Random acts of guidance: Personal reflections on professional generosity', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 17, no. 20, pp. 2669-2670.
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The author reflects on professional generosity in nursing. She mentions that professional generosity can be in any forms for nurses contributes to the development of others that occurs in a range of informal and formal contexts. She also mentions that primary function of mentoring is to provide socialization and transitional support for nurses.
Jackson, D.E. 2008, 'The ageing nursing workforce: how can we avoid a retirement brain drain?', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 17, no. 22, pp. 2949-2950.
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The article presents the author's view concerning the impact of retirement to the brain drain of retiring nurses. The author cites several studies on the impact of creating of retired nurses, the willingness of retiring nurses to continue contributing their knowledge, and on the delaying retirement strategies. The author suggests the need to consider the ways hat nursing could continue to benefit from the knowledge and contributions of a very skilled and experienced retiring nurses.
Watson, R., Jackson, D.E. & Haigh, C. 2008, 'Reviewing for JCN', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 17, no. 21, pp. 2801-2802.
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The article provides information on how the "Journal of Clinical Nursing" is reviewed. Accordingly, the people behind the journal have considered to operate double blind peer reviewing as the best way to maintain neutrality of both the authors and reviewers. It explores on the reviewing process of the journal through citing the procedures and approaches of the reviewers as well as the authors to provide an acceptable publicatio
Cleary, M., Walter, G., Jackson, D.E. & Daly, J. 2008, 'Editorial: Dealing with peer-review: What is reasonable and what is not?', Collegian, vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 123-125.
Factors to consider when submitting articles to peer-reviewed journals
East, L. & Jackson, D.E. 2007, ''I Don't Want To Hate Him Forever': Understanding Daughter's Experiences Of Father Absence', Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing, vol. 24, no. 4, pp. 14-18.
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Objective. Father absence is associated with negative child and adolescent outcomes, including early sexual activity, teenage pregnancy, behavioural difficulties and life adversity. However there is a lack of literature that explores the lived experience
Ogunbona, P., Wilkes, L. & Jackson, D.E. 2007, 'Female Genital Mutilation: Origin, Beliefs, Prevalence And Implications For Health Care Workers Caring For Immigrant Women In Australia', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 25, no. 1-2, pp. 22-30.
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The recent wave of immigrants to Australia includes people from countries where female genital mutilation (FGM) is predominant. FGM is the terminology used by the World Health Organisation to describe all procedures involving partial or total removal of
Atsalos, C., O'Brien, L. & Jackson, D.E. 2007, 'Against The Odds: Experiences Of Nurse Leaders In Clinical Development Units (Nursing) In Australia', Journal of Advanced Nursing, vol. 58, no. 6, pp. 576-584.
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Aim. This paper is a report of a longitudinal study to develop an understanding of the phenomena of Clinical Development Unit (Nursing) leadership by exploring the experiences of the nurse leaders of nine Australian units as they attempted to develop the
Luck, L., Jackson, D.E. & Usher, K. 2007, 'Stamp: Components Of Observable Behaviour That Indicate Potential For Patient Violence In Emergency Departments', Journal of Advanced Nursing, vol. 59, no. 1, pp. 11-19.
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Aim. This paper is the report of a study to explicate the components of observable behaviour that indicate a potential for violence in patients, their family and friends when presenting at an emergency department. Background. Violence towards nurses is a
Jackson, D.E., Firtko, A. & Edenborough, M. 2007, 'Personal Resilience As A Strategy For Surviving And Thriving In The Face Of Workplace Adversity: A Literature Review', Journal of Advanced Nursing, vol. 60, no. 1, pp. 1-9.
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Title. Personal resilience as a strategy for surviving and thriving in the face of workplace adversity: a literature review Aim. This paper is a report of a literature review to explore the concept of personal resilience as a strategy for responding to w
East, L., Jackson, D.E., O'Brien, L. & Peters, K. 2007, 'Use Of The Male Condom By Heterosexual Adolescents And Young People: Literature Review', Journal of Advanced Nursing, vol. 59, no. 2, pp. 103-110.
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Title. Use of the male condom by heterosexual adolescents and young people: literature review. Aim. This paper is a report of a literature review to explore issues influencing condom use in heterosexual adolescents and young people. Background. Sexually
O'Brien, L. & Jackson, D.E. 2007, 'It's A Long Way From The Office To The Creek Bed: Remote Area Mental Health Nursing In Australia', Journal of Transcultural Nursing, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 135-141.
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Mental health nursing in remote Australian Aboriginal communities provides opportunities and challenges unique from other experiences of nursing. The purpose of this article was to explore how mental health nurses experience working in remote communities
Peters, K., Jackson, D.E. & Rudge, T. 2007, 'Failures Of Reproduction: Problematising 'Success' In Assisted Reproductive Technology', Nursing Inquiry, vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 125-131.
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This paper scrutinises the many ways in which 'success' is portrayed in representing assisted reproductive technology (ART) services and illuminates how these definitions differ from those held by participant couples. A qualitative approach informed by f
East, L., Jackson, D.E. & O'Brien, L. 2007, 'Disrupted relationships: adult daughters and father absence', Advances in Contemporary Nursing, vol. 23, no. 2, pp. 252-261.
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Changes in family structures have resulted in many children growing up in nontraditional families, where their father is not resident in the family home. Father absence that occurs as a result of the breakdown of the parental relationship is associated with life adversity and less than optimal outcomes for children and adolescents. However, little research exists that explores this phenomenon from the perspective of the father absent young person.This phenomenological study was conducted in 2005 and aimed to explore women+s perceptions about relationships with their fathers within the context of a father absent childhood. Nine women participated in this study. Findings revealed that growing up without their father present in the family home disrupted the relationship these daughters held with their fathers. Due to the perceived lack of interest these daughters felt from their fathers, they expressed feelings of hurt and diminished respect for their fathers. F
Peters, K., Jackson, D.E. & Rudge, T. 2007, ''It Just Alienated Us': A case study to explore the impact of Assisted Reproductive Technology on family relationships', Advances in Nursing Science, vol. 30, no. 3, pp. 25-36.
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New reproductive technologies have the capacity to impact on both personal and healthcare relationships. This article utilizes a case study approach to unpack experiences of one couple who encountered immense and unforeseen difficulties as a result of treatment with assisted reproductive technology. Findings of this case reveal both difficulties and breaches in obtaining informed consent and the consequences these breaches have on relationships. Comprehensive information contributes to positive relationships between patients and healthcare providers. Maintaining supportive relationships between all parties concerned with assisted reproductive technology services is essential, as rifts in these relationships can be devastating and long-lasting.
McDonald, G., O'Brien, L. & Jackson, D.E. 2007, 'Guilt and shame: experiences of parents of self-harming adolescents', Journal of child health care, vol. 11, no. 4, pp. 298-310.
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This paper reports the findings of a qualitative study that used a hermeneutic phenomenological methodology to develop insights into the experience of parents of young people who engage in self-harming behaviour. Six mothers (and one father who accompanied his wife) participated in the study. Findings reveal that mothers experienced guilt and shame, and that these feelings shaped their reactions and responses. These mothers described experiencing emotional dilemmas, such as the degree to which they could be responsible, uncertainty about how to understand self harm, and the best course of action to take with their child. They also encountered difficulties in combating the negative emotional effects for themselves and other family members. Findings provide insights that can help nurses and family health workers to understand and assist parents with greater effectiveness; by maintaining a non-judgemental stance, acknowledging the difficulties of their experiences, encouraging confidence in their parenting abilities, and promoting effective stress management strategies.
Phillips, J., Davidson, P.M., Ollerton, R., Jackson, D.E. & Kristjanson, L. 2007, 'A survey of commitment and compassion among nurses in residential aged care', International Journal of Palliative Nursing, vol. 13, no. 6, pp. 282-290.
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To assess the views and attitudes of aged care staff providing direct care towards palliative care and to identify their learning needs. Design: Survey design using purposive sampling methods. Findings: Nurses and care assistants (n=222) employed within nine residential aged care facilities in regional Australia completed the survey. The majority had received on the job training and were committed to providing end-of-life care. Differences in the level of confidence to deal with patient/family interactions and manage complex palliative care scenarios were evident between nurses and care assistants (p<0.05). Both nurses and care assistants perceived a need for further education in symptom management and communication, yet their content need differed significantly between groups. Conclusions: Nurses and care assistants in residential aged care facilities demonstrate commitment to the delivery of palliative care and express a need for increased palliative care competencies. The heterogeneity of roles and educational preparation within the aged care workforce indicate that tailored palliative care education initiatives are required to meet the learning needs of aged care nurses and care assistants, particularly in relation to end-of-life care. These data have implications for skill-mix and model of care development.
Jackson, D.E., Wilkes, L. & McDonald, G. 2007, ''If I was in my daughter's body I'd be feeling devastated': Women's experiences of mothering an overweight or obese child', Journal of child health care, vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 29-39.
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Overweight and obesity in children is a major and ongoing public health concern and the negative physical, social, and psychological sequelae of childhood obesity are well documented. Parents, particularly mothers, are implicated in discourses around childhood obesity; however, little is known about women+s experiences of mothering an overweight or obese child. This article reports findings from a narrative-based study that sought to develop understandings into women+s experiences of mothering an overweight or obese child. The findings provide insights into the experiences of mothering an overweight or obese child, and reveals how the climate of blame associated with mothering an overweight or obese child complicated the mothering experience for the women in this study. These insights can assist health, welfare and child care workers to understand the importance of establishing supportive and no-blame relationships with mothers of obese and overweight children, in order to develop supportive therapeutic alliances better.
J, P., Davidson, P.M., Ollerton, R., Jackson, D.E. & Kristjanson, L. 2007, 'Pain is a common symptom at the end of life in Residential Aged Care and Targeted Education can improve symptom managament: P1154', Pain Practice, vol. 7, no. Supplement 1, pp. 62-62.
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Usher, K., Jackson, D.E. & O'Brien, L. 2007, 'Shattered Dreams: Parental Experiences of Adolescent substance abuse', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, vol. 16, no. 6, pp. 422-430.
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Drug or substance abuse by adolescents continues to have a major impact on the health and well-being of young people and poses a serious management problem for health workers. While the majority of the problems surrounding adolescent substance abuse rest on the parents, little is actually known about their experiences. This study aimed to describe and construct an interpretation of the lived experiences of parenting an adolescent who abuses illicit substances. A qualitative approach, underpinned by the tenets of phenomenology, was used to conduct in-depth interviews with 18 parents. Thematic analysis revealed eight themes: confronting the lies, deceit, and suspicion; struggling to set limits; dealing with the consequences; living with the blame and the shame; trying to keep the child safe; grieving the child that was; living with the guilt; and choosing self-preservation. The results indicate that parents struggle to manage the problem, are left to deal with the consequences of the behaviour with little support, and are constantly looking for answers to the questions raised by the problem
Phillips, J., Davidson, P.M., Jackson, D.E., Kristjanson, L., Daly, J. & Curran, J. 2006, 'Residential aged care: The last frontier for palliative care', Journal Of Advanced Nursing, vol. 55, no. 4, pp. 416-424.
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This paper is a report of an explorative study describing the perceptions and beliefs about palliative care among nurses and care assistants working in residential aged care facilities in Australia. Background. Internationally, the number of people dying in residential aged care facilities is growing. In Australia, aged care providers are being encouraged and supported by a positive policy platform to deliver a palliative approach to care, which has generated significant interest from clinicians, academics and researchers. However, a little is known about the ability and capacity of residential aged care services to adopt and provide a palliative approach to care. Methods. Focus groups were used to investigate the collective perceptions and beliefs about palliative care in a convenience sample of nurses and care assistants working in residential aged care facilities in Australia. Thematic content analysis was used to analyse the data, which were collected during 2004. Results. Four major themes emerged: (1) being like family; (2) advocacy as a key role; (3) challenges in communicating with other healthcare providers; (4) battling and striving to succeed against the odds. Although participants described involvement and commitment to quality palliative care, they also expressed a need for additional education and support about symptom control, language and access to specialist services and resources.
Daly, J., Chang, E. & Jackson, D.E. 2006, 'Quality of work life in nursing: Some issues and challenges (Editorial)', Collegian, vol. 13, no. 4, pp. 2-2.
Phillips, J., Davidson, P.M., Jackson, D.E., Kristjanson, L., Bennett, M. & Daly, J. 2006, 'Enhancing palliative care delivery in a regional community in Australia', Australian Health Review, vol. 30, no. 3, pp. 370-379.
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Although access to palliative care is a fundamental right for people in Australia and is endorsed by government policy, there is often limited access to specialist palliative care services in regional, rural and remote areas. This article appraises the evidence pertaining to palliative care service delivery to inform a sustainable model of palliative care that meets the needs of a regional population on the mid-north coast of New South Wales.
Hutchinson, M., Vickers, M.H., Jackson, D.E. & Wilkes, L. 2006, 'Workplace Bullying In Nursing: Towards A More Critical Organisational Perspective', Nursing Inquiry, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 118-126.
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Workplace bullying is a significant issue confronting the nursing profession. Bullying in nursing is frequently described in terms of 'oppressed group' behaviour or 'horizontal violence'. It is proposed that the use of 'oppressed group' behaviour theory
Mannix, J., Faga, P., Beale, B. & Jackson, D.E. 2006, 'Towards sustainable models for clinical education in nursing: An on-going conversation', Nurse Education in Practice, vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 3-11.
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This paper grew from a series of conversations about the challenges associated with clinical education for undergraduate nurses. In it we consider clinical education for undergraduate nurses within the current context of increasing resource and industry constraints. Beginning level clinical competence is the major aim of undergraduate nurse education, and therefore clinical education is central to nursing curricula. However, almost 20 years after the transfer of nurse education to the tertiary sector in New South Wales, Australia, concerns about the clinical learning opportunities in undergraduate nursing curricula continue to be raised. Many educational providers have adopted various permeations of the sessional clinical facilitator model. However, this model has inherent problems that threaten its sustainability and usefulness for undergraduate nurse education. We call upon the discipline to explore alternative pathways for undergraduate clinical education, and present sustainable options for future development in this area.
McCloughen, A., O'Brien, L. & Jackson, D.E. 2006, 'Positioning mentorship within Australian Nursing Contexts: A literature review', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 120-134.
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There are a variety of structured and unstructured supportive relationships available to nurses. Internationally, nurses commonly use preceptorship, clinical supervision, and mentorship to meet distinct needs and provide differing levels of commitment, intensity, and enabling functions. Of particular interest to the nursing profession is the use of mentoring relationships to support nurses in achieving leadership positions. In Australia, preceptorship and clinical supervision are freely used and understood by nurses however, mentoring relationships are less readily applied, and agreed meanings and understanding are lacking. This paper will explore the range of supportive relationships available to nurses. The terms used to define and describe these relationships, and how these relationships are contextualised, will be explored in order to better understand the position of mentorship for nurses in Australia. The potential value of mentorship in developing nursing leadership in Australia will also be identified.
Stewart, M., Wilkes, L., Jackson, D.E. & Mannix, J. 2006, 'Child-to-mother violence: A pilot study', Advances in Contemporary Nursing, vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 297-310.
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There is vigorous research and debate into family violence. However, there is a paucity of enquiry into violence directed from child-to-mother. This paper presents preliminary results from the pilot of a larger study that examines child-to-mother violence in the western suburbs of Sydney Australia.The data are from questionnaires distributed to women who are or have been mothers of children aged 10 to 24 years. Descriptive analysis revealed that an overwhelming majority of the 129 women surveyed experienced some form of threatening behaviour or acts of violence from their child/ren. The main perpetrators were sons and targets mothers. More than half the women had not spoken to anyone about the behaviour previously and a number of women stated their child had witnessed violence in the home. Findings suggest the complexity for women is increased as women are often encouraged to separate from violent partners but their role as mothers prevents them from dividing from a violent child.The incidence appears high, however further evidence from larger samples is required to reveal the full extent of this important social issue.
Luck, L., Jackson, D.E. & Usher, K. 2006, 'Survival of the fittest, or socially constructed phenomena? Theoretical understandings of aggression and violence towards nurses', Advances in Contemporary Nursing, vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 251-263.
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Violence is an issue that is attracting increasing attention in the nursing literature.There is general agreement that nurses are exposed to unacceptable levels of violence and aggression in the workplace, and that levels of violence are increasing. Despite this attention and awareness, however, violence does not have a standard definition, and theoretical explanations of violence are seldom considered when discussing it in relation to nursing.This paper discusses current issues associated with defining violence, and presents an overview of some of the traditional and contemporary theories of aggression and violence in relation to nursing and the health context. Conflicting issues surrounding predictors and precipitators of violence are examined.We explore the notion that violence is 'part of the job' in nursing. In conclusion, we assert that the current discourses on aggression and violence maintain the status quo, and argue that new explanatory positions on aggression and violence towards nurses are needed.
Hutchinson, M., Vickers, M.H., Jackson, D.E. & Wilkes, L. 2006, ''They stand you in a corner; you are not to speak': Nurses tell of abusive indoctrination in work teams dominated by bullies', Advances in Contemporary Nursing, vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 228-238.
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This paper reports some of the findings from the first qualitative stage of a large national study of bullying in the nursing workplace currently being undertaken in Australia.The findings reported here reveal how relationships between bullies were embedded within informal organizational alliances, enabling bullies to control work teams and use emotional abuse and psychological violence as a means of enforcing bully-defined 'rules of work'.Within nursing teams, bullies controlled work roles, tasks, and status in the nursing hierarchy through enforcing their 'rules'. Bullies enforced these rules through a process of ritual indoctrination, destroying the self-confidence and self-image of those targeted, and forcing them to eventually resign their position or acquiesce to survive.The merciless, calculated and deliberate nature of the bullying resulted in profound harm for many of those targeted.The findings of this research have implications for the understanding and management of workplace bullying.
Power, C., Koch, T., KRALIK, D. & Jackson, D.E. 2006, 'Lovestruck: Women, romantic love and intimate partner violence', Advances in Contemporary Nursing, vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 174-185.
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Intimate Partner Violence remains a significant problem globally despite health promotion aimed at raising awareness. In particular, there is a current trend for many young women to view some abusive/violent behaviours as acceptable in their relationships. Intimate Partner Violence has serious implications for its short and long term impacts on the health of women and children. Health workers may find working with women a challenging and sometimes frustrating experience. A way forward is to develop clearer understandings of the complexities of Intimate Partner Violence and to better understand women++s investments in romantic relationships. In this paper a secondary analysis of data from a narrative study of women's recovery from IPV relationships is presented in order to illustrate discourses that inform underpinnings of romantic relationships. Transcriptions of audio-taped interviews were analysed using a feminist poststructural approach in order to make visible the ways in which the women negotiated their identities in the discourses of femininity. A critical review of current literature was also undertaken to develop the construct of romantic love. Women revealed that cues for Intimate Partner Violence were present early in the relationship but were not recognised at the time. Two positions within the discourse of romantic love were identified that underpinned their desires to establish and invest in the relationship despite the presence of cues for Intimate Partner Violence.These were 'Desperate for a man' and interpreting jealousy as a sign of love. Romantic love may be desirable for the sharing of warmth, safety and protection, and yet can mask behaviours that are cues for domestic violence. Understanding the complex nature of the ways that women's desires are located in the discourse of romantic love has implications for all nurses working to prevent and reduce the incidence of Intimate Partner Violence.
Jackson, D.E. & McMurray, A. 2006, 'Recognising, responding and resisting violence: A critical challenge for nurses', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 324-326.
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The ultimate weakness of violence is that it is a descending spiral, begetting the very thing it seeks to destroy. Instead of diminishing evil, it multiplies it. Through violence you may murder the liar, but you cannot murder the lie, nor establish the truth. Through violence you may murder the hater, but you do not murder hate. In fact, violence merely increases hate. So it goes. Returning violence for violence multiplies violence, adding deeper darkness to a night already devoid of stars. Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that.Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that. Martin Luther King Jr (1967: 62++63)
Luck, L., Jackson, D.E. & Usher, K. 2006, 'Case study: a bridge across the paradigms', Nursing Inquiry, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 103-109.
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Case study as a teaching and research tool has an extensive history in health and social sciences. Despite its suitability for many of the research questions that face nurses, nurses have not fully embraced case study as a comprehensive approach for research. The vagaries of the real-life clinical setting can confound methodologically purist researchers. Case study provides a milieu in which nurse researchers can respond to these vagaries and move towards a paradigmatic openness. In this paper, we argue that case study offers, as yet, under-explored and under-utilised potential as a bridge across the traditional research paradigms. We argue that case study has broad research application and epistemological, ontological and methodological flexibility. When used as a research approach, case study is both the process and end product of research. It provides a delineated boundary for inquiry, and a structural process within which any methods appropriate to investigating a research area can be applied.
Hutchinson, M., VICKERS, M., Jackson, D.E. & Wilkes, L. 2006, 'Like wolves in a pack: Predatory alliances of bullies in nursing', Journal of Management & Organization, vol. 12, no. 3, pp. 235-250.
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The findings from the first, qualitative stage of a larger sequential mixed method study of bullying in the Australian nursing workplace are reported. Interviews with twenty-six nurses, recruited from two health care organizations, were analysed using the constant comparative method. Partici- pants described informal organizational networks as the mechanism through which predatory, co- operative, and planned group bullying acts were promulgated. These predatory alliances enabled the co-option of legitimate organizational systems, the concealment of bullying, and the protection and promotion of perpetrators. By identifying the manner in which workplace bullying can be embedded within informal organizational networks, this research has important implications for further research in this field.
Jackson, D.E. & Darbyshire, P. 2006, 'Life in the 'family friendly' 21st Century:Finding the balance between work and family', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 23, no. 2, pp. 5-6.
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Jackson, D.E. & Darbyshire, P. 2006, 'Parenting in public: 'Watching the directives'', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 23, no. 2, pp. 189-201.
II s there anything to be learned about the state of contemporary parenting by watching TV? We think so. Saying that you actually watch TV at all is more of a confession than a statement for good card-carrying academics like ourselves.The cultural script that those of our ilk are meant to trot out with a dismissive half-sneer of superiority is, `We don+t watch television+, or conferring more gravitas still,`We don+t have a television+. Humbug. If you want to know something of the current culture you+re living in, turn on, tune in or drop out of a big part of understanding it.
Jackson, D.E., Usher, K. & O'Brien, L. 2006, 'Fractured families: Parental perspectives of the effects of adolescent drug abuse on family life', Advances in Contemporary Nursing, vol. 23, no. 2, pp. 321-330.
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Drug use in young people has serious ramifications for health and well-being of young people and their families and continues to be an area of major concern for health workers.Though the task of dealing with drug-related problems falls on families, particularly parents, very little literature has explored parental experiences of managing drug use within the context of family life. Eighteen parents of drug-abusing young people were recruited into this qualitative study that aimed to develop understandings into the effects of adolescent drug use on family life. Findings revealed that the experience of having a drug-abusing adolescent family member had a profound effect on other members of the immediate family. Family relationships were fractured and split as a result of the on-going destructive and damaging behaviour of the drug-abusing young person. Five themes were identified that captured the concept of fractured families.These are: Betrayal and loss of trust: You had to have the doors locked; Abuse, threats and violence:There were holes in the wall; Sibling anger and resentment: Better off now with him gone; Isolated, disgraced and humiliated: You are on your own with it; and Feeling blamed:You are not a good parent.Implications for practice and further research are drawn from the findings of this paper.
Jackson, D.E. & Darbyshire, P. 2006, 'Epilogue: Adolescent health: We have a long way to go', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 23, no. 2, pp. 342-344.
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In bringing this special issue of Contemporary Nurse to a conclusion, we would like to reflect on some of the health issues that impact on adolescents and young people.Though the majority of adolescents and young people experience very good mental and physical health (AIHW 2003) in comparison to other age groups, adolescence can be a period of high risk taking and habit forming behaviour, both of which can have long-term ramifications on health and wellbeing. During adolescence, health behaviours and patterns are set, and thus many health problems that will cause problems in later life are established (NSW Health 1999).
East, L., Jackson, D.E. & O'Brien, L. 2006, 'Father absence and adolescent development: a review of the literature', Journal of child health care, vol. 10, no. 4, pp. 283-295.
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Rapid social change has seen increasing numbers of woman-headed singleparent families, meaning that more and more children are growing up without a father resident in the home. Father absence is a term that is not well defined and much of the literature does not discriminate between father absence due to death, parental relationship discord or other causes. This article presents a critical review of the extant literature on father absence, particularly as it relates to adolescent well-being and development. Findings from the literature point to the importance of father presence in children's lives and suggest that father absence has ramifications for children and adolescents. The conclusions drawn from this literature review suggest that father absence and its effects on children and families is an area for further research, with the view of developing strategies to ameliorate the impact of father absence on children and adolescents.
Chang, E., Hancock, K., Johnson, A., Daly, J. & Jackson, D.E. 2005, 'Role stress in nurses: Review of related factors and strategies for moving forward', Nursing and Health Sciences, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 57-65.
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The aim of this paper was to review the literature on factors related to role stress in nurses, and present strategies for addressing this issue based on the findings of this review while considering potential areas for development and research. Computerized databases were searched as well as hand searching of articles in order to conduct this review. This review identified multiple factors related to the experience of role stress in nurses. Role stress, in particular, work overload, has been reported as one of the main reasons for nurses leaving the workforce. This paper concludes that it is a priority to find new and innovative ways of supporting nurses in their experience of role stress. Some examples discussed in this article include use of stress education and management strategies; team-building strategies; balancing priorities; enhancing social and peer support; flexibility in work hours; protocols to deal with violence; and retention and attraction of nursing staff strategies. These strategies need to be empirically evaluated for their efficacy in reducing role stress.
Firtko, A. & Jackson, D.E. 2005, 'Do The Ends Justify The Means? Nursing And The Dilemma Of Whistleblowing', Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 51-56.
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Background: Patient advocacy and a desire to rectify misconduct in the clinical setting are frequently cited reasons for whistleblowing in nursing and healthcare. Aim: This paper explores current knowledge about whistleblowing in nursing and critiques cu
Jackson, D.E., Macdonald, G.E., Mannix, J., Faga, P. & Firtko, A. 2005, 'Mothers' Perceptions Of Overweight And Obesity In Their Children', Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing, vol. 23, no. 2, pp. 8-13.
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Background: Childhood obesity is a growing health concern and the literature implicates parents, particularly mothers. Aim: To develop understandings into the views of a group of mothers with an overweight or obese child, about their child's overweight o
Hutchinson, M., Vickers, M.H., Jackson, D.E. & Wilkes, L. 2005, 'I'm Gonna Do What I Wanna Do. Organizational Change As A Legitimized Vehicle For Bullies', Health Care Management Review, vol. 30, no. 4, pp. 331-338.
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In depth interviews with nurses who have been bullied depict bullies masking their bullying behaviour behind the cloak of legitimate organizational processes, resulting in extensive harm to targets.
Jackson, D.E., Mannix, J., Faga, P. & Mcdonald, G. 2005, 'Overweight And Obese Children: Mothers' Strategies', Journal of Advanced Nursing, vol. 52, no. 1, pp. 6-13.
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Aim. This paper reports a study exploring the strategies a group of mothers of overweight and obese children were using and planned to use in the future to assist their children to achieve a healthy weight. Background. Over the past two decades, the prev
Borbasi, S., Jackson, D.E. & Wilkes, L. 2005, 'Fieldwork in nursing research: positionality, practicalities and predicaments', Journal of Advanced Nursing, vol. 51, no. 5, pp. 493-501.
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Aims. This paper draws on the literature to explore some of the issues of concern to nurses undertaking fieldwork in contemporary healthcare settings. Background. The emergence of poststructuralist and postmodern perspectives has raised questions about e
Usher, K., Jackson, D.E. & O'Brien, L. 2005, 'Adolescent drug abuse: Helping families survive', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 209-214.
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Drug use and abuse carries risk in people of all ages. However, adolescents are particularly vulnerable to substance misuse. Adolescent drug use continues to be an area of concern with a number of adolescents developing problems associated with the use of various drugs. Negative sequelae associated with adolescent drug use include areas such as schooling, health, and family relationships. Difficulties with the legal system, schooling, or within the family are commonly the triggers for recognition of substance misuse problems in a young person. However, problems are usually wellestablished before they are recognized. The challenge of dealing with these problems will fall on families, particularly parents. This is a crisis for families, and ongoing support is needed if they are to overcome the challenges. Health workers (including nurses) are well-positioned to support families who are dealing with adolescent drug problems. In this paper we propose the adoption of a strengths approach as a strategy for developing resilience in families.
Borbasi, S., Emden, C. & Jackson, D.E. 2005, 'Nursing research programs gather strength in Australia', Collegian, vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 7-10.
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To shed light on programmatic research through direct experience is highly beneficial to nursing scholarship. Following a recent description of a successful Australian program of research centered around people's chronic illness experience we are inspired to continue the commentary (Koch et al 2005). Koch et al++s (2005) case study reported on several 'core elements' they believe have contributed to the growth and effectiveness of their program. In this paper we consider some of these in light of current literature and our own challenging experiences within several Australian universities. Koch et al (2005) also makes a not too subtle distinction between dedicated research units independent of universities and research programs emanating from academia, suggesting the former are more productive. While one of the authors in the above paper, a UK scholar and nursing academic, makes interesting observations about this assertion, we contend that his UK perspective fails to capture the urgency of establishing nursing research programs in Australian universities. Consequently, we have chosen to extend the discussion about nursing research programs from the perspective of Australian academe, including comment on building productive relationships, strengthening a track record, research and practice as symbiotic processes, competitive funding strategies, and the integral role of research students. The entire commentary is located in a celebratory context of 20 years of Australian nursing education in the university sector, a context not without controversy.We give consideration to the best way ahead for the future of nursing research programs and hope our ideas spark further sharing of experiences.
Johnson, A. & Jackson, D.E. 2005, 'Using the arts and humanities to support learning about loss, suffering and death', International Journal of Palliative Nursing, vol. 11, no. 8, pp. 438-443.
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In this article, the benefits of using the arts and humanities as teaching and learning strategies are explored. Their contribution to undergraduate nursing curricula, as a means of promoting a deeper understanding of the experiences of loss, suffering and death, cannot be undervalued. They need to be present equally alongside the physical and social sciences in nursing curricula. More than ever, is the need for all undergraduate nursing students to participate in self-reflection of these experiences, in order that they may meet the needs of their patients and families adequately, in a range of healthcare settings.
Darbyshire, P. & Jackson, D.E. 2005, 'Preface: Children, families and nursing: Spotlights, shadows and places in between', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 18, no. 1-2, pp. viii-xii.
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Jackson, D.E. & Darbyshire, P. 2005, 'Using a strengths approach to understand resilience & build health capacity in families', Contemporary Nurse - Advances in Contemporary Child and Family Health Care, vol. 18, no. 1-2, pp. 211-212.
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Borbasi, S. & Jackson, D.E. 2005, 'Nursing Leadership: power, politics and gender: the role of emotional intelligence', Collegian, vol. 12, no. 1, pp. 5-6.
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The huge outpouring of public tribute on the recent death of Ronald Reagan (RR), and the many statements attesting to his `great leadership+ came as a surprise to many. This was a President who was on the world stage at a time, when for many of us, less attention was being paid to international politics. Nevertheless, in many ways RR was portrayed as a somewhat unsophisticated man who had little conversation beyond movies and baseball.
Jackson, D.E. & Daly, J. 2004, 'Current challenges and issues facing nursing in Australia', Nursing Science Quarterly, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 352-355.
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This column is a discussion of nursing in Australia. The authors present current challenges and issues related to recruitment and retention, an aging workforce, violence and bullying, diversity, undergraduate and graduate education, professional development, information technology, clinical pathways, models of care delivery, and funding models. They also present what is happening in Australia in relation to nursing+s scope of practice, development of the nurse practitioner role, nursing leadership, and nursing research.
Halcomb, E., Daly, J., Jackson, D.E. & Davidson, P.M. 2004, 'An insight into Australian nurses' experience of withdrawal/withholding of treatment in the ICU', Intensive and Critical Care Nursing, vol. 20, no. 4, pp. 214-222.
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The success of biotechnology has created moral and ethical dilemmas concerning end-of-life care in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Whilst the competent individual has the right to refuse or embrace treatment, ICU patients are rarely able to exercise this right. Thus, decision-making is left to medical professionals and family/significant others. Aim: This study aimed to explore the lived experience of ICU nurses caring for clients having treatment withdrawn or withheld, and increase awareness and understanding of this experience amongst other health professionals. Methods: Van Manens+ (1990) phenomenological framework formed the basis of this study as it provided an in-depth insight into the human experience. A convenience sample of ten ICU Nurses participated in the study. Conversations were transcribed verbatim and analysed using a process of thematic analysis. Results: Five major themes emerged during the analysis. These were: (1) comfort and care, (2) tension and conflict, (3) do no harm, (4) nurse+family relationships and (5) invisibility of grief and suffering. Conclusion: The experience of providing care for the adult having treatment withdrawn or withheld in the ICU represents a significant personal and professional struggle. Improvements in communication between health professionals, debriefing and education about the process of withdrawing or withholding treatment would be beneficial to both staff and families and has the potential to improve patient care and reduce burden on nurses
Jackson, D.E., Mannix, J., Faga, P. & Gillies, D. 2004, 'Raising families: Urban women's experiences of requiring support', Advances in Contemporary Nursing, vol. 18, no. 1-2, pp. 97-107.
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Peters, K., Jackson, D.E. & Rudge, T. 2004, '"Trigger shot" Administration in Emergency Department: what are the issues?', Australasian Emergency Nursing Journal, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 13-19.
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Assisted reproductive and other technologies present ethical dilemmas and practical challenges to nurses and other health care providers.The administration of drugs, such as Human Chorionic Gonadotrophin (commonly known as 'trigger shots') by nurses in emergency departments is an issue that has not been addressed. Women receiving treatment for infertility who present to emergency departments requesting a nurse administer a'trigger shot', cannot usually provide a legal drug order. When faced with this situation, emergency nurses need to make a prompt decision about giving this injection (or not) because timely administration of this drug is paramount to the success of the reproductive cycle.
Stewart, M., Jackson, D.E., Mannix, J., Wilkes, L. & Lines, K. 2004, 'Current state of knowledge on child-to-mother violence: A literature review', Advances in Contemporary Nursing, vol. 18, no. 1/2, pp. 199-210.
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Child-to-mother violence is a common aspect of family violence, and presents nurses and health workers with continuing challenges. Though noted in the literature as early as the 1950's, this phenomenon remains poorly understood. A number of reasons for the lack of research scrutiny are proposed, the most compelling being that child-to-mother violence has been framed within the discourse of juvenile delinquency rather than family violence. Thus, unlike other forms of family violence, it has escaped close examination by health and welfare workers. A literature review was conducted to examine current knowledge of child-to-mother violence. Study of the literature reveals only partial understandings of this neglected aspect of family pathology. Directions for research to address these gaps in knowledge are drawn from the findings of this literature review
Davidson, P.M., Daly, J., Hancock, K. & Jackson, D.E. 2003, 'Australian women and heart disease: trends, epidemiological perspectives and the need for a culturally competent research agenda', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 16, no. 1-2, pp. 62-73.
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Heart disease commonly manifests as acute coronary syndromes (unstable angina pectoris, or myocardial infarction) and heart failure (HF). These conditions are major causes of morbidity and mortality in Australia and internationally. Australian faces particular challenges in health care delivery given the cultural and ethnic diversity of society and unique issues related to rurality. These factors have significant implications for health care delivery. Following an acute cardiac event women have poorer outcomes: higher mortality rates, higher incidence of complications and greater psychological morbidity compared with men. Language barriers, socioeconomic factors, psychological trauma related to migration and alternate health seeking behaviors and varying perceptions of risk are likely to impact adversely on health outcomes. Self-management in chronic cardiovascular disease underscores the importance of models of care that incorporate aspects related to self-care and promotion of adherence to primary and secondary prevention initiatives. Implicit in this statement is the inclusion of the individual in negotiating and developing their care plan. Therefore health professionals need to be aware of the patient's needs, values, beliefs and health seeking behaviours. These factors are strongly influenced by culture and ethnicity.
Wade, V., Jackson, D.E. & Daly, J. 2003, 'Coronary heart disease in Aboriginal communities: towards a model for self-management', Advances in Contemporary Nursing, vol. 15, no. 3, pp. 300-309.
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Coronary heart disease (CHD) is one of the main causes of death and disability in the Aboriginal population, and is the major cause of the twenty-year gap in life expectancy of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians. This paper explores Aboriginal health in relation to CHD, and suggests self-management as a culturally acceptable therapeutic and sustainable ideology from which positive outcomes may be achieved.
Daly, J. & Jackson, D.E. 2003, 'Preface: Transcultural health care: Issues and challenges for nursing', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 15, no. 3, pp. xiii-xiv.
Jackson, D.E., Mannix, J. & Daly, J. 2003, 'Nursing staff shortages: Issues in Australian residential aged care', Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 44-47.
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This paper explores the current nursing shortage, looks ahead to identify future threats to a viable nursing workforce in residential aged care, and raises some issues for future consideration.
Daly, J. & Jackson, D.E. 2002, 'Commentary on Long, T. & Johnson, M. Research in Nurse Education Today: Do we meet our aims and scope? (By invitation)', Nurse Education Today, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 94-95.
Jackson, D.E., Mannix, J. & Daly, J. 2001, 'Retaining a viable workforce: A critical challenge for nursing', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 11, no. 2-3, pp. 163-172.
Nursing is facing a crisis nationally and internationally with Australia, the United States, New Zealand, Canada, the United Kingdom and Western Europe experiencing critical shortages of nurses. Problems with recruitment, retention and an ageing workforce means that attempts to ensure a viable nursing workforce must be placed at the top of the professional agenda. Strategies currently used to manage the crisis, such as overseas recruitment, are not sustainable and are ethically dubious.The demographic timebomb is ticking and up to half the current nursing workforce will reach retirement age by 2020. It is vital that there are adequate numbers of skilled and qualified nurses to take their places. Nursing and nurses are facing unprecedented challenges and pressures in the workplace. Job satisfaction is threatened as nurses are pressured to do more with less. Nursing productivity has increased phenomenally over the past ten years in response to increased demands and decreasing numbers of staff. The nursing workplace has disturbingly high levels of occupational violence, and many nurses operate within a culture of blame and scapegoating.
Jackson, D.E. & Mannix, J. 2001, 'Clinical nurses as teachers: insights from students of nursing in their first semester of study', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 270-277.
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This paper reports the findings of a study which sought to gain insights about the role of clinical nursing staff in the planned clinical experience of undergraduate nursing students. This study differs from others in that the perspectives of students of nursing in their first year of the undergraduate programme are sought, and the role of clinical nurses rather than clinical teachers is of particular interest. Using a story-telling approach, an exploration of students' perspectives on the role of clinical nursing staff in their clinical learning was undertaken. Analysis allowed findings to be grouped into helpful and unhelpful behaviours. Helpful behaviours included understanding and being friendly, showing interest and explaining. Behaviours that students found unhelpful to their learning were often passive rather than active, but they made students feel acutely aware of being unwelcome in the clinical area. Several students described feeling intrusive, uncomfortable and even unwelcome in clinical areas because of the attitudes and behaviour of clinicians.
Daly, J., Elliott, D., Cameron-Traub, E., Salamonson, Y., Davidson, P.M., Jackson, D.E., Chin, C. & Wade, V. 2000, 'Health status, perceptions of coping, and social support immediately after discharge of survivors of acute myocardial infarction', American Journal of Critical Care, vol. 9, pp. 62-69.
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BACKGROUND: The period immediately after discharge from the hospital after an acute myocardial infarction is a stressful and vulnerable time about which little is known. OBJECTIVE: To explore health status, perceptions of coping, and social support among survivors of a recent myocardial infarction in the first 3 weeks after discharge from hospitals in southwestern Sydney, Australia. METHODS: A descriptive, exploratory approach with a triangulated methodology was used to assess the experiences of 38 survivors, detect patterns in these experiences, explore the health-support needs of survivors, and determine changes in health status in the first 3 weeks after discharge. Quantitative data were collected with the Medical Outcomes Study SF-36, New York Heart Association classification, Canadian Cardiovascular Society Angina Scale, and the Jalowiec Coping Scale. A semistructured interview schedule provided additional qualitative data about the experiences of the survivors. RESULTS: The health status of participants was relatively stable during the 3-week period; most had no activity limitation due to dyspnea or angina. However, the subjects' health status was considerably lower than that of their age-matched population. The most common and most effective coping strategies adopted during this period were confrontation, optimism, and self-reliance. In addition, the subjects experienced anxiety, depression, ambiguity and uncertainty, fear of recurrence of the infarction and of deterioration in health, of boredom and of inertia. CONCLUSION: These findings can help nurses in hospital and community settings assist survivors of acute myocardial infarction to prepare for and deal effectively with experiences during convalescence.
Jackson, D.E., Daly, J., Davidson, P.M., Elliott, D., Cameron-Traub, E., Wade, V., Chin, C. & Salamonson, Y. 2000, 'Women recovering from first-time myocardial infarction (MI): A feminist qualitative study', Journal of Advanced Nursing, vol. 32, no. 6, pp. 1403-1411.
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Although myocardial infarction (MI) is a leading cause of death and disablement for women internationally, little is known about women's recovery. This paper describes an exploratory descriptive study that was informed by feminist principles, and which aimed to explore the recovery experiences of a group of women survivors of rst-time MI in the initial period following discharge from hospital.

Other research activity

Blythe, S.L., Halcomb, E., Wilkes, L. & Jackson, D.E. 2013, 'Perceptions of Long-Term Female Foster-Carers: I'm Not a Carer, I'm a Mother', The British Journal of Social Work, Oxford University Press, United Kingdom, pp. 1-17.
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This paper seeks to provide insight and understanding of provision of long-term fostercare from the perspective of the female carer. The findings presented in this paper are drawn from a larger doctoral study that examined women's experiences of providing long-term foster-care in Australia.
Cleary, M., Jackson, D.E., Watson, R. & Chan, S.W. 2013, 'Quality doctoral programmes: views from the East Asian Forum of Nursing Scholars', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, Blackwell Publishing Ltd, Oxford, UK.
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The aims and objectives of this project were: 1)To identify the characteristics of a good doctoral programme. 2)To identify factors that are considered important when selecting/recommending a university to undertake doctoral studies. 3)To identify perceived qualities of successful doctoral students. 4)To identify characteristics of effective doctoral supervisors. 5)To ascertain how a PhD/Doctoral degree helps (or would help) one's career.