UTS site search

Associate Professor David Eager

Biography

David Eager is an internationally recognised expert on the safety aspects of trampolines and playgrounds, play surfaces, and sports and recreation equipment. He is an Associate Professor within the Faculty of Engineering Information Technology at UTS. He is a Fellow of Engineers Australia, Chartered Professional Engineer and on the National Professional Engineers Register.

David has a PhD in Engineering (UNSW), 1st Class Honours Degree in Engineering (NSWIT); and Graduate Certificate in Dispute Resolution (UTS).

David was the dux of the final year of his undergraduate degree. He worked in the mining, manufacturing and construction industries for more than a decade before entering academe. In 1992 David was awarded an Australian Postgraduate Research Award – Industry and in 1995 joined UTS academic staff. In 2007 he was made an honorary safety advisor with the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents. In 2009 he was award the William Evans Fellowship by the University of Otago, New Zealand.

He has also completed an apprenticeship as a Fitter and Machinist; TAFE Electrical Wiring Engineering Course; TAFE Establishing a Small Business; Graduate course in Principles and Practice of Teaching and Learning (UNSW); Certificate IV in Assessment and Workplace Training;  and WHS General Construction Induction.

David represents Australia on ISO/TC 83 Sports and Recreational Equipment. He is an invited technical observer on the European Union Technical Committee CEN/TC 136/SC 1 Children’s Playground Equipment and Surfacing (since 2006).

David is currently the Assistant Student Ombud and a past Deputy Chair of the UTS Academic Board (2011-12).

David is on the Board of ‘Kidsafe’ the Child Accident Prevention Foundation of Australia (since 2003).

David was a Green Beret within 1 Commando Regiment in the Australian Army Reserve in the 70s and again in the 80s. He was selected to represent 1 Commando Company on their prestigious Mountbatten Team that went on to win the 1988 Trophy.

As an undergraduate student David was the driving force behind the formation of the inaugural NSWIT Mountaineering Society in 1979 (current the ‘UTS Outdoor Adventure Club’) and served as the founding President of the Society (1979-80). As an academic he Chaired the Australian Standards Committee SF-047 that was responsible for drafting and publishing the climbing gym Standard AS 2316 Artificial climbing structures and challenge course equipment. He is currently the drafting leader for Sports and recreation facilities ropes course Standard.

David has been a Red Cross Blood Donor for 40 years and over that time has happily given more than 125 donations.

David is retained as the technical expert by NATA for the Accreditation and Certification of Playground Inspectors and Impact Attenuation Surfacing Testing Laboratories (since Sep 2004).

David holds pro-bono positions where he Represents Engineers Australia on the following Australian Standards Committees:

Children's Playground Equipment and Surfacing CS-005 (since 1999, Chairperson since 2008);

Amusement Rides and Devices ME-051 (since 1999);

Contained Play Facilities ME-51-03 (since 2005, Chairperson 2005-2013);

Trampolines CS-100 (since 2001, Chairperson 2001-2013);

Sports and Recreational Equipment CS-101 (2006-2007); and

Artificial Climbing Structures and Challenge Course Equipment SF-047 (since 2004, Chairperson 2004-2009);

David holds representative pro-bono positions on several ASTM International Technical Standards Committees, including:

ASTM International Committee F08 Sports Equipment and Facilities Technical Committee and Subcommittees: F08.17 Trampolines; F08.21 Climbing and Mountaineering; F08.63 Playground Surfacing Systems; F08.64 Natural Playing Surfaces; and F08.65 Artificial Turf Surfaces and Systems (since 2000).

ASTM International Committee F15 Consumer Products Technical Committee and Subcommittees: F15.09 Home Playground Equipment; F15.29 Playground Equipment Public Use; F08.36 Soft-Contained Play Systems; and F08.43 Soccer Goal Safety (since 2006).

ASTM International Committee F24 Amusement Rides and Devices Technical Committee and Subcommittees: F24.10 Test Methods; F24.20 Specifications and Terminology; F24.24 Design and Manufacture; F24.30 Maintenance and Inspection; F24.40 Operations and F24.60 Special Rides/Attractions (since 2000).

Professional

David retains membership to the following professional societies:

  • Fellow, The Institution of Engineers Australia
  • Chartered Professional Engineer
  • National Professional Engineers Register
  • Registered Professional Engineer of Queensland
  • Member, American Society of Mechanical Engineers
  • Member, Australian Acoustical Society
  • Member, Risk Engineering Society
  • Member, Australian Injury Prevention Network
  • Member, International Sports Engineering Association
  • Member, Australian and New Zealand Society of Biomechanics
  • Member, Parks and Leisure Australia
  • Member, International Ombudsmen Association
Image of David Eager
Associate Professor, School of Elec, Mech and Mechatronic Systems
Associate Member, Centre for Health Technologies
Core Member, GEVI Research Strength
Cert IV, BE (Hons) (NSWIT), GradCertDispRes (UTS), PhD (UNSW)
Chartered Engineer, National Professional Engineers Register
Member, American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Fellow, Institution of Engineers, Australia
Member, Parks and Leisure Australia
Member, Register of Professional Engineers of Queensland
Member, Australian and New Zealand Society of Biomechanics
Member, Australian Acoustical Society (AAS)
 
Phone
+61 2 9514 2687
Room
CB11.09.110

Research Interests

David's primary research is in the area of injury prevention by applying risk engineering and technological interventions to eliminate mortalities and reduce the likelihood and severity of injuries. He is also involved in the human factors research within the UTS Research Centre for Intelligent Mechatronic Systems that is conducting research into the physiological and psychological aspects of human-machine and human-environment interaction.

David is currently investigating improved techniques and parameters for the measurement of material properties for attenuating surfacing within children's play spaces with a view to reducing the severity and frequency of injuries associated with falls. He is also conducting research into the characterization of trampoline performance.

Current supervision

19 Undergraduate Honours students

3 Doctoral students

Doctoral Dissertations

Collaborative and cross-company project management within the automotive industry using the balanced scorecard

Masters Dissertations

Earned value management applied to an engineered-to-order multiple project environment

Factors affecting the flow of material in manufacturing

Conflict management resolution within engineering projects

High speed obstacle mapping and exploration robot – A mapping and navigation system

Bachelor Dissertations

David has supervised more than 250 final year Bachelor Degree theses. Space limits prevent listing them individually.

A comparative study into the impact attenuation effectiveness of Sydney rugby union oval surfaces [Dean’s Prize, Alan Chappel Award Highly Recommended, and Top Mechanical Engineering student]

Develop test method for impact attenuating sands - Playground safety [University Medalist; UTS Entrant Engineers Australia Excellent Award]

Wireless data acquisition for an impact test rig in accordance with AS/NZS 4422:1996 [Dean's Prize and Top Computer Systems Engineering student]

Sustainable transport and light rail in the South Sydney Growth Centre [Dean's Prize and Top Civil and Environmental Engineering student]

Greenhouse gases, marginal benefits and Australia's commitment to Kyoto [Winner SEDA Prize; Finalist Engineers Australia Senior University Bachelor of Engineering Student Award]

Risk management - A process approach for consulting engineering organisations [Finalist Association of Consulting Engineer Australia Excellence Award]

A preliminary investigation into the performance criteria used to assess playground surfaces [UTS Entrant Engineers Australia Excellent Award; Top Mechanical Engineering student]

Portable impact tester for use in evaluating playground safety [Alan Chappel Award Finalist]

An assessment of tourism facilities on South Molle Island in the context of eco-tourism and ecologically sustainable development [Winner Engineers Australia Senior University Bachelor of Engineering Student Award]

A preliminary study into the mechanical shock and vibration associated with a child carrier bicycle seat [UTS Entrant Engineers Australia Excellent Award; Top Mechanical Engineering student]  

An investigation into the safety procedures of indoor climbing facilities [Finalist IEAust Senior University Bachelor of Engineering Student Award]

High speed obstacle mapping and exploration robot [Top Mechanical Engineering Student]

Safety of cliff face anchor bolts [Top Mechanical Engineering student]

A critical appraisal of design conditions in determining the fire resistance of road tunnel structures [Top Civil Engineering student]

RADAR: Siro-Pulse II [Top Software Engineering student]

A preliminary investigation into the risks associated with usage of PAH (chemicals emitted) in playground equipment and surfacing

An investigation into maximisation of energy flow and impact forces in a Taekwondo punch

A preliminary study on the finite element modeling of playground surfaces

An experimental investigation into the impact attenuation properties of rugby headgear

Risk mitigation and insurance as it relates to the playground industry

Using a Clegg impact soil tested as a diagnostic tool in determining the suitability of a sporting field to be reopened after inclement weather

Design of a rugby scrumming machine with performance monitoring and real- time autonomous articulation

A preliminary investigation into the strain-rate dependence of non-linear elastomer materials through physical testing and FEA modeling

A test method to characterise the damping coefficient of trampoline beds

An audit of the ACCC Soccer Goal Mandatory Standard: Has it been effective

The effect of the new Work Health and Safety Act on the operation of local government in NSW

A study into the fitness benefits of trampolines

A preliminary investigation into the durability of running shoe cushion materials

Characterizing the effects of playground equipment G-forces on the human body

Investigation and development of a measurement model of the environmental and financial benefits of virtualization to Australia IT companies

An investigation into Kasperson's theory: Social amplification of risk

Impact attenuation testing of Australian Rules Football fields

A subsequent study into the risk paradox surround the risk management of children

Characterising the effects of trampoline G-forces on the human body

Competitive strategies within the civil contracting: The pareto efficiency, zero sum games and strategies for developing mutually beneficial outcomes

Risk management in NSW high school sports programs

Generational changes of risk perception involving children

A preliminary study into the risk paradox surrounding the risk management of children and play

A preliminary investigation into risk management practices within engineering organisations

A study into the risk paradox surrounding the risk management of children at play

Industrial pollution and environmental impact within Australia

Cost variance in residential housing construction - nation building economic stimulus plan

Preliminary investigation of risk management guideline: trampolines

Shade structures in local government playgrounds

Preliminary investigation into the determination of the inaudibility level of mechanical plant and music noise in the presence of ambient background noise for inaudibility of mechanical plant and music noise when combined with urban and suburban ambient backgrounds

Experimental study of friction between HDPE and a variety of woven cloth materials

Comparison between hemispherical-headform and J-headform impact tester rig

A preliminary investigation into the properties and application of engineered smart materials

Conflict in the Construction Industry – An investigation into the causes, consequences and prevention / resolution strategies

A tool for project risk management - An excel VBA application

Experimental study of the frictional properties of slides

The development of a test method and standard for impact attenuating soil – Rugby oval safety

Ground anchors used in the civil and construction industry

Evaluating the viability of utilizing pyrolysis as a means to convert biomass into char to sequester greenhouse gas emissions in Australia

An investigation into the impact attenuating properties and volumetric water content of playing field surfaces in the Baulkham Hills Shire Council

6 sigma applied to Local Government procurement

Risk management on children's playgrounds

Risk investigation and communications: Trampolines

An engineering risk management investigation into the safety of domestic inflatable rides

Design and testing penetrometer for bark surfaced playgrounds

A guide to risk management in children's playgrounds

Wood chip surfaced playground penetrometer testing

Economic burden of playgrounds injuries on society

An engineering risk analysis of trampoline systems

Literature review of human power measurement in sporting applications

Project managers, conflict and its resolution

The evaluation of synthetic grass playing surfaces and sports injuries

A preliminary investigation into the engineered safety and injury prevention characteristics of a SpringFree trampoline

Compliance evaluation of children's playgrounds in the Sutherland Shire Council

Hand-held measurement device for testing impact attenuation in playgrounds

Project management of multiple store refurbishments: Lessons learned

Risk management for information technology system in financial trading

Designing for occupational heights

Adventure tourism venture proposal

An engineering audit in accordance with ISO 9001 - A case study

Impact absorption performance of ethylene vinyl acetate foam

A continuing study into the progressive improvements to risk management of the City of Sydney’s playspaces

A preliminary feasibility analysis of brachytherapy in Australia

Feasibility study to install an aircraft seat to facilitate disabled passenger access

The development of an engineered system for the comparison and evaluation of playgrounds to AS 1924:1981 and AS 4685:2004

Using the value management principle to align project options with business needs

Intelligent traffic light control system

Study of the risks and hazards in playgrounds for children with multiple disabilities

Cost effect on forklift lifting accident in a construction project

Implementation of an ISO 9000 Quality System - Minto industrial products

A practical guide to project management for the inexperienced graduate engineer

A risk and safety analysis and impact attenuation study of artificial climbing structures

A engineering risk analysis of artificial climbing structures

Teaching aid for Acoustic Engineering

The design of a semi-closed circuit water recycling system

Portable test rig for playground undersurfacing impact attenuation testing in accordance with AS/NZS 4422:1996

Acoustic Tracking System: Off-line acquisition and processing for acoustic source localization

Cyber risk management

Confucianism, foreign investment and the Chinese environment

Performance measurement and reporting in the engineering industry

e-Business implementation: Software engineering applied to customer relationship management

A preliminary study into the maintenance of council owned playgrounds and play equipment in the Hornsby Shire

Cost management on construction sites: Woronora bridge and Northham bypass

Enhancing occupant productivity through sustainable building design

Powder permeability as an indicator of a pneumatic transportation properties

Sustainable transport and light rail in the South Sydney growth centre

An investigation into a sea-water condenser system for building cooling

Guidelines for the design of a sustainable house

Reporting on corporate sustainable development and investment behaviour in Australia

The technical and economical feasibility of forging a cutting ring using a cast pre-form

Development of teaching guides for the Higher School Certificate subject engineering studies

The effect of ozone layer depletion on unitary air conditioning design

Managing oil in Indonesia

Hydraulic excavators

Industrial hearing loss information pack

Occupational health and safety in a fabricated metal products manufacturing business - Tamworth custom fences

Impact absorption performance of polyethylene foam

Guidelines for the design of a sustainable house

The completion and hand-over phase of project management

Development of a hierarchical project management model

To study fire safety science for mechanical services engineers.

Online Capstone Project registration system

A historical review of transport to Sydney

Preliminary study into children's head injury and playground surface coverings

Design rationale applied to civil engineering

Implementation of systems and procedures to monitor the effects of mine profile on the performance of off-highway trucks

A preliminary investigation into playgrounds and their fall heights

Investigation into non-occupational hearing loss

The application of alternative BCA designs

Implementation of a data network using TCP/IP over a household electrical wiring system

A software implementation of the localization of the listening position

A practical investigation into infrasonic sound

Quality assurance in construction

A preliminary evaluation of the FHWA total noise model in Sydney

Chaos theory applied to the financial markets

The internet gaming device

A dilution tunnel for the measurement of diesel engine particulate emissions

A noise investigation of the M2 Motorway

Noise control in the 'test rig area' at Lucas Aerospace Australia

An investigation and comparison into the noise from two similar Trimdek roll-forming machines

Can supervise: Yes
David is currently supervising the following research students: 19 Undergraduate Honours students; 0 Masters by Thesis student; and 3 Doctoral students.

David co-ordinates and teaches the following postgraduate subjects

Risk Management in Engineering 49006

Managing Projects 49002

Air and Noise Pollution 49049

David delivers lectures in the following undergraduate subjects

Introduction to Civil and Environmental Engineering (48310)

Engineering Mechanics (48321)

Mechanical Vibration and Measurement (48601)

David is the assessor for the following postgraduate subjects

Systems Engineering for Managers (49004)

Risk Management in Engineering (49006)

Integrated Logistic Support (49655)

David also co-ordinates and teaches the Local Government Authority playground maintenance, inspection and design short courses for UTS

David has supervised or co-supervised the follow undergraduate dissertations

David has supervised more than 250 final year Bachelor Degree theses. Space limits prevent listing them individually.

A comparative study into the impact attenuation effectiveness of Sydney rugby union oval surfaces [Dean’s Prize, Alan Chappel Award Highly Recommended, and Top Mechanical Engineering student]

Develop test method for impact attenuating sands - Playground safety [University Medalist; UTS Entrant Engineers Australia Excellent Award]

Wireless data acquisition for an impact test rig in accordance with AS/NZS 4422:1996 [Dean's Prize and Top Computer Systems Engineering student]

Sustainable transport and light rail in the South Sydney Growth Centre [Dean's Prize and Top Civil and Environmental Engineering student]

Greenhouse gases, marginal benefits and Australia's commitment to Kyoto [Winner SEDA Prize; Finalist Engineers Australia Senior University Bachelor of Engineering Student Award]

Risk management - A process approach for consulting engineering organisations [Finalist Association of Consulting Engineer Australia Excellence Award]

A preliminary investigation into the performance criteria used to assess playground surfaces [UTS Entrant Engineers Australia Excellent Award; Top Mechanical Engineering student]

Portable impact tester for use in evaluating playground safety [Alan Chappel Award Finalist]

An assessment of tourism facilities on South Molle Island in the context of eco-tourism and ecologically sustainable development [Winner Engineers Australia Senior University Bachelor of Engineering Student Award]

A preliminary study into the mechanical shock and vibration associated with a child carrier bicycle seat [UTS Entrant Engineers Australia Excellent Award; Top Mechanical Engineering student]  

An investigation into the safety procedures of indoor climbing facilities [Finalist IEAust Senior University Bachelor of Engineering Student Award]

High speed obstacle mapping and exploration robot [Top Mechanical Engineering Student]

Safety of cliff face anchor bolts [Top Mechanical Engineering student]

A critical appraisal of design conditions in determining the fire resistance of road tunnel structures [Top Civil Engineering student]

RADAR: Siro-Pulse II [Top Software Engineering student]

A preliminary investigation into the risks associated with usage of PAH (chemicals emitted) in playground equipment and surfacing

An investigation into maximisation of energy flow and impact forces in a Taekwondo punch

A preliminary study on the finite element modeling of playground surfaces

An experimental investigation into the impact attenuation properties of rugby headgear

Risk mitigation and insurance as it relates to the playground industry

Using a Clegg impact soil tested as a diagnostic tool in determining the suitability of a sporting field to be reopened after inclement weather

Design of a rugby scrumming machine with performance monitoring and real- time autonomous articulation

A preliminary investigation into the strain-rate dependence of non-linear elastomer materials through physical testing and FEA modeling

A test method to characterise the damping coefficient of trampoline beds

An audit of the ACCC Soccer Goal Mandatory Standard: Has it been effective

The effect of the new Work Health and Safety Act on the operation of local government in NSW

A study into the fitness benefits of trampolines

A preliminary investigation into the durability of running shoe cushion materials

Characterizing the effects of playground equipment G-forces on the human body

Investigation and development of a measurement model of the environmental and financial benefits of virtualization to Australia IT companies

An investigation into Kasperson's theory: Social amplification of risk

Impact attenuation testing of Australian Rules Football fields

A subsequent study into the risk paradox surround the risk management of children

Characterising the effects of trampoline G-forces on the human body

Competitive strategies within the civil contracting: The pareto efficiency, zero sum games and strategies for developing mutually beneficial outcomes

Risk management in NSW high school sports programs

Generational changes of risk perception involving children

A preliminary study into the risk paradox surrounding the risk management of children and play

A preliminary investigation into risk management practices within engineering organisations

A study into the risk paradox surrounding the risk management of children at play

Industrial pollution and environmental impact within Australia

Cost variance in residential housing construction - nation building economic stimulus plan

Preliminary investigation of risk management guideline: trampolines

Shade structures in local government playgrounds

Preliminary investigation into the determination of the inaudibility level of mechanical plant and music noise in the presence of ambient background noise for inaudibility of mechanical plant and music noise when combined with urban and suburban ambient backgrounds

Experimental study of friction between HDPE and a variety of woven cloth materials

Comparison between hemispherical-headform and J-headform impact tester rig

A preliminary investigation into the properties and application of engineered smart materials

Conflict in the Construction Industry – An investigation into the causes, consequences and prevention / resolution strategies

A tool for project risk management - An excel VBA application

Experimental study of the frictional properties of slides

The development of a test method and standard for impact attenuating soil – Rugby oval safety

Ground anchors used in the civil and construction industry

Evaluating the viability of utilizing pyrolysis as a means to convert biomass into char to sequester greenhouse gas emissions in Australia

An investigation into the impact attenuating properties and volumetric water content of playing field surfaces in the Baulkham Hills Shire Council

6 sigma applied to Local Government procurement

Risk management on children's playgrounds

Risk investigation and communications: Trampolines

An engineering risk management investigation into the safety of domestic inflatable rides

Design and testing penetrometer for bark surfaced playgrounds

A guide to risk management in children's playgrounds

Wood chip surfaced playground penetrometer testing

Economic burden of playgrounds injuries on society

An engineering risk analysis of trampoline systems

Literature review of human power measurement in sporting applications

Project managers, conflict and its resolution

The evaluation of synthetic grass playing surfaces and sports injuries

A preliminary investigation into the engineered safety and injury prevention characteristics of a SpringFree trampoline

Compliance evaluation of children's playgrounds in the Sutherland Shire Council

Hand-held measurement device for testing impact attenuation in playgrounds

Project management of multiple store refurbishments: Lessons learned

Risk management for information technology system in financial trading

Designing for occupational heights

Adventure tourism venture proposal

An engineering audit in accordance with ISO 9001 - A case study

Impact absorption performance of ethylene vinyl acetate foam

A continuing study into the progressive improvements to risk management of the City of Sydney’s playspaces

A preliminary feasibility analysis of brachytherapy in Australia

Feasibility study to install an aircraft seat to facilitate disabled passenger access

The development of an engineered system for the comparison and evaluation of playgrounds to AS 1924:1981 and AS 4685:2004

Using the value management principle to align project options with business needs

Intelligent traffic light control system

Study of the risks and hazards in playgrounds for children with multiple disabilities

Cost effect on forklift lifting accident in a construction project

Implementation of an ISO 9000 Quality System - Minto industrial products

A practical guide to project management for the inexperienced graduate engineer

A risk and safety analysis and impact attenuation study of artificial climbing structures

A engineering risk analysis of artificial climbing structures

Teaching aid for Acoustic Engineering

The design of a semi-closed circuit water recycling system

Portable test rig for playground undersurfacing impact attenuation testing in accordance with AS/NZS 4422:1996

Acoustic Tracking System: Off-line acquisition and processing for acoustic source localization

Cyber risk management

Confucianism, foreign investment and the Chinese environment

Performance measurement and reporting in the engineering industry

e-Business implementation: Software engineering applied to customer relationship management

A preliminary study into the maintenance of council owned playgrounds and play equipment in the Hornsby Shire

Cost management on construction sites: Woronora bridge and Northham bypass

Enhancing occupant productivity through sustainable building design

Powder permeability as an indicator of a pneumatic transportation properties

Sustainable transport and light rail in the South Sydney growth centre

An investigation into a sea-water condenser system for building cooling

Guidelines for the design of a sustainable house

Reporting on corporate sustainable development and investment behaviour in Australia

The technical and economical feasibility of forging a cutting ring using a cast pre-form

Development of teaching guides for the Higher School Certificate subject engineering studies

The effect of ozone layer depletion on unitary air conditioning design

Managing oil in Indonesia

Hydraulic excavators

Industrial hearing loss information pack

Occupational health and safety in a fabricated metal products manufacturing business - Tamworth custom fences

Impact absorption performance of polyethylene foam

Guidelines for the design of a sustainable house

The completion and hand-over phase of project management

Development of a hierarchical project management model

To study fire safety science for mechanical services engineers.

Online Capstone Project registration system

A historical review of transport to Sydney

Preliminary study into children's head injury and playground surface coverings

Design rationale applied to civil engineering

Implementation of systems and procedures to monitor the effects of mine profile on the performance of off-highway trucks

A preliminary investigation into playgrounds and their fall heights

Investigation into non-occupational hearing loss

The application of alternative BCA designs

Implementation of a data network using TCP/IP over a household electrical wiring system

A software implementation of the localization of the listening position

A practical investigation into infrasonic sound

Quality assurance in construction

A preliminary evaluation of the FHWA total noise model in Sydney

Chaos theory applied to the financial markets

The internet gaming device

A dilution tunnel for the measurement of diesel engine particulate emissions

A noise investigation of the M2 Motorway

Noise control in the 'test rig area' at Lucas Aerospace Australia

An investigation and comparison into the noise from two similar Trimdek roll-forming machines

Books

Bagia, R., Eager, D.M. & Walmsley, M. 2011, Project Management for Engineers, 1, McGrawHill Australia Pty.Ltd., Australia.
A textbook for Undergraduate and postgraduate students of project management
Eager, D.M. 2010, Dictionary of Acoustics and Noise Pollution, 1st, McGraw-Hill, Sydney, Australia.
The Dictionary of Acoustics and Noise Pollution is a comprehensive assembly of terms and definitions with a particular emphasis on the engineering area of acoustics.
Eager, D.M. 2009, AS 3533.1-2009: Amusement rides and devices Part 1: Design and construction, 1st, Standards Australia, Sydney, Australia.
Specifies requirements for the design, manufacture and construction of fixed and portable amusement rides and devices. Includes a classification system for rides and devices.
Eager, D.M. 2009, AS 3533.2-2009 : Amusement rides and devices Part 2: Operation and maintenance, 1st, Standards Australia, Sydney, Australia.
Specifies requirements for the operation, maintenance, inspection and fire safety measures for fixed and portable amusement rides and devices.
Eager, D.M. 2009, AS2316.1-2009 Artificial climbing structures and challenge courses Part 1: Fixed and mobile artificial climbing and abseiling walls, 1st, Standards Australia, Sydney, Australia.
The objective of this Standard is to provide designers, manufacturers, proprietors and operating personnel with requirements and guidance specific to the design, construction, operation and maintenance of artificial climbing walls used for climbing, bouldering and abseiling in order to maximize the protection of health and safety for both operating personnel and participants.
Eager, D.M. 2009, AS 4722-2009 - Passenger ropeways and passenger conveyors, 1st, Standards Australia, Sydney, Australia.
Specifies requirements and guidelines for the design, construction, operation and maintenance of passenger ropeways and conveyors to promote safety for operating staff and patrons in the form of variations and additions to Canadian Standard CSA Z98-07, a copy of which is required for the application of this Standard.
Eager, D.M., Bagia, R. & Walmsley, M. 2008, Engineering Project Management 48280 and Managing Projects 49002, 1st Edition, McGraw-Hill, Sydney, Australia.
Eager, D.M. 2006, Trampoline AS 4989:2006, Standards Australia, 2nd, Standards Australia, Australia.
Eager, D.M. 2003, Dictionary of Noise Pollution and Acoustic Terminology, 1st, UTS Printing Services, Sydney, Australia.

Conference Papers

Howsawi, E.M., Eager, D.M., Bagia, R. & Niebecker, K.D. 2013, 'Using video data in project management research', Australian Institute of Project Management National Conference 2013, Perth, Australia, October 2013 in Australian Institute of Project Management (AIPM) National Conference 2013, ed AIPM Conference Organisers, Australian Institute of Project Management, Perth, Australia, pp. 1-10.
View/Download from: OPUS
In project management research, on site engagement is acknowledged as being good practice for gaining primary data and understanding the context of the projects being studied. However, it is not possible for researchers to be on site for every project they intend to research because projects can be difficult to access, or may be secret during the execution phase, or simply may have been completed a long time ago. Reading the project documents will provide a substantial amount of information, but there is always more to any project than written data alone, as project practitioners are well aware. Advances in technology since the beginning of the 20 th century enable the filming of project works and perhaps the main benefit of that filming is to document the process for documentary production. Since the camera can capture a wealth of detail and rich complexity that it is impossible or very difficult to capture by other means, and since the eye and ear can acquire a great deal of information that it is practically impossible to write down simultaneously, can the use of such video data be beneficial in project management research? This paper reports the experience of the authors in using video data in such research. More than 250 hours of video data have been examined in researching British aviation projects during the period of the Second World War. The benefits of, and guidance for, using video data are presented, as well as cautions about what may affect the successful use of video data
Eager, D.M., Chapman, C.M. & Bondoc, K. 2012, 'Characterisation of trampoline bounce using acceleration', Australasian Congress on Applied Mechanics, Adelaide, Australia, December 2012 in 7th Australasian Congress on Applied Mechanics, ed Barton A.C.T, Engineering Australia, Adelaide, Australia.
The hazards associated with trampoline usage have been extensively researched in biomechanics and within the product safety and injury prevention community. To-date little research has been published on the biomechanical benefits associated with trampoline usage. The primary aim of this research project was to measure the cyclical G-force loading experienced by a trampoline user under varying conditions. The experimental apparatus incorporated a tri-axial accelerometer system coupled with a high-speed camera to measure the trampoline bed deflection with respect to time. Three commonly available trampolines were studied. The acceleration and trampoline bed displacement data were measured simultaneously when triggered by the movement of the trampoline user. The variables studied included: the slope of the leading-edge of the acceleration pulse, the slope of trailing-edge of the acceleration pulse, the peak acceleration, the peak to peak cycle-time, air-time, and the bed deflection. Trampoline users experience cyclical loadings between almost weightlessness to approximately 5 G-force. Both qualitative and quantitative data was used to characterise the performance of each trampoline. The quantitative data were tested by enlisting volunteers to duplicate the experimental conditions and then provide their subjective opinions on the performance of each trampoline through the completion of a survey questionnaire.
Fox, D.L., Walmsley, M. & Eager, D.M. 2011, 'Application of EVM to Pressure Equipment Manufacturing', PMI Global Congress--North America (2011 : Dallas, Tex.), Dallas, USA, October 2011 in PMI Global Congress 2011, ed Jacqueline Kardon, PMI, Project Management Institute, Dallas, USA, pp. 1-12.
View/Download from: OPUS | Publisher's site
Work reported in this paper covers recent developments in transforming a project-based organization from one with minimal formal project management structure to a business that is now being managed as a whole by its project focus. Changes were driven by the need to restructure the host organization so sufficient data streams become available for earned value management (EVM) analysis. The central challenge has been to make EVM function beneficially on a relatively small scale without imposing uneconomic burdens in data generation and management. Established EVM theories were applied--as described here--and shown to be adaptable to the small-scale manufacturing projects this research is investigating. Results from schedule forecasting have shown consistency in the various methods applied, though some proved more accurate than others. Conclusions suggest EVM has the flexibility to be successfully used as an option for the tracking of pressure equipment manufacturing projects. In addition, the structure to support EVM, and the data delivered by the method, displays capacity to benefit functional areas of the SME and deliver improvements in estimating and scheduling.
Phillips, S.R., Eager, D.M. & Tonin, R. 2011, 'A preliminary investigation into the determination of the inaudibility of mechanical plant and music noise in the presence of ambient background noise', Acoustics 2011, Gold Coast, Australia, November 2011 in Proceedings of Acoustics 2011, ed Ian Hillock - Technical Review Committee Chair, Australian Acoustical Society, Gold Coast, Australia, pp. 1-8.
View/Download from: OPUS |
Currently there are regulations and guidelines that governing bodies have adopted when dealing with the emission of noise that make reference to or imply the term of inaudibility when setting criteria to be met for mechanical p lant and music noise after restricted hours. However, to date no such criteria has been established that can predict the inaudibility of these sources when combined with ambient backgrounds. As a result, stakeholders are met with uncertainty and designers are left with an inadequate subjective term when attempting to meet location-sp ecific noise criteria. This paper involves an investigation into the possibilities of conducting a psychoacoustic experiment that will test for the inaudibility of mechanical p lant and music noise in the presence of ambient background noise typical of the home environment situated in urban and suburban locations. This paper attempts to provide the framework for future larger scale investigations and provides the relevant findings and a methodology to assist in reducing the subjective nature of the responses observed. Through these future investigations, objective definable criteria from which to establish the inaudibility of mechanical plant and music noise in the presence of ambient background noise may be established
Howsawi, E.M., Eager, D.M. & Bagia, R. 2011, 'Understanding project success: four-level project success framework', IEEE International Conference on Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management, Singapore, December 2011 in 2011 IEEE International Conference on Industrial Engineering and Engineering Management, ed Meyer et al., IEEE, Piscataway, USA, pp. 620-624.
View/Download from: Publisher's site
project's success means different things to different people. This implies that the definition of success will be different for each project. However, success is a common goal for projects regardless of the specific definition for each project. This statement implies that there can be a common approach in planning for success and generalized framework that can guide the process of defining and planning the project success for different projects. This paper presents the underlying framework that directs the optimum success definition and planning process. Through a literature review and classification of success criteria, a four level success framework was developed, namely: context level; business level; product level; and project process level. This framework explains the relationship between levels and provides guidelines for decision process. The framework is generalized and can be applied to most projects.
Eager, D.M. 2010, 'Playground surfacing 101', The Nature of Play - Kidsafe Playground Conference, Perth, Western Australia, April 2010.
Playground surfacing is typically the least understood area of playground design, installation and maintenance. It is the causal link to the majority of playground injuries and inadequate or poorly maintained surfacing is the most common non-compliance issue that is consistently identified in playground studies. It is the surfacing onto which our children will impact when they inevitably fall from the play equipment and it is this surfacing that is absolutely necessary for the reduction of children's serious injury caused by these falls. This paper will discuss common playground surfacing issues and questions including: Definitions and requirements what is playground surfacing and when is it required? What's the difference in the various playground surfacing systems? What are the advantages and disadvantages of each system? Testing and certification. Will a compliant system eliminate accidents?
Elliott, R., McKinley, S.M. & Eager, D.M. 2009, 'A pilot study of sound levels in an Australian adult general intensive care unit', 6th Annual Congress of the World Federation of Critical Care Nurses and 10th Congress of the World Federation of the Societies of Intensive and Critical Care Medicine, Florence, Italy, August 2009.
View/Download from: Publisher's site
BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: High technology and activity levels in the intensive care unit (ICU) lead to high sound levels. As noise has been shown to affect the ability of patients to rest and sleep continuous sound levels are required during sleep investigations. The aim of this pilot study was to develop a robust protocol to measure continuous sound levels for a larger more substantive future study to improve sleep for the ICU patient. METHODS: A review of published studies of sound levels revealed sufficient information to develop a study protocol (twenty-three papers were used). An integrated sound level meter Class 1 was used. The microphone was placed 0.75 to 1m above the patient++s head. Sound recording was simultaneous to 24 hour sleep monitoring (polysomnography). Five broadband parameters were set: LAeq, LCpeak, LAFmax, LAFmin and LCeq along with LZ spectra recorded at a sampling and logging frequency of one sample per second. RESULTS: The study protocol resulted in 10 usable recordings out of 11 attempts to collect pilot data. The mean recording time was 17.49-4.5 hours. Sound levels exceeded recommendations made by the World Health Organization (WHO) for hospitals. The mean equivalent sound level (LAeq) was 56.22-1.65 dB and LA90 was 46.8-2.46 dB. CONCLUSION: The data reveal the requirement for a noise reduction program within this ICU. GRANT ACKNOWLEDGEMENT: Australian College of Critical Care Nurses awarded a research grant of A$15,000 in 2008.
Niebecker, K.D., Eager, D.M., Kubitza, K. & Plischke, D. 2008, 'Integrating a Collaborative Management Model into a Project Scorecard for efficient Cross-Company Project Management', Keeping the promise through people, projects and performance, Canberra, Australia, October 2008 in Integrating a Collaborative Management Model into a Project Scorecard for efficient Cross-Company Project Management, ed K. Niebecker, D. Eager, K. Kubitza, D. Plischke, Australian Institute of Project Management, Level 9/139 Macquarie Street, Sydney NSW 2000, Australia, pp. 1-12.
View/Download from: OPUS
Proceedings of the 2008 AIPM Project Management Conference 12-15 October, 2008, National Convention Centre, Canberra, ACT, Australia
Niebecker, K.D., Wagner, R., Kubitza, K. & Eager, D.M. 2008, 'Efficient Project Management and Performance Assessment of Cross-Company Projects with a Collaborative Project Scorecard', 22nd IPMA World Congress - Project Management To Run, Rome, Italy, November 2008 in Efficient Project Management and Performance Assessment of Cross-Company Projects with a Collaborative Project Scorecard, ed Niebecker, K., Wagner, R., Eager, D., Kubitza, K., International Project Management Association (IPMA), Rome, Italy, pp. 1-6.
Collaborative Project Management Assessment based on the Collaborative Project Scorecard and the Project Management Excellence Model
Niebecker, K.D., Eager, D.M. & Kubitza, K. 2007, 'A Strategy based Scorecard for Cross-Company Project Management in the Automotive Industry', ICAN 2007 Conference, Sydney, Australia, November 2007 in ICAN 2007 Conference, ed Niebecker K., Eager D., Kubitza K., ICAN, Sydney, Australia, pp. 1-24.
Cross-company and collaborative product development projects are often managed without clearly defined project goals and business alignment. With a shift towards more decentralized and distributed development teams, and an increasing level of collaboration, project transparency is reduced and status measurement is more difficult. To meet the demands, a new strategy-based scorecard method was developed to monitor and control collaborative projects, to measure their performance, and to manage risks. Based on the Balanced Scorecard (BSC) concept by Kaplan and Norton (Kaplan, R. & Norton, D. 1996), the method uses a modified BSC to manage projects on a cross-company and collaborative level. This paper discusses the concept of a Collaborative Project Scorecard with a focus on product development projects in the automotive industry. The development of collaborative strategy maps and integrated measures for project control based on key performance indicators (KPIs) is an essential step for successful collaboration.
Eager, D.M. & Chapman, C.M. 2005, 'A portable data acquisition system for the measurement of impact attenuation of playground surfacing', Annual Conference of the Australian Acoustical Society, Brusselton, November 2005 in Website Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Australian Acoustical Society 2005 Annual Conference, ed Conference Technical Committee, Australian Acoustical Society, Busselton, Western Australia, pp. 1-8.
View/Download from: OPUS | Publisher's site
Gone are the days when children+s playgrounds were erected on concrete and asphalt. Impact attenuating playground surfacing has been common place in most children+s playgrounds for many years. Unfortunately there is not a strong correlation between the expected reduction in the frequency and severity of playground injuries. Until recently testing of playground undersurfacing was restricted to the laboratory. This paper details the development and description of a portable data acquisition system for use in playgrounds.
Eager, D.M. & Chapman, C.M. 2004, 'Why Bounce is Bad', National Playground Conference, Sydney, Australia, March 2004 in National Playground Conference, ed Margaret Cavanagh, Suzanne Quinn, Beverley Boland, Penny Buchann, Annie Warn, Wendy Harris, David Eager, Linda Corkery, Meryl Bingham, Fiona Robbe, Rebeccfa Mitchell, Sheena Barnes, Kidsafe New South Wales Inc, Westmead, Australia, pp. 186-199.
View/Download from: OPUS | Publisher's site
Eager, D.M. & Chapman, C.M. 2004, 'Playground Surfacing Standards - A Discussion Paper', National Playground Conference, Sydney, Australia, March 2004 in National Playground Conference, ed Margaret Cavanagh, Suzanne Quinn, Beverley Boland, Penny Buchanan, Annie Warn, Wendy Harris, David Eager, Linda Corkery, Merryl Bingham, Fiona Robbe, Rebecca Mitchell, Sheena Barnes, Kidsafe New South Wales Inc, Westmead, Australia, pp. 86-95.
View/Download from: Publisher's site
Eager, D.M. 2003, 'A Study Into LDPE As An Undersurfacing Material For Injury Prevention and Risk Minimisation In Children's Playgrounds', American Society of Mechanical Engineering, Washington DC, USA, November 2003 in Proceedings of IMECE 2003, 2003 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress & Exposition, ed Barbara Signorelli, American Society of Mechanical Engineering, New York, USA, pp. 1-9.
View/Download from: OPUS | Publisher's site
Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE) closed-cell foam is used extensively as an impact absorbing material for injury prevention and risk minimisation in a variety of applications, including children's playground undersurfacing, padding for trampoline frames, and other fall zones. This paper presents and analyses the data from numerous impact tests performed on samples of LDPE of select different product thicknesses (10, 20, 30 and 40 mm), nominal Relative Densities (30, 45, 60 and 75 kg/m3) and drops or free height of fall (100 mm steps in heights from 300 to 2100 mm). The impact absorption properties of LDPE are characterized using the Australian and New Zealand Standard AS/NZS 4422: Playground Surfacing + Specifications, Requirements and Test Method. The gmax and HIC results are presented both graphically and numerically. This paper also discusses uses and limitations of LDPE with particular emphasis on injury prevention and risk minimisation.
Rozyn, M.K., Wilson, N.J., Andrews, M., Eager, D.M. & Clout, R.B. 2003, 'HOMER - A High Speed Robot For Indoor Exploration', Australasian Conference on Robotics and Automation, Brisbane, Australia, December 2003 in Australian Robotics & Automation Association, ed N/A, Australian Robotics & Automation Association, Brisbane, Australia, pp. 1-9.
View/Download from: OPUS

Journal Articles

Howsawi, E.M., Eager, D.M., Bagia, R. & Niebecker, K.D. 2014, 'Project Management During National Crisis: Concept Development', International Review of Management and Business Research, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 412-422.
Abstract National crises such as wars, economic crises and natural disasters are increasing in number and frequency worldwide. The context of a national crisis is unique and contains many abnormal challenges. Despite these challenges, projects are being commenced and executed during these events. Due to the abnormality of a national crisis context, the authors attempted, in this theoretical work, to propose the concept of project management during national crisis. Through literature synthesis and the content analysis of several data sets, the authors proposed a definition of the concept of crisis project management. This includes points of differences from peacetime project management and the common characteristics of a national crisis, with impact on project management processes. The authors discussed the results and provided some suggestions for further research.
Howsawi, E.M., Eager, D.M., Bagia, R. & Niebecker, K.D. 2014, 'The Use of Video Data in Project Management Research', Science Journal of Business and Management, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 10-15.
View/Download from: Publisher's site
Abstract In project management research, on site involvement is recognized as being effective practice for getting primary data, understanding the project tasks being examined and gaining context awareness. However, it is impossible for investigators to be present on site for every project they intend to investigate since project can be difficult to access, or may be undisclosed during the implementation stage, or may have been completed a long time ago. Reading the project reports and documents will provide a substantial amount of information, but there is always more to any project than written information alone; project practitioners are well aware of this fact. Advancements in technology since the beginning of the 20th century enable the film making of projects; possibly the main purpose of that film making is to produce documentaries. Based on the facts that the camera can capture a wealth of details and rich complexity that it is impossible or very difficult to capture by other means and the eye and ear can acquire a great deal of information that it is practically impossible to write simultaneously a question arises, can the use of video data be beneficial in project management research? This article reports the experience of the authors in employing video data in historic project management research. In researching British aviation projects during the period of the Second World War the authors uses the approach of content analysis to examine more than 250 hours of video data. A classification scheme of video data is presented in this paper. The advantages of and suggestions managing the usage of video are data also shown in this paper, in addition to caution concerning what may influence the effective usage of video data.
Howsawi, E.M., Eager, D.M., Bagia, R. & Niebecker, K.D. 2014, 'Success Strategies For Project Management During National Crises: Insights From The British Aviation Industry During World War Two', International Review of Management and Business Research, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 533-556.
Abstract Success is a fundamental imperative in the field of project management. The authors contributed to the theme of success by exploring the strategies that assisted in the delivery of successful projects during national crises. The occurrence of these crises stimulates the emergence of different dynamics and constraints that affect every aspect of the socioeconomic system, including projects. The success strategies needed in such contexts are different from those employed during times of peace. This paper reported the results of an introspective study of 24 British aviation projects undertaken during World War Two. The authors revealed six effective strategies that support the delivery of successful projects during a national crisis period. The authors discussed the results and made Links to contemporary projects together with practical recommendations that will enhance the understanding of successful project delivery during national crises.
Howsawi, E.M., Eager, D.M., Bagia, R. & Niebecker, K.D. 2014, 'Delivering a Mega Construction Project Successfully During a National Crisis: Lessons Learned From The Aswan High Dam Construction Project', International Review of Management and Business Research, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 625-647.
Abstract Project success is a key topic in project management research. This study contributes to this topic by presenting how projects succeed during difficult circumstances of national crises. The occurrence of a crisis leads to the emergence of new dynamics and constraints that affect projects. Success strategies pursued then are different from those employed during peacetime. This research takes the Aswan High Dam project in Egypt in the 1960s as a case study and reveals four strategies supporting ten success factors that helped that project to succeed during a period of national crises. Links to contemporary projects are presented, together with recommendations to enhance the understanding and likelihood of successful project delivery during a national crisis period.
Howsawi, E.M., Eager, D.M., Bagia, R. & Niebecker, K.D. 2014, 'The four-level project success framework: application and assessment', Organisational Project Management, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 1-15.
Success is one of the ultimate goals of any project endeavour. Thus, clarifying the meaning of success is a vital step in achieving the desired success. In this study, the authors reviewed the project success literature and provided a framework for defining and evaluating project success. The framework consists of four levels that contain the possible criteria for assessing and evaluating success. The authors demonstrate the framework by case application. Further, experts in the field of project management conducted an external evaluation of the framework to assess its merits.
Davidson, P., Wilson, S.P., Chalmers, D.J., Wilson, B.D., Eager, D.M. & McIntosh, A. 2013, 'Analysis of Energy Flow During Playground Surface Impacts', Journal Of Applied Biomechanics, vol. 29, no. 5, pp. 628-633.
View/Download from: OPUS |
The amount of energy dissipated away from or returned to a child falling onto a surface will influence fracture risk but is not considered in current standards for playground impact-attenuating surfaces. A two-mass rheological computer simulation was use
Eager, D.M., Scarrott, C., Nixon, J.W. & Alexander, K. 2012, 'Survey of injury sources for a trampoline with equipment hazards designed out', Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, vol. 48, no. 7, pp. 577-581.
View/Download from: Publisher's site
A significantly lower proportion of the injuries caused by falling off or striking the equipment was found for this new design when compared with traditional trampolines both in Australia and in the USA. The age of children being injured on trampolines in Australia was found to be markedly lower than in North America.
Eager, D.M., Scarrott, C., Nixon, J.W. & Alexander, K. 2012, 'Injury survey of a non-traditional 'soft-edged' trampoline designed to lower equipment hazards', International Journal of Injury Control and Safety Journal, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 42-49.
View/Download from: OPUS | Publisher's site
In Australia trampolines contribute one quarter of all childhood play equipment injuries. The objective of this study was to gather and evaluate injury data from a non-traditional, 'soft-edged', consumer trampoline, where the design aimed to minimise injuries from the equipment and from falling off. The manufacturer of the non-traditional trampoline provided the University of Technology Sydney with their Australian customer database. The study involved surveys in Queensland and New South Wales, between May 2007 and March 2010. Initially injury data was gathered by a phone interview pilot study, then in the full study, through an email survey. The 3817 respondents were the carers of child users of the 'soft-edge' trampolines. Responses were compared with Australian and US emergency department data. In both countries the proportion of injuries caused by the equipment and falling off was compared with the proportion caused by the jumpers to themselves or each other. The comparisons showed a significantly lower proportion resulted from falling-off or hitting the equipment for this design when compared to traditional trampolines, both in Australia and the US. This research concludes that equipment-induced and falling off injuries, the more severe injuries on traditional trampolines, can be significantly reduced with appropriate trampoline design.
Elliott, R., McKinley, S.M. & Eager, D.M. 2010, 'A pilot study of sound levels in an Australian adult general intensive care unit', Noise and Health, vol. 12, no. 46, pp. 26-36.
View/Download from: OPUS |
High technology and activity levels in the intensive care unit (ICU) lead to elevated and disturbing sound levels. As noise has been shown to affect the ability of patients to rest and sleep, continuous sound levels are required during sleep investigations. The aim of this pilot study was to develop a robust protocol to measure continuous sound levels for a larger more substantive future study to improve sleep for the ICU patient. A review of published studies of sound levels in intensive care settings revealed sufficient information to develop a study protocol. The study protocol resulted in 10 usable recordings out of 11 attempts to collect pilot data. The mean recording time was 17.49 4.5 h. Sound levels exceeded recommendations made by the World Health Organization (WHO) for hospitals. The mean equivalent sound level (LAeq) was 56.22 1.65 dB and LA90 was 46.8 2.46 dB. The data reveal the requirement for a noise reduction program within this ICU.
Eager, D.M. 2010, 'Inclusive risk for children at play', Australasian Parks and Leisure, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 9-10.
Eager, D.M. 2010, 'Fields of dreams - playing surfaces for the game played in heaven', Australasian Parks and Leisure, vol. Autumn, pp. 16-19.
Eager, D.M. 2010, 'Playground equipment certification and compliance', Journal Institute of Public Works Engineering Australia, vol. April/May, pp. 71-74.
Niebecker, K.D., Eager, D.M. & Moulton, B.D. 2010, 'Collaborative and cross-company project management within the automotive industry using the Balanced Scorecard', International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 328-337.
View/Download from: OPUS |
Purpose -This paper aims to summarize the scope, methodology, and main findings of a doctoral thesis about cross-company project management in the automotive industry. The concept of the collaborative project scorecard (CPS) is described and the results of its application to a project are sununarized and discussed. Design/methodology/approach -The project adopted an action research approach which included a series of interviews, surveys, workshops, and a case study where the developed project management concept was tested and evaluated in a real project setting, Findings -The concept of the CPS supports the alignment of project goals with business strategies, improves transparency in networked project organizations with respect to roles, responsibilities, goal achievement, sta.keholder identification, and performance assessment. Project goals is not only based on and measured by hard facts but also on soft facts such as trust and employee satisfaction. The balanced choice of common strategic project goals improves the achievement of long-term strategies in a project partnership.
Besinger, A., Sztynda, T., Lal, S., Duthoit, C.J., Agbinya, J.I., Jap, B., Eager, D.M. & Dissanayake, G. 2010, 'Optical flow based analyses to detect emotion from human facial image data', Expert Systems with Applications, vol. 37, no. 12, pp. 8897-8902.
View/Download from: OPUS | Publisher's site
Artificial recognition of facial expression has attracted a lot of attention in the last few years and different facial expression detection methods have been developed. The current study uses a feature point tracking technique separately applied to the five facial image regions (eyebrows, eyes and mouth) to capture basic emotions. The used dataset contains a total 60 facial images from subject+s different genders and nationality not wearing glasses and/or facial hair. Results show that the used point tracking algorithm separately applied to the five facial image regions can detect emotions in image sequences.
Eager, D.M. 2010, 'Playground equipment acceptance verification', Australasian Parks and Leisure Journal, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 23-26.
The key aspects that need to be kept in mind by several Australian Standards Committees with regards to acceptance verification of playground equipment are discussed. The main things that playground manufacturers and/or suppliers need to keep in mind when preparing equipment, especially including labeling are highlighted.
Eager, D.M. 2010, 'Playground equipment certification and compliance', Australian GovLink 2010, vol. 2010, pp. 149-151.
Alexander, K.M., Eager, D.M., Scarrott, C. & Sushinsky, G. 2010, 'Effectiveness Of Pads And Enclosures As Safety Interventions On Consumer Trampolines', Injury Prevention, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 185-189.
View/Download from: OPUS | Publisher's site
Background Trampolines continue to be a major source of childhood injury. Objective To examine available data on trampoline injuries in order to determine the effectiveness of padding and enclosures. Design Trampoline injuries from the NEISS database fro
Little, H. & Eager, D.M. 2010, 'Risk, challenge and safety: implications for play quality and playground design', European Early Childhood Education Research Jou..., vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 497-513.
View/Download from: OPUS | Publisher's site
In many countries playground design is driven more by safety than developmental benefits. As risk minimisation strategies become more stringent, many researchers and practitioners are questioning whether young children are able to take sufficient risks in play in order for their play experiences to be interesting and developmentally challenging. This study examined the outdoor play choices and risk-taking behaviour of 38 children (25 boys, 13 girls) aged between 48 and 64 months from Sydney, Australia. Semi-structured interviews examined children's play preferences and playground equipment usage. Observations of play explored engagement in risk-taking behaviour. Selection of equipment indicated a strong preference for challenge and excitement. However, the dominant observed play behaviours involved little risk suggesting equipment at these parks provided few opportunities to practice mastery of skills already in their behavioural repertoire, learning new skills or building on current capabilities. The findings have implications for play provision and playground design.
Sherker, S., Ritchie, J., Eager, D.M. & Dennis, R. 2009, 'Soft landings: encouraging compliance with safety standards in Local Government Authority playgrounds', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 31-36.
View/Download from: OPUS |
Issues addressed: Consistent with health promotion principles of good practice, addressing playground injury necessitates the creation of a supportive environment for the enhancement of wellbeing and the prevention of injuries. This study aims to survey local governments to: determine compliance with playground safety standards; establish frequency of playground inspections and maintenance; and identify motivators and barriers to compliance with safety standards. Methods: A survey of key informants for playground safety in all 152 local government councils in New South Wales (NSW) was undertaken. Results: Of 152 local councils in NSW (43 metropolitan and 109 non-metropolitan), 71.7% (n=109) completed the survey, 12.5% (n=19) refused to participate and no response was received by 15.8% (n=24). Self-reported compliance with key aspects of the standard was generally high. However, only 55% of councils complied with surface impact attenuation < 200 g(max) and < 1,000 HIC. Further, only 14.7% of councils reported impact testing the playground surface during inspections. The main motivators to compliance included: reducing risk of litigation or liability; enhancing community and child safety, and minimising the risk of injury. The main barriers included a lack of: time; personnel, and a lack of adequate and appropriate funding. Conclusions: Local Government Authorities have a duty of care to ensure the safety of playgrounds in their jurisdiction. They require time, personnel and adequate and appropriate funding in order to achieve this aim.
Niebecker, K.D., Eager, D.M. & Kubitza, K. 2008, 'Improving cross-company project management performance with a collaborative project scorecard', International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 1, no. 3, pp. 368-386.
View/Download from: OPUS |
Mitchell, R., Sherker, S., Cavanagh, M. & Eager, D.M. 2007, 'Falls from playground equipment: will the new Australian playground safety standard make a difference and how do we tell', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, vol. 18, pp. 98-104.
View/Download from: OPUS
Mitchell, R., Cavanagh, M. & Eager, D.M. 2006, 'Not all risk is bad, playgrounds as a learning environment for children', International Journal of Injury Control and Safety Promotion, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 122-124.
View/Download from: OPUS
The article discusses the implications of risk-free playgrounds on the development of children's social, cognitive, physical and emotional skills. Some experts would argue that children do not lose interest in playgrounds that is not challenging, while school-aged children indicate that risk free environment is not enjoyable. It concludes that it is important that playgrounds should provide opportunities to allow children to extend themselves in a challenging yet semi-controlled environment.
Nixon, J.W., Acton, C.H., Wallis, B.A., Battistutta, D., Perry, C. & Eager, D.M. 2004, 'Preventing Injuries on Horizontal Ladders and Track Rides', Injury Control and Safety Promotion Journal, vol. 11, no. 4, pp. 219-224.
View/Download from: OPUS
This study examined the type of injury, fall heights and measures of impact attenuation of surfaces on which children fell from horizontal ladders and track rides. METHOD: All injured children who presented to two children's hospitals and received medical attention following a fall from a horizontal ladder or track ride in a public school or park during 1996--1997 were interviewed and the playground visited. RESULTS: The number of children who fell from horizontal ladders and track rides and presented to hospitals with injury was 118. Of those children, 105 were injured when they hit the ground and data were available on 102 of those playground undersurfaces. Fractures to the arm or wrist were the most common injury. The median height fallen by children was 1930 mm, 73% of injuries were from falls greater than 1800mm. In 41% of sites, the surface was deficient in impact absorbing properties for the height of the equipment. Fractures were no more likely on loose surfaces than other surfaces, such as rubber matting (p = 0.556) but more prevalent on compliant than non-compliant surfaces. Relative to falls occurring on noncompliant surfaces, the odds of a fracture occurring on a compliant surface was 2.67 (95% CI 0.88-8.14). CONCLUSIONS: Modification of the height of horizontal ladders and track rides to 1800mm is preferable to removal of such equipment. The prevalence of fractures on compliant surfaces suggests that the threshold of 200g or 1000 head injury criteria (HIC) needs to be revisited, or additional test criteria added to take account of change in momentum that is not presently accounted for with either g-max on HIC calculations.
Eager, D.M. 2004, 'The Low Down On Playground Undersurfing', Journal of the Australian Institute of Landscape Architects, vol. 26, no. 2, pp. 54-56.
Eager, D.M. 2003, 'Undersurfacing - Myths and Facts', Playground News, vol. 11, no. Winter 2003, pp. 1-2.
Eager, D.M. 2003, 'Raising the Standard', Journal of the Australian Institute of Landscape Architects, vol. 25(4), no. 100, pp. 70-75.
Eager, D.M. 2003, 'How the New Standard Will Impact on Playgrounds', Journal Institute of Public Works Engineering Australia, vol. N/A, no. June/July 2003, pp. 22-27.
Eager, D.M. 2003, 'Understanding The Need For Playground Undersurfacing', Journal Institute of Public Works Engineering Australia, vol. N/A, no. August/September, pp. 36-37.

Reports

Eager, D.M. 2005, 'AS 3533.4.1-2005 Amusement Rides and Devices, Part 4.1: Specific Requirements - Land-borne inflatable devices', Standards Australia, Sydney, Australia, pp. 1-41.
View/Download from: Publisher's site
This Standard sets out requirements and guidance for the design, manufacture, operation and maintenance of land-borne inflatable amusement devices that are static when in use. It also specifies information to be supplied with the equipment. NOTE: This Standard is not applicable to inflatable toys, water-borne inflatable devices, airsupported buildings to which the Building Code of Australia would apply, inflatable devices used for protection rather than play or inflatable devices acting as artificial climbing structures involving belay systems.