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Dr David Bond

Biography

David Bond joined the Accounting Discipline Group in 2003 and has completed a PhD under the supervision of Professor Peter Wells. David’s PhD was on the topic ‘The impact of the Arthur Andersen and Ernst & Young merger on the Australian audit services market’. He graduated in May 2010.

During his time at UTS David has been involved in teaching financial reporting and introductory accounting at both an undergraduate and postgraduate level. He is also currently a member of the Faculty Board in Business and the Faculty Board of Law and a committee member for the International Conference for e-Learning. From 2003 David was responsible for the operational aspects of the UTS Audit Markets Database.

Since 2012 he has been a regular guest on 2SER. In 2013 he held the position of Academic Fellow at the International Financial Reporting Standards Foundation in London. He has also undertaken consulting work for a number of organizations.

David has an active interest in the role of emerging technology and social media in the learning environment. Through his work in this area, David has received the UTS Accounting Discipline Group Teaching & Learning Award twice (2009 and 2011), a UTS Teaching & Learning Citation (2009) and a UTS Teaching & Learning Award (2011). In 2012 he was awarded an Australian Government Office for Learning & Teaching Citation.

Image of David Bond
Senior Lecturer, Accounting Discipline Group
BBus (Hons) (UTS), B Bus (hons), GradCertHED (UTS), PhD
Member, Institute of Chartered Accountants Australia
 
Phone
+61 2 9514 3034

Research Interests

Audit markets; Financial accounting; Student engagement.

Successfully completed his PhD in the area of Audit Markets and graduated in May 2010.

Can supervise: Yes

Financial accounting

Conferences

Govendir, B., Bond, D. & Wells, P. 2015, 'An evaluation of asset impairments by Australian firms and whether they were impacted by AASB 136', Accounting and Finance with the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) joint Research Forum, Accounting and Finance, Hong Kong, pp. 259-288.
Loyeung, A.L., czernkowski, bond & Lee 2016, 'Market reaction to Non-GAAP Earnings around SEC regulation.', Accounting & Finance Association of Australia and New Zealand (AFAANZ)- annual conference, Gold Coast, Australia.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Loyeung, A.L., bond & czernkowski 2016, 'Market reaction to Non-GAAP Earnings around SEC regulation', European Accounting Association (EAA), Maastritcht, Netherlands.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Govendir, B., Bond, D. & Wells, P. 2015, 'An evaluation of asset impairments by Australian firms and whether they were impacted by AASB 136', British Accounting and Finance Association, Annual Conference, Manchester, UK.
Govendir, B., Bond, D. & Wells, P. 2014, 'An evaluation of asset impairments by Australian firms and whether they were impacted by AASB 136', American Accounting Association Annual Conference, Atlanta, USA.
Bond, D.K., Bugeja, M. & Czernkowski, R.M. 2011, 'Auditors and the provision of takeover advice', British Accounting and Finance Association Annual Conference 2011, British Accounting and Finance Association, Birmingham, United Kingdom.
Bond, D.K. 2011, 'The impact of the Arthur Anderson and Ernst & Young merger on the Australian audit services market', 34th Annual Congress - European Accounting Association, European Accounting Association, Rome, Italy.
Bond, D.K. 2011, 'The impact of the Arthur Andersen and Ernst & Young merger on the Australian audit services market', BAFA - 21st Audit and Assurance Conference, British Accounting and Finance Association (BAFA), Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
Bond, D.K., Holland, T. & Wells, P.A. 2009, 'Student performance and its association with utilisation of teaching material', 8th European Conference on e-Learning, European Conference on e-Learning, Academic Publishing Limited, Italy, pp. 91-99.
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This study examines the utilization of online course material by students and evaluates the relation with students' subsequent performance in assessments. Evidence is provided of the extensive utilization of online course material, although the pattern of utilization suggests that the label of 'digital natives' being applied to these students may be somewhat presumptuous. Specifi cally there is some evidence of a positive link between utilisation of practical exercises and performance as well as lecture slides and performance, No significance is found for either the utilisation of the discussion questions, quizzes or podcasts. Whilst we have made a necessary first step in order to ascertain impact of student utilisation and performance, a bigger question remains. How to increase students' timely utilisation of material?
Bond, D.K. 2008, 'Choice - is it really best for the student? An examination of flexible assessment', Program of American Accounting Association Annual Meeting, American Accounting Association Annual Meeting, American Accounting Association (AAA), Anaheim, USA.
Bond, D.K. 2008, 'Choice - is it really best for the student? An examination of flexible assessment', Technical Program of 2008 AFAANZ/IAAER Conference, Accounting and Finance Association of Australia and New Zealand Conference, AFAANZ, Sydney.
Bond, D.K., Holland, T. & Wells, P.A. 2008, 'Podcasting and its relation with student performance', Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on e-Learning, International Conference on e-Learning, International Conference on e-Learning (ICEL), University of Cape Town, South Africa, pp. 33-42.
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The provision of course material, including lecture notes and overheads, to students through learning management systems is commonplace in Australian universities, and the practice is well documented in the literature (e.g Jensen, 2007). Similarly, provision of lecture recording on magnetic tape cassettes dates back at least three decades, and is common place in provision of distance education. However, the digital recording of lectures and making these available to students generally through a learning management system (now referred to as podcasting) is a much more recent phenomenon and has only really impacted on the tertiary education sector for the past 3-4 years (Sull, 2005). This paper addresses the issues of how students utilise these recordings, and perhaps more importantly, how it impacts students academic performance.
Bond, D.K. 2007, 'Student engagement in a first-year accounting subject', AAA Conference, Chicago, Illinois, USA.
Bond, D.K. 2007, 'Student engagement in a first-year accounting subject', 2007 AFAANZ Conference Website, Accounting and Finance Association of Australia and New Zealand Conference, AFAANZ, Gold Coast, Australia, pp. 1-19.
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The aim of this study is to provide further evidence as to what drives student performance. Numerous studies (for example see Launius 1997, Thomas and Higbee 2000, Clump et al. 2003, Moore, 2003 and Gump 2005) have examined the link between tutorial attendance and student performance within a tertiary setting. Whilst the general conclusions are that reduced attendance is linked to decreased performance, these studies are unable to determine whether it is tutorial attendance or some other unobservable factor which influences performance.

Journal articles

Loyeung, A.L., Bond, D. & Czernkowski, R. 2017, 'Market reaction to Non-GAAP Earnings around SEC regulation', Journal of Contemporary Accounting and Economics.
Bond, D., Govendir, B. & Wells, P. 2016, 'An evaluation of asset impairments by Australian rms and whether they were impacted by AASB 136', Accounting and Finance, vol. 56, no. 1, pp. 259-288.
View/Download from: Publisher's site
This study evaluates how managers of Australian firms are implementing the regulation requiring the impairment of assets and whether asset impairments can be categorised as non-discretionary. We find some evidence that realised asset impairments are reflective of regulatory requirements. However, for the majority of firms exhibiting at least one externally observable indicator of impairment, they are not recognising asset impairments, and recognition is often delayed. Accordingly, while realised asset impairments might be categorised non-discretionary, the timing of their recognition appears highly discretionary. There is some evidence that the realisation of asset impairments increased subsequent to transition to IFRS; however, the majority of firms with indicators of impairment are still not recognising asset impairments.
Bond, D.K., Bugeja, M. & Czernkowski, R.M. 2012, 'Did Australian firms choose to switch to reporting operating cash flows using the indirect method?', Australian Accounting Review, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 18-24.
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In 2007 Australian accounting standards were amended to allow a choice of presenting operating cash flows using either the direct or indirect method. This study investigates the number of ASX-listed entities that switched to the indirect format. Our results indicate that between 2007 and 2009 nine companies changed their reporting format. The firms adopting the indirect method have similar leverage, liquidity and performance to industry and size-matched controls. Given that previous research indicates that the direct method provides superior information for predicting cash flows and performance, our results will be welcomed by financial statement users and the Australian Accounting Standards Board.
Bond, D.K., Czernkowski, R.M. & Wells, P.A. 2012, 'A team-teaching based approach to engage students', Accounting Research Journal, vol. 25, no. 2, pp. 87-99.
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Purpose The purpose of this paper is to describe the process of renewal undertaken in a large undergraduate financial reporting subject. Design/methodology/approach The approach taken in the subject is one in which student engagement is critical. Selected quantitative and qualitative data from university course and student feedback surveys were used to assess the effectiveness of the renewal process. Findings The renewal process led to increased student engagement, and influenced student learning by demonstrating the relevance of financial reporting regulation. Feedback was also positive in relation to the level of resources, especially technological, provided in the subject. Originality/value Engaging with students is a critical task in any subject, but especially in a technical accounting subject, as students may not necessarily see the value in the content. This article reveals possibilities for academics to engage with their students and for their students to engage with the subject material.
Bond, D.K. 2006, 'The value of the merger of Ernst and Young and Arthur Andersen in Australia (Acct paper #83)', School of Accounting Working Paper Series, vol. 83.

Other

Bond, D.K. 2005, 'The value of the merger of Ernst and Young and Arthur Andersen in Australia (Acct paper #74)'.
Culvenor, J.M., Stokes, D. & Bond, D.K. 2003, 'Big 5 audit partner industry expertise - audit pricing evidence (Acct paper #60)'.

Reports

Bond, D.K. & Stokes, D. Capital Markets CRC 2005, Independence and non-audit services report: ASX 200, pp. 1-15, Sydney, Australia.
Stokes, D. & Bond, D.K. Capital markets CRC Ltd 2004, Independence and non-audit services report: ASX 200, pp. 1-23, Sydney, Australia.
Peer review : CRD and KPMG