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Dr Chunzhou Mu

Biography

Chunzhou has a Masters degree in Economics from Jilin University (China) and is a PhD student (thesis submitted) in Economics from the University of New South Wales (UNSW). Chunzhou’s PhD thesis analyses the practice location and labour supply decisions of general practitioners in Australia. At CHERE Chunzhou is part of the Research Excellence in the Finance and Economics of Primary Health Care (REFinE-PHC).
Image of Chunzhou Mu
Research Fellow, Centre for Health Economics Research and Evaluation
Core Member, CHERE - Centre for Health Economics and Research Evaluation
BacMgmt, Mas.Econ, PhD. Philosophy
 
Phone
+61 2 9514 4745

Conferences

Goodall, S., Kenny, P. & Mu, C. 2015, 'What influences the choice of General Practitioners? Evidence from a Discrete Choice Experiment in Australia and New Zealand', CAER Workshop.
Goodall, S., Kenny, P. & Mu, C. 2015, 'What influences the choice of General Practitioners? Evidence from a Discrete Choice Experiment in Australia and New Zealand', Primary Health Care Research Conference, Adelaide.
Goodall, S., Kenny, P. & Mu, C. 2015, 'What influences the choice of General Practitioners? Evidence from a Discrete Choice Experiment in Australia and New Zealand', iHEA 11th World Congress on Health Economics, Milan, July.
Mu, C. 2015, 'Identifying a population at risk of diabetes using 45 and UP and WA administrative data', HSRAANZ 9th Health Services & Policy Conference, Melbourne.
Mu, C. 2013, 'The effect of government subsidies on General Practitioners' location decisions and labour supply', iHEA 9th World Congress on Health Economics, Sydney.
Mu, C. 2013, 'The effect of government subsidies on General Practitioners' location decisions and labour supply', Sydney.
Mu, C. & Maruyama, S. 2013, 'Salient gender differences in the wage elasticity of General Practitioners', iHEA 9th World Congress on Health Economics, Sydney.

Journal articles

Johar, M., Mu, C., van Gool, K. & Wong, C.Y. 2017, 'Bleeding hearts, profiteers, or both specialist physician fees in an unregulated market', Health Economics, vol. 26, no. 4, pp. 528-535.
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Mu, C., Kecmanovic, M. & Hall, J.P. 2015, 'Does living alone confer a higher risk of hospitalisation?', The Economic Record, vol. 91, no. S1, pp. 124-138.
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Mu, C. 2015, 'The age Profile of the location decision of Australian General Practitioners', Social science & medicine, vol. 142, pp. 183-193.
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The unbalanced distribution of general practitioners (GPs) across geographic areas has been acknowledged as a problem in many countries around the world. Quantitative information regarding GPs' location decision over their lifecycle is essential in developing effective initiatives to address the unbalanced distribution and retention of GPs. This paper describes the age profile of GPs' location decision and relates it to individual characteristics. I use the Medicine in Australia: Balancing Employment and Life (MABEL) survey of doctors (2008–2012) with a sample size of 5810 male and 5797 female GPs. I employ a mixed logit model to estimate GPs' location decision. The results suggest that younger GPs are more prepared to go to rural and remote areas but they tend to migrate back to urban areas as they age. Coming from a rural background increases the likelihood of choosing rural areas, but with heterogeneity: While male GPs from a rural background tend to stay in rural and remote areas regardless of age, female GPs from a rural background are willing to migrate to urban areas as they age. GPs who obtain basic medical degrees overseas are likely to move back to urban areas in the later stage of their careers. Completing a basic medical degree at an older age increases the likelihood of working outside major cities. I also examine factors influencing GPs' location transition patterns and the results further confirm the association of individual characteristics and GPs' location–age profile. The findings can help target GPs who are most likely to practise and remain in rural and remote areas, and tailor policy initiatives to address the undesirable distribution and movement of GPs according to the identified heterogeneous age profile of their location decisions.

Reports

Goodall, S., Kenny, P., Mu, C., Hall, J.P., Norman, R., Cumming, J., Street, D., Greene, J. & REFinE Team Australian National University 2016, REFinE-PHC: Preferences and choice in primary care Consumers and providers, Canberra.