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Professor Charles Rice

Biography

Educated in Australia and the UK, Charles Rice is Professor of Architecture at the University of Technology Sydney. He has previously taught at the University of New South Wales, the Architectural Association, and Kingston University London, where he was Head of the School of Art and Design History.

His research considers questions of the interior across art, architecture and design. His book The Emergence of the Interior: Architecture, Modernity, Domesticity (Routledge 2007) established the domestic interior as a category of the nineteenth century, and charted its impact on key developments into the twentieth century. His new book, Interior Urbanism: Architecture, John Portman and Downtown America (Bloomsbury 2016), uses Portman’s vast urban interiors as a lens through which to assess the changing developmental landscape of the post-war city.

Charles is Editor-in-chief of The Journal of Architecture (Routledge & RIBA). He has co-edited several collections of essays, and his own essays have appeared in numerous journals and anthologies. He has been invited to lecture at universities and cultural institutions internationally, most recently: Parsons, The New School for Design (New York), Geneva School of Art and Design, The Berlage Centre for Advanced Studies in Architecture and Urban Design (Delft), The University of Manitoba (Canada), and The Architectural Association (London).

He has acted as an external examiner for undergraduate, graduate and research degrees at universities in Australia, the UK, Germany, the Netherlands and South Africa. He is a member of the Peer Review College of the Arts and Humanities Research Council (UK).

Image of Charles Rice
Associate Dean (Research), Executive
Bachelor of Design Studies (Honours), Master of Research - Humanities & Cultural Studies, Doctor of Philosophy
 
Phone
+61 2 9514 8805
Can supervise: Yes

Books

Rice, C. 2016, Interior Urbanism: Architecture, John Portman and Downtown America, 1st, Bloomsbury.
Vast interior spaces have become ubiquitous in the contemporary city. The soaring atriums and concourses of mega-hotels, shopping malls and transport interchanges define an increasingly normal experience of being 'inside' in a city. Yet such spaces are also subject to intense criticism and claims that they can destroy the quality of a city's authentic life 'on the outside'. Interior Urbanism explores the roots of this contemporary tension between inside and outside, identifying and analysing the concept of interior urbanism and tracing its history back to the works of John Portman and Associates in 1960s and 70s America. Portman – increasingly recognised as an influential yet understudied figure – was responsible for projects such as Peachtree Center in Atlanta and the Los Angeles Bonaventure Hotel, developments that employed vast internal atriums to define a world of possibilities not just for hotels and commercial spaces, but for the future of the American downtown amid the upheavals of the 1960s and 70s. The book analyses Portman's architecture in order to reconsider major contexts of debate in architecture and urbanism in this period, including the massive expansion of a commercial imperative in architecture, shifts in the governance and development of cities amid social and economic instability, the rise of postmodernism and critical urban studies, and the defence of the street and public space amid the continual upheavals of urban development. In this way the book reconsiders the American city at a crucial time in its development, identifying lessons for how we consider the forces at work, and the spaces produced, in cities in the present.
Rice, C.E. 2007, The Emergence of the Interior: Architecture, Modernity, Domesticity, 1, Routledge, London and New York.
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Taking a radical position counter to many previous histories and theories of the interior, domesticity and the home, The Emergence of the Interior considers how the concept and experience of the domestic interior have been formed from the beginning of the nineteenth century. It considers the interior's emergence in relation to the thinking of Walter Benjamin and Sigmund Freud, and, through case studies, in architecture's trajectories toward modernism. The book argues that the interior emerged with a sense of 'doubleness', being understood and experienced as both a spatial and an image-based condition. Incorporating perspectives from architecture, critical history and theory, and psychoanalysis, The Emergence of the Interior will be of interest to academics and students of the history and theory of architecture and design, social history, and cultural studies

Chapters

Rice, C.E. 2016, 'Architecture's Capital? Revisiting Benjamin's Paris' in Clayson, H. & Dombrwski, A. (eds), Is Paris still the Capital of the Nineteenth Century? Essays on Art and Modernity, 1850-1990, Routledge, London and New York, pp. 19-34.
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Rice, C.E. 2015, 'Urban Interiority: Listening in to Coppola's The Conversation' in Breaking and Entering: The Contemporary House Cut, Spliced, and Haunted, McGill-Queens University Press, Montreal, pp. 33-45.
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Rice, C.E. & Penner, B. 2013, 'The Many Lives of Red House' in Sparke, P. & Massey, A. (eds), Biography, Identity and the Modern Interior, Ashgate, Farnham, pp. 23-35.
Through a series of case studies from the mid-eighteenth century to the start of the twenty-first, this collection of essays considers the historical insights that ethno/auto/biographical investigations into the lives of individuals, groups ...
Rice, C.E. 2012, 'Exploding the lobby: Hyatt Regency, Atlanta' in Avermaete, T. & Massey, A. (eds), Hotel lobbies and lounges, Routledge, Abingdon, UK, pp. 171-177.
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Rice, C.E. & Matthews, L.M. 2012, 'Designing (in) the PhD in Architecture: Knowledge, Discipline, Pedagogy' in Lee, A. & Danby, S. (eds), Reshaping Doctoral Education: International Approaches and Pedagogies, Routledge, London, pp. 99-112.
Rice, C.E. & Penner, B. 2010, 'The Conder Room: Evidencing the Interior's Dissolution' in O'Neill, M. & Hatt, M. (eds), The Edwardian Sense Art, Design, and Performance in Britain, 1901-1910, Yale Center for British Art / Yale University Press, pp. 127-133.
This is the twentieth in a series of occasional volumes devoted to studies in British art, published by the Yale Center for British Art and the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art and distributed by Yale University Press.
Rice, C.E. 2009, ''So the flaneur goes for a walk in his room': Interior, arcade, cinema, metropolis' in di Palma, V., Periton, D. & Lathouri, M. (eds), Intimate Metropolis: Urban Subjects in the Modern City, Routledge, London, pp. 72-89.
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To develop this reading, this chapter investigates a series of experiences and cultural forms that constitute the intimate metropolis: the domestic interior, the shopping arcade, the cinema, and a series of figures which inhabit and pass through these contexts: the rentier, the collector, the ffaneur and the cinephile. Weaving through their relationships is an explication of the fate of experience in a commodity culture that developed thlough the nineteenth century, and has come to be seen critically through its impact in the twentieth century.
Rice, C.E. 2009, 'The Inside of Space: Some Issues Concerning Heterogeneity, the Interior and the Weather' in Hensel, M., Hight, C. & Menges, A. (eds), Space Reader: Heterogeneous Space in Architecture, Wiley, London, pp. 185-193.
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Rice, C.E. 2009, 'The Geography of the Diagram: The Rose Seidler House' in Sparke, P., Massey, A., Keeble, T. & Martin, B. (eds), Designing the Modern Interior: From the Victorians to Today, Berg, Oxford and New York, pp. 131-143.
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When one considers the oppositional stance of the modemist avant-gardes, the domestic interior appears as one of the most charged sites of an anti-bourgeois antagonism. One might consider the famous poster for the Deutscher Werkbund exhibition Die Wohnung, in Stuttgart in 1927 (seeFigure 7.3). An image of a cosy, complacent, overstuffed bourgeois interior is literallycondemned with a red x daubed over it. The poster implies that, before the new could be realised, the old needed to be obliterated. Indeed, what seems to be done away with in modemism is the very idea of the interior itself, the interior as the provision of soft fumishing, as the covering of an inside space with pliable, impressionable stuff.
Rice, C.E. 2007, 'Interior / Image: Authorship and the spatialities of domestic life' in Anstey, T., Grillner, K. & Hughes, R. (eds), Architecture and Authorship: Studies in Disciplinary Remediation, Black Dog, London, pp. 74-81.
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Rice, C.E. 2007, 'For a Concept of the Domestic Interior: Some Historical and Theoretical Challenges' in Hollis, E.E.A. (ed), Thinking Inside the Box: a reader in interior design for the 21st century, Middlesex University Press, London, UK, pp. 177-185.
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Rice, C.E. 2007, 'Critical Post-Critical' in Dorrian, M., Fraser, M., Hill, J. & Rendell, J. (eds), Critical Architecture, Routledge, Oxon, England, pp. 261-268.
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Rice, C.E. 2006, 'Immersion et rupture: l'espace domestique de W.Benjamin' in Phillipe Simay (ed), Capitales de la modernite: walter Benjamin et la ville., Editions de l'eclat, Paris, France, pp. 153-168.
Rice, C.E. 2005, 'Photography's Veil: Reading Gender and Loos's Interiors' in Heynen, H. & Baydar, G. (eds), Negotiating Domesticity: Spatial Constructions of Gender in Modern Architecture, Routledge, London and New York, pp. 281-295.
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Rice, C.E. 2005, 'Walter Benjamin's Interior History' in Benjamin, A. (ed), Walter Benjamin and History, Continuum, London, UK, pp. 171-181.
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Rice, C.E. 2001, 'The image in the city: a hybrid reading of cinematic subjectivity' in Goggin, J. & Neef, S. (eds), Travelling Concepts 1: Text, Subjectivity, Hybridity, ASCA Press, Amsterdam, pp. 249-259.
Rice, C.E. 2000, 'Seeing whiteness in colour' in Tercier, J. (ed), Whiteness, Lawrence & Wishart, London, pp. 197-218.
Rice, C.E. 2000, 'Image and the interior' in Macarthur, J. (ed), Imaginary Materials: A Seminar with Michael Carter, IMA Publishing, Brisbane, pp. 35-39.

Conferences

Rice, C.E. 2010, 'The Emergence of Interior Urbanism: John Portman's Peachtree Centre in Atlanta', Looking into the Modern Interior: History, Theory and Discipline in Education and Practice - Abstracts, Looking into the Modern Interior: History, Theory and Discipline in Education and Practice, Interior Design Educators Council (IDEC), U.S.A. & Modern Interiors Research Centre (MIRC), Kingston, Atlanta, Georgia, pp. 2-2.
Rice, C.E. 1999, 'Marginality and the Antipodes: International Audiences for Australasian Architectural Histories', Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) Annual Conference, Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) Annual Conference, University of Tasmania, Hobart and Launceston, pp. 327-334.
Rice, C.E. 1997, 'Architectural Objects: Grounds of Definition', Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) Annual Conference, Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) Annual Conference, Society of Architectural Historians of Australia and New Zealand, University of South Australia, pp. 196-201.
Rice, C.E. 1997, 'Itinerant Objects', Building, Dwelling, Drifting: Migrancy and the Limits of Architecture. Papers from the 3rd 'Other Connections' Conference., Building, Dwelling, Drifting: Migrancy and the Limits of Architecture. 3rd 'Other Connections' Conference., University of Melbourne, University of Melbourne, pp. 278-283.

Journal articles

Rice, C.E. 2016, 'Heatwave, or The Megastructure as Eden', AA files: annals of the Architectural Association School of Architecture, no. 71, pp. 104-112.
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Rice, C.E. 2012, 'Stalking John Portman', AA Files: annals of the Architectural Association School of Architecture, no. 64, pp. 21-29.
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Rice, C.E. 2010, 'The space-time of pre-emption: an interview with Brian Massumi', Architectural Design, vol. 80, no. 5, pp. 32-37.
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The philosopher BrianMassumi is known for his explorations of experience, art, media theory and politics and has recently turned his attention to understanding the impact that sustained fear has on perception in a post-9/11 world. In an interview with guest-editor CharlesRice, Massumi defines threat by distinguishing it from real danger and how it manifests itself in both civil and military spaces of pre-emptive action that are primed to the possibilities of attack.
Rice, C.E. 2010, 'On message: an interview with Michael Chertoff', Architectural Design, vol. 80, no. 5, pp. 124-125.
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For governments, pre-emptive strategies for handling communications and risk management have become essential for public perception, which plays such a significant part in structuring political responses to disaster and conflict. In an interview with guest-editor Charles Rice, former US Secretary of Homeland Security Michael Chertoff highlights the importance of `lessons learnt and informed anticipation.
Rice, C.E. 2009, 'Out There: Architecture Beyond Building. 11th International Architecture Exhibition, Venice, 2008', The Journal of Architecture, vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 277-284.
Rice, C.E. 2008, 'The atmosphere of interior urbanism - OMA at IIT (Office for Metropolitan Architecture)', Architectural Design, vol. 78, no. 3, pp. 88-91.
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Charles Rice explores interior atmosphere in a site challenged by existing infrastructure among a generally deteriorating urban scene. Crediting the Office for Metropolitan Architecture's IIT building in Chicago with refiguring the field via the deployment of complex spatial planning, integration of the building with the elevated train rail and a highly differentiated illumination scheme, he ultimately defines the nature of interior urbanism, an urbanity and atmosphere beyond the limits of the building envelope.
Rice, C.E. 2007, 'Book Review: Imagined Interiors: Representing the Domestic Interior Since the Renaissance', The Journal of Architecture, vol. 12, no. 3, pp. 340-344.
Rice, C.E. 2006, 'Book Review: Visions of the City: Utopian, Power and Politics in Twentieth-century Urbanism', The Journal of Architecture, vol. 11, no. 5, pp. 623-627.
Rice, C.E. 2006, 'Book Review: Mies van der Rohe: the Krefeld Villas', The Journal of Architecture, vol. 11, no. 2, pp. 272-274.
Rice, C.E. 2005, 'Experience and criticality: returning to Federation Square', Journal of Architecture, vol. 10, no. 3, pp. 323-333.
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Rice, C.E. 2005, 'Exhibition Review: The Virtual Australian Pavilion, Venice Biennale of Architecture, 2004.', Architecture Australia, vol. 94, no. 1, pp. 35-36.
Rice, C.E. 2005, 'Evidence, experience and conjecture: reading the interior through Benjamin and Bloch', Home Cultures, vol. 2, no. 3, pp. 285-298.
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This article looks at the resonances between Walter Benjamin's writing on the bourgeois domestic interior, and Ernst Bloch's investigation of the detective novel. These resonances hinge on the evidence that the interior registers through traces, and how these traces relate to the conjectural knowledge of detection. Explored via Carlo Ginzburg, conjectural knowledge raises the question of experience in modernity, a question crucial to understanding the role of literary narrative in the nineteenth century, as well as the historical emergence of the bourgeois domestic interior at this time.
Rice, C.E. 2004, 'Rethinking Histories of the Interior', The Journal of Architecture, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 275-287.
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Our contemporary image-saturated culture revolves around the domestic interior. Sitting comfortably at home, we are constantly offered images of how we should live our domestic lives, or of how others live theirs. As a society, we seem at once threatened by, but also totally at ease with, this close fit between mechanisms of publicity and the private sphere. The correlation between images of the domestic and the domestic setting of their consumption is at the core of our contemporary fascination with lifestyle, a fascination we might often disavow in the search for a supposedly more authentic mode of living.
Rice, C.E. 2004, 'At Federation Square', Journal of Architecture, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 105-120.
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Our contemporary image-saturated culture revolves around the domestic interior. Sitting comfortably at home, we are constantly offered images of how we should live our domestic lives, or of how others live theirs. As a society, we seem at once threatened by, but also totally at ease with, this close fit between mechanisms of publicity and the private sphere. The correlation between images of the domestic and the domestic setting of their consumption is at the core of our contemporary fascination with lifestyle, a fascination we might often disavow in the search for a supposedly more authentic mode of living.
Rice, C.E. 2004, 'Exhibition Review: Space and Image: Inside Hill End', Architecture Australia, vol. 93, no. 4, pp. 40-41.
Rice, C.E. 2003, 'The Doubleness of the Interior', Time + Architecture, vol. 19, no. 74, pp. 107-111.
Rice, C.E. 2003, 'Exhibition Review: Richard Glover: Tate Transformation, Bankside to Modern', Architecture Australia, vol. 92, no. 6, pp. 23-24.
Rice, C.E. 2003, 'Bourgeois inhabitations: Theory and the historical emergence of the interior', Architectural Theory Review, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 143-151.
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In studying the domestic interior of the nineteenth century from within the discipline of architecture, two particular theoretical problems arise. On the one hand, turning one's attention to the domestic in architecture automatically suggests a focus on things below the level of architectural theory as classically conceived. On the other hand, to turn away from the explicitly theoretical in architecture leaves open the question of how theoretical approaches derived from other disciplines can aid us in understanding what is at stake in this very turning away. Initially this paper will look at how a concept of the interior, along with a professional practice of interior decoration, emerged historically from the beginning of the nineteenth century. In an engagement with the explicitly commercial rather than the explicitly theoretical in design terms, this historical emergence of the interior shows the limits of the concerns of architectural theory. At the same time as these limits are shown, the interior as a condition 'additional' to architecture brings to prominence the bourgeois subject who makes an interior through inhabitation. Here a new theoretical agenda opens, one which sets out an exploration of how this bourgeois subject inhabits this additional condition of the interior, created within, but apart from, architecture.
Rice, C.E. 2002, 'The Antipodean Relation', Archis, vol. 6, pp. 32-39.
Rice, C.E. 2002, 'Book Review: Architectural Philosophy', Architectural Theory Review, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 158-160.
Rice, C.E. 2002, 'Exhibition Review: John Horbury Hunt â Radical Architect, 1838-1904', Architecture Australia, vol. 91, no. 6, pp. 16-17.
Rice, C.E. 2001, 'Images at the edge of the built', Architectural Design, vol. 71, no. 3, pp. 25-29.
Rice, C.E. 2001, 'Collaging the Gardens of Suzhou', Kerb: Journal of Landscape Architecture, vol. 9, pp. 69-71.
Rice, C.E. 2001, 'Exhibition Review: Visions of a Republic: The Work of Lucien Henry', Architecture Australia, vol. 90, no. 4, pp. 28-28.
Rice, C.E. 2000, 'The drama of identification: reflexivity, the apparatus, and Peter Greenaway's The Draughtsman's Contract', Critical Quarterly, vol. 42, no. 2, pp. 92-107.
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Non traditional outputs

Burke, A.J., Hewett, B.R., Rice, C.E., Lahoud, A., Jakovich, J. & Perin, G.J., 'Museum of Ecological Succession', Canberra Parklands Design Compeition, Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, Pittsburgh Cultural Festival.
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This project was a team submission for an open design competiiton, that lead to a novel research trajecory at the intersection of scripting, computation, landscape and urban design. The proposal has been exhibited in Pittsburgh.