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Professor Carl Rhodes

Biography

Carl Rhodes is Professor of Organization Studies, and Head of The Management Discipline Group at UTS Business School. Working in the areas of organization studies and business ethics, his current research investigates the ethical and political environment in which contemporary organizations operate and its effects on their behaviour. Central focus is on how organizations, especially corporations, can and should be held to account for their actions by citizens and by civil society.  This work endeavours to contribute to the rigorous and critical questioning an reformulation of what the purpose of work organizations in the context of democracy. 

Carl’s most recent books are The Companion to Ethics and Politics in Organizations (Routledge, 2015 with Alison Pullen), and Organizations and Popular Culture (Routledge, 2012 Simon Lilley). He is currently working on The CEO Society which will be published in 2017 (Zed, with Peter Bloom).   He is Senior Editor of the journal Organization Studies, Associate Editor of Organization and Gender, Work and Organization, and is an editorial board member of Human Relations and The Journal of Business Ethics.

Professional

Carl regularly writes for the mainstream and independent press on issues related to ethics, politics and business.  Recent articles include:

Image of Carl Rhodes
Head of Management Discipline Group, Management Discipline Group
EdD (UTS), MEd (UTS)
 
Phone
+61 2 9514 3603

Research Interests

Carl’s research interests are:

  • Ethics and Politics in Organizations
    Under this theme the focus has been on exploring the vexed relationship between ethics and politics as they relate to the everyday goings on in organizations.  Key areas of inquiry having been on the meaning of ethics in organizational practice, the ways that managerial subjectivity is informed by ethics, how ethics informs political action in organizations and the ethics of surveillance and resistance in organizations,
  • Organizations in Popular Culture
    In exploring the critical representations of work and organizations in popular culture, special interest has been on understanding and theorizing  popular critique as it is located in various types of narratives that can be found in the mass media – especially television, popular music and cinema.  
  • Theory and Methods in Organization Studies
    This research has sought to develop new approaches to theory and method in organization studies, especially in terms of writing and storytelling as it relates to both organizations and the writing of organizations studies.  This work has also attended to, and tried to exemplify, how experimental and non-conventional writing can open up the possibilities for an avant-garde organization studies.
Can supervise: Yes

Carl is interested in supervising research students pursuing projects in any areas aligned with his research interests.  This includes:

  • Ethics and politics in organizations
  • Leadership ethics
  • Business ethics
  • Resistance in and to organizations
  • Organization and popular culture
  • Narrative and organizations
  • Poststructuralist approaches to organization studies
Organizational Theory, Leadership, Business Ethics, Research Methods

Books

Pullen, A. & Rhodes, C. 2015, The Routledge Companion to Ethics, Politics and Organizations, Routledge.
This collection will be a valuable reference source for students and researchers across the disciplines of organizational studies, ethics and politics.
Rhodes, C. & Lilley, S. 2013, Organizations and Popular Culture Information, Representation and Transformation, Routledge.
This book brings together the journal's best contributions which specifically address how popular culture represents, informs and potentially transforms organizational practice.
Pullen, A. & Rhodes, C. 2009, Bits of Organization, Copenhagen Business School Press DK, Copenhagen.
Organization Studies are in Wikipedia ! ! When we went to http://en.wikipedia. org /wiki/Organization_studies in March 2008 we found a useful and pithy definition: " the academic study of organizations, examining them using the methods of ...
Rhodes, C.H. & Westwood, R. 2008, Critical Representations of Work and Organizations in Popular Culture, 1, Routledge, London, UK.
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This book challenges traditional organizational theory, looking to representations of work and organizations within popular culture and the ways in which these institutions have also been conceptualized and critiqued there. Through a series of essays, Rhodes and Westwood examine popular culture as a compelling and critical arena in which the complex and contradictory relations that people have with the organizations in which they work are played out. By articulating the knowledge in popular culture with that in theory, they provide new avenues for understanding work organizations as the dominant institutions in contemporary society. Rhodes and Westwood provide a critical review of how organizations are represented in various examples of contemporary popular culture. The book demonstrates how popular culture can be read as an embodiment of knowledge about organizations often more compelling than those common to theory and explores the critical potential of such knowledge and the way in which popular culture can reflect on the spirit of resistance, carnivalisation and rebellion.
Westwood, R. & Rhodes, C. 2007, Humour, Work and Organization, Routledge, London.
Considering the relationship between humour and organization in a nuanced and radical way and this book takes the view that humour and comedy are pervasive and highly meaningful aspects of human experience.
Clegg, S.R. & Rhodes, C. 2006, Management ethics: Contemporary contexts, Taylor and Francis, London.
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Ethics has become big business but have businesses become ethical? This is a central question for today's managers.
Chappell, C.S., Rhodes, C.H., Solomon, N., Tennant, M.C. & Yates, L.S. 2003, Reconstructing the lifelong learner: Pedagogy and identity in individual, organisational and social change, 1, Routledge Farmer, London, england.
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Garrick, J. & Rhodes, C. 2002, Research and Knowledge at Work Prospectives, Case-Studies and Innovative Strategies, Routledge.
This fascinating and controversial text makes sense of the complexities of research in the workplace and how 'working' knowledge is constructed.
Rhodes, C.H. 2001, Writing Organization: (Re)presentation and Control in Narratives at Work, John Benjamins, Amsterdam.

Chapters

Rhodes, C.H. 2016, 'Justice: Re-membering the Other in Organization' in Mir, R., Willmott, H. & Greenwood, M. (eds), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy in Organization Studies, Routledge, London, pp. 449-458.
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Bloom, P. & Rhodes, C.H. 2016, 'Political Leadership in the 21st Century: Neoliberalism and the Rise of the CEO Politician' in Storey, J., Hartley, J.-.L., Denis, P., Hart, P. & Ulrich, D. (eds), The Routledge Companion to Leadership, Routledge, London, pp. 359-372.
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Rhodes, C.H. 2016, 'Popular Culture and Management: the Provocation of Spongebob Squarepants' in Czarniawska, B. (ed), A Research Agenda for Management and Organization Studies, Edward Elgar Publishing, UK, pp. 126-135.
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Rhodes, C.H. 2016, 'Permission Taking: The Humanities and Critical Pedagogy in the MBA' in Steyaert, C., Beyes, T. & Parker, M. (eds), The Routledge Companion to Reinventing Management Education, Routledge, UK, pp. 361-373.
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The MBA has been under significant critique in recent years, most saliently in relation to its narrow functional focus, instrumental orientation and lack of attention to the ethical dimensions of business (Mintzberg 2004; Navarro 2008; Muff et al. 2013). Although it is common for responses to these issues to focus on broad-based programmes and curricular change (for example, Moldoveanu and Martin 2008; Datar et al. 2010), with this chapter I want to explore ways in which individual educators can respond and have responded to these issues in the classroom. In so doing I am not dismissing the importance of changes to the structure of education at the level of either policy or practice; clearly what happens at such lofty levels has a significant impact on teachers and students. Commentary on, for example, changes to government funding arrangements, the widespread vocationalization of management education, or universities focusing on using management programmes in a way that puts revenue generation above education is critical to maintaining democratic debate over the future of education. However, for most of us who toil away in the classroom our influence on such matters is for the most part limited, rendering us almost passive in our receipt of changes that eventually trickle down to us. We might engage with them in a similar manner to how we care about national politics, but our position is as citizens (in this case of the university) rather than as politicians. Moreover, if as individual educators we become enthralled solely with general debates at the expense of considering the possibilities of our own professional practice, then we risk avoiding taking action in the very location where we can make a difference. Although it may be the case that changes to the structure and governance regimes of universities have augmented managerial power at the expense of that of individual academics (Parker and Jary 1995), the classroom is a prime site where such encroachments ...
Pullen, A. & Rhodes, C. 2015, 'Introduction: The inseparability of ethics and politics in organizations' in Pullen, A. & Rhodes, C. (eds), The Routledge Companion to Ethics, Politics and Organizations, Routledge, London, pp. 1-9.
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Pullen, A. & Rhodes, C.H. 2015, 'Is Becoming-woman Possible in Organizations?' in Pullen, A. & Rhodes, C. (eds), The Routledge Companion to Ethics, Politics and Organizations, Routledge, London, pp. 355-367.
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Bjorkeng, K., Carlsen, A. & Rhodes, C.H. 2014, 'Between the Saying and the Said: From Self-reflexivity to Other-vulnerability in The Research Process'' in Cooren, F., Vaara, E. & Langley, A. (eds), Language and Communication at Work Discourse, Narrativity, and Organizing, OUP Oxford, pp. 325-348.
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Rhodes, C. 2013, 'Justice and the ethical quality of leadership' in Organizational Change, Leadership and Ethics: Leading Organizations Towards Sustainability, pp. 55-72.
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Rhodes, C.H. & Lilly, S. 2012, 'Studying Organizations Through Popular Culture' in rhodes, C. & Lilly, S. (eds), Organizations and Popular Culture: Information, Representation and Transformation, Routledge, London, pp. 1-15.
Rhodes, C.H. & Pullen, A. 2012, 'Gender, Work and Organizations in Popular Culture Narratives: Patriarchy, Politics and Parody' in Jeanes, E., Knights, D. & Martin, P.Y. (eds), Handbook of Gender, Work and Organization, John Wiley & Sons, Oxford, pp. 51-64.
After industrialization the stories we tell ourselves about ourselves are a part of the vast matrix of corporate activity. Gender, race and religion are deeply entrenched in and influential on popular culture and the mass media (Fiske, 1989 ).
Rhodes, C.H. 2012, 'he Moral of the Story: Ethics, Narrative and Organizational Change' in The Routledge Companion to Organizational Change, Routledge, pp. 506-518.
Rhodes, C. 2011, 'Organizational justice' in Business Ethics and Continental Philosophy, pp. 141-161.
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© Mollie Painter-Morland and René ten Bos 2011. Goals of this chapter. After studying this chapter you will be able to: Articulate the ways in which management and business ethics researchers have approached and developed the idea of organizational justice; distinguish between the three most commonly defined dimensions of organizational justice: distributive justice, procedural justice, and interactional justice; explain how management and business ethics researchers have understood the relationship between justice and ethics; explain how the concept of justice is understood in the philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas and contrast this with the concept of justice used in the literature on organizational justice; consider the radical implications of Levinas's understanding of justice for organizational justice; understand the meaning of the term pleonexia and its relationship with justice in organizations. Introduction. The idea of justice is philosophically sophisticated, culturally embedded, and practically enacted. Justice has had massive uptake in Western society and culture over some thousands of years. With this longevity 'justice' is part of our normal lexicon and is an idea that forms the basis of some of the main national and international institutions that serve to govern our everyday lives. The breadth of juridico-political structures that regulates interactions between people in both national and global settings rests in one way or the other on the idea of justice. Business organizations are also sites where the idea of justice is meaningful, and it has therefore not escaped the attention of those who study, theorize, and practice management and ethics-especially in terms of the just treatment of employees.
Boje, D., Pullen, A., Rhodes, C.H. & Rosile, G.A. 2011, 'The Virtual Leader' in Bryman, A., Collinson, D., Grint, K., Jackson, B. & Uhl-Bien, M. (eds), The SAGE Handbook of Leadership, SAGE, London, pp. 518-530.
INTRODUCTION This chapter provides a critical review and evaluation of the idea and practices of the 'virtual leader'. Although the issue of virtuality has been taken up in leadership studies in relation to 'virtual teams' (see Martins, Gilson and ...
Rhodes, C.H. 2011, 'The Gift of the World: Writing as Openness and Responsibility' in Dutton, J. & Carlsen, A. (eds), Research Alive: Exploring Generative Moments of Qualitative Research, CBS Press, Copenhagen, pp. 190-193.
Rhodes, C.H. & Pullen, A. 2010, 'Gender, The Mask and The Face: Towards a Corporeal Ethics' in Simson, R. & Lewis, P. (eds), Concealing and Revealing Gender, Palgrave, Badingstoke, pp. 233-248.
Rhodes, C.H. & Pullen, A. 2009, 'Narrative and stories in organizational research: An exploration of gendered politics in research methodology' in Buchanan, D.A. & Bryman, A. (eds), The Sage Handbook of Organizational Research Methods, Sage Publications, London, UK, pp. 583-601.
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Pullen, A. & Rhodes, C.H. 2009, 'Borderlines' in Pullen, A. & Rhodes, C. (eds), Bits of Organization, Copenhagen Business School Press, Denmark, pp. 9-17.
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Rhodes, C.H. & Kornberger, M.M. 2009, 'Writing in the crowded margin: Transgression, postmodernism and organization studies' in Pullen, A. & Rhodes, C. (eds), Bits of Organization, Copenhagen Business School Press, Denmark, pp. 99-118.
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Rhodes, C. & Pullen, A. 2009, 'Organizational moral responsibility' in The SAGE Handbook of Organizational Behavior: Volume II - Macro Approaches, pp. 340-355.
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Rhodes, C.H. 2008, 'Popular Culture' in Clegg, S.R. & Bailey, J.R. (eds), International Encyclopedia of Organization Studies, Sage, Thousand Oaks, Ca, pp. 1257-1260.
Rhodes, C.H. 2008, 'Organization Man' in Clegg, S.R. & Bailey, J.R. (eds), International Encyclopedia of Organization Studies, Sage, Thousand Oaks, Ca, pp. 1137-1139.
Rhodes, C.H., Scheeres, H.B. & Iedema, R.A. 2008, 'Triple Trouble: Undecidability, Identity and Organisational Change' in Coulthard & Iedema (eds), Identity Trouble, Palgrave Macmillan, Houndmills Basingstoke, UK, pp. 229-249.
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Kornberger, M.M. & Rhodes, C.H. 2007, 'Business ethics' in Ritzer, G. (ed), The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Sociology, Blackwell, Oxford, pp. 1439-1442.
Rhodes, C.H. & Westwood, R. 2007, 'Letting Knowledge Go: Ethics and Representation of the Other in International and Cross-Cultural Management' in Carter, C., Clegg, S., Kornberger, M., Laske, S. & Messner, M. (eds), Business Ethics as Practice: Representation, Reflexivity and Performance, Edward Elgar, Cheltenham, pp. 68-83.
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Rhodes, C.H. & Pullen, A. 2007, 'Representing the d'other: The grotesque body and masculinity at work in The Simpons' in Westwood, R. & Rhodes, C. (eds), Humour, Work and Organization, Routledge, London, pp. 161-179.
Westwood, R. & Rhodes, C.H. 2007, 'Humour and the study of organizations' in Westwood, R. & Rhodes, C. (eds), Humour, Work and Organization, Routledge, London, pp. 1-14.
Rhodes, C.H. 2007, 'Management Discourse' in George Ritzer (ed), The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Sociology, Blackwell, London, pp. 2722-2725.
Rhodes, C.H., Iedema, R.A. & Scheeres, H.B. 2007, 'Identity, Surveillance and Resistance' in Pullen, A., Beech, N. & Sims, D. (eds), Exploring Identity: Concepts and Methods, Palgrave Macmillan, Houndmills, pp. 83-99.
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Clegg, S.R. & Rhodes, C.H. 2006, 'Introduction: questioning the ethics of management practice' in Clegg, S. & Rhodes, C. (eds), Management Ethics: contemporary contexts, Routledge, Abingdon, UK, pp. 1-9.
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ARC Special Projects (ASSA)
Clegg, S.R. & Rhodes, C.H. 2006, 'Conclusions: possible ethics & ethical possibilities' in Clegg, S. & Rhodes, C. (eds), Management Ethics: contemporary contexts, Routledge, Abingdon, OX, UK, pp. 172-191.
ARC Special Projects (ASSA)
Czarniawska, B. & Rhodes, C.H. 2006, 'Strong plots: popular culture in management practice & theory' in Gagliardi, P. & Czarniawske, B. (eds), Management Education & Humanities, Edward Elgar, Cheltenham, GL, UK, pp. 195-218.
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Kornberger, M.M., Rhodes, C.H. & Ten Bos, R. 2006, 'The others of hierarchy: rhizomatics of organising' in Fuglsang, M. & Sorensen, B.M. (eds), Deleuze and the Social, Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh, UK, pp. 58-74.
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Clegg, S.R. & Rhodes, C.H. 2006, 'Conclusions: Possible ethics and ethical possibilities' in Clegg, S. & Rhodes, C. (eds), Management Ethics: Contemporary Contexts, Routledge, Abingdon, OX, UK, pp. 172-176.
Rhodes, C.H., Rhodes, J. & Rhodes, D. 2005, 'Jackass' in Jones, C. & O'Doherty, D. (eds), Manifestos for the Business School of Tomorrow, Dvalin Books (http://www.dvalin.org/), Abo, Sweden, pp. 72-78.
Rhodes, C.H. 2002, 'Politics and popular culture: Organizational carnival in the Springfield nuclear power plant' in Clegg, S.R. (ed), Management and Organization Paradoxes Management and Organization Paradoxes Management and Organization Paradoxes, John Benjamins, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, pp. 119-137.
Rhodes, C.H. 2002, 'Dialogue, Learning and Management Education' in McNiff, J. (ed), Action Research in Organisations, Routledge, London, pp. 261-264.
Introduction In The Fifth Discipline, Peter Senge says: 'The organizations that will truly excel in the future will be the organizations that discover how to tap people's commitment and capacity to learn at all levels in an organization' (1990: 4; ...

Journal articles

Harvey, G., Rhodes, C.H., Vachhani, S.J. & Williams, K. 2017, 'Neo-villeiny and the service sector: the case of hyper flexible and precarious work in fitness centres', Work, Employment and Society, vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 19-35.
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Pullen, A., Rhodes, C. & Thanem, T. 2017, 'Affective politics in gendered organizations: Affirmative notes on becoming-woman', Organization, vol. 24, no. 1, pp. 105-123.
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© 2016, © The Author(s) 2016. Current approaches to the study of affective relations are over-determined in a way that ignores their radicality, yet abstracted to such an extent that the corporeality and differentially lived experience of power and resistance is neglected. To radicalize the potential of everyday affects, this article calls for an intensification of corporeality in affect research. We do this by exploring the affective trajectory of 'becoming-woman' introduced by Deleuze and Guattari. Becoming-woman is a process of gendered deterritorialization and a specific variation on becoming-minoritarian. Rather than a reference to empirical women, becoming-woman is a necessary force of critique against the phallogocentric powers that shape and constrain working lives in gendered organizations. While extant research on gendered organizations tends to focus on the overwhelming power of oppressive gender structures, engaging with becoming-woman releases affective flows and possibilities that contest and transgress the increasingly subtle and confusing ways in which gendered organization affects people at work. Through becoming-woman, an affective and affirmative politics capable of resisting the effects of gendered organization becomes possible. This serves to further challenge gendered oppression in organizations and to affirm a life beyond the harsh limits that gender can impose.
Rhodes, C. 2017, 'Ethical Praxis and the Business Case for LGBT Diversity: Political Insights from Judith Butler and Emmanuel Levinas', Gender, Work and Organization, vol. 24, no. 5, pp. 533-546.
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© 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.This paper critically reconsiders debates about the business case for workplace diversity as exemplified in lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) activism. These debates have long suggested that there is an oppositional distinction between justifying diversity on self-interested business grounds and justifying it on the grounds of ethics, equality and social justice. This has led to an impasse between ethically driven diversity theory and activism, and the dominant business case approach commonly deferred to in managerial practice. As a way of mediating this impasse the contribution of this paper is to demonstrate how 'ethical praxis' can be deployed both despite and because of non-ethically motivated approaches to ethics in business. Drawing on Judith Butler's and Emmanuel Levinas's considerations of the relationship between ethics and the practice of justice, it is argued that critiques of the business case for diversity rely on a pure ethics that does not adequately recognize its connection to lived politics. Conversely, support for the business case evinces a politics that has failed to remember its origin in ethics. The paper positions ethical praxis as a political intervention undertaken in the name of ethics and uses this to suggest that the business case, despite its ethical poverty, holds potential to create real opportunities for justice in organizations.
Rhodes, C. & Westwood, R. 2016, 'The Limits of Generosity: Lessons on Ethics, Economy, and Reciprocity in Kafka's The Metamorphosis', Journal of Business Ethics, vol. 133, no. 2, pp. 235-248.
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This paper interrogates the relation between reciprocity and ethics as it concerns participation in the world of work and organizations. Tracing discussions of business and organizational ethics that concern themselves, respectively, with the ethics of self-interest, the ethics of reciprocity, and the ethics of generosity, we explore the possibility of ethical relations with those who are seen as radically different, and who are divested of anything worth exchanging. To address this we provide a reading of Franz Kafka's famous novella The Metamorphosis and relate to it as a means to extend our understanding of business and organizational ethics. This story, we demonstrate, yields insight into the unbearable demands of ethics as they relate to reciprocity and generosity. On this basis, we draw conclusions concerning the mutually constitutive ethical limitations of reciprocity and generosity as ethical touchstones for organizational life while simultaneously accepting the seemingly insurmountable difficulties of exceeding those limits. In such a condition, we argue, ethics is not best served by adopting idealistic or moralizing positions regarding generosity but rather by working in the indissoluble tensions between self and other.
Rhodes, C. 2016, 'Democratic Business Ethics: Volkswagen's Emissions Scandal and the Disruption of Corporate Sovereignty', Organization Studies, vol. 37, no. 10, pp. 1501-1518.
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© 2016, © The Author(s) 2016. There is an established body of politically informed scholarly work that offers a sustained critique of how corporate business ethics is a form of organizing that acts as a subterfuge to facilitate the expansion of corporate sovereignty. This paper contributes to that work by using its critique as the basis for theorizing an alternative form of ethics for corporations. Using the case of the 2015 Volkswagen emissions scandal as an illustrative example, the paper theorizes an ethics that locates corporations in the democratic sphere so as to defy their professed ability to organize ethics in a self-sufficient and autonomous manner. The Volkswagen scandal shows how established organizational practices of corporate business ethics are no barrier to, and can even serve to enable, the rampant pursuit of business self-interest through well-orchestrated and large-scale conspiracies involving lying, cheating, fraud and lawlessness. The case also shows how society, represented by individuals and institutions, is able to effectively resist such corporate malfeasance. The 'democratic business ethics' that this epitomizes is one where civil society holds corporations to account for their actions, and in so doing disrupts corporate sovereignty. This ethics finds practical purchase in forms of dissent that redirect power away from centres of organized wealth and capital, returning it to its democratically rightful place with the people, with society.
Rhodes, C. 2016, 'Review of: Stephen Edgell, Heidi Gottfried and Edward Granter (eds.), The SAGE Handbook of the Sociology of Work and Employment', Journal of Industrial Relations, vol. 58, no. 5, pp. 697-698.
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Pullen, A. & Rhodes, C. 2015, 'Writing, the Feminine and Organization', GENDER WORK AND ORGANIZATION, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 87-93.
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Rhodes, C. 2015, 'Writing organization/romancing fictocriticism', CULTURE AND ORGANIZATION, vol. 21, no. 4, pp. 289-303.
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Pullen, A. & Rhodes, C. 2015, 'Ethics, embodiment and organizations', ORGANIZATION, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 159-165.
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Phillips, M., Pullen, A. & Rhodes, C. 2014, 'Writing Organization as Gendered Practice: Interrupting the Libidinal Economy', ORGANIZATION STUDIES, vol. 35, no. 3, pp. 313-333.
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Pullen, A. & Rhodes, C. 2014, 'Corporeal ethics and the politics of resistance in organizations', ORGANIZATION, vol. 21, no. 6, pp. 782-796.
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Rhodes, C.H. 2014, 'Ethical Anarchism, Business Ethics and The Politics of Disturbance', Ephemera: Theory and Politics in Organization, vol. 14, no. 4, pp. 725-737.
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Rhodes, C. & Wray-Bliss, E. 2013, 'The ethical difference of Organization', ORGANIZATION, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 39-50.
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Pullen, A. & Rhodes, C. 2013, 'Parody, subversion and the politics of gender at work: the case of Futurama's "Raging Bender'', ORGANIZATION, vol. 20, no. 4, pp. 512-533.
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Rhodes, C. 2012, 'Ethics, alterity and the rationality of leadership justice', HUMAN RELATIONS, vol. 65, no. 10, pp. 1311-1331.
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Rhodes, C. & Pullen, A. 2012, 'Commercial gender: Fracturing masculinity in the case of OzRock', CULTURE AND ORGANIZATION, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 33-49.
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Rhodes, C. & Harvey, G. 2012, 'Agonism and the Possibilities of Ethics for HRM', JOURNAL OF BUSINESS ETHICS, vol. 111, no. 1, pp. 49-59.
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Rhodes, C.H. & Bloom, P. 2012, 'The Cultural Fantasy of Hierarchy: Sovereignty and The Desire For Spiritual Purity', Research in the Sociology of Organizations, vol. 35, pp. 141-141.
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Bureaucratic hierarchy, as the hallmark of the modern organization, has been remarkably resilient in the face of increasingly pervasive attacks on its fundamental value and usefulness. We investigate the reasons for this from a cultural, particularly psychoanalytic, perspective – one that sees hierarchy's perpetuation not in terms of the efficacy of its instrumental potential, but rather in the values that are culturally sedimented within it. We argue that hierarchy reflects longings for a pure heavenly order that can never be attained yet remains appealing as a cultural fantasy psychologically gripping individuals in its beatific vision. To tease out this cultural logic we examine two representations of it in popular culture – the U.S. television comedy The Office (2005–) and comedian Will Farrell's impersonation of George W. Bush (2009). These examples illustrate the strength of bureaucratic hierarchy as an affective cultural ideal that retains its appeal even whilst being continually the subject of derision. We suggest that this cultural ideal is structured through a 'fantasmatic narrative' revolving around the desire for a spiritualized sense of sovereignty; a desire that is always undermined yet reinforced by its failures to manifest itself concretely in practice. Our central contribution is in relating hierarchy to sovereignty, suggesting that hierarchy persists because of an unquenched and unquenchable desire for spiritual perfection not only amongst leaders, but also amongst those they lead.
Rhodes, C.H. & Price, O. 2011, 'The Post-Bureaucratic Parasite: Contrasting Narratives Of Organizational Change In Local Government', Management Learning, vol. 42, no. 3, pp. 241-260.
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This article investigates the relationship between learning, bureaucracy and post-bureaucracy as manifest in a local government council in the Australian state of New South Wales. Empirically, we compare the culturally dominant narrative of the necessity
McMurray, R., Pullen, A. & Rhodes, C. 2011, 'Ethical subjectivity and politics in organizations: A case of health care tendering', ORGANIZATION, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 541-561.
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Rooney, D.L., Rhodes, C.H. & Boud, D.J. 2010, 'A community college's performance of 'organisation': Its a drag!', Studies in the Education of Adults, vol. 42, no. 1, pp. 18-33.
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Noting the ever-increasing encroachment of discourses and practices from the private sector on public education providers, this paper argues that such organizations exist within competing sets of differences that seek to define and fix the meaning of 'education' and 'business'. We report on fieldwork conducted in an adult education college in Sydney. In the Australian context these colleges are referred to as community colleges and their history is one based in a strong liberal tradition. Utilising Judith Butler's idea of 'drag' we consider the effects of changing modes of governance in the college with specific reference to the stories told to us about it. Our discussion suggests that the organisation was caught between identifying itself with a masculinised discourse of business and a discourse of community cast as its feminised other. In navigating between these, the college was seen to perform as a 'drag king' an organisation performing the masculine but in so doing, undoing its gendered status. This leads us to suggest that the incorporation of business and market-based discourse into the management of community education is something that is actively resisted and undermined through such forms of gendered transgression. We conclude by proposing that this organization's capacity to perform drag is a contributing factor to its overall success, and particularly in an economic climate where many not-for-profit organisations are floundering.
Rhodes, C.H., Pullen, A. & Clegg, S.R. 2010, ''If i should fall from grace...': Stories of Change and Organizational Ethics', Journal of Business Ethics, vol. 91, no. 4, pp. 457-614.
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Although studies in organizational storytelling have dealt extensively with the relationship between narrative, power and organizational change, little attention has been paid to the implications of this for ethics within organizations. This article addresses this by presenting an analysis of narrative and ethics as it relates to the practice of organizational downsizing. Drawing on Paul Ricoeurs theories of narrative and ethics, we analyze stories of organizational change reported by employees and managers in an organization that had undergone persistent downsizing. Our analysis maintains that the presence of a dominant story that seeks to legitimate organizational change also serves to normalize it, and that this, in turn, diminishes the capacity for organizations to scrutinize the ethics of their actions. We argue that when organizational change narratives become singularized through dominant forms of emplotment, ethical deliberation and responsibility in organizations are diminished. More generally, we contend that the narrative closure achieved by the presence of a dominant narrative amongst employees undergoing organizational change is antithetical to the openness required for ethical questioning.
Iedema, R.A. & Rhodes, C.H. 2010, 'The Undecided Space Of Ethics In Organizational Surveillance', Organization Studies, vol. 31, no. 2, pp. 199-217.
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While much contemporary organizational research has highlighted how surveillance and self-surveillance are dominant modes of attempting subjective control in organizations, in this article we consider whether 'being seen' harbours the potential to also e
Rhodes, C.H., Pullen, A., Vickers, M.H., Clegg, S.R. & Pitsis, A. 2010, 'Violence and workplace bullying: What are an organization's ethical responsiblities?', Administrative Theory & Praxis, vol. 32, no. 1, pp. 96-115.
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Understood as an act of violence intentionally perpetuated by one person over another, bullying is a direct affront to ethics, especially when ethics is seen to be grounded in a primary relationship with and responsibility for other people. Existing research has attended largely to providing individualized rather than organizational explanations of bullying and has not adequately interrogated bullying in relation to ethics. With this paper, we address the question What are organizations ethical responsibilities in responding to the bullying that occurs within them? We argue that although organizations cannot necessarily be held responsible for individual acts of bullying, they can be held responsible for asserting constant vigilance that seeks to address and minimize the presence of such acts. We call for organizations to act, not just to prevent or censure individual acts of bullying, but also to engage in an ongoing and active self-critique of all of their practices insofar as they support the institutionalization and normalization of bullying relationships.
Rhodes, C. & Pullen, A. 2010, 'Neophilia and organization', CULTURE AND ORGANIZATION, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 1-6.
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Rhodes, C., Pullen, A., Vickers, M.H., Clegg, S.R. & Pitsis, A. 2010, 'Violence and Workplace Bullying', Administrative Theory & Praxis, vol. 32, no. 1, pp. 96-115.
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Rhodes, C.H. 2009, '"All I want to do is get that check and get drunk" Testifying to resistance in Charles Bukowski's Factotum', Journal Of Organizational Change Management, vol. 22, no. 4, pp. 386-401.
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Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to examine the themes of resistance to organizations in Charles Bukowski's novel Factotum in relation to contemporary theory in organization studies, and to consider the ways in which the literary depiction of resistance can be used to extend theoretical debates on the subject Design/methodology/approach - Literary fiction, and the novel in particular, is theorized as an undecidable space between experiential reality and creative/fictional experiment that offers a valuable exposition of and experimentation with, the meaning of work in organizations. The theme of resistance to organizations in Factotum is read in terms of how the experiment of the novel can be articulated with discussions of resistance in organization studies. Findings - The paper shows how Bukowski's novel portrays a form of resistance that has elided attention in the organization studies literature - that which is highly individualistic and disorganized yet extreme and overt. This is a resistance that does not just work against the power structures of one organization, but rather rejects all aspects of capitalist work relations other than those necessary for survival. Originality/value - Theoretically, the paper extends theories of resistance in organizations by using Factotum to explore the meaning of extreme individualised organizational resistance. Methodologically the paper exemplifies how the reading of novels can provide insight to the paper of organizations not available through more conventional means by testifying to, and experimenting with, the meaning of organizational experience.
Rhodes, C.H. 2009, 'After reflexivity: Ethics, freedom and the writing of organization studies', Organization Studies, vol. 30, no. 6, pp. 653-672.
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Building on existing considerations of reflexivity in research writing, this essai seeks to reappraise the concept of responsibility in relation to the ethics of post-representational research methodology in organization studies. Jacques Derridas discussions of responsibility and undecidability and Emmanuel Lévinas distinction between the saying and the said are brought to bear on the ethics of the discursive construction of organizational research as a form of representing the Other. The essai argues that responding to reflexivity extends beyond textual practice and self-accounting towards a responsibility for the exercise of academic freedom. This freedom entails a radical openness that is operationalized in an ongoing reinvention that resists the institutionalization of the field of inquiry through a form of transformative knowledge. It is the legacy and promise of reflexivity in organization studies that can invigorate the imagination in research its poiesis as an ongoing project of saying the ethical.
Pullen, A. & Rhodes, C.H. 2008, ''It's All About Me!' Gendered Narcissism and Leaders' Identity Work', Leadership, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 5-25.
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This article develops and illustrates a gendered theorization of narcissism as it relates to the self-identity of leaders in organizations. While the value of existing theories of leadership and narcissism are acknowledged, it is noted that they treat narcissism in an implicitly masculine fashion. In so doing they limit narcissistic leadership identity to relatively aggressive, self-oriented, and domineering forms. To develop a more thorough and nuanced appreciation of the implications of narcissism for leaders' identity work, the article articulates a gendered perspective on narcissism that accounts for forms of leadership that are self-focused but not necessarily traditionally masculine. Four types of leadership narcissism are identified and illustrated: the bully, the star performer, the servant, and the victim. While each of these forms is narcissistic in that identity is associated with the defence of a grandiose self-image (ego ideal) through the admiration of others and the love of the self, they achieve this in markedly different, and gendered, ways. The article concludes by arguing how a gendered reading of narcissism and leadership provides a richer understanding of the narcissistic behaviours of men and women in contemporary organizations.
Rhodes, C.H. & Parker, M. 2008, 'Images of Organizing in Popular Culture', Organization, vol. 15, no. 5, pp. 627-637.
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Between 1999 and 2004 Playmates Toys Inc. of Costa Mesa, California, released a hugely successful line of plastic fi gurines depicting characters from the animated television series The Simpsons. Under the trademark `The World of Springfi eld, the series featured the cartoon characters in various poses and confi gurations. They were sold as `playsets replete with props and scenery. Playmates Toys is a subsidiary of Playmates Holding Ltd, a company listed on the Hong Kong stock exchange. The toys were manufactured in China and distributed all over the world as part of a global empire of fi gures and collectibles you might even have one in your home. Playmates operated under a license from the 20th Century Fox Film Corporation as just one part of the multi-million dollar merchandising businesses fuelled by the massive popularity of The Simpsons. Indeed, there are many hundreds of organizations licensed to use The Simpsons to market everything from breakfast cereal to board games. You can even purchase Simpsons branded `sugar free chewable omega 3 capsules and various `vitamin products, not to mention the Homer Simpson talking pizza cutter.
Rhodes, C.H. & Pitsis, A. 2008, 'Organization and Mimetic Excess: Magic, Critique and Style', International Studies of Management & Organization, vol. 38, no. 1, pp. 71-91.
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This paper presents a series of connected reflections that consider the process of representation, mimesis, and poiesis in textuality, with a particular focus on writing about management and organizations. The paper juxtaposes and partially connects stories, narrative fragments, and arguments ranging in source from, inter alia, fictionalizations of ancient Rome, reflections on the magical practices of native South Americans, lyrics of popular songs, considerations of Hindu gurus, and the phenomena of guru management books. This assemblage of different yet interconnected texts intends to suggest a critique of popular fashionable management, as well as a critique of its critique elsewhere. The point we arrive at is that management and its scholarship might eschew a desire for being either fashionable or scientific, and instead try just to be stylish.
Pullen, A. & Rhodes, C.H. 2008, 'Dirty Writing', Culture and Organization, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 241-259.
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On 16 August 2006 we watched Life of Grime: New York on Australia's Channel 10 television network. The camera followed a group of 'grime professionals' cleaning up the streets of New York. They cleaned rats, dogs and other peoples' dirt. One guy struck us as particularly interesting. His job was cleaning the streets after suicides. His latest assignment was someone who had recently jumped from an apartment block of 17 floors, a woman. He enjoyed scrubbing the railing which caught her flesh as she fell, the blood fresh on the sidewalk. As he hosed down the street with complete detachment from the dirt he was cleaning, the blood just ran, slipping away - life having already slipped away. The debris was fresh and easy to remove. Stale dirt, hardened blood, crusty flesh is harder to brush away and with it better hydraulics are required to sterilize the streets, he told us. Maybe writing is like this. Ignoring the material(ity) of the dirt. Pretending that it didn't come from real people. Forgetting the damaged lives that produce the dirt. Removing the dirt from view. And our dirt is so encrusted, so hard to sanitize despite our massive cleaning efforts.
Rhodes, C.H., Clegg, S.R. & Anandakumar, A. 2008, 'Ethical Vitality: Identity, Responsibility and Change in an Australian Hospital', International Journal of Public Administration, vol. 31, no. 9, pp. 1037-1057.
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This article reports and reflects on a narrative ethnographic account of organizational change in a large public hospital in Australia. We describe how the conduct and identity positions of people in the hospital were related to three prevalent discourses; one of authoritarian professionalism, one of collaboration and open disclosure, and one of inspection and retribution. We suggest that the presence of multiple and competing organizational discourses on which to base decisions, highlighted the need for managers to take a personal stake in deciding their own conduct. We propose the notion of ethical vitality as a means of registering the ways that ethical responsibility can only come alive in organizations when people take, and are in a position to take, a reflexive responsibility for their conduct. On this basis, we suggest that the presence of multiple ethical norms and rules in organizations, on a plural model, might actually make people in organizations more rather than less ethically responsible
Rhodes, C.H. 2007, 'Outside The Gates Of Eden - Utopia And Work In Rock Music', Group & Organization Management, vol. 32, no. 1, pp. 22-49.
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This article explores how the relationship between work and utopia has been articulated in rock music. Rock is a cultural discourse that provides insight into the tension between representations of utopian imagination with the often hard realities of the
Clegg, S.R., Kornberger, M.M. & Rhodes, C.H. 2007, 'Business Ethics as Practice', British Journal of Management, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 107-122.
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In this article we develop a conceptualization of business ethics as practice. Starting from the view that the ethics that organizations display in practice will have been forged through an ongoing process of debate and contestation over moral choices, we examine ethics in relation to the ambiguous, unpredictable, and subjective contexts of managerial action. Furthermore, we examine how discursively constituted practice relates to managerial subjectivity and the possibilities of managers being moral agents. The article concludes by discussing how the 'ethics as practice' approach that we expound provides theoretical resources for studying the different ways that ethics manifest themselves in organizations as well as providing a practical application of ethics in organizations that goes beyond moralistic and legalistic approaches.
Clegg, S.R., Rhodes, C.H. & Kornberger, M.M. 2007, 'Desperately Seeking Legitimacy: Organizational Identity and Emerging Industries', Organization Studies, vol. 28, no. 4, pp. 495-513.
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In this article we examine the process of organizational identity formation in emerging industries. We argue that organizational identity is best understood in terms of the relationship between temporal difference (i.e. the performance of a stable identity over time) and spatial difference (i.e. by locating organizational identity in relation to other firms, both similar and different). It is the relationship between these two forms of difference that enables the construction of a legitimate sense of organizational identity. Our discussion is illustrated using empirical material from a study of the emerging industry of business coaching in Australia.
Clegg, S.R., Kornberger, M.M. & Rhodes, C.H. 2007, 'Organizational ethics, decision making, undecidability', Sociological Review, vol. 55, no. 2, pp. 393-409.
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In this paper we develop a conceptualisation of organizational decision-making as a practice that is, necessarily, ethical. The paper starts with a discussion of the notion of decision-making as it relates to organizational rationality and the relationsh
Byers, D. & Rhodes, C.H. 2007, 'Ethics, Alterity and Organizational Justice', Business Ethics: A European Review, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 239-250.
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This paper articulates a conception of organizational justice based on the promise of a mode of organizing that does not violate the particularity of each and every other person. It argues that the decisive condition for such a form of justice resides in the realities of the cultural practices of an organization as they are apparent in the conduct of people in relation to multiple others. These are practices that can only seek justification in the primary right of each person to be regarded with absolute alterity. It also argues that a degree of violence is unavoidable within any practical ordering of justice and that any consideration of ethics and justice in organizations must account for such violence and seek to negotiate its existence on ethical terms. The organizational justice that is referred to is one sensitive to the exercise of its own power and authority in the context of its unavoidable violation of its basis in ethics. This is a justice that is ethically necessary, but is never sure of itself.
Clegg, S.R., Kornberger, M.M., Carter, C. & Rhodes, C.H. 2006, 'For management?', Management Learning, vol. 37, no. 1, pp. 7-27.
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Over the past decades there have been persistent radical critiques of management. Previously the goal was to apply forms of Marxian analysis to the world of management and organizations, usually seeing it as a sphere of false consciousness distorted and
Boje, D. & Rhodes, C.H. 2006, 'The leadership of Ronald McDonald double narration and stylistic lines of transformation', The Leadership Quarterly, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 94-103.
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This research note reports a study of Ronald McDonalds leadership. The argument is that rather than just being a spokesperson or marketing device for the McDonalds corporation, Ronald performs an important transformational leadership function. Ronalds re
Rhodes, C.H. & Scheeres, H.B. 2006, 'Between cultures: values, training and identity in a manufacturing firm', Journal Of Organizational Change Management, vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 223-236.
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Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to critically scrutinize the use of training interventions as a means of implementing corporate culture change and to assess the implications of such programs for employee identity. Design/methodology/approach - The
Iedema, R.A., Rhodes, C.H. & Scheeres, H.B. 2006, 'Surveillance, resistance, observance Exploring the teleo-affective volatility of workplace interaction', Organization Studies, vol. 27, no. 8, pp. 1111-1130.
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Central to the critical study of contemporary management practice has been an understanding of the possibilities for worker subjugation framed in terms of the disciplinary practices of surveillance and responses to it in terms of compliance and resistanc
Ibarra-Colado, E., Clegg, S.R., Rhodes, C.H. & Kornberger, M.M. 2006, 'The ethics of managerial subjectivity', Journal of Business Ethics, vol. 64, no. 1, pp. 45-55.
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This paper examines ethics in organizations in relation to the subjectivity of managers. Drawing on the work of Michel Foucault we seek to theorize ethics in terms of the meaning of being a manager who is an active ethical subject. Such a manager is so i
Rhodes, C.H. 2006, 'Critical Management Studies: A Reader', British Journal Of Industrial Relations, vol. 44, no. 3, pp. 590-593.
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Rhodes, C.H. 2006, 'For Business Ethics', Organization Studies, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 303-308.
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Clegg, S.R., Kornberger, M.M. & Rhodes, C.H. 2005, 'Learning/becoming/organizing', Organization, vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 147-167.
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In this paper we rethink and reframe organizational learning in terms of organizational becoming. We see these concepts as two mutually implicating ways of exploring and simultaneously constituting the phenomena of organization. Bearing in mind that the
Iedema, R.A., Rhodes, C.H. & Scheeres, H.B. 2005, 'Presencing identity: organizational change and immaterial labor', Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 327-337.
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Purpose - To examine Hardt and Negri's discussions of immaterial labor in relation to personal identity and sociality at work in a context of the postmodernization of the global economy. Design/methodology/approach - Hardt and Negri's discussions of imma
Boje, D. & Rhodes, C.H. 2005, 'The virtual leader construct: The mass mediatization and simulation of transformational leadership', Leadership, vol. 1, no. 4, pp. 407-428.
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Rhodes, C.H. & Brown, A. 2005, 'Narrative, organizations and research', International Journal of Management Reviews, vol. 7, no. 3, pp. 167-188.
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Given the rapid expansion of narrative approaches in management and organization theory in recent years, this paper investigates the contribution of this literature to the understanding of organizations and processes of organizing. The paper tells the story of the development of narrative approaches in organizational theory. Narrative's contribution to substantive areas of organization theory is evaluated. These developments are then reviewed in relation to an ongoing tension between story and science. We conclude by contemplating some of the criticisms, and the future, of narrative research.
Rhodes, C.H. & Brown, A. 2005, 'Writing responsibly: Narrative fiction and organization studies', Organization, vol. 12, no. 4, pp. 467-491.
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In this paper, we reflect on the use of fictional source material and fictional formats in organization studies in order to explore issues of responsibility in the writing of research. We start by examining how research using fictional narrative methods has worked to radically destabilize distinctions between what is real and what is fictional. In relation to this, we ask the question: if a research account can be regarded as fiction, what are the implications of this insight for the responsibilities of authors? Opposing the view that using fiction necessarily leads to an anything goes relativism, we argue that a recognition of the fictionality of research texts implies a heightened sense of researcher-author responsibility. We see our main contribution as extending existing discussions of reflexivity in research into a consideration of issues of ethics and responsibility as it relates to the textuality of research writing. To do so, we draw on Derridas theorization of responsibility and undecidability as a way of problematizing and discussing the ethics of research in relation to its textuality. We argue that the explicit borrowing from fictional genres evinces the essentially written and fictional status of research papers, and highlights the ethical dimensions associated with decisions related to representational strategies and authorial subjectivity.
Rhodes, C.H. 2005, 'David Grant, Cynthia Hardy, Cliff Oswick and Lunda Putnam (eds): the SAGE Handbook of Ornganizational Discourse', Organization Studies, vol. 26, no. 5, pp. 793-804.
Book review
Clegg, S.R., Rhodes, C.H., Kornberger, M.M. & Stilin, R.A. 2005, 'Business coaching: challenges for an emerging industry', Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 37, no. 5, pp. 218-223.
Rhodes, C.H. 2005, 'The Sage Handbook Of Organizational Discourse', Organization Studies, vol. 26, no. 5, pp. 793-799.
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Rhodes, C. 2005, 'Book Review: Campbell Jones, Martin Parker and Rene ten Bos: For Business Ethics', Organization Studies, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 303-308.
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Rhodes, C. 2005, 'Book Review: The SAGE Handbook of Organizational Discourse', Organization Studies, vol. 26, no. 5, pp. 793-799.
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Rhodes, C. & Brown, A.D. 2005, 'Writing responsibly: Narrative fiction and organization studies', ORGANIZATION, vol. 12, no. 4, pp. 467-491.
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Clegg, S.R., Kornberger, M.M. & Rhodes, C.H. 2004, 'Noise, parasites and translation - theory and practice in management consulting', Management Learning, vol. 35, no. 1, pp. 31-44.
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Clegg, S.R., Kornberger, M.M. & Rhodes, C.H. 2004, 'When the saints go marching in: a reply to Sturdy, Clark, Fincham and Handley.', Management Learning, vol. 35, no. 3, pp. 341-344.
Byers, D. & Rhodes, C.H. 2004, 'Justice, identity and managing with philosophy', Ephemera: critical dialogues on organisations, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 152-164.
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Rhodes, C.H. 2004, 'Utopia in popular management writing and the music of Bruce Springsteen: do you believe in the promised land?', Consumption, Markets and Culture, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 1-20.
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Rhodes, C.H. & Scheeres, H.B. 2004, 'Developing people in organisations: working (on) identity.', Studies in Continuing Education, vol. 26, no. 2, pp. 175-193.
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Rhodes, C.H. 2004, 'Books Review: Debating Organization: Point-counterpoint In Organization Studies', Contemporary Sociology-a Journal Of Reviews, vol. 33, no. 4, pp. 443-444.
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Ten Bos, R. & Rhodes, C.H. 2003, 'The game of exemplarity: subjectivity, work and the impossible politics of purity', Scandinavian Journal of Management, vol. 19, pp. 403-423.
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Rhodes, C.H. & Garrick, J. 2003, 'Project based learning and the limits of corporate knowledge', Journal of Management Education, vol. 27, pp. 447-471.
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Rhodes, C.H. 2002, 'Text. Plurality and organisational knowledge/I like to write about organisations', Ephemera, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 98-118.
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Rhodes, C.H. & Garrick, J. 2002, 'Economic metaphors and working knowledge: enter the 'cogito-economic' subject', Human Resource Development International, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 87-97.
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Rhodes, C.H. 2002, 'Coffee and the business of pleasure: the case of Harbucks vs. Mr Tweek', Culture and Organization, vol. 8, no. 4, pp. 293-306.
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In this paper, I examine the representation of organizations in the television cartoon series South Park . In particular the South Park episode 'Gnomes' is reviewed - this episode contains a direct parody of the role and conduct of organizations in society as its story revolves around a 'fictitious' coffee chain, Harbucks', attempt at a hostile takeover of a small town coffee shop. Drawing on the episode's roman a clef (or perhaps cartoon a clef ) depiction of the global coffee retailing organization Starbucks, it is argued that this popular culture representation offers opportunities to critique and debate organizational behaviour in a way not available to modes of representation common to Organization Studies. Following Bakhtin's model of the carnival, South Park is read as exemplary of a subversive culture of folk humour that mocks, satirises and undermines official institutions - a culture rich in understandings of contemporary organizations and their relationship with society.
Rhodes, C.H. 2001, ''D'Oh: The Simpsons, Popular Culture and the Organisational Carnival', Journal of Management Inquiry, vol. 10, no. 4, pp. 374-383.
Published in a major US journal. The journal is ranked "Recognised internationally 2* in the Aston Business School Data Base
Rhodes, C. 2000, 'Ghostwriting Research: Positioning the Researcher in the Interview Text', Qualitative Inquiry, vol. 6, no. 4, pp. 511-525.
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This article reviews the practice of interview-based research through the metaphor of researcher as ghostwriter. What is suggested is that research can be examined as a form of textual practice in which researchers create images of others and also enter those images. In such a practice, research can be understood as a dialogic process where researchers are never neutral in their attempts to write about the lives of other people. This then leads to a need for researchers to account for their textual choices and their role in producing accounts of the experience of others. The article concludes that the ghostwriter metaphor is a way of understanding research that enables researchers to acknowledge their role in the production of textual representations of their research participants. © 2000, Sage Publications. All rights reserved.
Rhodes, C. 2000, 'Reading and writing organizational lives', ORGANIZATION, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 7-29.
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garrick, J. & Rhodes, C.H. 1998, 'Deconstructive Organizational Learning: Towards a Postmodern Epistemology of Practice', Studies in the Education of Adults, vol. 30, no. 2, pp. 172-183.
Rhodes, C. 1997, 'The legitimation of learning in organizational change', JOURNAL OF ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE MANAGEMENT, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 10-&.
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Rhodes, C.H. 1997, 'Playing With Words: Multiple Representations of Organizational Learning Stories'', Electronic Journal of Radical Organization Theory, vol. 3, no. 1.
Rhodes, C.H. 1996, 'Postmodernism and the Practice of Human Resource Development in Organizations', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Vocational Education Research,, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 79-88.
Rhodes, C.H. 1996, 'Researching Organizational Change and Learning: A Narrative Approach', Researching Organizational Change and Learning: A Narrative Approach, vol. 2, no. 4.

Reports

Czarniawska, B. & Rhodes, C.H. Gothenburg Research Institute 2004, Strong Plots: the relationship between popular culture and management theory & practice, pp. 1-37, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Strong Plots: the relationship between popular culture and management theory & practice
Chappell, C.S., Hawke, G.A., Solomon, N. & Rhodes, C.H. Australian National Training Authority 2003, High Level Review of Training Packages - Phase 1 report - An analysis of the current and future context in which Training Packages will need to operate, pp. 1-47, Brisbane, Australia.
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An analysis of the current and future context in which Training Pac kages will need to operate
Chappell, C.S., Hawke, G.A., Rhodes, C.H. & Solomon, N. OVAL Research UTS 2003, Major research program for Older Workers; Stage 1 The Conceptual Framework, pp. 1-76, http://sitesearch.uts.edu.au/oval/publication_result.lasso.
This commissioned Report to ANTA develops a conceptual framework to understand the education and training needs of older workers in order to inform the context and future directions of education and gtraining policy in Australia