UTS site search

Dr Angela Dawson

Biography

Dr Angela Dawson is a public health social scientist with expertise in maternal and reproductive health service delivery to vulnerable populations. She has undertaken research into women’s access to abortion in Australia and emergency contraceptive pills in Cambodia, as well as the management and referral of women who have experienced domestic violence.

Angela has over 50 publications in peer-reviewed journals and she has written numerous reports and papers for governments and United Nations bodies. She has over 17 years experience in the areas of Indigenous Australian and international health, primary health care services, workforce development, health promotion and health communication. Angela was involved with the National Malaria Control Programme in five African countries, a Gates funded project with the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. She has also designed programmes to develop dialogue and debate between journalists and public health practitioners in Africa, Asia and the Caribbean.

See https://womeninscienceaust.org/stem-profiles/angela-dawson/

Image of Angela Dawson
Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Health
Member, Centre for Health Services Management (CHSM)
Member, Centre for Midwifery, Child and Family Health (CMCFH)
Member, WHO Collaborating Centre for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Development (WHO or WHOCC)
Core Member, CHSP - Health Services and Practice
Bachelor of Arts, Master in Arts, PhD
 
Phone
+61 2 9514 4892

Research Interests

Research expertise

  • Maternal and reproductive health service delivery
  • Adolescent sexual and reproductive health
  • Global health 
  • Sexual and reproductive health in humanitarian settings
  • Indigenous Australian primary health care 
  • Health promotion and communication

Areas of research supervision

  • Global health 
  • Primary health care workforce and service delivery 
  • Maternal and reproductive health 
  • Vulnerable and marginalised populations 
  • Community health 
  • Health communication

Apply for a research degree

Can supervise: Yes
Level 1 Research areas International Health Primary Health care workforce and service delivery Maternal and reproductive health Vulnerable and marginalized populations Community health Health communication

International health
Primary health Care service delivery
Qualitative Research methods
Mixed methods
Health Promotion

Conferences

Dawson, A., Doab, A. & Fowler, C. 2014, 'Factors that influence mother-child reunification for mothers with a history of substance use: A systematic review of the evidence to inform policy and practice in Australia.', The 34th Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs (APSAD), Adelaide.
Background: An estimated 60-70% of Australian children in out of home care have a parent with a substance use disorder (SUD). The assessment of a parent's history and needs and the design of supportive interventions, particularly for mothers who are often the primary carers of children, are important considerations in deciding whether or not family reunification is desirable and possible. It is not clear for the research how the needs of families can be best met. There are no systematic reviews that provide evidence to inform the development of preventative and remedial interventions and related policy options. We undertook an integrative literature review to examine maternal characteristics and program features that facilitate or prevent mother-child reunification in mothers with SUD. Methods: A structured search of 8 databases was undertaken to identify peer reviewed literature in English between 2004 and 2014 to examine factors that influenced mother-child reunification in mothers with SUD. We employed a narrative synthesis design to analyse the findings section of all papers as the methods of the various studies did not permit the pooling of data. Results: A total of 11 studies were included in this review. Findings show that factors such as timeliness of treatment entry, treatment completion and the receipt of matched services, and programs that provided a greater level of integrated care are positively related to reunification. The presence of a mental health disorder, use of opiates and having a greater number of children were barriers to reunification. Conclusion: Women with SUD who have a child in out of home care appear to have multiple unmet needs. Comprehensive and integrated care services as well as greater access to primary health care must be considered to improve the physical and psycho-social outcomes of these women, as well as their children.
Dawson, A., Homer, C. & Brodie, P. 2014, 'How should we collaborate to build midwifery capacity in low income countries?', 30th ICM Congress, Prague.
Progress towards MDG5 cannot be achieved without midwives and midwifery organisations coming together to support midwifery education, regulation and professional association efforts in low and middle income countries. Capacity building is critical to scaling up the midwifery workforce and improving maternal and child health. A number of symposia have sought to develop ways to build midwifery capacity through collaboration. This includes the 2010 meeting of the Global Advisory Group for Nursing and Midwifery Development that focused on developing policy and technical guidance in key areas including inter-professional collaboration. Other forums have emphasised partnership through pairing organizations (twinning), networking as well as bilateral and global collaboration. However, despite considerable effort towards building midwifery capacity through collaboration there is little high level evidence about the effectiveness of such strategies. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of approaches to collaboration documented in peer-reviewed research papers that were examined as part of a meta-synthesis study. We will discuss the complexities of collaborative efforts between midwifery organizations from different nations and describe a framework to guide practice. The presentation will present experiences of international midwifery collaboration from the literature that have sought to build capacity through the provision of tools, training midwives to develop appropriate clinical or research skills, building adequate numbers of skilled midwives, supervisor networks and incentives, establishing appropriately managed facilities as well as systems to facilitate effective decision making, information gathering and accountable midwifery care. We will examine these efforts in the light of social theory, including power relations, concepts of reciprocity and empowerment. This paper will present an innovative framework for the design and evaluation of midwifery coll...
Dawson, A. & Dean, S... 2014, 'A new building capacity model for the co-production of research between health academics and NGOs', the International Conference on Interdisciplinary Social Science, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
In today's high pressure academic research environment there is the expectation that researchers not only carry out high impact work but that this is translated into practice to improve health and social outcomes. This is more often than not a criterion for funding. NGO's who provide health services are increasingly keen to ensure that their programs are evidence-based in order to maximise client outcomes. This requires building workforce capacity to monitor and evaluate their programs in order to assess their merit. In reality, budget constraints, limited skills and funding opportunities constrains NGOs ability to carry out intervention research. In addition on-going efforts to secure funding for operation needs restricts an NGOs ability to deliver services. Over the years university engagement with NGO's has involved contract research or NGOs have often provided the primary data for university researchers. However, in recent times there has been an impetus for changing the way universities and NGO's work together, that demands collaboration and joint partnership. This paper reviews the different models of research partnership and examines a case study where university researchers worked with an NGO to analyse existing client outcome data in a residential drug and alcohol program in Australia. This involved building research skills and developing a plan for longitudinal research that will be used to provide an evidence –base to ensure program effectiveness. We present a framework based upon this experience that could be used for future collaborations that can guide genuine efforts towards, research co-productions.
Dawson, A. & Turkmani, S. 2014, 'Evidence to inform education, training and supportive work environments for midwives involved in the care of women with female genital mutilation', the Australian College of Midwives NSW Branch State Conference, Novotel Sydney Brighton Beach NSW.
Female genital mutilation (FGM) is a practice that is carried out on young girls and women in 29 countries in Africa and the Middle East, as well as some Asian countries (WHO, 2008). Migration from these countries to Australia has led to an increasing number of midwives caring for women with FGM and educating families in order to prevent this harmful and illegal practice. However very little is known about the challenges midwives face in delivering care and education and what professional development and workplace strategies might better support midwives. This presentation reports on a synthesis of the peer reviewed literature published between 2004 and 2014 undertaken to identify the knowledge, experiences and needs of midwives globally with respect to FGM. This review forms part of a larger research project funded by the Department of Health and Aging to examine the obstetric outcomes of women who have FGM and midwives experiences in Australia. Ten papers were included in the review, two from lower-middle income counties and eight from high income countries. The findings indicate that midwives lack technical knowledge and cultural competency to adequately care for women. Midwives, particularly those in lower-middle income counties where FGM was traditionally practiced were found to face significant challenges in their efforts to advocate for the abandonment of the practice. Training for midwives in the area of FGM was limited. Only one study reported the outcomes of an education initiative that was found to be beneficial. Professional education and training, a working environment supported by guidelines and responsive policy and community education, were suggested are necessary to enable midwives to improve the care of women with FGM and advocate against the practice. Implications for midwifery in NSW include the need for specialised education and training for midwives on FGM, alongside opportunities for collaborative practice in contexts that support the eff...
Doab, A., Fowler, C. & Dawson, A. 2014, 'Factors that influence mother-child reunification for mothers with a history of substance use:A systematic review of the evidence to inform policy and practice in Australia.', Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and Drugs, Adelaide.
Issues: Child abuse and neglect are of national concern in Australia and increasing reports to authorities are placing statutory child protection services under pressure Given the current increases in the number of Australian children in out of home care (OOHC) care, and that a large proportion of children in OOHC are have a parent with a substance use disorder (SUD), it is worthwhile examining the literature to provide evidence to inform the development of preventative and remedial interventions. Approach: Using a narrative synthesis design, this review explores programs and maternal characteristics that either facilitate or act as a barrier to mother-child reunification in mothers with SUD Key Findings: Outcomes regarding treatment modality and reunification were mixed. Factors such as presence of a mental health disorder and using opiates and were among several barriers to reunification. Implications: This has implications for health care planning and delivery for women who use opiates and a have a mental health issue. Conclusion: Women with SUDs who have a child in out of home care have multiple unmet needs. More comprehensive and integrated care services as well as greater access to primary health care must be considered if we are to improve outcomes and address issues for these women, as well as their children and potential future generations. Implications for Practice or Policy: Practice and policies that better support mothers with a SUD including reduction of stigma, removal of barriers for treatment access, and increased treatment retention are required. Furthermore, treatment for mental health issues must be better integrated into SUD treatment settings.
Homer, C.S., Rumsey, M., Brodie, P.M., Dawson, A., Copeland, F.H. & Daly, J. 2013, 'Helping build foundations for improved maternal health in PNG', International Council of Nurses 25th Quadrennial Congress, Melbourne.
Dawson, A., Pritchard, C., Dean, S., Robertson, J. & Jackson, D.E. 2013, 'Collaborative approaches to addressing the complex needs of women with post traumatic stress disorder and substance use disorder.', PHAA National Social Inclusion and Complex Needs Conference, PHAA National Social Inclusion and Complex Needs Conference, Public Health Association, Canberra, ACT, Australia, pp. 28-28.
In Australia, the health, social and economic burden of alcohol and drug dependence is profound. Women's substance use problems are highly stigmatized and often not acknowledged. Pregnant and parenting women face particular societal condemnation and encounter multiple systemic barriers that delay treatment seeking with women fearing consequences for them and their children. Rates of comorbid post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorder (SUD) are higher for women than men and are associated with trauma related to sexual abuse and family violence. Little research has been undertaken internationally or in Australia to determine the most effective treatment for women with PTSD and SUD. Given the high incidence of PTSD co morbidity, it is critical that treatment models accommodate the complex needs of these women and draw upon integrated services requiring multiple service providers and professionals. This paper reports on the trial of a unique program for women with SUD and PTSD at Jarrah House, a residential medical detoxification and rehabilitation NGO program for women and their children. Early findings show encouraging increases in client quality of life scores and insight into how the program has empowered women to make life changes and plan their recovery supported by various providers.
Dean, S., Dawson, A. & Jackson, D.E. 2013, 'Towards gender responsive treatment for substance abuse disorder: issues for consideration when providing services.', 8th International Conference on Interdisciplinary Social Sciences., Prague, Czech Republic..
In Australia the health, social and economic burden of female alcohol and drug dependence is profound. Women's substance use problems are more stigmatized, less likely to be acknowledged than men's, pregnant and parenting women face particular societal condemnation and encounter multiple systemic treatment barriers and they often delay seeking treatment services for fear of the consequences for them and their children. This particularly applies for Government agencies and women often feel more supported in seeking treatment programs in the NGO sector. International studies have documented high rates of comorbid post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD) and substance abuse disorders for men and for women although the rates appear to be higher for women and typically stem from different trauma. The relationship between PTSD and substance abuse disorders tells us very different stories in men and women and the social determinants and coocurring life problems are often very different with women experiencing issues with children more frequently than men. There is very little research internationally or Australia to determine what is the best type of treatment for women with PTSD and substance use disorders. Given the high incidence of this comorbidity, treatment models that do not address this critical issue may not be successful. This paper reports on a unique program being trialled in a residential medical detoxification and rehabilitation program for women and their children in NSW. Jarrah House is part of the NGO sector and it's mission is to promote the empowerment, health and well-being of women and children by providing an effective and therapeutic gender responsive drug and alcohol treatment service. The program being trialled is an integrated program addressing both trauma and substance use and is the focus of this paper.
Dawson, A., Meyers, J., Tran, N.-.T. & Krause, S. 2013, 'Capacity assessment of humanitarian organizations to implement the MISP and comprehensive reproductive health: Global review', The American Public Health Association Annual Meeting, Boston, USA.
Introduction. Institutions play a central role in advancing the field of reproductive health in humanitarian settings (RHHS), yet little is known about organizational capacity to deliver RHHS and how this has developed over the past decade. This study aimed to document the current institutional experiences and capacities related to RHHS. Materials and methods. Descriptive study using an online questionnaire tool. Results. Respondents represented 82 institutions from 48 countries, of which two-thirds originated from low-and middle-income countries. RHHS work was found not to be restricted to humanitarian agencies (25%), but was also embraced by development organizations (25%) and institutions with dual humanitarian and development mandates (50%). Agencies reported working with refugees (81%), internally-displaced (87%) and stateless persons (20%), in camp-based settings (78%), and in urban (83%) and rural settings (78%). Sixty-eight percent of represented institutions indicated having an RHHS-related policy, 79% an accountability mechanism including humanitarian work, and 90% formal partnerships with other institutions. Seventy-three percent reported routinely appointing RH focal points to ensure coordination of RHHS implementation. There was reported progress in RHHS-related disaster risk reduction (DRR), emergency management and coordination, delivery of the Minimum Initial Services Package (MISP) for RH, comprehensive RH services in post-crisis/recovery situations, gender mainstreaming, and community-based programming. Other reported institutional areas of work included capacity development, program delivery, advocacy/policy work, followed by research and donor activities. Except for abortion-related services, respondents cited improved efforts in advocacy, capacity development and technical support in their institutions for RHHS to address clinical services, including maternal and newborn health, sexual violence prevention and response, HIV prevention, managem...
Dawson, A., Tran, N.-.T., Wesley, E., Festin, M. & Mangiaterra, V. 2013, 'Access to ECP in Low and Middle income Countries: What do we know and what do we need to know?', International Emergency Contraception Jamboree,, New York City, Baruch College.
Background Objective 10.1 of the ECP work plan of the UN Commission on Life-Saving Commodities (UNCoLS) consists of conducting a systematic review of the literature on strategies to expand access to ECP in high-burden countries. A face-to-face meeting to share research findings and set a research agenda on ECP in developing countries was part of the activities under this objective. Methods of work The systematic review of the literature was launched in September 2013 and preliminary results were presented by Angela Dawson and Nguyen-Toan Tran in a special session chaired by Mario Festin during the 2013 EC Jamboree. This annual meeting was organized by the International Consortium on Emergency Contraception (ICEC) on 21-22 October 2013 in New York. A group of more than 30 international experts from both developed and developing countries attended the special session. After the interactive presentation of the preliminary findings and possible future research questions, experts were invited to form eight small working groups based on the six WHO health system building blocks plus a group on women, men and users, and another group on community and partnership. Nominal group technique was applied to generate first reflection and inputs from each participant. The individual research themes were then presented and prioritized in each working group, before being presented for discussion in the plenary. Findings The results of the different working groups are presented in the table below. Integration and contextualization. There was a common understanding that research questions from each building block need to be built on the questions from the other building blocks. Although ECP has its specific market delivery models and barriers, participants highlighted the importance of integrating ECP into other FP, GBV, and post-abortion care programs and services. The research questions need to be contextualized to the country situation, such as the definition of different hea...
Dawson, A., Homer, C., Brodie, P., Rumsey, M. & Copeland, F. 2013, 'We kam longwe so far: Building Midwifery Capacity in Papua New Guinea. Innovative approaches for women's health. Are the current initiatives adequate?', Pacific Society of Reproductive Health Biennial Conference, Honiara, The Solomon Islands.
Background In early 2012, the AusAID funded WHO PNG Maternal and Child Health Initiative (MCHI) was established to improve maternal health outcomes in Papua New Guinea in close partnership with the PNG National Department of Health. The WHO Collaborating Centre at UTS is subcontracted by WHO PNG to deliver a range of activities focused on improving the standard of midwifery clinical teaching and practice in four teaching sites. This has included the placement of 8 clinical midwifery facilitators to work alongside PNG midwifery educators, 2 obstetricians providing clinical care and education in rural areas, the provision of learning resources and training and education and capacity building workshops. Two obstetricians were also placed in two rural hospitals to assist in the delivery of obstetric care and training. Methods Multiple data collection tools are being used to collect both qualitative and qualitative data. These include In-country visits where interviews and focus groups were conducted with various stakeholders. Additionally surveys and reports were collected from educators, students, and faculty staff to the contribution that this capacity building initiative is making to the strengthening of teaching and learning and regulation. Findings The findings are currently being presented to WHO PNG and AusAID as part of a Mid Term Review. The findings will be presented at the PSRH Conference. Conclusion The MCHI is a new, and solid beginning towards the scale up of midwifery in PNG but only through on-going investment and development can the impact that can be made by midwives at population level be fully realized.
Dawson, A., Waters, C., Dignam, D. & Setiwan, A. 2013, 'Enhancing care access: Reducing infant mortality in Indonesia through Community Case Management', 4th International Congress on Paediatric Nursing, Australian College of Children & Young People's Nurses, Melbourne.
Aim: Indonesia is striving to achieve the Millennium Development Goal of no more than 30 infant deaths per 1000 live births in 2015. In order to reach this target, a new model of care called Community Case Management (CCM), developed by international non-government organizations and introduced by the Ministry of Health in three districts in the country in 2011. This paper reports on a study investigating the implementation of CCM in Indonesia from the perspective of Community Health Workers(CHWs) (community nurses, village midwives and community volunteers); and from the families who received care. Method: A Qualitative approach was used to gain insight into participants' perceptions and experiences. The data were collected following the training of CHWs and the initial phase of implementation. Interviews and FGDs were conducted with CHWs, families and key informants. CHWs were observed while delivering intervention to families. Result: CHWs reported that the program had increased their knowledge of and confidence, to deliver evidenced-based practice, alongside improved clinical reasoning. They reported improved access to care, family compliance with care plans, less need to refer to health facilities, and an increase in the capacity of families to learn about caring for sick children. Some implementation barriers and constraints and cultural concerns to were identified. Conclusion and 'take home message': Despite the reported success of the CCM program a number of cultural concerns highlight the need for programs to be more tailored to the socio-cultural context. Recommendations are made to overcome these barriers.
Dawson, A., Conigrave, K., Lee, K., Holme, E., Blaszczyk, J., Perry, J., Demirkol, A. & Freeburn, B. 2013, 'Improving Access for Indigenous Australians to Evidence-based Options to Substance Use', Drug and Alcohol Review Special Issue: Abstracts of the Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Conference, 24-27 November 2013, Melbourne, Australia, Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol & other Drugs APSAD Conference, Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol & other Drugs, Brisbane, pp. 13-13.
Aim of Abstract: This symposium will explore efforts to improve access of Aboriginal andTorres Strait Islander (Indigenous) Australians to evidence-based approaches to address substance use. Nature of Interactive Element: An interactive discussion will occur at four points in the symposium. Three of these will be co-chaired by Professor Conigrave, an experienced addiction medicine specialist. Mr Jimmy Perry (an Aboriginal health professional experienced in both remote and urban settings) will provide commentary on each presentation and lead a discussion.
Dawson, A. 2013, 'Influenza Vaccination during Pregnancy: What do General Practioners' Think?', Communicable Disease Network Australia's, Communicable Disease Control (CDC) Conference Australian Society for Infectious Diseases (ASID) Annual Scientific Meeting, Hyatt Hotel, Canberra.
Dean, S., Jackson, D.E. & Dawson, A. 2012, 'The Impact of Short Term Residential Treatment Programs for Women Withdrawing from Alcohol and Other Drugs in Australia', International Council on Women's Health Issues (ICOWHI), Bangkok, Thailand..
Objectives: To determine the impact of short term residential treatment programs for women withdrawing from alcohol and other drugs in Australia. Methods: In this first phase of a longitudinal study of women (n=80) in a residential treatment program in NSW women were invited to complete questionnaires to measure quality of life, psychological health and confidence in their ability to abstain at the commencement of the 21 day program following a physical detoxification; after the 21 day program had concluded; and again at 42 days if they repeated the program cycle. The women completed questionnaires on quality of life, WHO-8: EUROHIS, psychological health Kessler -10 Plus and confidence to abstain from alcohol and other drugs. Results: Preliminary results indicate that outcomes were positive on all scales after completing the 21 day program with no marked difference when women repeated the program and remained in the program for a further 21 days. Conclusion: Residential treatment programs specifically for women withdrawing from alcohol and other drugs are scarce in Australia and in fact internationally. There are huge waiting lists for these types of services. Given the long waiting lists for treatment services, the chance of relapse following women making the initial call to self refer to a program and the long wait for admission to a service, the fact that women are often separated from their children, communities and social supports, taken out out of employment, the high cost of residential treatments particularly if they involve clinical input for detoxification, it would seem pertinent that more data are available on time in treatment as a predictor of outcomes. Whilst some literature seems to suggest that the longer time spent in treatment is a good predictor of good outcomes for some client groups there is little information available on the impact of short term programs as a predictor of good outcomes (Ross et al 2004). Results from this study will be use...
Dawson, A. & Wijiwardena, K. 2012, 'Delivering Adolescent Reproductive Health Services in the Estate Sector in Sri Lanka', Lanka International Confederation of Midwives Asia Pacific Regional Conference, Hanoi, Viet Nam.
Managing and building the capacity of primary health care staff to deliver care, services and information to unique populations is challenging and requires strategies specially tailored to such contexts. The vast, privately owned tea and rubber plantations in Sri Lanka are home to half a million Tamils whose health outcomes and socio-economic status are the poor. The adolescent fertility rate in the estate sector is nearly double that of the non-estate sector not including the Northern Province (DoCS 2008). Youth on Estates are marginalised with high unemployment and school dropout rates. Health care on private estates is managed by plantation owners and midwives provide free preventative reproductive health services. There is little available information concerning the training, management and development needs of these staff and how they can be better supported to deliver adolescent reproductive health (ARH). This paper outlines the results of a case study examining estate midwives perceptions of ARH service needs and the barriers to the provision of such services. Focus group discussions were held with 20 Estate Midwives from tea and rubber estates across the Kalutara District in the Western Province. Data was analysed using the constant comparative method resulting in 5 main themes. Midwives report that they are increasingly attending to pregnant unmarried girls and assisting with sexual abuse cases. However, many of their activities are directed by the estate superintendent to whom they report. Training varied and was not consistent with Ministry of Health requirements. Estate midwives depend upon public health care workers outside the Estate for assistance as they feel they lack adequate knowledge and skills. Resources for promotion and preventative activities are limited and poor roads and transport affect the ability of adolescents to access other services. Midwives reported poor referral and follow up of adolescents. Improving infrastructure, estate mid...
Dawson, A., Ith, P. & Homer, C. 2012, 'Quality of maternity care practices of skilled birth attendants during labour, birth and the immediate postpartum period in Cambodia', International Confederation of Midwives Asia Pacific Regional Conference, Hanoi, Viet Nam.
The proportion of births attended by skilled birth attendants (SBAs) has been used as a proxy indicator to monitor progress towards achievement of Millennium Development Goal five which aims to reduce maternal mortality by three quarters by 2015. However, there has been little emphasis on examining the provision of quality of maternity care practices in Cambodia. The objective of this study was to seek to understand SBAs' perceptions and practices and the factors affecting their practice during labour, birth and the immediate postpartum. Methods: A qualitative design was employed using in-depth interviews and focus group discussions with midwives, nurses-midwives and doctors with midwifery skills in two health centres and three referral hospitals in one province of Cambodia. Data were analysed using a thematic approach. Findings: SBA practice is not always consistent with evidence-based standards known to reduce morbidity and mortality. Eight inter-related themes emerged which described patterns of SBA practice.. These were: skills in the care of labouring women; provision of support in labour; interventions in the second stage of labour; management of the third stage of labour; lack of policy and authority; fear of litigation; workload and lack of human resources; and, financial incentives and socioeconomic influences. Conclusions: A gap exists between evidence-based standards and current SBA practice during labour, birth and the immediate postpartum care. This is largely driven by the lack of a supportive working environment. The findings of this research provide maternal health services, workforce planners and policy makers with valuable information to improve maternal health. Recommendations for decision makers are made that maybe transferrable to other developing country contexts.
Dawson, A., Joof, B., Palmer, A., Dibba, A., Yehuenou, S., Devanny, B., Ocran, C., Kasse, Y., Milligan, P. & Cheun, Y. 2007, 'Peer health education for promoting knowledge andpractice of malaria prevention among school childrenand their families', Tropical Medicine and International Health, Multilateral Initiative on Malaria, Blackwell Publishing, Younde, Cameroon, pp. 175-175.
Introduction: Health promotion in schools aims to improve the health and well being of students by empowering them with the knowledge, skills and confidence to take responsibility for their own health. We incorporated a malaria component to an established peer health education programme in schools in The Gambia, and evaluated its impact on knowledge attitudes and practice of school students and their families. Methods: The intervention comprised training of peer health educators, teacher coordinators, and members of drama troupes, in key malaria messages and principles of health education, over a 10-week period. The peer educators then conducted a rolling programme of presentations to children and youth in their own schools using drama, puppetry, small group and in-class presentations about malaria, as well as community outreach programs targeting out-of-school youth and the general public. The programme was evaluated by KAP surveys of school children and mothers/carers of children under 5 in the community in a randomized design. Twelve communities including 18 schools were randomized to receive the programme immediately or after a delay of 18 months. Results: The intervention and evaluation methods were piloted in 10 schools. The value of a preintervention interview was investigated to determine whether this would influence the person's test score when interviewed for the second time. Methods to assess schoolchildren's comprehension of malaria messages that did not rely on literacy were developed using photographs to prompt students explanations of their knowledge and experience of malaria, while the interviewer checks the key malaria messages stated. The repeatability and inter-interviewer agreement of these assessment methods was investigated by repeat interviews. Twelve school communities were pairmatched on urban/rural location and school type, and one community in each pair randomly selected to receive the intervention. In each school a systematic sample of...

Journal articles

West, F., Homer, C. & Dawson, A. 2016, 'Building midwifery educator capacity in teaching in low and lower-middle income countries. A review of the literature', Midwifery, vol. 33, pp. 12-23.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Aim and objective: midwifery educators play a critical role in strengthening the midwifery workforce in low and lower-middle income countries (LMIC) to ensure that women receive quality midwifery care. However, the most effective approach to building midwifery educator capacity is not always clear. This paper will explore approaches used to build midwifery educator capacity in LMIC and identify evidence to inform improved outcomes for midwifery education. Design: a structured search of bibliographic electronic databases (CINAHL, OVID, MEDLINE, PubMed) and the search engine Google Scholar was performed. It was decided to also review peer reviewed research, grey literature and descriptive papers. Papers were included in the review if they were written in English, published between 2000 and 2014 and addressed building knowledge and/or skills in teaching and/or clinical practice in midwifery educators who work in training institutions in LMIC. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta Analyses (PRISMA) was used to guide the reporting process. The quality of papers was appraised in discussion with all authors. The findings sections of the research papers were analysed to identify successful elements of capacity building approaches. Findings: eighteen (six research and 12 discursive) papers were identified as related to the topic, meeting the inclusion criteria and of sufficient quality. The findings were themed according to the key approaches used to build capacity for midwifery education. These approaches are: skill and knowledge updates associated with curriculum review, involvement in leadership, management and research training and, participation in a community of practice within regions to share resources. Key conclusions: the study provides evidence to support the benefits of building capacity for midwifery educators. Multilevel approaches that engaged individuals and institutions in building capacity alongside an enablin...
Dawson, A., Kililo, M., Geitab, L., Mola, G., Brodie, P., Rumsey, M., Copeland, F., Neill, A. & Homer, C. 2016, 'Midwifery capacity building in Papua New Guinea: Key achievements and ways forward', Women and Birth, vol. 29, no. 2, pp. 180-188.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Akter, T., Dawson, A. & Sibbritt, D. 2016, 'What impact do essential newborn care practices have on neonatal mortality in low and lower-middle income countries? Evidence from Bangladesh.', Journal of Perinatology, vol. 36, pp. 225-230.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
To assess the impact of essential newborn care (ENC) practices on the mortality of neonates delivered at home in Bangladesh.This study used cross-sectional data from the 2011 Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey. Adjusted logistic regression model was used to examine the effect of ENC practices on neonatal mortality based on 3190 live-born infants.Delayed bathing (72h after delivery) significantly contributed to reducing neonatal mortality. A significant but counterintuitive relation was observed between the dry cord care and neonatal deaths.Neonatal mortality may be reduced through emphasizing delayed bathing. Specific guidelines on the cleanliness of the fabric used to dry and wrap newborns, as well as emphasizing the use of clean delivery kits and initiation of immediate and exclusive breastfeeding, may improve neonatal outcomes. Further, the ENC guidelines in Bangladesh should include the application of topical antiseptics to the cord stump.Journal of Perinatology advance online publication, 3 December 2015; doi:10.1038/jp.2015.181.
Rossiter, C., Power, T., Fowler, C., Jackson, D., Hyslop, D. & Dawson, A. 2016, 'Becoming a 'better' father: Supporting the needs of incarcerated fathers', The Prison Journal, vol. In Press.
Lam, Y., Dawson, A. & Fowler, C.M. 2015, 'Health promotion interventions to prevent early childhood human influenza at the household level: a realist review to identify implications for programmes in Hong Kong', Journal of Clinical Nursing, vol. 24, no. 7-8, pp. 891-905.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Aims and objectives. To identify factors affecting the delivery of health promotion interventions to prevent early childhood human influenza at the household level.
Dawson, A., Turkmani, S., Fray, S., Nanayakkara, S., Varol, N. & Homer, C. 2015, 'Evidence to inform education, training and supportive work environments for midwives involved in the care of women with female genital mutilation: A review of global experience', Midwifery, vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 229-238.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Objective to identify how midwives in low and middle income countries (LMIC) and high income countries (HIC) care for women with female genital mutilation (FGM), their perceived challenges and what professional development and workplace strategies might better support midwives to provide appropriate quality care. Design an integrative review involving a narrative synthesis of the literature was undertaken to include peer reviewed research literature published between 2004 and 2014. Findings 10 papers were included in the review, two from LMIC and eight from HIC. A lack of technical knowledge and limited cultural competency was identified, as well as socio-cultural challenges in the abandonment process of the practice, particularly in LMIC settings. Training in the area of FGM was limited. One study reported the outcomes of an education initiative that was found to be beneficial. Key conclusions professional education and training, a working environment supported by guidelines and responsive policy and community education, are necessary to enable midwives to improve the care of women with FGM and advocate against the practice. Implications for practice improved opportunities for midwives to learn about FGM and receive advice and support, alongside opportunities for collaborative practice in contexts that enable the effective reporting of FGM to authorities, may be beneficial and require further investigation.
Dawson, A., Daniels, J. & Clapham, K. 2015, 'The Contribution of Focus Group Discussions to Aboriginal Australian Health Service Research: a Content Analysis of Practice and Experience', International Journal of Critical Indigenous Studies, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 1-15.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) are a common way of gathering qualitative data in Aboriginal health services research; however there have been no studies on the question of whether they are appropriate research tools in such contexts, nor are there are specific guidelines available to ensure that FGDs are delivered to collect data in ways that are consistent with Aboriginal approaches to consultation, ownership and ways of knowing. Furthermore, there is a lack of clarity concerning the theoretical and methodological perspectives that could be operationalised by FGDs to gather data, guide analysis and interpretation in ways that are culturally appropriate, ethically sound and rigorous. We undertook a content analysis of Aboriginal health services research studies using FGDs to determine their use and elements that may provide insight into good practice. A framework is proposed to help guide future FGD research with Aboriginal people.
Dawson, A.J., Turkmani, S., Varol, N., Nanayakkara, S., Sullivan, E. & Homer, C.S. 2015, 'Midwives' experiences of caring for women with female genital mutilation: Insights and ways forward for practice in Australia.', Women and Birth, vol. 28, no. 3, pp. 207-214.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Female genital mutilation (FGM) has serious health consequences, including adverse obstetric outcomes and significant physical, sexual and psychosocial complications for girls and women. Migration to Australia of women with FGM from high-prevalence countries requires relevant expertise to provide women and girls with FGM with specialised health care. Midwives, as the primary providers of women during pregnancy and childbirth, are critical to the provision of this high quality care.To provide insight into midwives' views of, and experiences working with, women affected by FGM.A descriptive qualitative study was undertaken using focus group discussions with midwives from four purposively selected antenatal clinics and birthing units in three hospitals in urban New South Wales. The transcripts were analysed thematically.Midwives demonstrated knowledge and recalled skills in caring for women with FGM. However, many lacked confidence in these areas. Participants expressed fear and a lack of experience caring for women with FGM. Midwives described practice issues, including the development of rapport with women, working with interpreters, misunderstandings about the culture of women, inexperience with associated clinical procedures and a lack of knowledge about FGM types and data collection.Midwives require education, training and supportive supervision to improve their skills and confidence when caring for women with FGM. Community outreach through improved antenatal and postnatal home visitation can improve the continuity of care provided to women with FGM.
Dawson, A., Tran, N.T., Westley, E., Mangiaterra, V. & Festin, M. 2015, 'Workforce interventions to improve access to emergency contraception pills: a systematic review of current evidence in low- and middle-income countries and recommendations for improving performance', BMC Health Services Research, vol. 15, no. 180.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
BACKGROUND: Emergency contraceptive pills (ECP) are one of the 13 essential commodities addressed by the UN Commission on Life-Saving Commodities for Women and Children. Although ECP have been available for 20 years, a number of barriers still limit women's access ECP in low and middle-income countries (LMIC). The workforce who prescribe or dispense ECP are diverse reflecting the varied contexts where ECP are available across the health, commercial and justice sectors and in the community. No reviews currently exist that examine the roles and experiences of the workforce that provide ECP in LMIC. METHOD: We present a narrative synthesis of research to: identify provider factors that facilitate and constraint access to ECP; assess the effectiveness of associated interventions and; explore associated health system issues in LMIC. A search of bibliographic databases, meta-indexes and websites was undertaken to retrieve peer reviewed and grey literature. Literature was screened and identified documents examined to appraise quality. RESULTS: Thirty-seven documents were included in the review. Studies focused on formal health workers revealing knowledge gaps concerning the role of private sector and non-health providers who increasingly provide ECP. Data from the findings section in the documents were coded under 4 themes: provider knowledge; provider attitudes and beliefs; provider practice and provider training. The analysis revealed provider knowledge gaps, less than favourable attitudes and practice issues. The findings provide limited insight into products prescribed and/or dispensed, the frequency of provision, and information and advice offered to consumers. Pre and in-service training needs were noted. CONCLUSION: As the provision of ECPs shifts from the clinic-based health sector to increasing provision by the private sector, the limited understanding of provider performance and the practice gaps revealed in this review highlight the need to further examine pr...
Dawson, A., Homer, C.S., Turkmani, S., Black, K. & Varol, N. 2015, 'A systematic review of doctors' experiences and needs to support the care of women with female genital mutilation.', International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics, vol. 131, no. 1, pp. 35-40.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
BACKGROUND: Female genital mutilation (FGM) involves partial or complete removal of the external female genitalia or other injury for non-therapeutic reasons. Little is known about the knowledge and skills of doctors who care for affected women and their practice in relation to FGM. OBJECTIVES: To examine the FGM experiences and educational needs of doctors. SEARCH STRATEGY: A structured search of five bibliographic databases was undertaken to identify peer-reviewed research literature published in English between 2004 and 2014 using the keywords "female genital mutilation," "medical," "doctors," "education," and "training." SELECTION CRITERIA: Observational, quasi-experimental, and non-experimental descriptive studies were suitable for inclusion. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: A narrative synthesis of the study findings was undertaken and themes were identified. MAIN RESULTS: Ten papers were included in the review, three of which were from low-income countries. The analysis identified three themes: knowledge and attitudes, FGM-related medical practices, and education and training. CONCLUSIONS: There is a need for improved education and training to build knowledge and skills, and to change attitudes concerning the medicalization of FGM and reinfibulation.
Doab, A., Fowler, C. & Dawson, A. 2015, 'Factors that influence mother–child reunification for mothers with a history of substance use: A systematic review of the evidence to inform policy and practice in Australia', International Journal of Drug Policy, vol. 26, no. 9, pp. 820-831.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Tran, N.-.T., Dawson, A., Meyers, J., Krause, S. & Hickling, C. 2015, 'Developing Institutional Capacity for Reproductive Health in Humanitarian Settings: A Descriptive Study', PLoS One, vol. 10, no. 9, pp. e0137412-e0137412.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Varol, N., Turkmani, S., Black, K., Hall, J. & Dawson, A. 2015, 'The role of men in abandonment of female genital mutilation: a systematic review', BMC Public Health, vol. 15, no. 1034.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Background: Men in their roles as fathers, husbands, community and religious leaders may play a pivotal part in the continuation of female genital mutilation (FGM). However, the research on their views of FGM and their potential role in its abandonment are not well described. Methods: We undertook a systematic review of all publications between 2004 and 2014 that explored men's attitudes, beliefs, and behaviours in regards to FGM, as well as their ideas about FGM prevention and abandonment. Results: We included twenty peer-reviewed articles from 15 countries in the analysis. Analysis revealed ambiguity of men's wishes in regards to the continuation of FGM. Many men wished to abandon this practice because of the physical and psychosexual complications to both women and men. Social obligation and the silent culture between the sexes were posited as major obstacles for change. Support for abandonment was influenced by notions of social obligation, religion, education, ethnicity, urban living, migration, and understanding of the negative sequelae of FGM. The strongest influence was education. Conclusion: The level of education of men was one of the most important indicators for men's support for abandonment of FGM. Social obligation and the lack of dialogue between men and women were two key issues that men acknowledged as barriers to abandonment. Advocacy by men and collaboration between men and women's health and community programs may be important steps forward in the abandonment process.
Rossiter, C., Power, T., Fowler, C., Jackson, D., Hyslop, D. & Dawson, A. 2015, 'Mothering at a Distance: What Incarcerated Mothers Value About a Parenting Program', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 50, no. 2-3, pp. 238-255.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Background: Children with incarcerated mothers experience adverse health, social and emotional circumstances, and are a particularly vulnerable group. Mothers in custody face significant challenges in parenting their children. Aims: The study aimed to identify participants' views on impact of a parenting support programme for incarcerated mothers in NSW Australia. Methods: The mixed-methods study examined 134 responses to open and closed questions on a questionnaire for programme participants. Results: Participants found the programme worthwhile, engaging and relevant. It enhanced their parenting knowledge and confidence. Open-ended responses highlighted program elements which participants valued, specifically support for their parenting role in complicated circumstances, greater understanding of child development and perspectives, and practical strategies for facilitating connections with their children during their incarceration. Conclusions: The study informs nurses working with women who have experienced incarceration and their children, both in custodial and community settings.
Lam, W., Dawson, A. & Fowler, C. 2015, 'The Health Literacy of Hong Kong Chinese Parents with Preschool Children in Seasonal Influenza Prevention: A Multiple Case Study at Household Level', PLoS One, vol. 10, no. 12, pp. e0143844-e0143844.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Dawson, A.J., Nkowane, A.M. & Whelan, A. 2015, 'Approaches to improving the contribution of the nursing and midwifery workforce to increasing universal access to primary health care for vulnerable populations: a systematic review.', Human resources for health, vol. 13, no. 97.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Despite considerable evidence showing the importance of the nursing and midwifery workforce, there are no systematic reviews outlining how these cadres are best supported to provide universal access and reduce health care disparities at the primary health care (PHC) level. This review aims to identify nursing and midwifery policy, staffing, education and training interventions, collaborative efforts and strategies that have improved the quantity, quality and relevance of the nursing and midwifery workforce leading to health improvements for vulnerable populations.We undertook a structured search of bibliographic databases for peer-reviewed research literature using a focused review question and inclusion/exclusion criteria. The quality of retrieved papers was appraised using standard tools. The characteristics of screened papers were described, and a deductive qualitative content analysis methodology was applied to analyse the interventions and findings of included studies using a conceptual framework.Thirty-six papers were included in the review, the majority (25) from high-income countries and nursing settings (32). Eleven papers defined leadership and governance approaches that had impacted upon the health outcomes of disadvantaged groups including policies at the national and state level that had led to an increased supply and coverage of nursing and midwifery staff and scope of practice. Twenty-seven papers outlined human resource management strategies to support the expansion of nurse's and midwives' roles that often involved task shifting and task sharing. These included approaches to managing staffing supply, distribution and skills mix; workloads; supervision; performance management; and remuneration, financial incentives and staffing costs. Education and training activities were described in 14 papers to assist nurses and midwives to perform new or expanded roles and prepare nurses for inclusive practice. This review identified collaboration between nur...
Dawson, A., Turkmani, S., Varol, N., Sullivan, E. & Homer, C.S.E. 2015, 'Midwives' experiences of caring for women with female genital mutilation: Insights and ways forward for practice in Australia', WOMEN AND BIRTH, vol. 28, no. 1, pp. S30-S30.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Dawson, A., Pritchard, C., Dean, S. & Jackson, D.E. 2014, 'Towards Gender-responsive, Trauma-informed Care for Substance Use Disorders and PTSD: Evidence to Inform Non-government Services in Australia', The International Journal of Interdisciplinary Social and Community Studies, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 67-91.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Trauma-informed care assumes an understanding of trauma is integrated in all aspects of service delivery and care. In women with substance use disorders (SUD) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the disorders are treated simultaneously. Existing evidence in this sector points to the need for a gender-specific program approach to drug and alcohol disorders and health workers who have the knowledge, skills, expertise, and confidence to deliver these programs for women. The objective of this review is to identify characteristics associated with outcomes for SUD and PTSD and the experiences and needs of women in treatment contexts. A narrative synthesis of peer-reviewed literature from 2003 to 2013 was undertaken, with retrieved documents assessed using an inclusion/exclusion criterion and quality appraisal guided by critical assessment tools. Concepts were analysed thematically. Eleven papers were found that related to the topic under study. This review found that trauma-informed care models can lead to reduced alcohol and drug severity symptoms, improved abstinence rates, and reduced PTSD symptoms. However, a trauma-informed approach may be the most beneficial for women with severe SUD and PTSD symptoms. Trauma-informed care appears to be a promising treatment for women with SUD and PTSD. However, this appears to be mediated by client baseline characteristics and treatment program composition. This highlights the need for proper baseline assessment and flexible treatment programming delivered by a well-supported workforce.
Maher, L.M., Dawson, A., Wiley, K., Hope, K., Torvaldsen, S., Lawrence, G. & Conaty, S. 2014, 'Influenza vaccination during pregnancy: a qualitative study of the knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and practices of general practitioners in Central and South-Western Sydney', BMC Family Practice, vol. 15, no. 102.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Research article
Nagaya, Y. & Dawson, A. 2014, 'Community-Based Care of the Elderly in Rural Japan: A Review of Nurse-Led Interventions and Experiences', Journal of Community Health, vol. 39, no. 5, pp. 1020-1028.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Nurses play a critical role in delivering care to elderly people at primary health care level but there is no synthesis of research knowledge to guide community nursing practice in Japan. This review aims to identify nurse-led interventions that have been found to improve elder health at village level; the barriers and constraints that service providers face when delivering care to the elderly; and the experiences of elderly people and their caregivers. The electronic databases such as MEDLINE, CINAHL and Google Scholar were searched to retrieve peer-reviewed primary research literature.
Dawson, A., Stasa, H., Roche, M.A., Homer, C.S. & Duffield, C.M. 2014, 'Nursing churn and turnover in Australian hospitals: nurses perceptions and suggestions for supportive strategies', BMC Nursing, vol. 13, pp. 11-11.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Background This study aimed to reveal nurses' experiences and perceptions of turnover in Australian hospitals and identify strategies to improve retention, performance and job satisfaction. Nursing turnover is a serious issue that can compromise patient safety, increase health care costs and impact on staff morale. A qualitative design was used to analyze responses from 362 nurses collected from a national survey of nurses from medical and surgical nursing units across 3 Australian States/Territories. Method A qualitative design was used to analyze responses from 362 nurses collected from a national survey of nurses from medical and surgical nursing units across 3 Australian States/Territories. Results Key factors affecting nursing turnover were limited career opportunities; poor support; a lack of recognition; and negative staff attitudes. The nursing working environment is characterised by inappropriate skill-mix and inadequate patient-staff ratios; a lack of overseas qualified nurses with appropriate skills; low involvement in decision-making processes; and increased patient demands. These issues impacted upon heavy workloads and stress levels with nurses feeling undervalued and disempowered. Nurses described supportive strategies: improving performance appraisals, responsive preceptorship and flexible employment options. Conclusion Nursing turnover is influenced by the experiences of nurses. Positive steps can be made towards improving workplace conditions and ensuring nurse retention. Improving performance management and work design are strategies that nurse managers could harness to reduce turnover.
Dawson, A., Brodie, P.M., Copeland, F.H., Rumsey, M. & Homer, C.S. 2014, 'Collaborative approaches towards building midwifery capacity in low income countries: A reviewof experiences', Midwifery, vol. 30, no. 4, pp. 391-402.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Research paper
Dawson, A., Tran, N.T., Westley, E., Mangiaterra, V. & Festin, M. 2014, 'Improving access to emergency contraception pills through strengthening service delivery and demand generation: a systematic review of current evidence in low and middle-income countries.', PloS one, vol. 9, no. 10, pp. e109315-e109315.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Emergency contraception pills (ECP) are among the 13 essential commodities in the framework for action established by the UN Commission on Life-Saving Commodities for Women and Children. Despite having been on the market for nearly 20 years, a number of barriers still limit women's access to ECP in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) including limited consumer knowledge and poor availability. This paper reports the results of a review to synthesise the current evidence on service delivery strategies to improve access to ECP.A narrative synthesis methodology was used to examine peer reviewed research literature (2003 to 2013) from diverse methodological traditions to provide critical insights into strategies to improve access from a service delivery perspective. The studies were appraised using established scoring systems and the findings of included papers thematically analysed and patterns mapped across all findings using concept mapping.Ten papers were included in the review. Despite limited research of adequate quality, promising strategies to improve access were identified including: advance provision of ECP; task shifting and sharing; intersectoral collaboration for sexual assault; m-health for information provision; and scale up through national family planning programs.There are a number of gaps in the research concerning service delivery and ECP in LMIC. These include a lack of knowledge concerning private/commercial sector contributions to improving access, the needs of vulnerable groups of women, approaches to enhancing intersectoral collaboration, evidence for social marketing models and investment cases for ECP.
Hung, T.T., Chiang, V.C., Dawson, A. & Lee, R.L. 2014, 'Understanding of factors that enable health promoters in implementing health-promoting schools: a systematic review and narrative synthesis of qualitative evidence.', PloS one, vol. 9, no. 9, pp. e108284-e108284.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Health-promoting schools have been regarded as an important initiative in promoting child and adolescent health in school settings using the whole-school approach. Quantitative research has proved its effectiveness in various school-based programmes. However, few qualitative studies have been conducted to investigate the strategies used by health promoters to implement such initiatives. In this study, the researchers conducted a systematic review and narrative synthesis of the qualitative literature to identify important enablers assisting the implementation of health-promoting schools from the perspectives of health promoters. Five enablers have been identified from the review: (a) Following a framework/guideline to implement health-promoting schools; (b) Obtaining committed support and contributions from the school staff, school board management, government authorities, health agencies and other stakeholders; (c) Adopting a multidisciplinary, collaborative approach to implementing HPS; (d) Establishing professional networks and relationships; and (e) Continuing training and education in school health promotion. This highlights the importance of developing school health policies that meet local health needs, and socio-cultural characteristics that can foster mutual understanding between the health and education sectors so as to foster health promotion in children and adolescents.
Dawson, A., Pritchard, C., Dean, S. & Jackson, D. 2014, 'Trauma Informed Treatment for women with SUD and PTSD: Evidence to inform NGO programs in Australia', The International Journal of Interdisciplinary Social and Community Studies, vol. 8, pp. 67-91.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Ith, P., Dawson, A., Homer, C.S. & Whelan, A.K. 2013, 'Practices of skilled birth attendants during labour, birth and the immediate postpartum period in Cambodia', Midwifery, vol. 29, no. 4, pp. 300-307.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality rates in Cambodia are high. The provision of quality care by skilled birth attendants (SBAs )in a supportive working environment is an important strategy to reduce morbidity and mortality.There has been little emphasis on examining this issue in Cambodia.
Dawson, A. & Jackson, D.E. 2013, 'The primary health care service experiences and needs of homeless youth: A narrative synthesis of current evidence', Contemporary Nurse, vol. 44, no. 1, pp. 62-75.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Homeless youth are a growing, vulnerable population with specific primary health care (PHC) requirements. There are no systematic reviews of evidence to guide the delivery of PHC interventions to best address the needs of homeless youth in Australia. We present a narrative synthesis of peer reviewed research designed to determine: (1) the PHC services homeless youth access; (2) experiences of services, reported outcomes and barriers to use; and, (3) the PHC service needs of homeless youth. Findings show that homeless youth access a variety of services and delivery approaches. Increased PHC use is associated with youth who recognise they need help. Street-based clinic linked services and therapy and case management alongside improved housing can positively impact upon mental health and substance use outcomes. Barriers to service use include knowledge; provider attitudes, financial constraints and inappropriate environments. Findings support targetted, co-ordinated networks of PHC and housing services with nurses working alongside community workers.
Ith, P., Dawson, A. & Homer, C.S. 2013, 'Women's perspective of maternity care in Cambodia', Women and Birth, vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 71-75.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Background: Consideration of the needs of pregnant women and their ability and willingness to attend maternal services and pay for them is central to the provision of accessible and acceptable maternal care.
Dawson, A. & Homer, C.S. 2013, 'How does the mining industry contribute to sexual and reproductive health in developing countries? A narrative synthesis of current evidence to inform nursing practice', Journal Of Clinical Nursing, vol. 22, no. 23-24, pp. 3597-3609.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Aims and objectives. The aim of this review was to explore client and provider experiences and related health outcomes of sexual and reproductive health interventions that have been led by or that have involved mining companies. Background. Miners, and those living in communities surrounding mines in developing countries, are a vulnerable population with a high sexual and reproductive health burden. People in these communities require specific healthcare services although the exact delivery needs are unclear. There are no systematic reviews of evidence to guide delivery of sexual and reproductive health interventions to best address the needs of men and women in mining communities.
Dawson, A., Jackson, D.E. & Cleary, M. 2013, 'Mothering on the Margins: Homeless Women with an SUD and Complex Mental Health Co-Morbidities', Issues in Mental Health, vol. 34, no. 4, pp. 288-293.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Substance use disorder (SUD) and co-morbid mental health conditions are a serious and growing issue associated with 14% of the global health burden, and affecting family social wellness and the future potential of children (World Health Organization [WHO], 2008). Women with co-occurring substance use and mental health disorders are at particular risk as they may have dependent children and are vulnerable to poverty, family dysfunction, violence, and homelessness. In 2001, the World Health Report called for interconnected primary health and community-based interventions and human resource development to address mental health and SUD (WHO, 2001). Gender-based approaches have been highlighted as essential in order to engage women in treatment tailored to their needs (United Nations Of?ce on Drugs and Crime [UNODC], 2004). In this column, we provide an epidemiological overview of this vulnerable group of mothers and examine current progress and opportunities for improving health and social outcomes for these women.
Dawson, A., Buchan, J., Duffield, C.M., Homer, C.S. & Wijewardena, K. 2013, 'Task shifting and sharing in maternal and reproductive health in low-income countries: a narrative synthesis of current evidence', Health Policy and Planning, vol. 29, no. 3, pp. 396-408.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Reducing maternal mortality and providing universal access to reproductive health in resource poor settings has been severely constrained by a shortage of health workers required to deliver interventions. The aim of this article is to determine evidence to optimize health worker roles through task shifting/sharing to address Millennium Development Goal 5 and reduce maternal mortality and provide universal access to reproductive health. A narrative synthesis of peer-reviewed literature from 2000 to 2011 was undertaken with retrieved documents assessed using an inclusion/exclusion criterion and quality appraisal guided by critical assessment tools. Concepts were analysed thematically. The analysis identified a focus on clinical tasks (the delivery of obstetric surgery, anaesthesia and abortion) that were shifted to and/or shared with doctors, non-physician clinicians, nurses and midwives.
Dawson, A. & Homer, C.S. 2013, 'Managing the International Humanitarian and Development Health Workforce: a review of experiences and needs', Asia Pacific Journal of Health Management, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 14-23.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
The overseas development and humanitarian assistance provided by high income nations includes considerable investment directed at improving health in low and middle income countries. Governments, non-government organisations and consulting companies employ international health staff in low and middle income countries to deliver health interventions, manage programs and provide technical assistance. There are no reviews of evidence to guide the management, support and training of these staff, especially in relation to capacity building. We undertook a narrative synthesis of research to examine the needs and experiences of international health personnel engaged in development and humanitarian work. We found that altruism and a desire for professional and personal development motivated most international workers, however their roles are not always clear, affecting the delivery of quality care and services. Staff supply and skill-mix, short contracts, remuneration, leadership and workload were highlighted as issues. A lack of preparedness was also noted and staff identified strategies for coping in the field. Current efforts towards the professionalisation of health development and humanitarian staff may provide mechanisms to better support the workforce to respond and be accountable to the needs of countries. A performance management framework may need to be developed requiring research and validation
Lee, K., Dawson, A. & Conigrave, K. 2013, 'The role of an Aboriginal women's group in meeting the high needs of clients attending outpatient alcohol and other drug treatment', Drug and Alcohol Review, vol. 32, no. 6, pp. 618-626.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Introduction and Aims. Support groups are typically offered as part of specialist alcohol or other drug treatment. However, their usefulness with Indigenous Australians has not been examined. This paper provides a profile of Aboriginal women attending an inner city outpatient alcohol and other drug treatment service, insight into how effective women and staff perceive the support group to be at meeting their needs and suggestions for improvements.
Dawson, A., Wijewardena, K. & Black, E. 2013, 'Health and education provider collaboration to deliver adolescent sexual and reproductive health in Sri Lanka', South East Asia Journal of Public Health, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 42-49.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
The complex nature of adolescent sexual and reproductive health (ASRH) determinants demands a multidisciplinary and intersectoral approach. Collaborative approaches are central to the delivery of quality health care and services but the focus is often health sector specific. Few research studies have explored the views and experiences of health workers and teachers and examined how ASRH services and information are provided by professionals across the education and health sector. Sri Lanka has made considerable progress towards addressing the Millennium Development Goals (MDG), however, there are still gaps reflected in adolescent health, social indicators, and the delivery of services. Enhancing the collective efforts of teachers and health professionals may help to improve the quality and use of services and ASRH knowledge. This study aimed to identify the experiences, needs, knowledge, attitudes and practices of primary healthcare and education professionals and the strategies that best support them to deliver sexual and reproductive health information, education, counseling and clinical services to Sri Lankan adolescents. Qualitative and survey data were gathered from 65 nurses, midwives, public health inspectors, medical officers, teachers, counselors and principals in the district of Kalutara. Knowledge, attitudes and service gaps were identified in relation to contraception and policy guiding practice. Participants highlighted concerns with confidence, roles and training that were said to affect student access to appropriate health services. ASRH Collaborative practices were noted across the sectors and strategies suggested for improvement. Findings suggest that inter-professional educa-tion and training may provide opportunities to enhance collaboration supported and guided by appropriate policy, supervision and job descriptions (i.e. roles and responsibilities).
Maher, L.M., Hope, K., Torvaldsen, S., Lawrence, G., Dawson, A., Wiley, K., Thomson, D., Hayen, A. & Conaty, S. 2013, 'Influenza vaccination during pregnancy: Coverage rates and influencing factors in two urban districts in Sydney', Vaccine, vol. 31, no. 47, pp. 5557-5564.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Background: Pregnant women have an increased risk of complications from influenza. Influenza vaccination during pregnancy is considered effective and safe; however estimates of vaccine coverage are low. This study aimed to determine influenza vaccination
Dawson, A., Brookes, L., Carter, B., Larman, G. & Jackson, D.E. 2013, 'Stigma, health and incarceration: Turning the tide for children with a parent in prison', Journal Of Child Health Care, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 3-5.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
NA
Islam, M., Topp, L., Day, C., Dawson, A. & Conigrave, K. 2012, 'The accessibility, acceptability, health impact and cost implications of primary healthcare outlets that target injecting drug users: A narrative synthesis of literature', International Journal of Drug Policy, vol. 23, no. 2, pp. 94-102.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Injecting drug users (IDUs) are at increased risk of health problems ranging from injecting-related injuries to blood borne viral infections. Access to primary healthcare (PHC) is often limited for this marginalised group. Many seek care at emergency departments and some require hospital admission due to late presentation. The costs to both the individual and the health system are such that policymakers in some settings have implemented IDU-targeted PHC centres, with a number of models employed. However, there is insufficient evidence on the effectiveness of these centres to inform health service planning. A systematic review examining such interventions is not possible due to the heterogeneous nature of study designs. Nevertheless, an integrative literature review of IDU-targeted PHC may provide useful insights into the range of operational models and strategies to enhance the accessibility and acceptability of these services to the target population.
Maher, L.M., Brown, A.M., Torvaldsen, S., Dawson, A., Patterson, J.A. & Lawrence, G. 2012, 'Eye health services for Aboriginal people in the western region of NSW, 2010', NSW Public Health Bulletin, vol. 24, no. 4, pp. 81-86.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Aim: To assess the availability, accessibility and uptake of eye health services for Aboriginal people in western NSW in 2010.
Ith, P., Dawson, A. & Homer, C.S. 2012, 'Quality of maternity care practices of skilled birth attendants in Cambodia', International Journal of Evidence-Based Healthcare, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 60-67.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
The World Health Organization's recommended package of interventions for the integrated management of pregnancy and childbirth provides guidance for the use of evidence-based interventions to ensure the best outcomes for mother and newborn. However, the extent to which skilled birth attendants (SBAs) follow evidence-based guidelines is not known. There are few studies into childbirth practices of SBAs in Cambodia. The aim of this study was to observe practices of SBAs during labour, birth and the immediate post-partum period and their consistency with evidence-based guidelines. Methods: A structured non-participant observation study was undertaken. Data were collected using an observational checklist of evidence-based practices adapted from the Cambodian clinical assessment tools for associate degree in midwifery. Maternity care settings in one provincial hospital, two district referral hospitals and two health centres in one province of Cambodia were purposively selected. Results: Twenty-five SBAs who attended 40 women during labour, birth and the postnatal period were observed. The results showed that the use of the partograph was low; birth companions were not permitted; cleanliness during birth was lacking; management of the third stage of labour was inappropriate; monitoring of mother and baby in the early postnatal period was lacking; the SBAs lacked skills in neonatal resuscitation; skin-to-skin contact with the newborn and early breastfeeding were rare; and intramuscular injection of vitamin K varied. Conclusion: The findings suggest that the current SBA practices during labour, birth and the immediate postpartum period in one province of Cambodia are not consistent with evidence-based guidelines. Service improvements that address evidence-based practices are likely to have an impact on clean and safe childbirth, thereby enhancing outcomes for Cambodia women.
Cooray, S., Dawson, A. & Wijewardena, K. 2012, 'Are consultants in Colombo, Sri Lanka satisfied with their job?', Health, vol. 4, no. 10, pp. 919-922.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Introduction: Job stress and job satisfaction play a key role in the work environment of an organization. These influence the behaviour of a doc- tor towards his or her co-workers, administration and, most importantly towards the patients.
Ith, P., Dawson, A. & Homer, C.S. 2012, 'Challenges to Reaching MDG5: A Qualitative Analysis of the Working Environment of Skilled Birth Attendants in Cambodia', International Journal of Childbirth, vol. 2, no. 3, pp. 153-162.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Objective: To explore the working environment of skilled birth attendants (SBAs) in one region in Cambodia and the factors affecting their motivation and performance.
Maher, L.M., Phelan, C., Lawrence, G., Dawson, A., Torvaldsen, S. & Wright, C. 2012, 'The Early Childhood Oral Health Program: Promoting Prevention And Timely Intervention Of Early Childhood Caries In NSW Through Shared Care', Health Promotion Journal of Australia, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 171-176.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
Issue addressed: Early childhood caries (ECC) continues to have high prevalence worldwide, despite being largely preventable. The Early Childhood Oral Health (ECOH) Program was established in New South Wales (NSW) using a model of shared responsibility f
Dawson, A., Jackson, D.E. & Nyamathi, A. 2012, 'Children of incarcerated parents: Insights to addressing a growing public health concern in Australia', Children and Youth Services Review, vol. 34, no. 12, pp. 2433-2441.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS or Publisher's site
In Australia, the children of incarcerated parents are a growing and vulnerable population at risk for life adversity and social inequity. There is little understanding of these children's experiences, perceived risks, reported outcomes and needs. There is also a lack of knowledge regarding evidence-based interventions that can address the multiple risk factors to which these children may be exposed. The aim of this study was to provide insight into the multiple perspectives of children with incarcerated parents, their carers, parents and service providers so that social and health programs may be tailored to best serve their needs. We undertook an integrative literature review of qualitative research studies using a narrative synthesis methodology to explore the effect of parental incarceration upon the social and health outcomes of children and perceptions of interventions designed to support them. Findings revealed that children of incarcerated parents grieved their parent's absence which they reported had a profound effect on their behavior and resulted in exposure to discrimination, violence and abuse. However, resiliency was manifested by a number of coping strategies that could be harnessed to better support the children and young adults of incarcerated parents. Rigorous and innovative intervention studies are required to better inform comprehensive evidence-based policy and practice.
Dawson, A. 2012, 'Improving the quality of Human Resources for Health information', Pacific Health Dialog: Journal of Community Health and Clinical Medicine for the Pacific, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 65-82.
Research paper
Maher, L., Brown, A.M., Torvaldsen, S., Dawson, A.J., Patterson, J.A. & Lawrence, G. 2012, 'Eye health services for Aboriginal people in the western region of NSW, 2010.', New South Wales public health bulletin, vol. 23, no. 3-4, pp. 81-86.
AIM: To assess the availability, accessibility and uptake of eye health services for Aboriginal people in western NSW in 2010. METHODS: The use of document review, observational visits, key stakeholder consultation and service data reviews, including number of cataract operations performed, to determine regional service availability and use. RESULTS: Aboriginal people in western NSW have a lower uptake of tertiary eye health services, with cataract surgery rates of 1750 per million for Aboriginal people and 9702 per million for non-Aboriginal people. Public ophthalmology clinics increase access to tertiary services for Aboriginal people. CONCLUSION: Eye health services are not equally available and accessible for Aboriginal people in western NSW. Increasing the availability of culturally competent public ophthalmology clinics may increase access to tertiary ophthalmology services for Aboriginal people. The report of the review was published online, and outlines a list of recommendations.
Islam, M., Topp, L., Day, C.A., Dawson, A. & Conigrave, K.M. 2012, 'Primary healthcare outlets that target injecting drug users: opportunity to make services accessible and acceptable to the target group.', International Journal of Drug Policy, vol. 23, no. 2, pp. 109-110.
View/Download from: Publisher's site
Dawson, A. & Joof, B. 2005, 'Seeing, thinking and acting against Malaria: a new approach to health worker training for community empowerment in rural Gambia', Rural Remote Health, vol. 5, no. 4.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Joof, B., Palmer, A., Dawson, A., Dibba, A., Yehuenou, S., Devanney, B., Ocran, C., Kasse, Y. & Milligan, P. 2005, 'Peer health education for promoting knowledge and practice of malaria prevention among school children and their families [MIM-AP-59778]', ACTA TROPICA, vol. 95, pp. S275-S275.
Dawson, A. & Joof, B.M. 2005, 'Seeing, thinking and acting against malaria--a new approach to health worker training in rural Gambia.', Education for health (Abingdon, England), vol. 18, no. 3, pp. 387-394.
CONTEXT: In the Gambia, West Africa, Malaria is a major cause of death among children in rural areas. It has been estimated that in one division in the country malaria accounts for 40% of all deaths in children aged between one and 4 years. Most malaria cases are managed at home assisted by primary healthcare workers. The strategic plan of Gambia's National Malaria Control Programme includes improved training and supervision of all health care providers, at all levels, and increased community awareness in order to reduce the malaria burden by 50% before 2007. ISSUE: A malaria in-service training program for Community Health Nurses (CHNs) working at village level was piloted in 2004. The program includes a computer-based training (CBT) package, the first of its kind for health professionals in Gambia. The education program is part of a larger initiative, funded by the Gates Malaria Partnership, that aims to increase community involvement in malaria control. The objective of the course is to enable CHNs to facilitate the change process. The curriculum was informed by a reference group and stakeholder input. Interviews and evaluation forms were used to gather information about learner experience and learning preferences. ANALYSIS: The CBT package was well received. Learners reported wanting more computer instruction, but felt they had gained confidence. There was resistance from other health professionals regarding the development of information technology skills in CHNs. This related to the perceived role and status of CHNs, as well as confidence in their ability. Some modifications of the CBT package were necessary, including the reworking of some activities and language. LESSONS LEARNED: There are issues related to sustainability and resource implications that need to be addressed. Opportunities exist to expand e-learning in the Gambia for pre-service CHNs and other professionals. An investigation into the viability of reproducing this module as a generic planni...
Dawson, A. & Ijumba, J. 2003, 'Malaria and the Media Advocating health policy and practice in Sub Saharan Africa', Tanzania Health Research Bulletin, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 30-31.
Pritchard, C., Cox, M. & Dawson, A. 1997, 'Suicide and 'violent' death in a six-year cohort of male probationers compared with pattern of mortality in the general population: evidence of accumulative socio-psychiatric vulnerability.', Journal of the Royal Society of Health, vol. 117, no. 3, pp. 180-185.
The 'Health of the Nation' (Department of Health, 1992) suicide targets focus upon the mentally ill, but virtually ignore the mentally abnormal offender. Whilst forensic services deal with the severely disturbed, the majority of offenders remain in the community, despite long-standing psychosocial difficulties. This study explores the mortality rates of a six-year cohort of male probationers (1990-1995) with males in the general population. Male offenders (aged 17-54) had double the death rate, five times the 'external death' rate and nine times the suicide rate of the general population. This paper highlights the need to further improve the health-psychiatric-criminal justice collaboration.
Clapham, K., Digregorio, K.D., Dawson, A. & Hughes, I. 1997, 'The Community as Pedagogy: innovations in Indigenous health worker education', Journal of Higher Education Policy and Management, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 35-43.
View/Download from: Publisher's site

Other

Dawson, A. & Whelan, A. 2014, 'Nursing and midwifery workforce and universal health coverage Background paper WHO Global Forum for Government Chief Nursing and Midwifery Officers'.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
As the deadline for achieving the Millennium Development Goals approaches, the concept of universal health coverage is increasingly becoming a rallying point for post-2015 Millennium Development Goals. The purpose of this paper is to stimulate discussion at the 2014 Global Forum for Government Chief Nursing and Midwifery Officers, on the role of nurses and midwives in carrying forward the universal health coverage (UHC) agenda. The paper takes into account the three thematic areas of the Global Forum which include: Leadership and policy direction for universal health coverage (UHC) Quantity, quality and relevance of the nursing and midwifery workforce Collaborative partnerships Nurses and midwives are frontline workers in the health service delivery system and are therefore critical in working towards and achieving Universal Health Coverage. This background literature demonstrates where nurses and midwives have played a role, in terms of leadership and improving the quantity, quality and relevance of midwifery and nursing workforce, towards universal health coverage. The paper also clarifies the concept of Universal Health Coverage (UHC) in order to establish a common understanding among the participants to this Global Forum. Examples advanced in this paper provide a starting point for discussion on the way forward with regards to nursing and midwifery and the contributions that nursing and midwifery national leadership could make towards universal health coverage.

Reports

Dawson, A. 2014, Access to emergency contraceptive pills in low- and middle-income countries: A narrative synthesis of current evidence for the Technical Resource Team for Emergency Contraceptive Pill of United Nations Commission on Life-Saving Commodities.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Beek, K.M., Whelan, A. & Dawson, A. 2013, Stories and Strategies - Public Health Emergencies: Lessons Learned from Pilot Phase of the SPRINT Initiative in Asia Pacific Region..
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Inadequate human resourcesboth in numbers and qualityare a well documented limitation to effective responses to public health emergencies. Although significant progress has been made in the past 15 years, the literature reveals that the lack of trained health workers continues to exacerbate the marginalised emergency response to sexual and reproductive health (SRH) needs. A comprehensive response to public health, including SRH care, is essential to minimise death, illness and disability in an emergency.
Dawson, A. The Inter-Agency Working Group on Reproductive Health in Crisis 2013, Institutional Capacity for Reproductive Health in Humanitarian SettingsReport of a global online survey - 2013 for The Inter-Agency Working Group on Reproductive Health in Crisis.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Dawson, A. University of New South Wales 2012, Health and Education Sector Collaboration In Adolescent Sexual And Reproductive Health In Sri Lanka A situational analysis and case study of the Kalutara District.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Dawson, A. 2012, Strengthening human resources for adolescent health in Sri Lanka through health and education sector collaboration.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Dawson, A., Howes, T., Grey, N. & Kennedy, E. University of New South Wales 2011, Human resources for health in maternal, neonatal and reproductive health at community level: A profile of Fiji, pp. 1-19, Sydney.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
This profile provides baseline information that can inform policy and program planning by donors, multilateral agencies, non-government organisations and international health practitioners.
Dawson, A., Howes, T., Grey, N. & Kennedy, E. University of New South Wales 2011, Human resources for health in maternal, neonatal and reproductive health at community level: A profile of Vanuatu, pp. 1-14, Sydney.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
This technical report series has been produced by the Human Resources for Health Knowledge Hub of the School of Public Health and Community Medicine at the University of New South Wales.
Dawson, A., Howes, T., Grey, N. & Kennedy, E. University of New South Wales 2011, Human resources for health in maternal, neonatal and reproductive health at community level: A profile of Timor-Leste, pp. 1-19, Sydney.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
This technical report series has been produced by the Human Resources for Health Knowledge Hub of the School of Public Health and Community Medicine at the University of New South Wales.
Dawson, A. University of New South Wales 2011, Human resources for health in maternal, neonatal and reproductive health at community level: A profile of Lao People's Democratic Republic, pp. 1-24, Sydney.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Dawson, A., Howes, T., Grey, N. & Kennedy, E. University of New South Wales 2011, Human resources for health in maternal, neonatal and reproductive health at community level: A profile of Indonesia, pp. 1-20, Sydney.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
This technical report series has been produced by the Human Resources for Health Knowledge Hub of the School of Public Health and Community Medicine at the University of New South Wales.
Dawson, A., Howes, T., Grey, N. & Kennedy, E. University of New South Wales 2011, Human resources for health in maternal, neonatal and reproductive health at community level: A profile of Philippines, pp. 1-20, Sydney.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
This technical report series has been produced by the Human Resources for Health Knowledge Hub of the School of Public Health and Community Medicine at the University of New South Wales.
Dawson, A., Howes, T., Grey, N. & Kennedy, E. University of New South Wales 2011, Human resources for health in maternal, neonatal and reproductive health at community level: A profile of Solomon Islands, pp. 1-13, Sydney.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
This technical report series has been produced by the Human Resources for Health Knowledge Hub of the School of Public Health and Community Medicine at the University of New South Wales.
Dawson, A., Howes, T., Grey, N. & Kennedy, E. University of New South Wales 2011, Human resources for health in maternal, neonatal and reproductive health at community level: A profile of Papua New Guinea, pp. 1-24, Sydney.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
This technical report series has been produced by the Human Resources for Health Knowledge Hub of the School of Public Health and Community Medicine at the University of New South Wales.
Dawson, A., Howes, T., Grey, N. & Kennedy, E. University of New South Wales 2011, Human resources for health in maternal, neonatal and reproductive health at community level: A profile of Bangladesh, pp. 1-22, Sydney.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
This technical report series has been produced by the Human Resources for Health Knowledge Hub of the School of Public Health and Community Medicine at the University of New South Wales.
Dawson, A., Howes, T., Grey, N. & Kennedy, E. University of New South Wales 2011, Human resources for health in maternal, neonatal and reproductive health at community level: A profile of Cambodia, pp. 1-12, Sydney.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
This technical report series has been produced by the Human Resources for Health Knowledge Hub of the School of Public Health and Community Medicine at the University of New South Wales.
Dawson, A. Human Resources for Health Knowledge Hub of the School of Public Health and Community Medicine 2010, Towards a comprehensive approach to enhancing the performance of health workers in maternal, neonatal and reproductive health at community level: Learning from experiences in the Asia and Pacific regions Discussion paper 2, pp. 1-29, University of New South Wales, Sydney.
This discussion paper presents a comprehensive approach to the assessment of individual health worker, team and HRH management performance in the context of health system strengthening and the achievement of Millennium Development Goal 5 (MDG 5). The paper focuses on health workers who deliver maternal, newborn and reproductive health care to households or provide outreach services from specific points in a community. Human resources in this context include nursing and midwifery professionals, community health workers, and traditional or cultural practitioners. These cadres do not only provide care at critical locations that vulnerable populations need to access, but they can also facilitate community empowerment which is central to primary health care.
Dawson, A. Human Resources for Health Knowledge Hub of the School of Public Health and Community Medicine 2010, Improving the quality of HRH information: A focus on the providers of maternal, neonatal and reproductive health care and services at community level in selected Asia and Pacific countries - Discussion paper 1, pp. 1-25, University of New South Wales, Sydney.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
Accurate, accessible and quality information about the providers of maternal, neonatal and reproductive health (MNRH) care at community level, how they are performing as well as how they are managed, trained and supported, is central to workforce planning, personnel administration, performance management (PM) and policy making. A number of documents have identified the need for timely, reliable, detailed and consistent workforce data in order to provide evidence to justify requests for both new and ongoing investment in human resources for health (HRH) development (WHO 2008a; Dal Poz et al. 2009). This information is critical to quality service delivery, and at the community level this includes health workers delivering evidence-based packages of care to women and newborns and making emergency referrals to facilities beyond the communit
Dawson, A. UNSW Human Resources for Health Knowledge Hub 2010, Improving the Quality of HR Information: Discussion Paper 1, pp. 1-24, UNSW 2052.
A focus on the providers of maternal, neonatal and reproductive health care and services in Asia and Pacific countries.
Dawson, A. UNSW Human Resources for Health Knowledge Hub 2010, Towards a comprehensive approach to enhancing the performance of Health Workers: Discussion Paper 2, pp. 1-28, UNSW, 2052.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS
A technical report in maternal, neonatal and reproductive health at community level: Learning from experiences in the Asia and Pacific regions.
Dawson, A. 2010, Human Resources for health in maternal, neonatal and reproductive health at community level: A synthesis of literature with a focus on the Asia and Pacific Regions, University of New South Wales.
View/Download from: UTS OPUS