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The ithree institute brings together an internationally competitive team focused on addressing key challenges in the understanding and control of infectious diseases in humans and animals. Our innovative science uses a systems biology approach to develop a greater insight into basic biology and its application to the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of infectious diseases.

The ithree institute is led by Professor Liz Harry, an internationally recognised expert in the field of infectious diseases with a track record of driving innovation both within academia and within industry. It consists of research groups led by globally experienced scientists in the fields of microbial and parasitic infectious diseases, and in the application of their basic research to the treatment and prevention of these diseases.   

The ithree institute has active research programs and collaborations in the fields of bacteriology, parasitology and virology.  We are building our reputation by recruiting academics with a passion to work at the forefront of basic and applied research in the field of infection and immunity. 

The core philosophy at the ithree institute is to work in partnership with others to delivery world-class scientific discovery and to drive innovation. We have established relationships with universities, research institutes, medical institutes and industry, both within Australia and internationally.

Featured News
Benjamin Raymond receiving his award

Benjamin Raymond awarded top prize

UTS postdoctoral fellow Dr Benjamin Raymond has received the Louis Dienes award at the 21st Congress of the International Organization for Mycoplasmology, which was held recently in Brisbane.
Featured video
Colour bacteria seen under microscope

Global antibiotic resistance crisis

Antibiotics discovery revolutionised human health and medicine. We now take these drugs for granted and bacteria are fighting back leading to antibiotic resistance.
UTS postdoctoral fellow Dr Benjamin Raymond has received the Louis Dienes award at the 21st Congress of the International Organization for Mycoplasmology, which was held recently in Brisbane.
Large-scale intensive livestock production generates huge volumes of animal waste contaminated with veterinary antibiotics, further driving global antibiotic resistance.
Parasitic worms are typically something we're keen to avoid, but new research from UTS's ithree institute shows that controlled infection of parasites could be harnessed to prevent the progression of multiple sclerosis (MS).
Professor Liz Harry – a world leader in the field of bacterial cell division – has been appointed as Director of ithree institute (infection, immunity and innovation) at UTS Science.