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Ausgrid sale great for everyone, except consumers
Renew Economy, 24 October 2016
The sale of a 50 per cent stake in Australia’s biggest network operator, Ausgrid, to two Australian super fund managers has been hailed in just about all media quarters as a really good deal: Great for the government, great for the taxpayer, great for the investors, and great for the investment bankers and advisers who will pocket massive fees… Grant is not the only analyst to suggest that network values are over-inflated. Numerous other studies, including from the Institute for Sustainable Futures, Carbon Market Economics, and Bruce Robertson at the IEEFA, come to the same conclusion, raising similar questions about the impact of distributed energy. Read full story

Women’s input key to achieving SDG6
Australian Water Association, 24 October 2016
Australia has dedicated $100 million to gendered water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) issues abroad, but more must be done to address the absence of women’s input if true change is to be affected, says a leading Australian WASH researcher… UTS Institute of Sustainable Futures’ Associate Professor Juliet Willetts, who is co-authoring with colleagues Melita Grant and Chelsea Huggett a framing paper to inform the Federal Government on gender and SDG6 (water and sanitation), said a key focus must be to herald women’s input on water developments. Read full story

Wind power to generate 20% of global electricity by 2030
Climate Action Programme, 19 October 2016
The Global Wind Energy Council has released its biennial Global Wind Energy Outlook, according to which wind power could generate 20 per cent of global electricity by 2030… Lead analyst of the report, Sven Teske, research principal for the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology Sydney, said: "Decarbonising the global energy system includes the transport sector as a major emitter of carbon. The market for electric mobility, both in regard to electric vehicles as well as public transport, will continue to grow significantly and with this electricity demand for the transport sector. Wind power is in a pole position to supply this future power demand making the wind industry one of the key industries of the energy sector.” Read full story

Wind energy could supply 20% of global electricity by 2030
Renew Economy, 19 October 2016
The Global Wind Energy Council published its Global Wind Energy Outlook report this week, outlining scenarios which show how wind energy could supply 20% of global electricity by 2030… “Decarbonising the global energy system includes the transport sector as a major emitter of carbon,” added the report’s lead analyst Dr. Sven Teske, Research Principal for the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology Sydney. Read full story

GWEC: Wind could supply a big chunk of global power by 2030
North American Wind Power, 19 October 2016
The Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC) has released its biennial Global Wind Energy Outlook, outlining scenarios in which wind could supply 20% of global electricity by 2030. The report also looks at four scenarios exploring the future of the wind industry in 2020, 2030 and 2050…. “Decarbonizing the global energy system includes the transport sector as a major emitter of carbon,” said Dr. Sven Teske, research principal for the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology Sydney and the report’s lead analyst. “The market for electric mobility, both in regard to electric vehicles, as well as public transport, will continue to grow significantly and with this electricity demand for the transport sector.” Read full story

Wind Energy Could Supply 20% Of Global Electricity By 2030, According To GWEC
Clean Technica, 18 October 2016
The Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC) has released its biennial Global Wind Energy Outlook, outlining scenarios in which wind could supply 20% of global electricity by 2030. The report also looks at four scenarios exploring the future of the wind industry in 2020, 2030 and 2050…. “Decarbonizing the global energy system includes the transport sector as a major emitter of carbon,” said Dr. Sven Teske, research principal for the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology Sydney and the report’s lead analyst. “The market for electric mobility, both in regard to electric vehicles, as well as public transport, will continue to grow significantly and with this electricity demand for the transport sector.” Read full story

Wind power could fuel 20 per cent of power requirements by 2030
The Economic Times, 18 October 2016
Wind power could fuel 20 per cent of global electricity by 2030 the Global Wind Energy Council has estimated in its biennial Global Wind Energy Outlook on Tuesday. Read full story

Wind power could fuel 20 per cent of power requirements by 2030
Recharge News, 18 October 2016
Wind power is gearing up to be the main engine for the global power sector's growth, with expectations it will supply as much as 20% of world's electricity by 2030, according to the latest forecast from the Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC). Read full story

Apps that help you get to know the world around you
ABC Science, 18 October 2016
As mobile ownership continues to rise, the number of apps available grows — and many of those apps are geared at helping you find out more about the world around you, not the digital one at your fingertips… John McKibbin is a research principal at the University of Technology's Institute for Sustainable Futures. He said there are a number of apps that can help people reduce their energy bill and carbon footprint. Read full story

Interview with Fiona Berry about Byron Region Food Sovereignty
Chopsuey Roaming Radio, 17 October 2016
Fiona Berry and Vicky Spin come in to chat about Byron Hinterland Seed Savers & Byron Region Food Sovereignty Networks 'Seed Freedom & Fair Food Celebration' event on this Sunday 23rd -  Read full story

Interview with the mayor of Kangaroo Island about renewable energy
ABC Eyre Peninsula and West Coast, ABC North and West SA, 5 October 2016
The Mayor of Kangaroo Island says a decision must be made about the future of the island's power supply by November or SA Power could have to spend millions of dollars in case of a power failure. A study by Sydney's University of Technology recently suggested a mix of renewable could be as cost effective as a new cable for the island. Peter Clements, Mayor, Kangaroo Island [Council], says the decision lies with SA Power.

Council continues to cool the city
Western Weekender, Penrith, 7 October 2016
Council has received $80,000 in grant funding from the NSW Government under the Building Resilience to Climate Change program in a partnership project with the Institute for Sustainable Futures (UTS) and other Western Sydney councils. The project is based around a design competition for a bus shelter which is comfortable year round for our climate. Planning is now underway to build the winning design on Derby Street outside Nepean Hospital

Love Food Hate Waste - Surfing the Coldstream
Daily Examiner, Grafton, 3 October 2016
The Surfing The Coldstream Festival is going Waste Wise, a Love Food Hate Waste initiative, with the support of Clarence Valley Council, North East Waste and The Green Room They are also piloting another Love Food Hate Waste Initiative, Food Stall Savers, a program developed by the Institute of Sustainable Futures, with a grant from the EPA foodstallsavers.org.au

Here's what caused Wednesday's huge blackout in South Australia
The Conversation and Business Insider Australia, 29 September 2016
Power is gradually returning to South Australia after wild storms blew across the state last night, but some areas could be offline for days. The storm – associated with heavy rain, lightning, and severe winds – damaged transmission lines that carry electricity from power generators to people, causing a state-wide blackout… Renewable energy technologies are actually a key part of the solution. Numerous studies from many organisations have demonstrated that Australia can have 100% renewable electricity generation. Indeed, increasing decentralised energy solutions such as solar with battery storage and micro-grids would likely increase the resilience and energy security of South Australia’s very stringy electricity network. Read full story

District energy sharing proposal rejected by Energy Market Commission
Architecture and Design, 28 September 2016
Despite having the potential to save NSW consumers $1.2 billion by 2050, the Australian Energy Market Commission (AEMC) has advocated rejecting a proposed energy market rule change to allow district energy sharing…Support for the rule change was offered by a study conducted by the UTS Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF), which found that combining local network credits with a measure allowing businesses and communities to trade electricity could provide an overall economic benefit of about $1.2 billion by 2050. Read full story

The A$1.2 billion saving Australia’s electricity rule-maker just knocked back
The Conversation, 28 September 2016
The governing body for our energy market, the Australian Energy Market Commission, has just missed a major opportunity to modernise our electricity networks. Last week the commission rejected a proposal to pay credits to small, local generators (such as small wind, solar and gas). Our research shows that this could save electricity consumers A$1.2 billion by 2050. Read full story

Yamba's Festival to be Waste Wise
Clarence Valley Independent, 26 September 2016
This year's Surfing The Coldstrcam Festival will be a waste wise event by using alternatives to plastic, reducing waste to landfill and providing water stations for attendees… Among these partners, are North East Waste, the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology Sydney, who turn research-based waste management solutions into engaging community education programs under the banner of Love Food, Hate Waste.

Interview with Jennifer Richards, Hawkesbury Harvest about Sydney Food Futures project
702 ABC Sydney, 25 September 2016
Richards says the Sydney Food Futures Project is a research put together by the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology Sydney. She says the study looked at the situation of the farms around Sydney, particularly about what they produce, how much they are producing, and what will happen to them in the future. 

City of Sydney request to change energy market rull all but rejected
Sydney Morning Herald, The Border Mail, Crookwell Gazette, 25 September 2016
A proposed energy market rule change that could save NSW consumers $1.2 billion by 2050 has been all but ruled out by the Australian Energy Market Commission… Support for the rule change was offered by a federal government funded study this week, which found that combining local network credits with a measure allowing businesses and communities to trade electricity could provide an overall economic benefit of about $1.2 billion by 2050The study, conducted by the UTS Institute for Sustainable Futures, involved five trials of proposed local energy projects at council and utility sites around the country.   Read full story

The billion dollars that NSW consumers could have saved by 2050
Sun Herald, Sydney, 25 September 2016
A proposed energy market rule change that could save NSW consumers $1.2 billion by 2050 has been all but ruled out by the Australian Energy Market Commission… Support for the rule change was offered by a federal government funded study this week, which found that combining local network credits with a measure allowing businesses and communities to trade electricity could provide an overall economic benefit of about $1.2 billion by 2050. The study, conducted by the UTS Institute for Sustainable Futures, involved five trials of proposed local energy projects at council and utility sites around the country.   

Renewable energy on Kangaroo Island
Radio National, 24 September 2016
The undersea electricity cable that supplies power to Kangaroo Island off the South Australian coast is due to be replaced in the next two to three years. A new report that suggests that 86 per cent of the island's power could be supplied by renewable technology for a similar cost and that over the long-term, a 100 per cent renewable option would be cost effective. Read full story

Incumbents erect another barrier to solar, storage and shared energy
Renew Economy, 23 September 2016
Last month, Andrew Vesey, the chief executive of AGL Energy, made a frank admission. Regulation in the energy industry, he said, were not designed to protect consumers. They were put in place to protect investors… The Australian Energy Markets Commission on Thursday announced it would reject a proposed rule change that would give credit to customers using less of the grid because they would share and store more of their locally generated electricity… Jay Rutovitz, from the Institute of Sustainable Futures, described the modelling and the decision as “laughable”. She said the modelling commissioned by the AEMC was distorted by a number of factors, such as the inclusion of existing systems, and by only including solar PV and no other technologies, and wrongly assuming that the proposed rule change would apply to small solar systems. Read full story

Households food spending high - and wastage too
The Age, 23 September 2016
Households in Victoria are among Australia’s biggest spenders on groceries, dropping about $149 at the checkout on average every week. And yet almost one in five of those same households will send more than 20 per cent of that food straight to the bin… Jenni Downes, a research consultant at the UTS Institute of Sustainable Futures has studied food, consumption and waste for more than three years. In that time, one thing has remained clear: ‘‘What we know about food waste is actually very little, because very little consistent official data is collected.’’ 

Sydney households spend an average of $163 a week on groceries
Sydney Morning Herald, 22 September 2016
Households in Sydney spend more on groceries than anywhere else in Australia, dropping around $163 at the checkout on average every week. And yet almost one in five of those same households will send more than 20 per cent of that food straight to the bin. Read full story

AEMC says no on rewarding local energy sharing, and industry is dismayed
The Fifth Estate, 22 September 2016
The case for generating energy locally and sharing it with neighbours has been dealt a huge blow after the Australian Energy Market Commission today ruled against a proposal to incentivise the practice put forward by the Property Council, City of Sydney and Total Environment Centre. Read full story

Distributed energy could provide more than $1bn in grid cost savings
Inside Waste, 22 September 2016
A major Australian study has found that Australia could unlock more than $1 billion in savings via avoided network costs if regulatory measures that reward local energy generators for their contributions are introduced… The report was led by the University of Technology Sydney's Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF) and funded by ARENA, with findings based on results of five virtual trials conducted by the ISF in Queensland, NSW and Victoria. Read full story

A key step in the possibility of Kangaroo Island becoming self-sufficient in power generation
ABC Eyre Peninsula and West Coast, ABC North and West SA, 22 September 2016
A key step in the possibility of Kangaroo Island becoming self-sufficient in power generation will be taken tonight. Research from Sydney's University of Technology has found that a mix of renewable energy could be as cost-effective as a new cable. The forum will be held at Kingscote Aurora Ozone Hotel.
Interview with Chris Dunstan about Kangaroo Island
ABC Adelaide, 20 September 2016
Compere asks why Dunstan think Kangaroo Island was a good example of a could-be sustainable island. Dunstan says they have been doing a lot of work on developing clean energy across the country. He says they have worked with the Australian Renewable Energy Agency, Renewable SA, and Kangaroo Island Council to have a closer look at it. 

Credit where it's due: how distributed energy could save $1bn on grid costs
Renew Economy and One Step Off the Grid, 20 September 2016
The introduction of regulatory measures to reward local energy generators for their contributions to the grid could unlock savings of more than $1 billion in avoided network costs, a major Australian study has found. The study – which was led by the University of Technology Sydney’s Institute for Sustainable Futures, and funded by ARENA – found that paying ‘local network credits’ to local generators for their role in reducing overall investment in the electricity network could reduce network expansion costs by 59 per cent, representing an overall positive economic benefit of approximately $1.2 billion by 2050. Read full story

Report on the future of ARENA
Radio Adelaide, 14 September 2016
The Coalition Government and Labor have yesterday announced they were teaming up to save the Australian Renewable Energy Agency... Nicola Ison, senior research consultant, Institute for Sustainable Futures, University of Technology Sydney, says ARENA was set up under the Rudd Government to combine all of Australia's renewable energy, grants and research funding programs.

Report on Kangaroo Island's power
Radio Adelaide (The Wire), 16 September 2016
Kangaroo Island is considering switching to 100% renewable energy. The University of Technology Sydney has released a study that says it is possible and it may save money.  Read full story

Kangaroo Island: 100% renewables cheaper than sticking with grid
Renew Economy, 15 September 2016
Kangaroo Island, the iconic tourist attraction off the South Australian coast near Adelaide, would likely find it cheaper to go 100 per cent renewable, with its own resources, rather than stay connected to the main grid, according to a detailed study led by the Institute of Sustainable Futures. Read full story

Kangaroo Island’s choice: a new cable to the mainland, or renewable power
The Conversation, 16 September 2016
South Australia’s iconic Kangaroo Island, the site of Australia’s first free settled colony, could pioneer a new age of renewable energy, according to our new research. Read full story

Australian Renewable Energy Agency saved but with reduced funding - experts react
The Conversation, 13 September 2016
The Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA) has been granted a funding lifeline of A$800 million over the next five years, after the federal government and opposition came to an agreement that will save the agency. Read full story

Towards 100% renewable energy for Kangaroo Island study results
The Islander, 13 September 2016
Kangaroo Island has come to a crossroads with sustainable energy and local council are urging residents to have their say on the future of the Island. The decision is between two contrasting paths: replacing the existing undersea electricity cable from the mainland or developing local electricity supply based on an affordable, diverse and reliable combination of the Island’s renewable energy resources. The ‘Towards 100 per cent Renewable Energy for Kangaroo Island’ research study was completed by the Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF) at the University of Technology Sydney. Read full story

Interview with Prof. Damien Giurco about coffee pods
ABC Far North, 7 September 2016
Interview with Professor Damien Giurco, Director, Institute for Sustainable Futures. Shorey talk about coffee pods. He says coffee pods can have an effect on the environment, saying it takes 150 to 500 years for it to breakdown. Giurco notes that billions of coffee pods have already been produced. He then explains how coffee pods are recycled, indicating that it undergoes a lengthy process of recycling that negates the convenience of the pods. Giurco then asks if combustible capsules could be a possible solution on coffee pods, and Giurco confirms by saying they are like biodegradable plastic bags that breakdown in shorter time.

How to accelerate IoT innovation in Australia
IoTHub, 8 September 2016
Take-up of the Internet of Things in Australia is not as rapid as it is in the United States and parts of Europe, and a recent IoT workshop at the University of Technology, Sydney, heard from three industry experts about what's holding back IoT here and how the obstacles can be overcome. Read full story

The world's population will reach 9.9 billion by 2050, but can Earth cope with the increase?
News.com.au, 2 September 2016
A new report by the Population Reference Bureau predicts the world’s population could reach 9.9 billion by 2050, which exceeds the current UN predictions suggesting 9.6 billion people…Associate Professor at the Institute for Sustainable Futures Chris Riedy shared the sentiments about needing to put a bigger emphasis on renewable energies before the world’s population increases too much. Read full story

Interview with Dana Cordell about phosphorus
ABC regional, 2 September 2016
Pre-recorded interview with Dana Cordell, Sustainable Futures, University of Technology Sydney. Neindorf mentions that the world is running out of phosphorus, key fertiliser. She notes that phosphorus can be found in human waste. Cordell says urine has all the plant available nutrients, phosphorus, nitrogen, and potassium, in a right ration

Cutting ARENA would devastate clean energy research
The Conversation, republished in Ecobusiness, 30 August 2016
This week’s first sitting of the 45th Parliament of Australia is considering a A$6.5 billion “omnibus savings bill”, including a proposed cut of A$1.3 billion to the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA). If adopted, it would effectively mean the end of ARENA and would devastate clean energy research in Australia. Read full story

Plumbing issue the same the world over
Plumbing Connection, 1 September 2016
Every two years an important plumbing industry education event is held in the USA, it's called The International Emerging Technology Symposium [IETS]… Professor Stuart White, the Director of the Institute for Sustainable Futures, based at the University of Technology Sydney gave the keynote address.

The effect of the sharing economy in Australia
Radio National, The Money, 25 August 2016
Compere wonders about what's the effect of sharing economy in Australia. He mentions Chris Riedy, University of Technology Sydney saying the effect depends on the location. Read full story

Coffee pod conundrum: how green is your coffee?
ABC online, 26 August 2016
Coffee snobs, you might not like what you're about to read. The former boss of Nespresso says coffee pods are killing the environment. So how does your coffee stack up on the environmental scale?... Well, Professor Damien Giurco, director at the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology Sydney, reckons you can order something good for the environment. Read full story

Sydney launches city-wide free IoT network
Business Solutions, 16 August 2016
Australia has launched a public access open data network that connects the city to the Internet of Things (IoT), thanks to the collaboration between the University of Technology Sydney’s (UTS) Institute for Sustainable Futures and the Sydney-based IoT integrator Meshed. Read full story

Radio interview with Professor Cynthia Mitchell
ABC Radio National, 15 August 2016
Professor Cynthia Mitchell's research improves water supply and sanitation systems in developed and developing countries. Read full story

People power is the secret to reliable, clean energy
The Conversation, 12 August 2016
Australia’s energy watchdog, the Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO), has issued a stark warning: more wind and solar power will demand new approaches to avoid interruptions to electricity supply. Read full story

It’s official: We’re wasting our natural resources faster than ever before
news.com.au, 9 August 2016
Have you heard of “Earth Overshoot Day”? Spoiler alert: it was yesterday. No, this isn’t an event that warrants celebration. To the contrary, the closer to the beginning of the year this day occurs, the more concerned we should be… Dr Chris Riedy, an Associate Professor at the Institute for Sustainable Futures, said this new record is a legitimate cause for concern for the planet. Read full story

Researcher predicts an energy revolution for local government
WIN News Wagga, 8 August 2016
A Sydney University of Technology researcher is predicting an energy revolution for local government as it battles to cut costs for ratepayers. Speaking at a recent energy forum in Wagga, Ed Langham says councils need to look at cheaper, more efficient ways of powering infrastructure. With the Federal Government setting a Government pollution reduction target of 20% by 2020, he thinks the challenge for local government is to keep current with developments in renewable energy, such as geo thermal and off-grid power sharing.

National renewable energy map adds value
Electrical Solutions, 5 August 2016
An online map that helps renewable energy developers find the best locations for new Australian projects has recently received a major upgrade...New network opportunity maps, developed with ARENA support and hosted on AREMI, were also announced by the UTS Institute for Sustainable Futures at the summit. Read full story

It's 2016 - Greg Hunt & Josh Frydenberg are carrying our climate future
The Fifth Estate, 4 August 2016
On Thursday Ian Dunlop was also sceptical of change in the parliament but willing to see there could be a shift in the government’s thinking…The theme of Dunlop’s talk on Tuesday night (where The Fifth Estate joined Dunlop, Stuart White, director of UTS’ Institute for Sustainable Futures and Graham Davies director of Resonant Solutions for a panel discussion) was the need for an emergency response to climate change, in the same way as we might mobilise for war. Read full story

The mega-trends to watch out for in waste and recycling
The Fifth Estate, 3 August 2016
Ahead of this year’s Australasian Waste & Recycling Expo, four industry experts share their views on innovation, best practice and future mega-trends in waste and recycling, both in Australia and abroad. Read full story

How the Internet of Things will keep Sydney green and connected
Lifehacker, 2 August 2016
The Internet of Things is being deployed to make Sydney a greener city via a public access open data network launched in a collaboration between the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) and local startup and IoT integrator Meshed. Read full story

The electricity market's not doing a great job - here's how to improve it
The Conversation, 2 August 2016
The past three weeks have seen considerable discussion of Australia’s wholesale electricity market, driven largely by severe price spikes in South Australia. Read full story

Australia's renewables map shows new opportunities
Spatial Source, 2 August 2016
CSIRO’s data research and development body Data61, last week unveiled the new and improved Australian Renewable Energy Mapping Infrastructure (AREMI) at the Clean Energy Summit in Melbourne….New network opportunity maps, developed with ARENA support and hosted on AREMI, were also announced by the UTS Institute for Sustainable Futures at the summit. The new network opportunity maps show where energy demand is expected to outstrip supply. These are often locations where renewables offer an alternative to extra poles and wires and can reduce power prices whilst increasing network stability. Read full story

The Eureka Factory
The Monthly, 1 August 2016
If you haven’t already heard, the solar cell efficiency race is on, and once you’ve dusted off your periodic table, it’s a race as scintillating as any big-ticket derby. The stakes, however, are much, much higher…This radical drop in cost was “the first wave of the solar revolution”, says Sven Teske, a solar industry expert at the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology Sydney. The second wave in this revolution – which Teske says will ensure that solar PV “dominates global energy markets” – is now gathering momentum, thanks to the development of battery storage. Read full story

Roo-lationship status: It's complicated
Sunday Age, Sun Herald, Sunday Canberra Times, WA Today, 31 July 2016
Chefs love kangaroo meat for its flavour and texture. Enthusiasts hail it as a distinctively Australian product, low in fat, high in iron and kinder to the environment than grazing livestock. But animal welfare advocates oppose the slaughter as cruel, and say farmers need more support to manage kangaroos without killing. 'It's a gruesome fate and these joeys are seen as collateral damage.' Louise Boronyak, THINKK manager. Read full story

Free, city-wide IoT network launched in Sydney
Computerworld, 29 July 2016
The result of a partnership between the University of Technology Sydney's (UTS) Institute for Sustainable Futures and Sydney-based Internet of Things integrator, Meshed, the public-access network is being offered for free to entrepreneurs, researchers and students… The result of a partnership between the University of Technology Sydney's (UTS) Institute for Sustainable Futures and Sydney-based Internet of Things integrator, Meshed, the public-access network is being offered for free to entrepreneurs, researchers and students. Read full story

Possible alternative to trraditional grid management
Utility Magazine, 29 July 2016
A new tool launched by the Institute of Sustainable Futures is encouraging alternatives to traditional grid management and has received support from the Energy Networks Association (ENA). Read full story

National renewable energy map more valuable than ever
esdnews.com.au, 28 July 2016
An online map that helps renewable energy developers find the best locations for new Australian projects has received major upgrades. The Australian Renewable Energy Mapping Infrastructure (AREMI), developed by CSIRO’s Data61 with funding support from the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA), provides free and open access to a wide array of Australian renewable energy data and is a repository for ARENA-funded knowledge. Read full story

New map shows areas of opportunity for renewable energy systems
Engineers Australia, 28 July 2016
Companies involved in renewable energy, battery storage and power demand management can now identify the areas in Australia which have the greatest opportunities, thanks to a new map developed by the Institute for sustainable Futures. Read full story

Online renewables mapping upgrade highlights importance of battery storage
Renew Economy, 27 July 2016
The CSIRO-developed online mapping program that helps renewable energy developers find the best locations for new Australian wind, solar and wave power projects has received major upgrades, including the addition of new maps that will highlight areas of electricity network constraint, where battery storage, demand management and other decentralised energy resources can be best applied. The collaboration included project partners Geoscience Australia and the Clean Energy Council, as well as the University of Technology Sydney’s Institute for Sustainable Futures, whose contribution was to develop a standardised data protocol on network information and opportunities, supported by Network Service Providers in the NEM.  Read full story

You can't half bake the renewable energy revolution
InDaily, 25 July 2016
What’s required is a fundamental rewrite of our energy laws in order to facilitate the transition to 100 per cent renewable power – a transition that is completely achievable, would save us $90 billion by 2050 (according to a Sydney University of Technology report), and would bring our energy system to a near-zero emissions scenario. Read full story

First IoT networks launched in Sydney
Prime Mover Magazine, 24 July 2016
A public access open data network has been launched in Sydney, connecting the city to the Internet of Things (IoT). The Ultimo-based network is the result of a collaboration between the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) and local IoT integrator Meshed. Read full story

The Internet of Things has just gone green with a brand new network in Sydney
Business Insider Australia, 20 July 2016
The Internet of Things is being deployed to make Sydney a greener city via a public access open data network launched today in a collaboration between the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) and local startup and IoT integrator Meshed.

Interview with Louise Boronyak about light rail development and wildlife
2SER FM, 17 July 2016

Our cities today face the dilemma of catering for growing populations while at the same time ensuring that growth takes sustainability on board. The light rail development in Sydney's Eastern Suburbs has faced a large amount of criticism due to the culling of more than 1000 mature aged trees and a lack of consultation with the public. Read full story

Green thumbs up for more city trees
The Advertiser, 5 July 2016
Adelaide is to become one big leafy suburb under plans to increase the coverage of tree canopies by half over the next three decades….A report by the Institute for Sustainable Futures analysed SA’s 19 local government areas using i-Tree software – which uses aerial photography to estimate benefits, including cooler urban areas.

Revised 30-year plan seeks more leafy streets but fewer people
The Advertiser, 4 July 2016
Adelaide is to become one big leafy suburb under plans to increase the coverage of tree canopies by half over the next three decades….A report by the Institute for Sustainable Futures analysed SA’s 19 local government areas using i-Tree software – which uses aerial photography to estimate benefits, including cooler urban areas. Read full story

City of Penrith to prototype climate-resilient bus shelter
The Fifth Estate, 30 June 2016
The University of Technology Sydney, four Western Sydney city councils and the NSW government have joined forces to find a design for bus shelters that will perform effectively under future climate change scenarios. The Climate Adapted People Shelter competition aimed to address the thermal performance and user comfort aspects of bus shelters. It is part of a wider collaboration on transport infrastructure between UTS experts, the Adapt NSW program and the four councils… Institute of Sustainable Futures researcher Dr Brent Jacobs said Western Sydney was projected to experience up to seven additional days above 35 degrees a year by 2030, placing exposed communities, including Sydney’s 600,000 daily bus users, at heightened risk. Read full story

Interview with Chris Dunstan about 100% renewables on Kangaroo Island
ABC North and West SA, 28 June 2016
Interview with Chris Dunstan, Research Director, University of Technology, Sydney's Institute for Sustainable Futures. Bennett talks about a study investigating on the Kangaroo Island solely powered by renewable energy kicking off.

Can Kangaroo Island run off renewables?
esdnews.com.au, 28 June 2016
Can Australia’s iconic Kangaroo Island be powered by 100 per cent renewable energy? This is the focus of a new study announced by the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) in partnership with the Kangaroo Island Council. Read full story

A study is investigating whether Kangaroo Island can be solely powered by renewable energy.
ABC Eyre Peninsula, 28 June 2016
The study by Kangaroo Island Council and Sydney's University of Technology is funded by the Australian Renewable Energy Agency. Research director with the university Chris Dunstan says the study was commissioned because the cable that feeds electricity to the island from the mainland is approaching the end of its life.

Towards 100% renewable energy for Kangaroo Island
phys.org, 27 June 2016
Can Australia's iconic Kangaroo Island be powered by 100 per cent renewable energy? This is the focus of a new study announced today by the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) in partnership with the Kangaroo Island Council. Read full story

Can Kangaroo Island be powered by 100% renewable energy
Renew Economy, 27 June 2016
A new study funded by the Australian Renewable Energy Agency will look at the possibility of using renewable energy to provide 100 per cent of the power needs of the iconic Kangaroo Island. But it appears to be a race against time. The study – led by the Institute of Sustainable Futures at Sydney’s University of Technology – needs to deliver a report by July 15 on the 100 per cent renewable energy option to meet a deadline by the South Australian network operator, SA Power Networks, on future gird options for the island. Read full story

Sustainability strategist Cynthia Mitchell
ABC Online, 26 June 2016
Professor Cynthia Mitchell is the deputy director of the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS). Her speciality is "restorative infrastructure development" which aims to harness new development to drive positive economic and environmental outcomes. Read full story

Interview with Stuart White about container deposit schemes
2SER FM, 26 June 2016
Did you ever collect old cans or bottles when you were younger to take back to the store for a few bucks? The 'cash for cans' scheme is old news in South Australia, but ongoing campaigns could potentially see the scheme come to Sydney. Read full story

Interview with Katie Ross about Indonesian community sanitation systems
2SER FM, 26 June 2016
What if every time you needed to go to the toilet you had to walk out of your house and down to the shopping district bathrooms? For many Indonesian communities this is a reality, with such community members also being responsible for the operation and maintanence of these sanitation systems. Read full story

Interview with Solar Citizens national director Claire O'Rourke
Radio Adelaide, 22 June 2016
Hastwell discusses Solar Citizens' new report which has found Australians spending over $1.2b in the last five years on rooftop solar, far more than what has been spent on large-scale solar… O'Rourke says they have commissioned the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology Sydney to do economic and technical scenario modelling on renewable energy. She explains that the results of the research show that it is possible to go quickly to renewable energy by 2030.

Solar citizens' state of solar report shows Australia has the highest levels of rooftop solar power in the world
ABC News Radio, 22 June 2016
Claire O'Rourke, Solar Citizens, says Australians have spent $8bn since the 2007 financial year out of the hip pocket, with the motivation of savings, as power bills and network charges increase. O'Rourke details savings on carbon pollution from University of Technology modelling, and emphasise the importance of variable over baseload power, and is critical of Federal Government cuts.

Australians have spent almost $8bn on rooftop solar since 2007
Guardian Australia, 22 June 2016
In April, Solar Citizens and GetUp! published a report advocating a range of policies intended to transition Australia to 100% renewable energy by 2030. It proposed changes in three broad areas: regulations, funding and obstacles to the rollout of renewable energy. That report followed modelling the groups funded, produced by the institute for sustainable futures at the University of Technology Sydney, which suggested such a transition would be technically feasible and would save the country $90bn. Read full story

Interview with Damien Giurco about recycling coffee pods
ABC Kimberley, Broome, 16 June 2016
Giurco explains the disposed coffee pods are almost about 3m in number and are frequently wrapped in aluminium, which generates a lot of waste into the landfill. 

Interview with Louise Boronyak about trees and light rail
2SER FM, 12 June 2016
Sydney is in the middle of a light rail uprising, but how many trees have to be cut down in the process? This week we're talking light rail logistics,  Read full story

Interview with Claire O'Rourke, Director Solar Citizens
ABC New England North West, 9 June 2016
O'Rourke says they will launch the homegrown power plant in Tamworth tonight. She says it's a joint project between Solar Citizens and GetUp. She says they use the economic and technical modelling by the University of Technology Sydney.

Energy storage key to a 100 per cent renewable Australia
Eco business, 7 June 2016
Research shows that it is possible for Australia to be 100 per cent renewable-powered by 2030. But meeting this goal will require the mass adoption of energy storage technologies… Speaking at the same event, Sven Teske, principal researcher at the University of Technology Sydney’s Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF), noted that storage technologies would be crucial to helping Australia become a nation fully powered by renewable energy. Read full story

Australia's 7.5m tonnes of food waste: can 'ugly food' campaigns solve the problem?
The Guardian Australia, 6 June 2016
While government needs to address food waste issue, experts say customers also need to change their perceptions about what normal food looks like… But Jenni Downes, research consultant at the Institute for Sustainable Futures, says that as long as campaigns like these undervalue perfectly edible food, the result is farmers receiving less money for produce, which can trigger rebound effects. For instance, anecdotal evidence shows that consumers are more likely to waste cheap food because they don’t value it as much. Read full story

Ancient fig has deep roots in our past
Southern Courier, 31 May 2016
The fight is stepping up to save an ancient tree that stands as a living reminder of our past…Saving Sydney’s Trees’ Kathlene Hennessy is urging Randwick councilors to back the push to save the Tree of Knowledge, pointing to a report from the Institute for Sustainable Futures, Benchmarking Australia’s Urban Tree Canopy that found Randwick has the third lowest tree canopy coverage of all the Sydney councils.

How can you take part in the Ideas Boom?
Skynews.com.au, 23 May 2016
When it's implemented properly, a strong innovation strategy can bring real and ongoing benefits to the business bottom line…Joining Smart Money's Jon Dee to give advice on these issues were Helena Fern from Monash Sustainability Institute and Damien Giurco from the Institute for Sustainable Futures at UTS in Sydney. Read full story

The vampire power products sucking our energy
The Daily Mail, 22 May 2016
Australian consumers could save $860 million a year by switching appliances off standby. Televisions, air conditioners, modems, gaming consoles, coffee machines and microwaves are among the thousands of everyday gadgets that feature a standby function or sleep mode… The research principal at the Institute of Sustainable Futures, Edward Langham told the publication: 'Although it's not the problem it once was, with the number of connected devices we do need to be careful with the direction this could take us ... to make sure we don't let vampire power products drain our power unknowingly.' Read full story

Standby energy consumption adds $860 million to electricity bills
Sydney Morning Herald, 22 May 2016
A quick glance around the average home and you will see them. In the kitchen, the living room and the bedroom. They are the hungry devices costing Australian consumers $860 million a year and resulting in almost 2.6 million tonnes of carbon dioxide emissions – and that is when they are not being used… The research principal at the Institute of Sustainable Futures, Edward Langham, said regulatory frameworks needed to be "awake" to the increase in home network devices. Read full story

UTS opens new transport research and innovation hub
Govnews, 20 May 2016
The University of Technology Sydney (UTS) has created a new research and development hub focused on improving transport infrastructure. New South Wales Minister for Transport Andrew Constance opened the UTS Transport Research Centre on 17th May, 2016, saying it’s a great example of NSW leading the way when it comes to transport and technology. Read full story

Putting grassroots adaptation on map
The Land and Queensland Country Life, 19 May 2016
Landcare communities are rethinking the way they conduct revegetation and other rehabilitation initiatives in response to a changing climate, according to ongoing research conducted by CSIRO and the University of Technology Sydney.

Interview with Helena Fern, Monash Sustainability Institute and Damien Giurco UTS Institute for Sustainable Futures
Sky Business News, 18 May 2016
Interview with Helena Fern, Monash Sustainability Institute and Damien Giruco, UTS Institute for Sustainable Futures. Fern believes that innovation has to be a top down process, starting with CEO and board of executives, who should be encouraging people to think innovatively. She adds that the leaders of companies have to support those who come up with new innovations. Giurco says that companies can be innovation leaders by leveraging their market know how. 

Interview with Damien Giurco about recycling coffee pods
ABC Southern Queensland, ABC Riverland, ABC South West WA, 13 May 2016
Pre-recorded interview of Professor Damien Giurco, University of Technology Sydney with Niomi O'Hara, ABC. Giurco talks about the problem with the coffee pod machines. He says there are some brands who were claiming that there pods were recyclable, with the metals melted to make aluminium products.

Anti-waste ‘Food Stall Savers’ project targets community festivals and local farmers markets
Newsmaker, 11 May 2016
The booming local festival and farmers market sector is being targeted by an innovative new food waste avoidance engagement and education project being piloted at this weekend’s 6th annual Pyrmont Festival. Read full story

Highlights of the UTS 2016 Summer Study on Energy Productivity
Radio National, Big Ideas, 11 May 2016
Barclay says energy costs have jumped by around 60 per cent over the past decade putting increasing pressure on households, businesses and the overall national productivity. One way to reduce these costs is to improve energy productivity.

Unlikely heroes: how lithium mining could change the Pilbara for the better
Guardian Australia, 10 May 2016
Out Western Australia way unlikely new environmental heroes can be found toiling in the red ochre dust of the Pilbara… That’s where Altura Mining comes in, timing plans to develop the Pilgangoora Lithium project to coincide with the battery boom… Damien Giurco, professor of resource futures at the University of Technology Sydney’s (UTS) institute for sustainable futures, cautions that when it comes to the emerging market for lithium-ion batteries, some forms of lithium are more suitable than others. Read full story

Interview with Damien Giurco about managing waste
702 ABC Sydney, 5 May 2016
Harmer says they are discussing ideas on managing waste today. Prof. Damien Giurco He says waste produced in Australia is now at two tonnes per person, with a third from households, a third from business and a third from construction, and this level has doubled since 1990.

Incumbents' tariff war on rooftop solar accelerates 'death spiral'
Renew Economy, 3 May 2016
The refusal of Australian utilities to recognise the value of local generation – such as rooftop solar and battery storage – means that they are undermining their own business models and effectively accelerating the “death spiral” they fear so much… Jay Rotovitz, from the Institute for Sustainable Futures in Sydney, has been working on a government-funded project – Facilitating Local Network Charges and Virtual Net Metering – that looks at what would happen if the owners of local generation received a network credit and were able to trade with others. Read full story

Strategy for the future
Sunshine Coast Daily, 28 April 2016
Geoff Cass, concerned at the possible cost of developing and implementing a sustainable renewable energy strategy, will be pleased to learn of the findings of new modelling undertaken by the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the Sydney University of Technology. The modelling shows that committing to a strategy which meets all of Australia's future energy needs from renewable sources makes economic as well as environmental sense.

Interview with Kerryn Wimot about Sydney as a world class digital city
702 ABC Sydney, 28 April 2016
Harmer says they are discussing the future of Sydney as a world class digital city today, after a recent City of Sydney paper said towns risk lagging behind if they do not harness smart governance with smart city technology. Wilmot says the term 'smart cities' is bandied around a lot and involves gathering a lot of data in a central operations centre to improve the efficient operation of a city. She says governments are now trying to bring a lot of data together and make it open source for people to access and do things with it. She says the public transport data was released to the public which has helped people to see when their bus is due and where it is.

Labor trumps Coalition on climate, forces Turnbull into Abbott-era scare campaign
Renew Economy, 27 April 2016
Labor has sought to outflank the Coalition government by committing to a zero net carbon pollution target by 2050, proposing two separate “low-cost” emission trading schemes, and reinforcing its interim commitments to cut carbon emissions by 45 per cent by 2030, and reaching 50 per cent renewable energy by the same date…Senator Richard di Natale reinforcing his party’s commitment to cut emissions by 80 per cent and reach 90 per cent renewables by 2030 – a target that is not far short of studies produced by Beyond Zero Emissions and the Institute for Sustainable Futures in recent weeks. Read full story

Transitioning to 100% renewables could save Australia $90bn
AusBN, 27 April 2016
Converting Australia to 100 per cent renewable energy by 2050 could save the country US$90 billion, a new report says from the Institute for Sustainable Futures in Sydney. Building new infrastructure to generate renewable energy for transport, electricity and industry from now until 2050 would cost Australia around $800 billion. It would also save the economy up to $740 billion, saving $90 billion up until 2050. Read full story

Reducing Australia's reliance on fossil fuels
Dalby Herald, 22 April 2016
Australia could transition to 100% renewable energy by 2050 and save $20 billion annually along the way, a new report says… The report says modelling by UTS Institute for Sustainable Futures shows households could be totally on renewable energy by 2030 if the right decisions are made.

Renewable energy could save billions
Bribie Weekly, 22 April 2016
Australia could transition to 100% renewable energy by 2050 and save $20 billion annually along the way, a new report says…The report says modelling by UTS Institute for Sustainable Futures shows households could be totally on renewable energy by 2030 if the right decisions are made.

100% renewables might be fantasy, but it's what Australia is signing up for
Renew Economy, 22 April 2016
Earlier this week, the Institute for Sustainable Futures in Sydney released a report that told us not only is 100 per cent renewable energy by 2030 possible – the Australian Energy Market Operator had already told us that – but it would also likely save us money. Read full story

It takes a village: why community energy is vital
One Step Off The Grid, 20 April 2016
This week, a major new report from the Institute for Sustainable Futures in Sydney has detailed how Australia could transition to 100 per cent renewable electricity generation by 2030, and to 100 per cent renewable everything – including industry, heat and transport – by 2050. And all for a multi-billion dollar saving to the Australian economy. Read full story

Australia's switch to renewable energy could be just around the corner
Digital Energy, 20 April 2016
The Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF) at the University of Technology in Sydney has claimed that Australia’s electricity, heating and fuel needs can all be fulfilled by adopting renewable energy. The 100 percent Renewable Energy for Australia Report found that Australia could phase out all coal burning by 2030 and convert all its transport to renewable energy by 2035.  Read full story

Nation could run carbon free and save $20bn a year
News Mail, Bundaberg,Sunshine Coast Daily, Toowoomba Chronicle, Gladstone Observer, Daily Mercury, Northern Start, Daily News Warwick, Fraser Coast Chronicle, Queensland Times, Norning Bulletin, 20 April 2016
Australia could transition to 100% renewable energy by 2050 and save $20 billion annually along the way, a new report says. The Homegrown Power Plan report, a joint project of GetUp and Solar Citizens, looks at how Australia can end its reliance on fossil fuels by embracing renewable energy sources including solar and wind power. The report says modelling by UTS Institute for Sustainable Futures shows households could be totally on renewable energy by 2030 if the right decisions are made.

Coalition wants to build 1.2GW coal plant, using climate funds
Renew Economy, 19 April 2016
The Turnbull Coalition government has kicked off its informal re-election campaign by repeating its desire to build a massive coal fired power station in north Queensland, only this time it proposes to use climate funds to help pay for the project… On the same day as a compelling economic case for shifting Australia to 100 per cent renewable energy is published. Read full story

New report shows 100% renewable by 2030 can save Australia money
Renew Economy, 19 April 2016
A new report from the Institute for Sustainable Futures in Sydney says a rapid transition to a 100 per cent renewable energy system can save Australia money – with avoided fuel costs to quickly offset the extra capital expenditure of building wind, solar and other renewable energy installations Read full story

100% renewable energy can save Australia $90Bn
The Wire, 19 April 2016
How fast can Australia clean up its renewable energy system? The Institute of Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology, Sydney reported a 100%  renewable energy transition is possible by 2050. The study found Australia would save $90bn, saying the transition is ‘practical, achievable, economically sound and overwhelmingly popular.’ Read full story

Road open to 100% RE in Oz
Renews, 19 April 2016
Australia could provide all of its electricity, heating and fuel needs from renewable energy sources by 2050, according to the Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF) at the University of Technology Sydney. The ISF research considered the possible phase out of all coal-fired power by 2030 and the supply of electricity being 100% renewable by the same year for stationary power. Read full story

100% renewables powered Australia within a generation?
Energy Matters, 19 April 2016
Australia’s energy sector – including for transport and industry – could be fully decarbonised within just one generation according a study from Curtin University’s Institute for Sustainable Futures. The report, prepared for GetUp! and Solar Citizens, states Australia could generate all its electricity, heating and fuel needs with renewable energy by 2050. Read full story

Interview with Nicky Ison on the Hownegrown Power Plan
Channel 10, Melbourne (The Project), 19 April 2016
Interview with Nicky Ison, University of Technology Sydney on the Homegrown Power Plan report which says that switching to entirely renewable energy sources in Australia could produce $90b more revenue than staying with fossil fuel as an energy source. Ison says that switching entirely to renewable sources could power electrical networks, public transport and industry, noting that Australia's coal-fired power stations will have to close in the next few decades anyway. She adds that their plan would not leave workers in the Latrobe Valley in the lurch but have a sustainable transition away from coal.

Modelling shows move to 100% renewable energy would save Australia money
The Guardian Australia, 19 April 2016
Transitioning Australia to 100% renewable energy by 2050 would cost less than continuing on the current path, according to a new report. Building the infrastructure to supply renewable energy for all electricity, transport and industry would cost about $800bn between now and 2050, the report from the institute for sustainable futures at the University of Technology Sydney, found. Read full story

Drought to linger even after El Nino, water expert warns
Philippine Daily Inquirer, 15 April 2016
An Australian expert on water management has warned that the the Philippines is at risk of massive water shortage even after the El Niño phenomenon passes because of inadequate policies to govern water use in the face of expanding roads, housing projects, malls and other infrastructure. Prof. Stuart White, director of Institute for Sustainable Futures of the University of Technology Sydney said the Philippines needs to step up policy measures to mitigate the impact of drought as well as balance water supply and demand to meet infrastructure development. Read full story

Ministers' thumbs up to compost
Hawkesbury Gazette, 6 April 2016
The Minister for Primary Industries talked to the Gazette while visiting the compost trial taking place on university lands at Richmond on Monday… The project is being run with the Institute of Sustainable Futures and the NSW Farmers group.

Re-evaluating the reduce, reuse, recycle model
Think:Sustainability 2SER, 27 March 2016
When it comes to recycling, it seems to be at the top of our priority list. But what about the other two re's - reuse and reduce? Why are we less focused on reusing things for another purpose, or reducing our consumption of unnecessary things altogether? Read full story

Interview with Judy Friedlander about meat consumption
ABC News 24, 25 March 2016
Interview with Judith Friedlander, University of Technology Sydney. Today is Good Friday and many Christians will be eating fish. The livestock industry contributed 6b tonnes of greenhouse gas each year. Researchers believe people are eating too much red meat. The Australian Dietary guidelines specify that men are eating 20% too much red meat. However, Lancet believes men are eating double what they should be eating in terms of red meat. If people adopt a plant-based diet, greenhouse gases can be reined in. Friedlander also notes 70% of consumed fish in Australia is imported and 40% of Australia's marine stocks are overexploited and overfished. She has created the Food Faith idea. Footage of the Interfaith Garden in Lang Cove is shown. She has the backing from all the major religious councils in Australia, which include the Catholic Earth Care, National Imams council, Jewish board of deputies, Buddhist and Hindu associations.

Living Planet: Bus shelter to protect against Australian heatwaves
Deutsche Welle (DW), 24 March 2016
In Australia, bush fires and floods make the headlines. But extreme heat waves have caused more deaths. New Sydney bus shelters will protect people from extreme heat in an ever-warming climate. Read full story

Interview with Stuart White about upcoming World Water Day and ways to protect water resources
ABC Mid North Coast 18 March 2016
Interview with Stuart White, Institute For Sustainable Futures, University of Technology, discussing on the upcoming World Water Day and ways to protect water resources. White says they will have some activities and media conference to improve water situation. White says one of their focuses is to improve water efficiency. Wyllie mentions Thailand has started pumping water from the Mekong River into its own waterways, sparking concern from downstream countries like Vietnam, which is suffering its worst drought in almost a century. White talks about the dry spell in Southeast Asia. He talks about the problems in Mekong River, with four countries sharing this large watershed namely Thailand, Myanmar, Laos and Cambodia. Dyer talks about the fights between NSW, Victoria, Qld and SA with the Murray-Darling Basin. White says the high salinity of the Mekong River affects the growth of crops and the agriculture industry. He talks about the Nile River, as well as the sanitising the rivers in India. White says the lack of safe drinking water is one of the major causes of deaths in infants. He talks about their efforts to promote safe drinking water

City slicker PM hitches ride on urban express
Sydney Morning Herald 12 March 2016
The Turnbull government is working on something other than tax reform, and it's something potentially bigger… Around the world, when a new highway is built, it speeds traffic flows initially. But the new road soon entices more drivers and soon it's congested again. Michelle Zeibots of UTS said that this has been exactly borne out in Australia: "We see these patterns after the opening of every new motorway in Sydney."

City slicker PM hitches ride on urban express
Sydney Morning Herald 12 March 2016
The Turnbull government is working on something other than tax reform, and it's something potentially bigger… Around the world, when a new highway is built, it speeds traffic flows initially. But the new road soon entices more drivers and soon it's congested again. Michelle Zeibots of UTS said that this has been exactly borne out in Australia: "We see these patterns after the opening of every new motorway in Sydney."

Peak hour in Sydney is getting worse - and longer, data shows

Sydney Morning Herald 11 March 2016
Average speeds have fallen by at least 1km/h on more than half of the 124 routes included in the government's Roads Report, according to a Fairfax Media analysis comparing weekday peak hour data from 2013 and 2015…Michelle Zeibots, research director in Transport at UTS' Institute for Sustainable Futures, said upgrades tended to deliver only short-term improvements to traffic. "As people are attracted to the network, speeds deteriorate before flattening out, returning to what they were before the new capacity was added," Dr Zeibots said. Read more

Interview with Michelle Zeibots about Sydney's gridlock problem
2SER FM (The Daily) 11 March 2016
Zeibots explains the theory of induced traffic growth through the introduction of more roads.

Interview with Laura Wynne about Sydney's food futures
2SER FM (The Daily) 11 March 2016
Interview with Laura Wynne, Senior Research Consultant, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney's Food Futures, about food production in Sydney.

Life in the slow lane
Sydney Morning Herald 11 March 2016
Sydney's traffic gets slower and gridlock lasts longer Peak-hour speeds on some of Sydney's major roads have slumped by up to 25km/h in the past two years, figures show… Michelle Zeibots, research director in transport at UTS' Institute for Sustainable Futures, said upgrades tended to deliver only short-term improvements to traffic. "As people are attracted to the network, speeds deteriorate before flattening out, returning to what they were before the new capacity was added," Dr Zeibots said.

Report about the RenewEconomy story about wind energy not being to blame for SA power outage
Three D Radio, Adelaide 8 March 2016
Roman says there was interesting piece published by Giles Parkinson on the Renew Economy website, late last week, saying wind energy not to blame for SA power outage…He says Sven Teske, Energy Analyst, Institute for Sustainable Futures compared moving to a renewables based system as the transition from analogue communications to digital.

Sydney's property development threatening foodbowl
Property Observer 6 March 2016
Sydney loves to talk about food, and the housing market. But rarely do we talk about the threat that housing poses to the resilience of Sydney’s food system. If we continue along the path we’re on, Sydney stands to lose more than 90% of its current fresh vegetable production.  Read more

Kangaroo fertility trial slammed
Canberra Times 1 March 2016
Kangaroo activist Marcus Fillinger is setting up his own trial with the University of Technology in Sydney, slamming the ACT government’s fertility trial as out of date, far too slow and doomed to failure.

Kangaroo activist Marcus Fillinger is setting up his own trial with UTS
2CC Canberra Breakfast 1 March 2016
Kangaroo activist Marcus Fillinger is setting up his own trial with the University of Technology in Sydney, slamming the ACT government’s fertility trial as out of date, far too slow and doomed to failure.

Study findings offer new options for urban water and energy management
AZoCleantech 4 March 2016
Renewable hydropower generated from desalination plants and other existing infrastructure would bring economic and environmental benefits to our biggest cities, according to new research from Griffith University, co-authored by ISF’s Damien Giurco. Read more

Wind energy not to blame for South Australia power outage
Reneweconomy 4 March 2016
When rolling blackouts occurred for some consumers in South Australia late in the evening of November 1 last year, the fossil fuel industry, the nuclear lobby, conservatives and many in the mainstream media were quick to point the finger at wind energy, in particular, and renewable energy in general… Moving to a renewables-based system does have its challenges. As Sven Teske, an energy analyst with the Institute of Sustainable Futures suggested this week, it is like the transition from analog communications to digital.  Read more

Drought-plagued California misses mandated 25 percent water cut
NanoNews 5 March 2016
The State Water Project is alongside the federally operated Central Valley Project in moving water from the mountains to cities and farms...“The Australian experience shows that investment in water conservation options provided the cheapest, quickest and most effective contribution to managing demand during the drought”, said Professor Stuart White, director of the Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF), at the University of Technology Sydney.  Read more

2SER launches new show about sustainability
radioinfo.com.au 4 March 2016
Everyone’s talking about sustainability. But what is it? How can we achieve it? A new show on 2SER FM, called THINK: Sustainability, aims to answer those questions. Hear more

Base load' power: a myth used to defend fossil-fuel
Echo Daily 4 March 2016
Last week, leading lights of the global fossil power industry gathered at a conference in Houston, Texas, for CERA, known in the sector as the ‘Davos of Energy’. They reportedly got the shock of their professional careers… ‘Base load is not a technical concept, it is an economic concept and a business concept of the coal industry that is no longer feasible,’ says Sven Teske, an analyst with the Institute for Sustainable Futures in Sydney. Read more

NSW needs a 10c container deposit legislation
Newcastle Herald 29 February 2016
Each year, Australians consume drinks in about 17 billion containers. Less than half of these are recycled, meaning more than 8.5 billion recyclable cans and bottles go into landfill or end up littering our land and waterways… Professor Stuart White, Director of the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology Sydney, was commissioned in 2000 by the then NSW Environment Minister Bob Debus to conduct an independent review of container deposit legislation. His report concluded that there were significant net benefits arising from its implementation, including both a reduction in litter, and economic benefits from avoiding the unnecessary production of new materials.

Interview with Chris Dunstan about global energy efficiency
Radio National, Saturday extra 27 February 2016
Interview with Chris Dunstan, Research Director at the University of Technology Institute for Sustainable Futures, and Mona Yew, Senior Advisor at the China-US Energy Efficiency Alliance and China Program Director for the Natural Resources Defence Council, about global energy efficiency.

Fresh Feud
Daily Telegraph 26 February 2016
Fresh produce sold at Australia's big supermarket chains may not be as fresh as it looks...A report published yesterday by UTS's Institute for Sustainable Futures warned that urban sprawl and high property prices threatened Sydney's food bowl, with the city set to lose 90 per cent of local growers.

Fresh food from supermarkets may not be so fresh after all
Daily Telegraph 26 February 2016
Fresh produce sold at Australia's big supermarket chains may not be as fresh as it looks...A report published yesterday by UTS's Institute for Sustainable Futures warned that urban sprawl and high property prices threatened Sydney's food bowl, with the city set to lose 90 per cent of local growers.

In pursuit of the mining millions
Earthsharing 25 February 2016
Kevin Morrison (UTS) discusses best practices in consensus building when it comes to resource rent taxation. We then debate the mechanism to share these mining millions.

Interview with Kateria Callahan, Alliance to Save Energy about energy productivity
Radio National, Canberra, Breakfast 25 February 2016
Interview with Kateri Callahan, President, Alliance to Save Energy, a Washington-based non-profit organisation that promotes energy productivity Kelly says experts agree that the single easiest way to cut out carbon emissions is to not waste energy in the first place. Today, 300 delegates from Australia and overseas meet in Sydney for the 2016 Australia Summer Study on Energy Productivity, co-hosted by the Institute of Sustainable Futures at UTS and the Australian Alliance to Save Energy.  Hear more

Interview with David Hochschild, California Energy Commissioner
666 ABC Canberra 25 February 2016
Pre-recorded interview with David Hochschild, California Energy Commissioner, about California's bipartisan approach to renewable energy. Hochschild is currently in Australia for the UTS Australian Summer Study on Energy Productivity.  Hear more

Australia’s Millenium Drought May Teach California How to Prepare and Respond to El Niño
The Planning Report 25 February 2016
The US-Australia Dialogue on Water Management and Drought in Los Angeles highlighted lessons learned when Californians traveled to learn from Australia’s drought. Read more

Time to take the plunge over coffee choices
Warrnambool Standards 24 February 2016
It's the same thing every morning. Top up the kettle. Boil the kettle. Grind the beans. Fill the plunger. have someIwhere between three and four cups every day before I leave the house...Damien Giurco, the professor of research futures at the Institute of Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology Sydney, describes coffee pods as bottled electricity, or more precisely, podded electricity.

Time to take the plunge over coffee choices
Illawarra Mercury 24 February 2016
It's the same thing every morning. Top up the kettle. Boil the kettle. Grind the beans. Fill the plunger. have someIwhere between three and four cups every day before I leave the house...Damien Giurco, the professor of research futures at the Institute of Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology Sydney, describes coffee pods as bottled electricity, or more precisely, podded electricity.

Interview with Prof. Stuart White about container recycling schemes
702 ABC Sydney 24 February 2016
Interview with Professor Stuart White, Director, Institute of Sustainable Futures, UTS, about container recycling schemes. Harmer recalls when Sydney had a bottle recycling scheme, which is in place in SA and the NT and which the NSW Government has announced it will trial. White explains the Premier [Mike Baird] and the Minister for the Environment [Mark Speakman] announced in 2015 they would introduce a world-class container deposit scheme, and submissions close on Friday on a discussion paper, which proposes reverse vending machines.

Forget coffee pods, stick with your plunger
Sydney Morning Herald 23 February 2016
It's the same thing every morning. Top up the kettle. Boil the kettle. Grind the beans. Fill the plunger. have someIwhere between three and four cups every day before I leave the house...Damien Giurco, the professor of research futures at the Institute of Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology Sydney, describes coffee pods as bottled electricity, or more precisely, podded electricity.  Read more

Urgent need to turn down inner west's heat
Inner West Courier 23 February 2016
A study mapping surface temperatures in Leichhardt shows the Bays Precinct is one of the hottest areas in the city with temperatures reaching nearly 46 degrees. The heat mapping analysis, by the University of Technology Sydney and Leichhardt Council, revealed summer ground temperatures in the Bays Precinct can be up to 15 degrees higher than in streets nearby.

Forget coffee pods, stick with your plunger
WA Today 22 February 2016
It's the same thing every morning. Top up the kettle. Boil the kettle. Grind the beans. Fill the plunger. have someIwhere between three and four cups every day before I leave the house...Damien Giurco, the professor of research futures at the Institute of Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology Sydney, describes coffee pods as bottled electricity, or more precisely, podded electricity.

Shout out for the quiet energy revolution
Renew Economy 19 February 2016
It is almost the perfect energy source. It can provide half of all our energy needs by 2030 with zero carbon emissions. Read more

Interview with Ed Langham about trading rooftop solar generated electricity
ABC South East NSW 18 February 2016
Interview with Ed Langham. Research Principal, Institute for Sustainable Futures, University of Technology Sydney, about a proposal to allow households, small businesses and community groups to trade rooftop-solar generated electricity without involving the big electricity companies using Tesla batteries. Langham says current regulations mean that customers get only a very small amount of money for the excess electricity they feed back into the system. He says at the moment there is a need for reduced network charges to transport the power locally and local electricity trading to promote more sharing of rooftop-solar generated electricity

Trading solar-generated power between households to change the way consumers buy electricity
ABC News online 17 February 2016
The concept of bypassing major energy retailers to trade rooftop solar-generated electricity between households, small businesses and community groups is inching closer to reality… The Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology Sydney is conducting virtual trials of local energy trading at five sites along the eastern seaboard. Read more

Trading solar-generated power between households to change the way consumers buy electricity
ABC Radio Australia 17 February 2016
The concept of bypassing major energy retailers to trade rooftop solar-generated electricity between households, small businesses and community groups is inching closer to reality… The Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology Sydney is conducting virtual trials of local energy trading at five sites along the eastern seaboard. Read more

Scientists just found another key threat to global food security
The Washington Post 16 February 2016
With the world’s population expected to exceed 9 billion people by the year 2050, producing enough food for everyone is a top concern for global policymakers… Additionally, while there’s demand for phosphate all over the world, the mines are concentrated in just a few regions, said Dana Cordell, research principal at the University of Technology Sydney’s Institute for Sustainable Futures. Read more

Help reimagine smarter, coolder bus shelters
Inner West Courier 16 February 2016
Ashfield Council is joining a new initiative which aims to keep Sydney's bus commuters cooler - the Climate Adapted People Shelter concept design competition…CAPS is part of a collaboration with the Institute for Sustainable Futures, University of Technology Sydney, U.lab, Adapt NSW and four Western Sydney Councils (Penrith, Parramatta, Ashfield and Canterbury) that aims to improve transport infrastructure - with an emphasis on keeping vulnerable people cool and hydrated over the hottest periods of summer.

Interview with Chris Dunstan about moving off the electricity grid
Radio National, Canberra, Life Matters 15 February 2016
Interview with Chris Dunstan, Research Director, University of Technology, Sydney's Institute for Sustainable Futures, Phillip Vannini, documentary filmmaker, and Michael Mobs, off the grid electricity user, about the idea of getting off the electricity grid.

Climate policy void defies grim forecasts
Farm Online, The Land 14 February 2016
Farmers and researchers are burning up over inadequate climate policy that is at odds with productivity forecasts from Treasury…UTS academic Dr Brent Jacobs, a research director with the Institute for Sustainable Futures, and leader of the Adaptation Research Hub's adaptive communities node, said he hoped there would be a shift towards more adaptation resources over time. Read more

Cooler, smarter bus shelters wanted
Sydney Morning Herald 10 February 2016
The standard design of Sydney’s roadside bus shelters has caught the attention of four western Sydney councils on the hunt for new ‘sool and smart’ shelters, adapted to address high temperatures associated with climate change. In collaboration with the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of technology Sydney the u.lab design innovation team at UTS Business School and the government’s Adapt NSW, the councils have launched a competition seeking designs to maximise thermal performance and user comfort.

Interview with Jochen Schweitzer about bus shelters
2UE Sydney 10 February 2016
Interview with Jochen Schweitzer, University of Technology Sydney, about bus shelters. Schweitzer says bus shelters need to be designed so they can provide shade but also shelter from thunderstorms and rain. He says they also need to be able to display bus information. He says often they have been poorly designed and get too hot on warm days according to some research from the Institute of Sustainable Futures.

Interview with Dr Brent Jacobs about bus shelter competition
702 ABC Sydney 9 February 2016
Interview with Brent Jacobs, Research Director. Glover says a collaboration between the UTS Institute for Sustainable Futures and some Sydney councils has launched a competition seeking bus shelter designs that maximise thermal performance and user comfort. Jacobs outlines the complaints about bus shelters, and explains a lot can probably be done. Glover mentions seats that cannot be sat down on which seem to be a dastardly trick trying to stop people who are sleeping rough from sleeping in the shelter. He says Parramatta, Penrith, Ashfield and Canterbury have selected two sites each.

‘Fifth fuel’ saves us $50bn a year, so let’s tap into it
The Australian 8 February 2016
As Australia approaches 25 years of uninterrupted economic growth, what energy resources have powered this boom? It is probably not what you think. Read more

‘Fifth fuel’ saves us $50bn a year, so let’s tap into it
The Australian 8 February 2016
As Australia approaches 25 years of uninterrupted economic growth, what energy resources have powered this boom? It is probably not what you think.

Sydney bus shelters to get a cool makeover and adapt to climate change
Sydney Morning Herald 8 February 2016
What is made of glass, fails to keep the rain out and has seats that can heat up to 60 degrees? Unfortunately for Sydney commuters, it is a typical roadside bus shelter. In a collaboration with the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology, Sydney, the U.lab design innovation team at UTS Business School and the state government's Adapt NSW, the councils have launched a competition seeking designs that maximise thermal performance and user comfort… "When we did our mapping of heat islands in Sydney we noticed they were related to where major roads are, and out in western Sydney they are related to residential areas where most of the trees are removed," said the institute's research director, Brent Jacobs. Read more

From food bowl to urban sprawl
Sun Herald, Sydney 7 February 2016
Urban sprawl and rising land prices will cause the share of Sydney’s vegetables grown within the city’s food basin to crash to just 1 per cent in the next 15 years… According to the Sydney Food Futures project, farmers around Sydney produced around 20 per cent of the city’s agricultural food needs in 2011, a share that will drop to 6 per cent by 2031.

Sydney's vegetable basin losing ground to urban sprawl as land bankers speculate
Sun Herald, Sydney 7 February 2016
Urban sprawl and rising land prices will cause the share of Sydney’s vegetables grown within the city’s food basin to crash to just 1 per cent in the next 15 years… According to the Sydney Food Futures project, farmers around Sydney produced around 20 per cent of the city’s agricultural food needs in 2011, a share that will drop to 6 per cent by 2031. Read more

Australian town Huntlee could be first off-grid, but what about everyone else?
Guardian Australia 3 February 2016
Falling technology costs and rising electricity prices make going off the grid appealing but regulations and networks could hold others back. Living off-grid used to be something that people had to do to support modern life in remote communities but living without centralised power is becoming an increasingly mainstream concept…Further, there is little regulatory incentive to change the current business model, says Chris Dunstan, a research director at the University of Technology Sydney’s Institute for Sustainable Futures. Read more

Shopping overseas is costing the environment too
Finder.com.au 2 February 2016
For Australians, shopping at overseas retailers is more than an economic issue. Given that the vast majority of online stores are in places like the United Kingdom and the USA, there is a significant amount of air and road travel involved in getting purchased items to your front door…Jenni Downes, research consultant at the Institute for Sustainable Futures, explains that the environmental impact of online shopping is actually a very complex issue. It is interesting to know that in fact much current research supports the idea that online shopping is actually better for the environment. Read more

Green is the colour to make us happy
Architecture and Design 1 February 2016
The Western Sydney Regional Organisation of Councils is pushing along with this urban canopies’ approach. The councils cover suburbs that are too far away from the coast to catch full sea breezes. Dr Brent Jacobs, research director for the Institute of Sustainable Futures and the University of Technology, Sydney, said, “We have a legacy of past development that didn't account for urban heat islands and pressure for new, affordable housing developments to accommodate population growth." Read more

Australia taking solar power to the next level
The Straits Times 31 January 2016
They are often seen on the rooftops of suburban homes in Australia - large glistening tiles that reflect an unusual feature of life in the sun-drenched nation… Sustainable energy expert Chris Dunstan of the University of Technology Sydney said the government needed to focus on removing regulatory barriers for utility companies. "We are a relatively affluent country and we have a lot of sun and we have a lot of rooftops," he told The Sunday Times. "Solar power has to be a big part of the future in Australia." Read more

Mercury up in Bays precinct
City News and City Hub, 28 January 2016
Sydney’s largest urban redevelopment project could end up the inner west’s hottest place, with a new study showing temperatures along the coastal Bays Precinct could hit nearly 50 degrees due to a lack of urban greenery. This has led to claims the NSW Government is at odds with the Federal Government’s recently announced urban tree coverage vision…Kerryn Wilmot, Research Principal at the Institute for Sustainable Futures, said that addressing high levels of heat caused by high-density development was crucial to creating liveable cities.

Untapped opportunity for energy productivity
Sustainability Matters 27 January 2016
Lifting energy productivity is the ‘missing link’ in enabling us to meet our carbon reduction targets and reconciling emission cuts with strong economic growth, said Chris Dunstan, Research Director of Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF). Read more

Interview with Kerryn Wilmot about urban heat centres
2UE 26 January 2016
Interview with Kerryn Wilmot about urban heat centres

Urban heat island effect encompassing western Sydney
Sydney Morning Herald 22 January 2016
Western Sydney is not waiting for Greg Hunt's trees. This week, the acting Cities Minister announced a federal government pledge to increase tree coverage in Australian cities each decade to 2050, an effort to "green" and "cool" the city. "The problem is not the iconic city centres where there is money to invest in urban renewal, but in the suburbs in western Sydney," said Dr Brent Jacobs, research director for the Institute of Sustainable Futures and the University of Technology, Sydney. Read more

Interview with Dr Brent Jacobs about tree plans for cities
702 ABC Sydney 22 January 2016
Interview with Dr Brent Jacobs, Research Director, Institute of Sustainable Futures and University of Technology Sydney. Harmer says a tree plan for the cities was announced by the Federal Acting Cities Minister Greg Hunt earlier this week. Councils in Sydney are already making their own plans to tackle the heat in Blacktown, Richmond, Liverpool and Parramatta. Jacobs says as they build cities they take out all the natural open spaces, grassland, trees and they cover the ground with hard surfaces and black roads that heat up. Jacobs says they need trees that provide a nice filtered shade and root systems that don't interfere with buildings.

Interview with Dr Brent Jacobs about tree plans for cities
2UE 22 January 2016
Interview with Dr Brent Jacobs from the Institute for Sustainable Futures, University of Technology Sydney. Stanley says he spoke about a plan by the Federal Government to put a green canopy over Sydney. He notes that trees on the main street in St Marys have been replaced by posts, making the area noticeably hotter. Jacobs notes that people are better at putting garden beds in, but there is a need for shade. He says a new type of porous concrete allows it to cool. Linnell says trees were replaced in Maroubra, but bitumen was used right up to the bark. Jacobs says Penrith City Council and Parramatta City Council have implemented policies on the matter. He says New York has strict rulings on building colours, due to heat in built-up areas.

Looking at green cities to reduce heat
District Reporter Camden 22 January 2016
With smaller blocks of land becoming the norm - there is little chance of trees playing a role in backyards anymore and there are calls for more inventive and innovative ways to tackle radiant heat and improve air quality… Research director, Brent Jacobs, at the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology agreed that more could be done to make cities and growth areas greener -especially growth centres such as Camden.

Urban heat island effect encompassing western Sydney
Sydney Morning Herald 21 January 2016
Western Sydney is not waiting for Greg Hunt's trees. This week, the acting Cities Minister announced a federal government pledge to increase tree coverage in Australian cities each decade to 2050, an effort to "green" and "cool" the city. "The problem is not the iconic city centres where there is money to invest in urban renewal, but in the suburbs in western Sydney," said Dr Brent Jacobs, research director for the Institute of Sustainable Futures and the University of Technology, Sydney. Read more

Interview with Dr Brent Jacobs about tree plans for cities
Radio National, Canberra, Breakfast 20 January 2016
Interview with Dr Brent Jacobs, Director, Institute for Sustainable Futures, University of Technology Sydney. This week the Federal Government announced a plan to increase the tree cover in Australia's major cities to help cool them down. Kelly asks how much of a problem is heat in the major cities. Jacobs says it is a big problem because urbanisation causes heat islands to occur and every city in Australia suffers from this problem. He says the way to address this problem is to get structured vegetation back into urban spaces, change surfaces to allow water to penetrate and evaporate, and make space for new vegetation. Jacobs says there is pretty good evidence that once places are made cooler and more pleasant they become more appealing and commercial activity increases. Kelly asks why the government is cutting down historic trees at the same time it is saying cities need more of them. Jacobs says it is always a problem because we do not value our natural capital in the same way we value infrastructure. He says new tools coming out allow experts to assign a dollar value to trees in much the same way we apply dollar value to pieces of infrastructure. Kelly asks if the felling of trees should be stopped. Jacobs says that is one way to go but there is always scope for compromise. Kelly asks if city residents actually support the government in this proposal. Jacobs says there are quite diverse cultural views in regards to trees and the natural environment.

Here to stay: 'Disruptive' sharing economy worth $500m annually to NSW
Sydney Morning Herald 19 January 2016
The rise of so-called "disruptive" businesses such as Uber and Airbnb is receiving fresh support from the state government amid new estimates that they contributed more than half a billion dollars to the NSW economy in the past year…. Chris Riedy, associate professor with the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology Sydney who has been researching the collaborative economy for the past five years, said the announcement was "quite a positive step".  Read more

NSW to embrace the new share economy
Sydney Morning Herald 19 January 2016
The rise of so-called "disruptive" businesses such as Uber and Airbnb is receiving fresh support from the state government amid new estimates that they contributed more than half a billion dollars to the NSW economy in the past year…. Chris Riedy, associate professor with the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology Sydney who has been researching the collaborative economy for the past five years, said the announcement was "quite a positive step".

Fatigue, cost hits green power
The Australian 6 January 2016
A scheme under which people volunteer to pay more for renewable energy is losing customers and sales as the price of a green conscience rises dramatically… A report by UTS’s Institute of Sustainable Futures for the NSW Department of Resources and Energy — which administers the scheme on behalf of all the states — said the rise in rooftop solar panels had contributed to the demise of GreenPower. Read more

Feeding a growing need
Penrith Press, 9 December 2015
Semi rural suburbs like Wallacia, Mulgoa and Kemps Creek serve as a veritable food bowl for the rest of Sydney but how will they be affected by the explosion of growth in the Penrith region? The Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology is seeking to find out how food security would be affected by rapid development as Western Sydney scrambles to cater for an extra one million residents by 2030 Read full story

Report on businesses who are trying to be green in Sydney
2SER, 3 December 2015
Compere says while climate discussions are happening in Paris, in Sydney they are exploring the challenges to living green. Dr Chris Riedy, Associate Professor at the Institute for Sustainable Futures says he is still seeing a lot of supermarkets and shops that automatically offer you a plastic bag. Compere says Riedy highlighted affordability as an issue.

We can't go on as we are: why sustainability is the big issue of our time
The Guardian, 1 December 2015
Guardian Sustainable Business launches in Australia today. We’ve asked a group of leading experts to advise us on our work in this field, and here some of them explain what sustainability means to them, and why everybody should be thinking about it… To ensure we know about the most important sustainability issues, we asked Australia’s top thought leaders and change-makers in this area to form an advisory council. The members include Sydney Lord Mayor Clover Moore, Climate Council’s Amanda McKenzie, Social Ventures Australia ’s Michael Traill, Sustainable Business Australia’s Andrew Petersen, Diversity Council Australia’s Lisa Annese, WWF’s Dermot O’Gorman, 350.org’s Blair Palese, Greenpeace’s David Ritter, Beyond Zero Emissions’ Dr Stephen Bygrave, BLabs Australia’s Alicia Darvall, Australian Youth Climate Coalition’s Amelia Telford, Earth Hour’s Anna Rose, Do Something! Jon Dee, Professor Stuart White, the Director of the Institute for Sustainable Futures’ and Professor John Thwaites of Monash Sustainability Institute & ClimateWorks Australia.

Finding food for our future
Wollondilly Advertiser, 2 December 2015
Wollondilly Council is leading the charge to elevate the importance of agriculture and food production in a new ‘foodshed’ research project. The council is project leader in the Mapping Sydney’s Potential Foodsheds research project, partnering with the Sustainable Futures Institute at the University of Technology Sydney.

Enova Energy set to break new ground as it nears IPO minimum target
Australian Financial Review, 30 November 2015
Start-up Enova Energy is close to breaking new ground, verging on crossing the $3 million raising thresholds for its initial public offer, which will make it Australia’s first publicly owned community electricity supplier… Community energy is still in its early stages in Australia compared with countries such as Germany, where some 47 per cent of renewable energy capacity is owned by citizens and communities, according to Nicky Ison, senior research consultant at the Institute for Sustainable Futures in Sydney. But she said some areas of the sector offered huge growth potential.

Enova Energy set to break new ground as it nears IPO minimum target
Sydney Morning Herald, Business Day, 30 November 2015
Start-up Enova Energy is close to breaking new ground, verging on crossing the $3 million raising threshold for its initial public offer, which will make it Australia's first publicly owned community electricity supplier…Community energy is still in its early stages in Australia compared with countries such as Germany, where some 47 per cent of renewable energy capacity is owned by citizens and communities, according to Nicky Ison, senior research consultant at the Institute for Sustainable Futures in Sydney. Read full story

Dam wall worries Guardians
Daily News, Tweed Heads, 28 November 2015
Leading environmental group the Northern Rivers Guardians say more community consultation is needed before a decision is made on the future of the shire’s water supply…Mayor Katie Milne urged council to contract the Institute of Sustainable Futures (ISF) to investigate the Tweed’s water options.

UTS student start up wins $5,000 for smart baby car seat device
My Business, 1 November 2015
Around 4,000 children and babies are rescued from locked cars across Australia each year. A small change in routine can lead to parents functioning on 'autopilot' & unintentionally leaving their child in the car- known as 'forgotten baby-syndrome'. Sarina and her team recently won the UTS Project Pitch aimed at supporting students to develop the next big idea. Sarina's idea will use an in car device and smart technology to ensure that babies can't be left unintentionally in cars.

Australian SP comes to giving tips on how to cope with drought
O Globo, 23 November 2015
The population of Australia is already used to dealing with drought…According to the Australian Professor Stuart White, director of the Institute for Sustainable Futures, these changes and investment in sewage treatment and water reuse were more efficient than building new dams or desalination plants. Read full story

Earth, wind and wires
Choice, National, 1 November 2015
We've rated 23 electricity retailers on their green credentials. Uta Mihm takes a look at a sustainable future. Prices may have come down in recent months, but electricity still takes a big bite out of the household budget - it's consistently been the number one cost concern in our Consumer Pulse surveys. So paying extra for GreenPower might be the last thing on your mind… CHOICE collaborated with the Total Environment Centre (TEC), Greenpeace and the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology (UTS) in Sydney to bring the Green Electricity Guide to Australians.

Shoppers outraged over tree removal at St Marys
Mt Druitt - St Marys Standard, 10 November 2015
Shoppers and residents are furious Queen St’s leafy established trees have been cut down during the shopping area’s multi-million dollar ­upgrade. Many people have taken to social media to condemn the move as contradictory to Penrith Council’s promise to cool the area with more trees with its Cooling the City Strategy... University of Technology Sydney’s Institute for Sustainable Futures research consultant Candice Delaney has been working in partnership with the council and other councils to provide ­research on green cover policy and implementation. She said when it came to long-term and sustainable cooling solutions, “trees have a double cooling effect as they provide shade and release moisture through evapotranspiration”. Read full story

Leafy view for bare land
Penrith Press, 6 November 2015
Penrith Council has been hailed a leader in developing cooling strategies, as figures confirm the hottest day in Sydney for October was recorded at Penrith Lakes. The council has revealed it is carrying out an audit of some 7000 trees after new research found Western Sydney had the highest proportion of "potentially plantable spaces" out of all NSW councils. The research, conducted by the 202020 Vision and the University of Technology Sydney, found Penrith, Liverpool, Blacktown, Camden and Fairfield all boasted significant areas of grassbare ground that could be planted.

Sydney progressives band together for shared power
4ZZZ, 4 November 2015
Groups in Sydney are leading the charge against electricity networking rules that inhibit the sharing of locally produced energy. Read full story

Is this the world’s smartest energy services company?
One Step off the Grid, 4 November 2015
Aussie start-up Reposit Power have an exciting vision, whereby households can store their solar energy and collectively sell it on the wholesale spot market. But like a lot of things in the energy world, a German company called Next Kraftwerke has been doing this sort of thing for six years already, with astounding results… In Australia, the energy regulators failed the people to the tune of $16 billion dollars between 2010 and 2015. This was the amount of network capacity upgrades which could have been avoided via distributed energy solutions, according to the Institute for Sustainable Futures. But the bigger network got built, and the prices went up. Read full story

Property and environment groups have teamed up with the City of Sydney to challenge high electricity network charges.
ABC News, 3 November 2015
Property and environment groups have teamed up with the City of Sydney to challenge high electricity network charges. They don't see why they should have to pay so much, when the energy they generate takes the burden off the power grid. The Central Park Building generates large scale power by using a gas fired tri-generation plant. The bi-products it creates are used for heating and cooling. The neighbouring University of Technology wants some of the power to meet its own renewable energy targets. As soon as the energy goes through Central Park's power meter, it attracts a hefty network charge. The Sydney Council, the Total Environment Centre and the Property Council have proposed a new scheme, where generators who power is used locally would get a credit for taking the strain off the network during peak periods.

Proposed electricity network rule change to incentivise energy sharing, lead to consumer savings
ABC online, 3 November 2015
An energy market rule change has been proposed that could revolutionise the way power is generated and transmitted, giving residents and businesses better access to clean power and “…we're looking at transitioning to low carbon precinct tri-generation," Ed Langham from UTS's Institute for Sustainable Futures said. Read full story

A taller, greener future
Future Perfect, 3 November 2015
An abandoned brewery site near the very heart of Australia’s largest city has been reborn, and it’s becoming the toast of the town. Read full story

Book review: Meat the Future: how cutting meat consumption can feed billions more
UTS Newsroom, 2 November 2015
Can we save the planet and end food shortages by reducing the amount of meat we eat? Meat the Future is a compelling selection of international research and expert opinion investigating the environmental, social and economic issues linked to meat consumption. Read full story

Green Visions: Nature as infrastructure
Architecture Au, 29 October 2015
A number of recent industry campaigns and major policy documents from both state and local government levels promote nature’s critical role in supporting economic prosperity, health and wellbeing…. In order to substantiate claims and evaluate the program’s success, the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology, Sydney, used satellite imagery to map tree canopy, and has analysed 139 local government areas lying within Australia’s most densely populated urban areas. The report “Benchmarking Australia’s Urban Tree Canopy” provides a starting point for councils, developers and decision-makers to better understand the existing tree canopy in their local areas, as well as guidance on how to measure it.

NSW Councils considering urban forest strategy to combat El Nino and urban blight
Architecture & Design, 27 October 2016
An award-winning urban forest strategy is being considered by NSW Councils to deal with the environmental challenges facing the community…Candice Delaney, Senior Research Consultant at the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology Sydney agrees that tree cover and ground surface vegetation can play a major role in minimising the impact of extreme heat events. For instance, a broad canopy cover can reduce ground surface temperatures by up to 8°C, decrease irrigation demands of lawns and trees, and lower energy costs of the built environment.
Read full story

Energy retailer takes big step towards a sustainable future
Choice, 22 October 2015
The electricity sector is one of the dirtiest industries in Australia, creating about one third of the nation's carbon emissions. And the big three retailers, Origin, AGL and Energy Australia have a bad track record when it comes to cleaning up the sector… Stay tuned for more information on green energy – CHOICE is cooperating with the Total Environment Centre (TEC), Greenpeace and energy analysts from the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) to bring you the Green Electricity Guide early next month. Read full story  

New apartments set to complete the Green Heart of Chippendale
Domain, Sydney Morning Herald, 21 October 2015
Joint venture partners Frasers Property Australia and Sekisui House Australia have been given the green light to build the last two towers at Sydney’s Central Park. The NSW government has approved plans for the two mixed-use towers called DUO, an investment of $520 million in Central Park, the $2 billion urban village in the inner-city suburb of Chippendale…Central Park is one of Australia’s “greenest urban villages”, with its own on-site tri-generation power station and water recycling plant. Its sustainability strategy was devised in close collaboration with the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the UTS. Read full story

The 'candidate of water'
Inquirer.net, 21 October 2015
Admit it, weren’t you one of the Metro Manilans, beholding the arrival of Typhoon “Lando” and hearing of the lashing rains it had unleashed, who were secretly rejoicing? I bet that foremost on your mind was the thought that at least the dams that contain the metropolis’ water supply were now full (if not overflowing). And with the dams full, weren’t we now at least assured of a steady water supply to see us through the worst of the El Niño drought?... In the Greater Sydney area, said Dr. Stuart White of the Institute for Sustainable Futures of the University of Technology Sydney, the response to the periodic droughts that affect Australia has been to develop new technologies and approaches to reduce the demand for “clean” water and promote “more efficient” use of water. Read full story

Water strategy offers boost for building communities’ resilience
Manila Bulletin, 21 October 2015
Experts are promoting implementation of water demand management (WDM) to help build Philippine communities’ resilience to climate change and the drought-driving El Niño phenomenon, both of which threaten water supply nationwide… University of Technology Institute for Sustainable Futures Director Dr Stuart White noted aside from communication, regulation and incentives, data generation is essential in promoting water security. “Attention must be paid to what’s driving water demand,” he noted at the briefing. He added there must be coordination on investment and policies for water, sanitation, storm water, agriculture, energy and nutrients. Read full story

New Maps To Help Guide Australian Renewables Investment
Energy Matters, 9 October 2015
The first set of maps developed by the Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF) at the University of Sydney indicating opportunities for renewable energy in Australia were made available online yesterday. Read full story

To-the-point: Australia rolls out renewables investment roadmap
SeeNews Renewables, 8 October 2015
The Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF) at the University of Technology Sydney has presented its first set of maps depicting the optimal locations for new renewable energy plants in Australia. Using sample data from local electricity service providers, the maps unveil both network constraints and planned investment. Read full story

New maps identify opportunities for renewable energy investment
Phys.org, 8 October 2015
Interactive maps of Australia's electricity grid released today will help identify the most valuable locations to invest in renewable energy and demand management within the grid. The online resources, developed by the Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF) at the University of Technology Sydney, fill an information gap by providing clear, consistent and timely information on where alternatives to building new electricity network infrastructure deliver the greatest economic benefit. Read full story

Z-NET and the rising appetite for investing in energy sovereignty
The Fifth Estate, 8 October 2015
Momentum in the community-owned renewable energy sector has gained even more traction with this week’s release of the Zero Net Energy Town Blueprint, a plan for towns to achieve net zero grid energy use through a combination of energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. According to Nicky Ison, founding director of the Community Power Agency and a senior research consultant with UTS’s Institute for Sustainable Futures, the potential of the sector to also generate solid financial returns is now starting to attract impact investors and superannuation dollars. Read full story

The map which shows batteries are a waste of time in NSW and QLD
Business Spectator, 9 October 2015
There’s an awful lot of hype and excitement surrounding batteries.  Even Environment Minister Greg Hunt called energy storage the “new black” at the All Energy Conference...These maps were the brain child of Chris Dunstan and the product of a team of collaborators at the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology, Sydney. The maps, which are provided on a platform that operates in a similar manner as Google Maps, provide a wealth of data that dramatically improves the transparency and accessibility of information about networks component of Australia’s electricity market. Read full story

Government invests in maps of electricity grid to drive renewables investment
Miniter for the Environment, media releases, 8 October 2015
Investment by the Australian Government in interactive maps of Australia's electricity grid will help identify the most valuable locations to invest in renewable energy. Minister for the Environment Greg Hunt said it was critical that we make the best, most efficient use of renewable energy. "Investing in technology to map the most valuable locations to invest in renewables will drive further investment in renewables innovation. The online resources were developed by the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) with $453,000 funding from the Australian Government through the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA). Read full story

Renewables mapping tool to boost investment, add value to NEM
Renew Economy, 9 October 2015
A new tool identifying the best places in Australia to install renewable energy and demand management has been released, with the launch of a series of interactive maps by the University of Technology in Sydney. The online resource, developed by the UTS’s Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF) with financial support from ARENA, aim to provide clear, consistent and timely information on where renewables alternatives to building new electricity network infrastructure would deliver the greatest economic benefit. Read full story

Government maps out renewable energy investment opportunities
Business Environment News, 12 October 2015
Thanks to funding by the Australian government, the Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF) at the University of Technology Sydney has developed interactive maps of the country's electricity grid. Read full story

Australia invests in interactive maps of electricity grid
Enterpriseinnovation.net, 13 October 2015
The Australian government is investing in interactive maps of the electricity grid to easily identify the most valuable locations to invest in renewable energy. The online resources were developed by the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) with $453,000 funding from the government through the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA). Read full story

Mapping project reveals renewable opportunities
Utility magazine, 13 October 2015
The University of Technology Sydney’s Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF) has released a set of maps that show possibilities for renewable energy. The maps are part of their ARENA supported mapping project, and draw on sample data from electricity network service providers to show network constraints and planned investment. Read full story

Sydney Professor to join IWA's Strategic Council
The Source, October 2015
Professor Stuart White, Director of the Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF) at the University of Technology Sydney, has been elected by his peers to serve on the International Water Association's (IWA) Strategic Council. Read more

Co-housing could make homes cheaper, greener
New Scientist, 26 September 2015
The concept of co-housing has the potential to contribute to more compact, sustainable cities. Housing affordability is at crisis levels in many Australian cities, fuelled by inadequate supply in areas close to jobs and a taxation system that favours investors over first-home buyers. The Reserve Bank has suggested that "the answer... lies in more innovative and flexible use of the land that we have".

Top 100 transform public life
Australian Financial Review, 24 September 2015
All those listed have an outstanding record for changing the perception of women and the opportunities for them in the corporate sector. Read full story

Will urban heat be the death of us?
Sourceable, 28 September 2015
Over the past 100 years, heatwaves have caused more deaths than any other natural hazard according to professor Will Steffen of the Climate Council… Brent Jacobs, research director at the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology offers some stark statistics on how critical vegetation and in particular trees are for our urban lifestyle.
Read full story

Woolworths misses food waste target but sets new goal with OzHarvest partnership
Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, The Canberra Times, 25 September 2015
Supermarket giant Woolworths has failed to hit its "ambitious" target of eliminating food waste sent to landfill by 2015. However, it believes it can reach its goal in five years, partly through establishing a partnership with food rescue charity OzHarvest, which will help divert more food onto the plates of the homeless and disadvantaged… Jenni Downes, food waste researcher at the University of Technology Sydney, Institute for Sustainable Futures, said OzHarvest had a good model that covered numerous elements of food charity, and if the partnership was successful, it could make a great impact.
Read full story

Top 100 transform public life
Australian Financial Review, 24 September 2015
All those listed have an outstanding record for changing the perception of women and the opportunities for them in the corporate sector. ISF’s Prof. Cynthia Mitchell has been recognised in the AFR and Westpac 100 Women of Influence Awards for her transdisciplinary research and impact on public policy.
Read full story

Research reveals Perth's hottest real estate... in terms of tree cover
Sydney Morning Herald, 16 September 2015
It puts a whole new spin on "leafy" suburbs - research has found some Perth suburbs are up to six degrees hotter than surrounding areas. As a result, councils are scrambling to develop "urban forests" in certain dormitory, or commuter, suburbs
Read full story

Is rainwater for outdoor taps only?
Brink, Sydney Morning Herald, 15 September 2015
The water shortages and restrictions of the 2000s encouraged many people to install rainwater tanks. Joining those ranks of tanks are the ones included in new houses and renovations to meet the requirements of the Building Sustainability Index (BASIX).  The result is millions of dollars worth of rainwater tanks across the country, with a potential to slash mains water use. But the reality is not matching the potential. Research suggests many tanks don't work and most of the rest have limited use. Social researcher Candice Delaney has been investigating practices and habits in households with rainwater tanks and discovered that water use is complex.
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Pharmacy role in managing disease
Brink, Sydney Morning Herald, 15 September 2015
You pop into your local pharmacy for a check of your blood pressure, cholesterol, medication, diet and exercise regime. Your condition is monitored and recorded. Information provided is expert and up to date. If need be, you are referred without delay to a GP…Dr Sabater-Hernández is working with UTS researcher Dr Dena Fam, of the Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF), and says the goal of their project is to make the system more sustainable.
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Sydney's 'white elephant' water plant
The Straits Times, 8 September 2015
Heavy rains, overflowing dams mean costly desalination plant has stood idle for 3 years … An expert on urban water supplies, Associate Professor Damien Giurco, from the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology Sydney, said the plant quickly became unnecessary because the drought broke and the public improved its water efficiency. This was partly the result of mandatory water restrictions, including curbs on watering gardens and washing cars.

Pacific islands are not passive victims of climate change but need help
The Conversation, 8 September 2015
As Prime Minister Tony Abbott attends the Pacific Island Forum summit today, attention has again turned to how the low-lying islands will deal with global warming. Pacific leaders have been highly critical of Australia’s post-2020 climate target. A report released for the forum has argued that Australia’s approach threatens “the very survival of some Pacific nations” and is incompatible with limiting warming to 2C.
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Put a price on every Perth tree: Bayswater councillor Chris Cornish
Sydney Morning Herald, 3 September 2015
A Bayswater councillor wants laws giving a dollar value to each Perth tree that developers propose to chop down, in a bid to combat dangerous overheating in suburbs stripped of greenery. A state government authority in August predicted heat-wave related deaths in Perth would more than double by 2050 because of climate change and the "urban heat island effect", where cities are hotter than the country… A 2014 University of Technology Sydney report on Australia's urban tree canopy ranked local governments against each other, showing Perth's least-treed was Belmont, with less than 10 per cent cover.  
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New Edges
Morning Calm, Korean Air, 1 September 2015
Sydney’s neglected industrial neighborhoods are being revived and reinvented. With new restaurants, parks and architecture, these formerly run-down areas are becoming the hippest parts of town… “These developments are making the neighborhood feel a lot more vibrant,” says Kerryn Wilmot, a research principal at UTS’s Institute for Sustainable Futures. “When you have infrastructure of this high quality, it sends a message that this is a good place to be.”

Trees keep you younger
Australasian Science, 1 September 2015
Do trees and clean air make people healthy? There is circumstantial evidence they do. Analysis of the extent of tree cover in Australian cities by researchers from the University of Technology, Sydney found huge differences

How co-housing could make homes cheaper and greener
Architecture & Design, 26 August 2015
Housing affordability is at crisis levels in many Australian cities, fuelled by an inadequate supply of housing in areas close to jobs and a taxation system that favours investors over first home buyers. The Reserve Bank has suggested that “the answer… lies in more innovative and flexible use of the land that we have so that the marginal cost of adding more stock of dwellings is lower.” Co-housing – where a group of friends, extended family members or downsizers band together to buy into small blocks with some common space – may well be one of those innovations
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Joint project maps Sydney's future food supply sources
Sydney Morning Herald, 25 August 2015
A project to map food production sources for Sydney recently brought together farmers, planners, government agencies and industry representatives to consider the future of the city’s fertile land. Wollondilly Shire Council and the Institute of Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology, Sydney, hosted the workshop, which is part of a project called Mapping Sydney’s Potential Foodsheds. The project is also supported by the Sydney Peri-Urban Network, representing 12 councils around the ring of the city, including Wollondilly.

Connie Hedegaard to discuss Australia's emission targets in Sydney
ForeignAffairs.co.nz, 24 August 2015
Sydney Town Hall will host the first major public discussion about Australia’s emission targets for the Paris Climate Conference tomorrow… This CityTalk event is supported by the City’s official media partner, The Guardian, and event partner, the Institute for Sustainable Futures, University of Technology, Sydney.

How Sydney small business owners are making the switch to sustainability
Sydney Morning Herald, 19 August 2015
It was about seven or eight years ago that Sarah Mandelson decided she would need to put her money where her mouth was, if she was going to "rant and rail about government inaction". The owner of the renowned family-run Serendipity Ice Cream in Marrickville had found herself lamenting the lack of "political courage" on climate change...No matter how big or small a business is, there is always a possibility to make changes, said Professor Stuart White, director of the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology.
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HotHouse: on collaboration as key to better neighbourhoods
The Fifth Estate, 17 August 2015
HotHouse lived up to its name on 12 August at Sydney’s Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences (formerly the Powerhouse Museum) – as a means of cultivating and fast-tracking ideas – by bringing together a diverse group of people to consider how to create sustainable neighbourhoods…. Stuart White from the Institute for Sustainable Futures spoke about the progress being made in the Empowering Broadway initiative
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DFAT boosts gender equality
The Fiji Times online, 14 August 2015
The Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) has strengthened the monitoring and evaluation skills of women interest officers within the Ministry of Women….Co-ordinator of two recent workshops on "Enhancement of Monitoring and Evaluation" Dr Keren Winterford, who is employed at the Research Principal Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology in Australia, said the new skills learned through the workshop would enable the officers to effectively carry out their role.
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Women's interest officers learn monitoring skill
Fiji Sun, The Jordan Times, 12 August 2015
The women’s interest officers at the Ministry of Women have learned monitoring and evaluation skills. This was possible through the support of the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) to strengthen the department’s capacity in programme monitoring and evaluation (M&E)…Dr Keren Winterford, who co-ordinated the workshop, is a research principal at the Institute for Sustainable Futures, University of Technology in Australia. She said the new skills learned through the workshop would enable the officers to effectively carry out their roles.
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Climate costs: climate policy void defies grim forecasts
The Land, 6 August 2015
Farmers and researchers are burning up over inadequate climate policy that is at odds with productivity forecasts from Treasury… UTS academic Dr Brent Jacobs, a research director with the Institute for Sustainable Futures, and leader of the Adaptation Research Hub’s adaptive communities node, said he hoped there would be a shift towards more adaptation resources over time.

New recognition for water research leadership
UTS Newsroom, 5 August 2015
The leadership in water management of UTS's Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF) is being drawn on again internationally with ISF Director Professor Stuart White elected by his peers to serve on the International Water Association's Strategic Council.
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Four water saving toilet innovations you wouldn't want to send down the drain
Building Product News, 1 August 2015
In 1980, Bruce Thompson of Caroma developed a toilet cistern with two buttons and two flush volumes -one measuring 11 litres, the other 5.5 litres. named the Duoset cistern, the innovation would go on to save 32,000 litres of water a year for each household in a small South Australian town during a trial, and later-on pave the way for making dual-flush toilets compulsory for new buildings in every state in Australia but New South Wales… According to a 2008 report by the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology, Sydney, the average flush volume of a toilet sold then was about half of what it had been 25 years earlier.  
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Wealth from waste
AusIMM Bulletin, 1 August 2015
Depicting metals flows in the Australian economy and uncovering opportunities for higher value from recycling. Australia’s rich stocks of mineral resources have been the source of national wealth and competitive advantage for successive generations. Having the luxury of an abundance of natural resources and a comparatively low population has enabled Australia to be a global leader of resources in the international market.
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Mapping Sydney's potential foodsheds
District Reporter, Camden, 24 July 2015
Wollondilly was identified as in the thick of food production areas and was also the place to hold the inaugural 'Mapping Sydney's Potential Foodsheds'. The council in partnership with Sydney Peri-Urban Network (SPUN) and the Institute for Sustainable Futures (UTS) were successful in securing a grant called 'Building Resilience to Climate Change'.

All aboard the merry-go-round
Asia Today International, June/July 2015
The circular economy involves changing the very basis of manufacturing as we know it, to recycle material with the end aim of slowing likely depletion of natural resources in a world of growing consumerism.

Interview with Garry Glazebrook about proposal to close Cahill Expressway to cars
702 ABC Sydney Mornings, 21 July 2015
Interview with Garry Glazebrook, Research Director at the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology of Sydney, about reporter Matt Bevan's proposal to close the Cahill Expressway to cars and turn it into a bus terminal. Glazebrook says he thinks the proposal is a great idea, and that a similar one was made in the transport plan for Sydney a few years ago. Glazebrook says it would be important to provide lifts to get down to the station platform at Circular Quay and to where the light rail and ferries are.

Sick of lowly feed-in tariffs? A plan for better rewarding local generators
Business Spectator, 20 July 2015
One of the biggest barriers to decentralised energy has been the fact that as soon as a local generator wants to sell energy into the grid, full network charges apply… There is another project currently underway – managed by the Institute for Sustainable Futures and funded by ARENA, local councils and other partners – which involves a number of trials of netting-off between one site with excess generation and another with high consumption.
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Sydney metro rail station locations: public submissions closed but dreams live on
Sydney Morning Herald, 18 July 2015
The NSW government has never explained what it intends to do for those stations west of Bankstown on the Bankstown Line, such as Sefton, Chester Hill and Villawood. But Liverpool Council's push marries with a submission by Associate Professor Garry Glazebrook from the University of Technology, Sydney.
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How landscapes can transform suburban business district appeal and add real estate value
The Urban Developer, 13 July 2015
Consider this before and after scenario that is typical of many suburban and regional business areas in Australia. Just ask yourself: where would you rather be?... The link between living green environments and commercial value is strong. A recent study by the Institute for Sustainable Futures revealed that people were prepared to pay from 9% to 12% more for goods sold in commercial centres with high quality tree cover. 
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Going to seed could make people feel $10k richer and leave old age in the shade
Sydney Morning Herald, 10 July 2015
Street trees don’t just have visual allure – they can make you feel years younger, a new study says… So how does Australia’s canopy coverage measure up? A 2014 UTS study analysed the tree canopy cover of every urban local government area in Australia. 

UTS research to aid Californian drought response
UTS Newsroom, 6 July 2015
The worsening drought in California has prompted US agencies to turn to Australian researchers to identify the most effective strategies Australian utilities and agencies used to survive the Millennium Drought.
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Research to aid Californian drought response
Phys.org, 6 July 2015
The worsening drought in California has prompted US agencies to turn to Australian researchers to identify the most effective strategies Australian utilities and agencies used to survive the Millennium Drought. Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF) researchers based at UTS will evaluate the strategies used to cope with Australia's devastating, decade-long drought to help inform policies being developed in California.
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Vision for prosperity in a 'take-make-recreate' circular economy needed
WME Magazine, 6 July 2015
The University of Technology, Sydney Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF) has launched an Action Agenda for Resource Productivity and Innovation in a bid to help Australia remain globally competitive by increasing resource productivity. 

Circular economy to become $26bn industry in Australia by 2025: World Economic Forum
Sydney Morning Herald, 5 July 2015
Throwaways are out: Advocates for the "circular economy" say the future of economic growth is in recycling, re-using and re-purposing goods and resources.
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Interview with Dena Fam: are we wasting all our waste?
2SER FM, Sydney, 5 July 2015
Are we wasting all out waste? Couldn't our poo and wee be a bit more useful somewhere other than the bottom of the ocean? These are the questions our next guest, Dena Fam, wants to answer. And if we want to feed a whole lot more people, while reducing carbon, let's hope she answers it quick. 
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Goodbye to micro apartments as NSW increases minimum size of new studios
Domain, Sydney Morning Herald, 4 July 2015
The era of the micro apartment is over before it even got going in NSW, with new state government rules slapping a minimum size on new studios of 35 square metres…Many young people and first home buyers would be happy in units smaller than the new minimum size, believes Kerryn Wilmot, architect and research principal at the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology, Sydney, especially if they were selling for an accessible price.
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Plans to save on power
Byron Shire News, 2 July 2015
It may sound like something from the future, but Virtual Net Metering is a potential ‘game changer’ for electricity generators and heavy consumers such as local government…Byron Shire Council is contributing $30,000 towards the research project that will look at the costs and benefits for electricity providers and consumers. Project Director Jay Rutovitz said “The project brings together a partnership of consumers, and electricity providers. “We will investigate how market changes could help consumers and network businesses benefit from local generation by providing alternatives for customers who might otherwise use ‘behind the meter’ options or miss opportunities to invest in energy solutions altogether.”

Interview with Michelle Zeibots about benefits of light rail
Radio 2EU, 26 June 2015
Interview with Michelle Zeibots, Principal Transport Researcher, University of Technology Sydney, and Jim Donovan, Fix NSW Transport. Smith plays an excerpt of Mike Baird, NSW Premier, talking about the benefits of light rail. He says Baird and the Lord Mayor like it, while Luke Foley, NSW Opposition Leader and [George St] businesses do not… Zeibots says there are capacity issues for the CBD, adding the Transport Minister has pointed out buses face a lot of congestion. She says a light rail has the ability to pick and put down large numbers of people, which buses do not.

Changing styles in apartments
Parramatta Sun, 25 June 2015
More new apartments than ever are being built with eco features, as buyers look for ways to live more sustainably and developers realise these inclusions can be a point of difference in an increasingly competitive market - not to mention a way to contribute to the environment..."We’re now researching buildings that have a net positive impact, that create more energy than they use,’’ saidCaitlin McGee, research director at the Institute for Sustainable Futures at UTS.

Byron council in 'power exchange' trial
Byron Shire Echo, 24 June 2015
Byron Shire Council is part of a unique experiment that will see power generated at its sports and cultural complex hitch a ride on the grid to be consumed at the sewerage treatment plant (STP) down the road…It’s part of a one-year research project announced this week by the Institute for Sustainable Futures, based at UTS, which aims to ‘improve the economics of local energy generation for Australian consumers’

$250k investment into renewable energy projects
Utility magazine, 24 June 2015
ARENA is providing $250,000 to support the development of new locally based renewable energy projects through investigating more flexible tariffs and charges. ARENA CEO, Ivor Frischknecht, said the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) would conduct studies, consultations and virtual trials to inform potential rule changes in the National Electricity Market (NEM).
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Building with eco features
Blacktown Sun, 23 June 2015
Environmentally sensitive and cost-saving methods are finding favour with buyers and developers… Caitlin McGee, a research director at the Institute for Sustainable Futures at UTS, said that while environmental features were "not the number-one driver for consumers", they were definitely "on their radar" when buying new homes.

DESSO: proving it by doing it
Waste Management & Environmental, 22 June 2015
There is a group of business leaders engaged in the debate on the future of the world economy that believe it's distinctly circular in nature. Chief among them is Desso, the European company possibly known more for its commitment to Cradle to Cradle (C2C) principles than its carpet tiles and broadloom, although its products are extraordinary.

The resource revolution: activating the transition
Waste Management & Environmental, 22 June 2015
We've had the industrial revolution, the green revolution and the knowledge revolution. Now we're on the cusp of the resource revolution and there are many opportunities for Australian businesses.

Interview with Nicky Ison about the growth and potential for community energy
Radio Adelaide, 21 June 2015
Des Lawrence interview with Nicky Ison, Institute for Sustainable Futures, University of Technology Sydney about the growth and potential for community energy. Ison explains that community energy is when communities come together to develop, deliver and benefit from sustainable energy projects.

Byron council in 'power exchange' trial
Echo Net Daily, 19 June 2015
Byron Shire Council is part of a unique experiment that will see power generated at its sports and cultural complex hitch a ride on the grid to be consumed at the sewerage treatment plant (STP) down the road.
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Better forecasting for cheaper energy ad a climate kick-start
Climate Spectator, 19 June 2015
How will our electricity system change in the future? Will we consume more electricity over time or less? And how will we meet our energy needs?
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Communities are taking renewable power into their own hands
The Conversation, 18 June 2015
Australia, like much of the rest of the world, is in the midst of an energy transition. With falling electricity demand and the uptake of household solar panels in just under 1.4 million homes, the most important question is not whether this transition is happening, but how we manage it to maximise the benefit to all Australians.
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How Abbott is creating a Mad Max energy future
The New Daily, 18 June 2015
There has been fierce debate in the Senate this week over the revised Renewable Energy Act – the legislation that will cut the Rudd-era Renewable Energy Target (RET) by around 20 per cent. …  Australia is beginning to develop community renewables projects – researchers Nicky Ison and Ed Langham from the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology Sydney report that 19 such projects are already up and running.
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World Resources Forum meeting focuses on business collaboration
Higher Education, The Australian, 17 June 2015
Collaboration and networking have become the buzzwords for success in business in recent years and a tsunami of books has been devoted to these topics. But Australian business doesn’t seem to collaborate as much as it should, and this is one area where universities can play a matchmaking role…The Institute for Sustainable Futures’ Damien Giurco said that boosting industry collaboration was one of the drivers behind the event.
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Interview with Jay Rutovitz about virtual net metering
ABC NSW Statewide Drive, 16 June 2015
Interview with Jay Rutovitz, Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS, to discuss virtual net metering. Wyllie talks about a research project which looks into a new system of reducing power bills through a system called virtual net metering. She says several sites are taking part in trials including Byron Shire Council. Rutovitz explains virtual net metering. She mentions Willoughby Council is one of their project partners and there are doing a trial in co-generation system.

Inaccurate energy forecasts are costing us the Earth: here's why
The Conversation, 15 June 2015
How will our electricity system change in the future? Will we consume more electricity over time or less? And how will we meet our energy needs?
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ARENA tips $250,000 into tariff-change study to lift renewables
Climate Spectator, 15 June 2015
ARENA CEO Ivor Frischknecht said the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) would conduct studies, consultations and virtual trials to inform potential rule changes in the National Electricity Market (NEM).
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Climate change is real and it's affecting your food
Shoestring Magazine, 12 June 2015
Sydney farmers are now, more than ever, facing the reality of climate change as recent studies confirm a serious threat to 93 percent of Australia’s fresh produce. We look at what can be done to avoid higher prices and poor quality. 
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Light rail won't slow CBD traffic
Namoi Valley Independent, 9 June 2015
Two of Sydney’s leading transport planners have argued the CBD light rail project will not disrupt the flow of cars through the city - an could even increase its speed… Michelle Zeibots from the University of Technology Sydney says the effects of the light rail on traffic will depend on whether the state government reprograms Sydney’s traffic lights to fit trams.
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How the light rail will speed up traffic
Sydney Morning Herald, 9 June 2015
Two of Sydney’s leading transport planners have argued the CBD light rail project will not disrupt the flow of cars through the city - an could even increase its speed… Michelle Zeibots from the University of Technology Sydney says the effects of the light rail on traffic will depend on whether the state government reprograms Sydney’s traffic lights to fit trams.
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Region's growth to rely on lower use of resources
The Australian, 8 June 2015
Iron ore and coal have for decades been the major inputs in the growth of the Asia-Pacific region, but future development may be less resource intensive, according to a landmark report by the UN Environment Program, CSIRO and the University of Sydney…The UNEP report was presented last week at the Asia-­Pacific meeting of the World Resources Forum in Sydney…OneSteel has been working with UNSW’s SMART (Sustainable Materials Research Technology) centre to produce “green steel” from waste tyres. SMART, together with the UTS Institute for Sustainable Futures, hosted the three-day event.

Food and Faith
Indian Link, 5 June 2015
A new Australian initiative seeks to understand climate change from a religious perspective
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Why fund rail when roads are our future?
ABC Radio National Late Night Live, 3 June 2015
Which cities globally have prioritised public transport over roads? Which ones have good, efficient public transport systems, and how were these systems built? This segment explores how cities that provide effective transport alternatives paid for them, and what effect they had on the economy and the lives of the people who live there?
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Urban green spaces get a big stocktake
The Australian Financial Review, 29 May 2015
A huge project has mapped our cities' parklands. Many urban dwellers would take it completely for granted, but "green space" is an area that is exercising the minds of many thinkers… This work was done by the Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF) at the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS): using a software program called iTree Canopy, developed by the US Department of Agriculture Forest Service, the ISF studied the amount of tree canopy cover in 139 of Australia's most urban local government areas (LGAs), which are collectively home to 68 per cent of Australia's population.
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Penrith study affirms trees' prime role in cooling hotspots
The Australian Financial Review, 29 May 2015
Any sleeping dog will tell you that the shade is the best place to be in the harsh heat of the Australian summer, but Penrith City Council wanted to look further than that… The council engaged the Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF) at the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS) to analyse CSIRO thermal mapping of Penrith to identify the areas of higher heat, and whether those coincided with concentrations of its more vulnerable communities -that is, the old and disadvantaged.
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Interview with Stuart White, Director, Institute for Sustainable Futures, University of Technology, Sydney about future sources of energy. 
ABC South West WA, Bunbury, 29 May 2015
Interview with Stuart White, Director, Institute for Sustainable Futures, University of Technology, Sydney about future sources of energy. White announces that 20 or 50 years into the future the energy will almost certainly come from renewable sources.

Interview with Dr Nick Florin
2SER FM, 27 May 2015
Interview with Dr Nick Florin, Research Principal for Institute for Sustainable Futures, University of Technology Sydney, who is part of the Waste Research Cluster which looks into strategies to better recycle waste.

Coming up dry: California taps into drought advice from Down Under
The Vancouver Sun, 26 May 2015
California has turned to the world’s driest inhabited continent for solutions to its longest and sharpest drought on record.
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California looks Down Under for drought advice
Charleston Gazette, 26 May 2015
California's longest and sharpest drought on record has its increasingly desperate water stewards looking for solutions in Australia, the world's driest inhabited continent… Such efficiency measures can be implemented quickly, economically and easily, says Stuart White, an Australian sustainability expert who has advised Californians on drought response. "The water efficiency program is the unsung hero of this whole thing, says White, director of the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology, Sydney
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California looks to Australia for tips on surviving drought
The New York Times, 25 May 2015
California has turned to the world's driest inhabited continent for solutions to its longest and sharpest drought on record. Australia, the land poet Dorothea Mackellar dubbed "a sunburnt country," suffered a torturous drought from the late 1990s through 2012. Now Californians are facing their own "Big Dry," and looking Down Under to see how they coped.
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A valuable lesson in trust
Brink, Sydney Morning Herald, 18 May 2015
It was the discovery in mid-2013 that there had been four versions of results from soil testing near the Orica site at Botany Industrial Park that set the alarm bells ringing for nearby residents… "Whatever the best intentions of companies and governments, in Australia we have the polluter pays system, which means that residents are often being asked to trust the source of the problem to clean it up," says Dr Jason Prior from the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS).

Landfills a bonanza for metal reuse
Brink, Sydney Morning Herald, 18 May 2015
Mining is not often associated with sustainability, but an innovative above-ground form of it that extracts minerals and metals from urban landfill "ores" looks set to deliver a new level of sustainability to the mineral economy. Above-ground mining is part of a profound change to the nature of economies, as the mantra of economic growth fades in the face of proposals for a "circular economy".

Tesla Powerwall home battery setting a new standard for Australian energy providers
Sun Herald, 10 May 2015
The launch of battery for homes to store solar power in the US is a wake-up call to Australian energy providers, solar industry figures say…"I think it's a very significant announcement, and the track record of Tesla is when they do things, they do them well, in a very disruptive way," said Chris Dunstan, research director at the University of Technology, Sydney's Institute for Sustainable Futures.
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Last week the east coast of NSW was battered by the most extreme storms in a decade.
ABC News 24, Sydney, 2 May 2015
A UTS experts says it is an example of planning across of Australia - vulnerable people living right beside the edge of draining.

Do cars or trains cost society more?
Crikey.com.au, 24 April 2015
If you thought subsidies for public transport were greater than those for cars, think again… There might be understandable reasons for that disregard, but these are critical issues so I think it’s worth revisiting the earlier discussion. At that time I drew on a paper published in 2009 by Dr Garry Glazebrook from University of Technology, Sydney, “Taking the con out of convenience: the true cost of transport modes in Sydney”. Read full story

How co-housing could make homes cheaper and greener
SBS News onlne, 20 April 2015
Housing affordability is at crisis levels in many Australian cities, fuelled by an inadequate supply of housing in areas close to jobs and a taxation system that favours investors over first home buyers.
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How co-housing could make homes cheaper and greener
Property Observer, 20 April 2015
Housing affordability is at crisis levels in many Australian cities, fuelled by an inadequate supply of housing in areas close to jobs and a taxation system that favours investors over first home buyers. Read full story

Political leadership required on energy productivity
InDaily, 16 April 2015
The battery's significance is not so much its size, but that it is owned and controlled by an electricity network, feeding power to 300 houses and businesses on a small, carefully chosen section of the Victorian grid…But the numbers indicate "demand management" as a tool achieves only a limited reduction in overall demand for electricity. It helped to offset just 2 per cent of the total peak demand for electricity across Australian networks in 2010-11, shows the last available estimates from the Institute of Sustainable Futures. Read full story

How religion can help the world's food problems
ABC The Spirit of Things, 10 April 2015
For many religious people, food and faith are intertwined. Jews and Muslims eschew pork, while Buddhists and Hindus avoid meat altogether. With food at the heart of many of the problems facing the world, including obesity, hunger and environmental degradation, Rachael Kohn asks what role faith has to play. Read full story

Interview with Dr Jason Prior about trust and toxic news
3CR Melbourne, 9 April 2014
A new survey has been released by Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment has revealed how state Governments and industry need to lift their game. Prior says one of the focuses of CRC Care is understanding and improving the way in which Governments and industry are able to talk to communities about issues like contaminated sites.

Batteries bring extra power to the grid
Australian Financial Review, 8 April 2015
In four shipping containers on the outskirts of Melbourne sits one of the country's largest stand-alone batteries...But the numbers indicate "demand management" as a tool achieves only a limited reduction in overall demand for electricity. It helped to offset just 2 per cent of the total peak demand for electricity across Australian networks in 2010-11, shows the last available estimates from the Institute of Sustainable Futures.

Smart work hub struggling
Western Sydney Business Access, Parramatta, 1 April 2015
It is the dream of many people to cut their commute and work closer to home but a facility in South West Sydney enabling them to do so is underutilised…A University of Technology, Sydney, Institute for Sustainable Futures study found using smart work hubs could cut at least 30 minutes a day from the commute of more than 23,000 workers living near Liverpool.

Religious leaders launch unique initiative for food sustainability
The Fifth Estate, 31 March 2015
A world-first initiative on food sustainability bringing together representatives of the world’s major religious faiths, Indigenous leaders, sustainability activists and university academics has been launched in Sydney…Organisations supporting the initiative include the University of Technology Sydney’s Institute for Sustainable Futures, the Australian Religious Response to Climate Change and Meat Free Week. Read full story

Faith, food and sustainability
Australian Jewish News, 27 March 2015
A new Australian initiative is bringing together food and faith in response to the growing concerns of climate change, hunger, loss of biodiversity, water restrictions, and other environmental crises in which food and agriculture play a major role… FoodFaith is supported by the University of Technology's Institute for Sustainable Futures, the Australian Religious Response to Climate Change, and Meat Free Week.

Vanuatu islanders adopt well-honed survival techniques in teeth of huge storm
Daily Times, 25 March 2015
Aid groups and survivors of one of the world’s most powerful storms on record are hoping that early warnings, concrete-walled homes, cave refuges and a healthy respect for the sea have saved the South Pacific nation of Vanuatu from a huge death toll… “People do know they can’t stay in their homes at the peak of the cyclone and they will evacuate to more permanent structures,” said Anna Gero from the Institute for Sustainable Futures at University of Technology, Sydney. “They also know to look out for one and another.” Read full story

NSW government confirms Byron solar energy trading trial
Renew Economy, 24 March 2015
NSW Environment Minister Rob Stokes on Tuesday formally announced the government’s support for an “energy trading trial” that will allow Byron shire council to sell output from a solar rooftop array on its major sports centre to the neighbouring sewage plant, which has little roof space and high energy demand… The trial will run in collaboration with the Australian Renewable Energy Agency, the Institute of Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology Sydney and the NSW Renewable Energy Advocate. Read full story

Green MashUP: from waste to riches with urban mining
The Fifth Estate, 24 March 2015
People around the world are getting rich off waste and garbage. The United Nations Environment Programme estimates that every year 50 million tons of e-waste are generated globally. In developing countries, it is expected to grow by up to 500 per cent over the next decade…Here in Australia, the University of Technology, Sydney is leading a Wealth from Waste collaboration involving the CSIRO and several other universities. It has identified that more than $2 billion is lost to the Australian economy every year from failure to recycle waste metals. Read full story

Beyond Cyclone Pam: identifying Vanuatu's strengths and needs
The Conversation, 23 March 2015
While extreme weather events such as Cyclone Pam are not unexpected in the Pacific, climate change poses devastating challenges for countries like Vanuatu by further altering the patterns of tropical cyclones in coming years. Read full story

Food for the soul
J-Wire, 20 March 2015
The FoodFaith initiative was launched this week in Sydney with religious leaders breaking bread with academics and sustainability groups to discuss the latest food sustainability issues and strategies...Supporting organizations include the University of Technology Sydney’s Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF), the Australian Religious Response to Climate Change (ARRCC) and Meat Free Week. Read full story

Liberals' tunnel vision
Namoi Valley Independent, 20 March 2015
Congestion might be the issue foremost in the minds of NSW voters at the March 28 poll, according to focus group research for Fairfax Media. But even though this election features some of the most expansive, and expensive, transport proposals the state has seen for many years, travelling around Sydney is not likely to get any easier for years to come… Associate Professor Garry Glazebrook from the University of Technology, Sydney, is an experienced transport and urban planner. Dr Glazebrook says it is unfortunate that both major parties have committed to WestConnex, or in Labor's case most of WestConnex. Read full story

Food Faith organisation launched
Green Lifestyle Magazine, 20 March 2015
A Rabbi, Imam, Christian minister, Hindu, Buddhist, Catholic and Indigenous leaders gathered in Sydney this week to put the subject of food sustainability on the table. Read full story

NSW election: Labor and Coalition's transport policies run on parallel lines
Sydney Morning Herald, 19 March 2015
Congestion might be the issue foremost in the minds of NSW voters at the March 28 poll, according to focus group research for Fairfax Media. But even though this election features some of the most expansive, and expensive, transport proposals the state has seen for many years, travelling around Sydney is not likely to get any easier for years to come… Associate Professor Garry Glazebrook from the University of Technology, Sydney, is an experienced transport and urban planner. Dr Glazebrook says it is unfortunate that both major parties have committed to WestConnex, or in Labor's case most of WestConnex. Read full story

Call to cut meat consumption to preserve phosphorus
ABC online, 18 March 2015
A growing appetite for meat is threatening global food security because of the pressure it places on the key agricultural nutrient phosphorus, two Australian academics argue in a new book, Meat the Future: How Cutting Meat Consumption Can Feed Billions More. Read full story

Curbing meat consumption key to securing supply of phosphorus: academics
ABC Rural (Country Hour radio), 18 March 2015
A growing appetite for meat is threatening global food security because of the pressure it places on the key agricultural nutrient phosphorus, two Australian academics argue in a new book, Meat the Future: How Cutting Meat Consumption Can Feed Billions More. Read full story

Interview with Dr Jason Prior about science and communication
Astroawani, 17 March 2015
View online

Beyond taps, toilets in Alaska
Brink, Sydney Morning Herald, 16 March 2015
Researchers at the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS) are participating in an international competition, the Alaska Water and Sewer Challenge, to design a solution that people will use. Read full story

Interview with Michelle Zeibots about toll roads
6PR Perth, Drive, 16 March 2015
Shand mentions an exclusive in the West Australian today by Gareth Parker regarding the Chamber of Commerce, led by Deidre Willmott, announcing that toll roads are needed for additional road infrastructure. He adds that 'toll roads are going bust' across Australia. Zeibots says the Perth public transport network should be expanded, rather than roads.

Interview with Chris Dunstan about changes to Demand Management Incentive Scheme
Saturday Extra, Radio National  14 March 2015
Chris Dunstan from the UTS Institute for Sustainable Futures, argues that energy companies should embrace decentralised power by better managing demand for electricity. He backgrounds a rule change to the Demand Management Incentive Scheme that is being examined by the Australian Energy Market Commission. Read full story

In support of demand management incentives
Business Spectator  13 March 2015
As the interminable electricity privatisation debate rolls on, more important issues about the future of Australia’s electricity industry are being overlooked. Electricity consumption is trending down, while solar power is steadily increasing. Lights, appliances and buildings are becoming more efficient, and battery energy storage and electric vehicles are expected to proliferate. In short, dirty centralised power is in decline and cleaner, smarter, decentralised energy is in the ascendant. Read full story

Meat the future: making choices on livestock production
Queensland Country Live  10 March 2015  11:00
The merits of eating less meat in a bid to improve environmental sustainability have been frequently debated on The Conversation website and elsewhere. This week saw the launch of a new book, Meat, The Future: How Cutting Meat Consumption Can Feed Billions More, which delves deep into this question, covering meat-related issues ranging from water and carbon intensity, to health and food security. One chapter, written by us, (Stuart White, and Dana Cordell, University of Technology, Sydney) focuses on the influence of dietary choices on world phosphorus use from fertilisers, and the fate of these nutrients in the ecosphere. Read full story

Report on contributions from UTS to a new book called Meat the Future
ABC Hobart Breakfast  10 March 2015
Goddard says the Conversations website is reporting on contributions from UTS to a new book called 'Meat, the Future', looking at the geopolitical consequences of phosphorous.

Livability study looks to cool suburbs
Daily Telegraph  9 March 2015
Penrith Council is looking at ways to combat urban heat after nine areas were identified as extreme-heat hot spots. Council has been successful in gaining a $67,000 State Government grant that will go towards finding ways to improve livability by creating a cooler city… To better understand the heat exposure in the community, council teamed up with the Institute for Sustainable Futures to see what was happening on a local level in St Marys, using thermal imaging.     

Village People
Sunday Canberra Times  8 March 2015
Once you get past a certain age, sharehousing ceases to be an option. Or does it? We meet three people who find community living has many benefits… But it doesn't have to be that way, says architect Caitlin McGee, who is a research director at the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology in Sydney. She believes there are many singles, families and groups of friends who want to live in a more shared manner, not least because housing is so expensive.

Sustainability gathers a head of steam
Domain, Sydney Morning Herald, Australian Financial Review  7 March 2015
Environmentally sensitive and cost-saving methods are finding favour with buyers and developers alike. More new apartments than ever are being built with eco features, as buyers look for ways to live more sustainably and developers realise these inclusions can be a point of difference in an increasingly competitive market not to mention a way to contribute to the environment…Caitlin McGee, a research director at the Institute for Sustainable Futures at UTS, says while environmental features are "not the number-one driver for consumers", they are definitely "on their radar" when buying new homes. "All things being equal we will take the sustainable home, but there are affordability issues," she says. Read full story

Getting from here to there
The Great Southern Weekender  6 March 2015
Could the Great Southern region become energy grid positive in the foreseeable future? Self-sufficient in water? Carbon neutral in transport? What does this mean for regional business, community, lifestyle and environment? Join us for a topical, lively and timely keynote presentation and discussion with Professor Stuart White,

Expo now regional event
Denmark Bulletin  5 March 2015
From humble beginnings in Denmark six years ago, the Sustainable Living Expo has developed to a stage where it has regional appeal…The keynote speech and launch will be held on Friday, March 13 at the Albany Town Hall with the theme: A sustainable Great Southern: Getting from here to there, delivered by Professor Stuart White, director of the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology Sydney.

Extreme Heat
Penrith Press  3 March 2015
Penrith Council is looking at ways to combat urban heat after nine areas were identified as extreme-heat hot spots. Council has been successful in gaining a $67,000 State Government grant that will go towards finding ways to improve livability by creating a cooler city… To better understand the heat exposure in the community, council teamed up with the Institute for Sustainable Futures to see what was happening on a local level in St Marys, using thermal imaging.     

Electricity Power to the people as energy costs rise
Sydney Morning Herald  21 February 2015
When Brad Kelk and his family started building their new home in Murrumbateman last year they were faced with a decision. Would they pay $40,000 to connect to the nearest electricity grid, or, pay $79,000 to go off the grid, bidding farewell to electricity bills? … There are two main reasons a household elects to go off the grid, said Chris Dunstan, research director at the Institute of Sustainable Futures. "There's the cost side, with electricity prices doubling over the last six or seven years; where might they go in the next six or seven years," he said. "But people who go off the grid also do so because they are often not happy with sorts of energy choices being made on their behalf." As the price of batteries and solar PV falls, the front line of where off-grid living becomes cost effective is coming closer to cities.

Splendid isolation ... households take leap of faith off the grid
Canberra Times  21 February 2015
When Brad Kelk and his family started building their new home in Murrumbateman last year they were faced with a decision. Would they pay $40,000 to connect to the nearest electricity grid, or, pay $79,000 to go off the grid, bidding farewell to electricity bills? … There are two main reasons a household elects to go off the grid, said Chris Dunstan, research director at the Institute of Sustainable Futures. "There's the cost side, with electricity prices doubling over the last six or seven years; where might they go in the next six or seven years," he said. "But people who go off the grid also do so because they are often not happy with sorts of energy choices being made on their behalf." As the price of batteries and solar PV falls, the front line of where off-grid living becomes cost effective is coming closer to cities.

202020 Vision calls on planners to create more shade to tackle urban heat island effect
Leader Community Newspapers  20 February 2015
Melbourne  suburbs need to increase their tree coverage to combat rising temperatures, a recent study says….A lack of trees and shade is contributing to the urban heat island (UHI) effect, making it harder for many areas to keep cool in hot weather.The Institute for Sustainable Futures analysed land cover in 30 metropolitan Melbourne council areas and three regional municipalities to quantify tree canopy coverage, hard surfaces and grassed or bare land. Read full story

Hot topic: Council investigates ways to cool down our city
Western Weekender Penrith  20 February 2015
The State Government has awarded Penrith with $67,000 to look at ways to cool the city and improve living conditions. Penrith Mayor, Ross Fowler, said the funding will enable Council to undertake research in partnership with Leichhardt Council and the University of Technology's Institute for Sustainable Futures. "We will undertake heat mapping in four priority areas within the city by mapping surface temperature, vegetation and infrastructure. This will build on pilot research work already completed in St Marys," he said.

New motorway will derail commuters
Brink, Sydney Morning Herald  18 February 2015
Most people will tell you it is just commonsense. Morning trains arriving in the city from the western suburbs are packed with passengers like tins of sardines. There's no room for more commuters. We need more rail capacity. The roads are full too but a road lane only accommodates 2000 cars, or 2400 people, per hour, while the same amount of space given over to a rail line accommodates about 20,000 commuters. If we improve public transport services in western Sydney, we will relieve road congestion too, because people will have another commuting option. Read full story

The heat is on to stay cool
Moorabbin Leader  18 February 2015
Melbourne  suburbs need to increase their tree coverage to combat rising temperatures, a recent study says….A lack of trees and shade is contributing to the urban heat island (UHI) effect, making it harder for many areas to keep cool in hot weather.The Institute for Sustainable Futures analysed land cover in 30 metropolitan Melbourne council areas and three regional municipalities to quantify tree canopy coverage, hard surfaces and grassed or bare land.

Parramatta needs rail more than Bankstown: planners
Sydney Morning Herald  17 February 2015
A new metro rail line between Parramatta and central Sydney should be examined as an alternative to connecting another harbour rail crossing to the Bankstown Line at Sydenham, some transport and urban planners say…Garry Glazebrook, an adjunct professor at the University of Technology, Sydney, and one of the authors of the Herald's 2009 transport inquiry, said he supported linking the new harbour rail line to a new corridor to Parramatta.

Heat on for shade
Waverley Leader, Melbourne  17 February 2015
Melbourne  suburbs need to increase their tree coverage to combat rising temperatures, a recent study says….A lack of trees and shade is contributing to the urban heat island (UHI) effect, making it harder for many areas to keep cool in hot weather.The Institute for Sustainable Futures analysed land cover in 30 metropolitan Melbourne council areas and three regional municipalities to quantify tree canopy coverage, hard surfaces and grassed or bare land.

Music festivals go cleaner, greener
Sydney Morning Herald  17 February 2015 
Every summer, tens of thousands of people across Australia revel in live outdoor music, staying for a day or pitching their tents for a weekend. When the music dies, however, what's left may be less appealing – a churned-up landscape with tonnes of food and drink packaging, a sea of discarded possessions and overflowing portable toilets…There is hope for change though, says Laura Wynne, a research consultant for the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS). Read full story

Interview with Dr Michelle Zeibots about WestConnex
2SER FM, Sydney  13 February 2015  10:12am
Interview with Dr Michelle Zeibots, Institute for Sustainable Futures at UTS. Rosenzveig says he feels like there has been a lot of criticism over WestConnex but there have not really been too many people suggesting a feasible alternative

Brisbane train stations help provide robotic information to Sydney commuter study
ABC news online  12 February 2015 
The University Technology of Sydney (UTS) is using robotic sensors in Central and Roma Street stations in the Brisbane CBD to count commuters as 'grey blobs'. Daily commuters have noticed the new black boxes mounted on pillars throughout high-traffic stations this week. The research is being used for a study that aims to give daily commuters more information ahead of time about crowded carriages and platforms. UTS transport planner Michelle Zeibots told 612 ABC Brisbane that the study is happening in Queensland due to the encouragement of transport provider Queensland Rail. Read full story

Ambitious green targets unlikely to be met by City of Sydney
City Hub  12 February 2015
City of Sydney is not on track to meet its 2030 emission-reduction targets due to the failure of several environmental initiatives according to Councillor Linda Scott…The Lord Mayor went on to outline the benefits of several of the city's emission reduction initiatives, such as the installation of energy-efficient LED street lights, its building-mounted solar panel project, and the retrofitting of the city's office buildings for energy and water savings. According to Stuart White, Director Institute for Sustainable Futures, it is these efficiency boosting measures, not trigeneration or renewables, that will play a central role in reducing the city's carbon emissions.

Regulator's next power failure will cost us dearly
Sydney Morning Herald  11 February 2015
"Electricity network regulation". Sure, not the sexiest words in the English language but ignore them and bad things happen.  Few Australians paid attention back in April 2009 when the Australian Energy Regulator (AER) announced its NSW electricity network pricing decision. But this decision and the AER's following decisions for the other states, led to electricity prices doubling over seven years, pressure on household budgets, a spike in power disconnections, the carbon tax furore and ultimately, the federal Labor government's climate policy implosion and the demise of the Rudd and Gillard governments. Read full story

Anger spills onto King St: Thousands join protest march against controversial WestConnex
Inner City Weekender, Marrickville  6 February 2015
Thousands of people marched down King Street last weekend from Newtown Town Hall to Sydney Park to protest against the proposed WestConnex motorway. Speaking before the march, Dr Michelle Zeibots from UTS said there were a lot of similarities between the WestConnex and the East-West Link in Melbourne which she said was a significant factor in the downfall of the Napthine Liberal Government in Victoria late last year. Read full story

Interview with Dr Garry Glazebrook about WestConnex project
702 ABC Sydney Mornings  6 February 2015  9:26am
Interview with Dr Garry Glazebrook - University of Technology, Sydney, about the North West Rail Link and the Parramatta Road strategy. Glazebrook explains the need for an upgrade and why an extension to public transport networks are needed. Glazebrook says Parramatta Road will be a disaster unless underground metro or light rail is added to the public transport plans. Glazebrook says a rethink of the money going on the WestConnex project is needed. Glazebrook says there is a need for dedicated road space for commercial vehicles.

Increasing solar tower competitiveness: An analysis of different supercritical steam concepts
CSP Today  30 January 2015
The CSP industry is working intensively to improve its competitiveness and it has made great efforts, ranging from component manufacturing optimisation and lower parasitic consumption to higher cycle efficiency. These have indeed led to significant cost reductions over the last years. Read full story

Interview with Emma Pierce, Westconnex Action Group about the King Street Crawl.
2SER FM, Sydney  30 January 2015  11.11am
Rosenzveig says West Connex Action Group are teaming up with Reclaim the Streets Sydney to host a march through Newtown this Sunday...She says the rally will have a speech from Dr Michelle Zeibots, expert transport planner, University of Technology in Sydney.

Interview with A/Prof. Damien Giurco about problem waste streams
666 ABC Canberra, Breakfast  28 January 2015  7:20am
Interview with Associate Professor Damien Giurco Director, Institute for Sustainable Futures, University of Technology Sydney, about the push to force companies to make single-use coffee machine pods recyclable. Giurco says there is a group that address problem waste streams, like dental floss containers, cigarette butts. Jon Dee, Founder, Do Something, says that the claim that one one of the leading manufactures that 75% of the pods is recyclable is green-wash.

Reframing the power of economics
WME Magazine  1 January 2015
WME - ENERGY & CARBON LEADER 2014. Two WME Leaders listers coming from the Institute for Sustainable Futures this year flags the coming of age of economics applied in holistic fashion. Chris Dunstan has for more than 20 years been a key figure in the application of economics to the interface between energy and environment. It's not the techno-glitter end of the energy revolution, but his contribution has been foundational to emissions trading schemes and the burgeoning decentralisation of energy. Read full story

The water efficiency whisperer
WME Magazine  1 January 2015
WME - URBAN & INDUSTRIAL WATER LEADER 2014. Fifty years ago Idris Davies worked for the WA Public Works Department on plans to extend the Kalgoorlie pipeline to bring fresh water to agricultural areas. His grandson, Institute of Sustainable Futures director Stuart White, has done more than most to refocus the water agenda on demand-side measures - in Kalgoorlie, across Australia and around the world. Read full story

While shepherds watched, it got hotter and hotter
Sydney Morning Herald, 24 December 2014
Human health – and that of other animals and even plants – is likely to become an ever more pressing public issue as temperatures rise with global warming, cities grow and populations age… During a February 2011 heatwave, a Landsat satellite passed over Sydney taking infrared pictures identifying the city's hottest spots. Brent Jacobs, research director of the Institute of Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology, Sydney, is among those examining the heat mapping to help planners limit current and future effects of the warmth. Dr Jacobs says developers of new housing estates usually leave little in the way of green spaces and water features that – while costly to maintain – would help counter the inevitable heat-island effects. Read full story

UTS to host prominent resource event in 2015
Australian Resources & Investment, 1 December 2014
In a major development for the Australian resource sector, the inaugural World Resources Forum Asia-Pacific is being held at the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS), in June 2015. Co-hosted by UTS's Institute for Sustainable Futures and SMaRT @ UNSW, the forum includes international experts in the fields of wealth to waste', the 'circular economy', industrial ecology, governance and resource stewardship. It promises to be a key event on the resource-sector calendar for progressive companies interested in the latest thinking on profiting from sustainability. Read full story

Welcome to the SHARE economy
Sunday Telegraph (also in Adelaide, Perth, Hobart), 7 December 2014
It’s cheap, simple and good for the environment, so why buy when you can share? That’s the message of the new sharing economy, which is changing the way we consume everything from lawnmowers to holidays. Read full story

Future Cities
Catalyst, ABC TV, 4 December 2014
The media abounds with visions of gloomy, automated megacities or totally sustainable ecological utopias but how do these futuristic visions relate to the development of Australian cities over the next eighty years? With soaring populations, how will we keep our cities liveable? And what will the city of tomorrow look like? Catalyst reporter, Anja Taylor explores some innovative ideas to enhance our future cities. View online

Poor score for area recycling
Parramatta Advertiser, 3 December 2014
Auburn residents are the worst recyclers in the state, new research shows. Environmental Protection Authority figures on recycling by households in different council areas shows some residents have a lot of work to do, while others are putting out twice as much. UTS Research Principal Jade Herriman said the list comparing "raw recycling" put out by households does not necessarily mean they are the "best recyclers". She said other factors should be considered such as the fact that bigger homes produce more waste as well as more recycling. "Other homes may have high contamination rates in their recycling and far too much recyclable material in their red bins," Ms Herriman said.

Australian water leader offers strategies to address drought
San Diego Source - The Daily Transcript, 3 December 2014
An Australian water leader outlined strategies Wednesday that helped parts of his country confront the so-called Millennium Drought and could be helpful as California faces its own water shortage. Read full story

Sydney councils join forces to provide cheaper solar for residents, business
Renew Economy, 2 December 2014
In what is becoming a familiar pattern, a group of local government councils in NSW has joined forces to take up the federal and state policy slack and drive Australian solar uptake; this time by working to providing residents and small businesses with ready access to cheaper PV systems – including through a solar leasing option. Read full story

Sydney councils in plug for cheaper solar power
Sydney Morning Herald, 2 December 2014
Eight southern Sydney councils have banded together to provide residents and small businesses with cheaper solar power from early next year - including an innovative financing option. Read full story

CA water agencies to showcase creative conservation campaigns as part of 'ConservaCon' event
WaterWorld, 2 December 2014
In light of California's severe drought, communications professionals from more than 20 water agencies across the state will showcase creative campaigns as part of "ConservaCon" -- a spin-off of San Diego's legendary "Comic-Con" -- during the Association of California Water Agencies' (ACWA) 2014 Fall Conference & Exhibition held on Dec. 2-5, at the Manchester Grand Hyatt in the city… The three-day ACWA conference will also feature a delegation of water managers from Australia who will share lessons learned during the so-called Millennium Drought that gripped their country from 1995 to 2009. Among the delegation is Dr. Stuart White, director of the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology, Sydney. Read full story

Super Heroes of Water Conservation Set to Storm "ConservaCon"
Association of California Water Agencies, 1 December 2014
California's severe drought has pushed water agencies to tap deep into their reservoirs of creativity to find ways to encourage Californians to conserve water. Creative campaigns from around the state will be showcased at "ConservaCon" …The three-day ACWA conference also will feature a delegation of water managers from Australia who will share lessons learned during the so-called Millennium Drought that gripped their country from 1995 to 2009. Among the delegation is Dr. Stuart White, director of the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology, Sydney Read full story

Interview with Chris Dunstan about the future of the electricity industry
ABC South East NSW, 1 December 2014
Interview with Chris Dunstan, Research Director at the University of Technology's Institute for Sustainable Futures about the future of the electricity industry as rooftop solar systems and wind power are changing the way power is produced and distributed. Dunstan says lower electricity are a great thing but they need to be achieved a sustainable way. Dunstan says while the Government has been winding back their support, there has been a massive growth in rooftop solar, which is likely to continue. Holt says we've just seen the first wind farm in this part of the world at Boco Rock. Dunstan says that people are also becoming more efficient at consuming power which has fallen over the last few years. Dunstan says the Electricity Regulator should be providing support through, for example, a demand management incentive scheme.

Solar power cheaper in scheme set up by Sydney councils
The Age.com.au, 1 December 2014
Eight southern Sydney councils are working together on a scheme to provide residents and small businesses with cheaper solar power… Research that SSROC commissioned from the UTS Institute for Sustainable Futures last year, found residents were interested in installing rooftop solar systems but many could not afford the upfront cost or were confused about how to choose a good supplier. The report Our Energy Future: SSROC Renewable Energy Master Plan, in which the idea was first mooted,   can be viewed at ssroc.nsw.gov.au/publications. Read full story

Australian leaders to speak about drought at water conference
San Diego Source - The Daily Transcript, 1 December 2014
A delegation of Australian water leaders who had a key role in managing the so-called Millennium Drought that gripped their country from 1995 to 2009 will share insights at a conference in San Diego this week…Stuart White, director of the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology, Sydney, will deliver the keynote address during the opening breakfast on Wednesday. The Institute assisted water agencies during the Millennium Drought. Read full story

Online Electricity Network Mapping Tool Being Developed, Aims To Boost Renewables
Clean Technica, 28 November 2014
A new online electricity network mapping tool is currently being developed via a partnership between the UTS’s Institute for Sustainable Futures, Ergon Energy, the Australian Renewable Energy Agency, TransGrid, the New South Wales Department of Trade and Investment, and ElectraNet. Read full story

Green walls taking root in Sydney
The Straits Times, 26 November 2014
In the middle of the urban jungle of inner city Sydney, a new space has been found for lush subtropical gardens: on the sides and rooftops of high-rise buildings. The living walls, or green walls, are scattered across the city and have added colour to concrete eyesores. More than 118,000 sq m of roofs and walls in the city are now covered by gardens. The authorities say the figure could actually be much higher because green walls generally do not require council approval and so are harder to track.  Read full story

Water Leaders to Gather for "Moment of Truth" at ACWA Fall Conference & Exhibition
Penn Energy, 24 November 2014
With an epic drought and decisive passage of Proposition 1 as a backdrop, water leaders from throughout California will gather in San Diego Dec. 2-5 for the Association of California Water Agencies' 2014 Fall Conference & Exhibition, themed "Moment of Truth: One State, One Water Future." The conference, which is expected to draw more than 1,600 local, state and federal water managers, will feature more than 80 programs, keynote addresses and panel discussions on California's critical water issues. Some of the topics explored include landmark groundwater legislation enacted this fall, lessons learned from Australia's "Millennium Drought," the future of water storage in California, preparing for extreme weather events and water transfers. Read full story

Making better investment decisions
WME Magazine, 1 November 2014
Recent work from the Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF) shows how the treatment of risk in recycling needs to expand dramatically, write Andrea Turner, Pierre Mukheibir and Cynthia Mitchell.

Getting more out of 'ore'
WME Magazine, 1 November 2014
 Mining and metals companies should consider the emerging opportunities to recover materials from alternative sources of ore and achieve improved environmental outcomes, writes Paula Wallace. While the economic case might not compel some companies to consider "mining" alternative sources of "ore", energy intensive industries like mining and minerals processing could be some of the first to realise the opportunities in the face of rising costs… Recent research by the Institute for Sustainable Futures in collaboration the CSIRO and other universities found that up to 70% of Australia's metal consumption could be provided by recovering the five million tonnes of metals in landfills or discarded products.

Report reveals our city’s biggest tossers
Parramatta Advertiser, 26 November 2014
Think your neighbours throw away too much rubbish? You may just be right. New research reveals for the first time where people throw away the most rubbish in Sydney and who throws away the least.

Study a lot of rubbish: Data looks at city's waste
Southern Courier, 25 November 2014
Think your neighbours throw away too much rubbish? You may just be right. New research reveals for the first time where people throw away the most rubbish in Sydney and who throws away the least.

AGL Energy describes solar household tariffs as a “scam”
Renew Economy, 25 November 2014
AGL Energy has described tariffs that affect households with rooftop solar PV as a “scam”, and has alleged that non solar households are subsidising solar households to the tune of billions of dollars. In an extraordinary attack on rooftop solar, AGL Energy (Australia’s largest generator of coal-fired power), said solar households were being cross-subsidised by other homes, and inferred that there was already too much solar on household rooftops. Read full story

Networks told they need to play fair with local energy, solar
Renew Economy, 24 November 2014
Australia’s major utilities are being advised they need to give fair treatment to local energy generation – such as rooftop solar and battery storage – if they are to avoid the so-called death spiral that threatens their business models.A new report from the Institute of Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology in Sydney suggests local generation needs to be adequately rewarded to prevent mass defection from the grid from consumers unhappy about their treatment from utilities. Read full story

It’s official we’re tree-riffic
Cairns Post, 24 November 2014
Cairns has been confirmed as the best regional city in Australia to find a shady spot. A study of 139 of Australia's most urban, densely populated areas found the city had the highest tree canopy cover in the country at 79 per cent. Researchers from the Institute for Sustainable Futures at Sydney's University of Technology used software developed in the US to assess green space, such as parks and wetlands, across 62,185 sq km.

Cairns has been recognised as the leafiest regional city in Australia
Seven Local News Cairns, 24 November 2014
Cairns has been recognised as the leafiest regional city in Australia. A study into canopy coverage by the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology Sydney found Cairns is a city in a garden.

Power of change makers
mX (Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane), 24 November 2014
The PM may say “coal is our future” but great uni minds are charging forward with renewable-energy education, Charley Rico reports. If you’ve ever considered pursuing a degree in sustainability but worried you wouldn’t get a job, fret no more. Although the Australian Government is trying to shift away from renewables, there is hope for those who believe in the notion: “Enough, for all, forever.” Research principal Jade Herriman from the Institute of Sustainable Futures, of the University of Technology Sydney, says the job market for green careers continues to grow.

Residents recycle more than the city average
North Shore Times, Sydney, 21 November 2014
Ku-ring Gai residents are recycling more than the average Sydney household, according to new research. Environmental Protection Authority figures on recycling by households in different council areas shows some residents have a lot of work to do, while others are putting out twice as much.

Recycling not rubbish but we can do better
Wentworth Courier, Sydney, 19 November 2014
New research has lifted the lid on where people recycle the most rubbish in Sydney. It reveals homes in some parts of Sydney are putting out twice as much waste for recycling as others. UTS research principal Jade Herriman said the list comparing “raw recycling” put out by households does not necessarily mean they are the “best recyclers”.

Canopy quantity covered
Hills Shire Times, Sydney, 18 November 2014
The Hillks moniker as "the Garden Shire" appears to be safe for now, with a new report showing the district has the fourth-largest total tree canopy in the state. But with green space in decline across the country and the Shire on the cusp of massive growth, questions remain about how the area can maintain its position. The Where Are All the Trees report, prepared by the Institute for Sustainable Futures, found the Hills Shire had 53.7 per cent tree canopy cover, behind Pittwater (59.3), Hornsby (59) and Warringah (58).

Radio interview with Damien Giurco about landfill
702 ABC Sydney, 18 November 2014
Interview with Dr. Damien Giurco, Research Director, University of Technology Sydney Institute for Sustainable Futures, about his modelling on landfill and the rate at which things are filling up around Australia. Giurco says the research was done with a view to thinking how long existing landfill will last and what solutions are needed to deal with waste.

Keeping tabs on top tossers
Northern District Times, 12 November 2014
Think your neighbours throw away too much rubbish? You may just be right. New research reveals for the first time where people throw away the most rubbish in Sydney and who throws away the least…Research principal at UTS’s Institute for Sustainable Futures, Jade Herriman, said there are a range of reasons why households in some areas dump more than others.

Statistics show city's waste hot spots
North Shore Times, Sydney, 12 November 2014
New research has revealed for the first time where people throw away the most rubbish in Sydney and who throws away the least… Research principal at UTS’s Institute for Sustainable Futures Jade Herriman said there were a lot of reasons why some households dump more than others.

Survey scopes out our very worst dumpters
Inner West Courier, 11 November 2014
Think your neighbours throw away too much rubbish? You may just be right. New research reveals for the first time where people throw away the most rubbish in Sydney and who throws away the least… Research principal at UTS’s Institute for Sustainable Futures, Jade Herriman, said there are many reasons some households dump more than others.

Sydney's biggest tossers: EPA list reveals the suburbs that chuck out the most rubbish
Daily Telegraph, 7 November 2014
Think your neighbours throw away too much rubbish? You may just be right. The Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) has compiled data that reveals how many kilos of waste households put into their red bins each week, where people throw away the most rubbish in Sydney and who throws away the least. The list, which compares council areas, reveals for the first time where the biggest tossers in Sydney live… Research principal at UTS Institute of Sustainable Futures Jade Herriman says there are a lot of reasons why households in some areas dump more than others. Read full story

Electricity mapping tool to boost renewables, stop gold-plating
RenewEconomy, 5 November 2014
The development of an online electricity network mapping tool aims to help boost renewables deployment in Australia, and to avoid further network “gold plating”, by helping service providers and other stakeholders to navigate the changing landscape of the national electricity market. The series of detailed online ‘network opportunity maps’ are being developed through a partnership between the UTS’s Institute for Sustainable Futures, the Australian Renewable Energy Agency, Ergon Energy, TransGrid, the NSW Department of Trade and Investment and ElectraNet. Read full story

Interview with Jade Herriman
2UE Sydney, Weekend Afternoons, 2 November 2014
Interview with Jade Herriman, University of Technology, Sydney, about her sustainable cooking programme run in conjunction with TAFE. Herriman says that root to stalk cooking sums up the idea that we can be efficient in how we use vegetables and reduce throwing out usable food. Herriman says that menu planning and shopping lists can help reduce this. Herriman says that there is a whole generation of people who do not have basic cooking skills which means the waste-not attitude is forgotten. Herriman says that they had a master chef participant demonstrate what different things can be done with left over chicken.

The WME Leaders List
WME Magazine, 25 October 2014
Most environment and sustainability awards go to organisations but if the truth be known, it is the champions within them who need recognition. It is the individual who went the extra yards; who inspired those around them; who had the audacity to hope for something beyond 'business as usual'. That is the premise for the annual WME Leaders List awards. Below is the shortlist of nominations from our online poll, selected by an expert panel in each category. Now, it's your choice. Read full story

Give pees a chance
The Saturday Paper, 25 October 2014
Dana Cordell recently told me an anecdote about an eco-village in Sweden with urine-diverting composting toilets. The kids who live there have to attend a nearby school with regular flush toilets, which they thought were weird, so at first they held on all day until they got home. "So much of our response to toilets goes back to what we were taught when we were young," she says. "In contemporary Australian culture, our approach to toilets is 'flush and forget'. But I prefer toilet models where the user is slightly confronted by what they've produced, and given a chance to take responsibility for it."
Read full story

Views aired on project
Inner West Courier, 21 October 2014
The WestConnex motorway's ventilation stacks were a major talking point at a recent packed public meeting at St Peters Church. About 150 residents who attended rejected the proposed WestConnex motorway. Dr Michelle Zeboits from the UTS Research Principal, Institute for Sustainable Futures, also spoke at the meeting and was part of the expert advisory panel for the NSW Master Transport Plan. "If the government is serious about containing congestion, we must look at public transport solutions," she said.

Network must get smart
MX (Sydney), 21 October 2014
Putting commuters and their needs first could make Sydney's transport system a lot smarter, a world-renowned visiting engineer has said. Dr Felix Laube from Swiss engineering firm Emch+Berger, who is currently working as an adjunct professor at University of Technology, Sydney, will lead a free public talk at the university tonight about how clever train control systems can be used to make public transport work better for the people.

The day a new neighbour called in the chainsaws to destroy a giant tree and changed our lives forever
The Courier Mail, 15 October 2014
It happened because of the tree. It was the tree — the foliage 15 metres high and just as broad, the trunk solid, the branches long and smooth, the foliage waxy and resplendent — that made us buy the house. It was the tree that threw a blanket of shade across our verandahs and our corrugated iron roof on summer days, and at night became a roost for local brush turkeys high up, and lower, a thoroughfare for busy ringtail possums. A family of kookaburras shared lodgings in the tree…. According to the report ‘Where are all the Trees?’ (2014), an analysis of tree canopy cover in urban Australia, conducted by the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology, Sydney, Queenslanders can be rightly proud of their efforts over the years to green their towns and cities. Hobart topped the national list as the city with the largest percentage of tree canopy at 59 per cent. Brisbane wasn’t far behind, with 49 per cent.
Read full story

Get rich, go for the above ground urban mining revolution
The Fifth Estate, 14 October 2014
Research by the University of Technology in Sydney in collaboration the CSIRO and other universities found that up to 70 per cent of Australia’s metal consumption could be provided by recovering the five million tonnes of metals in landfills or discarded products. What this points to is an above ground revolution that’s making some innovative companies very rich. Read full story

Grid maps to 'boost renewables': ARENA
The Australian Business Review, 18 October 2014
ARENA yesterday announced $425,000 funding to create online maps of electricity network constraints to help better inform network investments and increase the use of renewable energy. ARENA CEO Ivor Frischknecht said the Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF) at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) would develop annually updated maps and make them freely available online...“The new maps may also enable faster development of renewable energy by showing where renewables and demand management can be more cost effective than network upgrades.” ISF Research Director Chris Dunstan said the energy sector is changing quickly and new tools are needed to manage this transition. Read full story

Opening the hood on networks could turbo-charge distributed energy
Business Spectator, 17 October 2014
When you chat to businesses engaged heavily in commercial solar, to wind farms, to energy management technology, one of their biggest frustrations is they find dealing with networks can sometimes be a bit like dealing with your mother when you were a child.,,UTS researcher, and a long time demand management advocate, Chris Dunstan explained to Climate Spectator that this online mapping tool could also grow in scope to provide further information to support both network businesses and distributed energy solutions. Read full story

Online network maps to boost renewables
The Fifth Estate, 16 October 2014
The Institute of Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology, Sydney will create online maps of electricity network constraints that will help inform network investments and lead to more renewable energy, thanks to $425,000 in funding from the Australian Renewable Energy Agency. ISF research director Chris Dunstan said an increase in distributed generation, including solar and trigeneration, was changing the energy sector and new tools were needed to manage the transition. Read full story

Online network maps to boost renewables
EcoGeneration, 17 October 2014
ARENA will provide $425,000 funding to create online maps of electricity network constraints to inform investments and increase the use of renewables. Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA) CEO Ivor Frischknecht said the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology Sydney would develop annually updated maps and make them freely available online. Read full story

Get rich, go for the above ground urban mining revolution
The Fifth Estate, 14 October 2014
Research by the University of Technology in Sydney in collaboration the CSIRO and other universities found that up to 70 per cent of Australia’s metal consumption could be provided by recovering the five million tonnes of metals in landfills or discarded products. What this points to is an above ground revolution that’s making some innovative companies very rich… But then, this could change business forever. Recent research from the Wealth from Waste collaboration led by the University of Technology, Sydney and involving the CSIRO and other universities, found that up to 70 per cent of Australia’s metal consumption could be provided via recovering the five million tonnes of metals such as iron, aluminum and copper locked up in landfills or discarded products
Read full story

Wasted! How to save more by throwing away less
Sydney Morning Herald and The Age, 14 October 2014
It was apocalyptic. Flames were leaping as gas escaped through cracks in the earth at an inner-city park that had once been a tip. Recent rain had formed puddles on the earth covering the former tip and bubbles were forming. Curious, I took a lighter to the bubbles and suddenly the ground was alight. Methane. Decades of buried household rubbish, mostly food waste, was decomposing into flammable gas… "It's most important to stop waste at the beginning of the pipeline," says Jade Herriman, research principal at the Institute for Sustainable Futures at University of Technology Sydney. She and her team are working with Sydney Institute of TAFE to educate apprentice chefs in "root to stalk" cooking, a play on nose to tail eating, the concept in which every part of an animal is used.

Food waste turns to methane. Cut back on what you throw out and help the environment.
Goodfood, 13 October 2014
It was apocalyptic. Flames were leaping as gas escaped through cracks in the earth at an inner-city park that had once been a tip. Recent rain had formed puddles on the earth covering the former tip and bubbles were forming. Curious, I took a lighter to the bubbles and suddenly the ground was alight. Methane. Decades of buried household rubbish, mostly food waste, was decomposing into flammable gas… "It's most important to stop waste at the beginning of the pipeline," says Jade Herriman, research principal at the Institute for Sustainable Futures at University of Technology Sydney. She and her team are working with Sydney Institute of TAFE to educate apprentice chefs in "root to stalk" cooking, a play on nose to tail eating, the concept in which every part of an animal is used. Read full story

Shades of Green
Courier Mail, Brisbane, 11 October 2014
An inner city bush oasis with wildlife in abundance, had as its centrepiece a tree that vanished in the space of 12 hours... but why? It happened because of the tree. It was the tree - the foliage 15 metres high and just as broad, the trunk solid, the branches long and smooth, the foliage waxy and resplendent - that made us buy the house. …according to the report Where are all the Trees? (2014), an analysis of tree canopy cover in urban Australia, conducted by the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology, Sydney, Queenslanders can be rightly proud of their efforts over the years to green their towns and cities. Hobart topped the national list as the city with the largest percentage of tree canopy at 59 per cent. Brisbane wasn't far behind, with 49 per cent.

Digital wild
UTS newsroom, 7 October 2014
Childhood today is a very different experience to what it was 50 years ago. Gone are the days of exploring the local creek and returning home for dinner at sunset. Parents' concerns about stranger danger and traffic are keeping children indoors, playing digital games during their free time. "Digital technology is often considered a barrier to independent outdoor play," says PhD candidate in the Institute for Sustainable Futures Bronwyn Cumbo, "but it could also be an important tool for change. Read full story

How technology could motivate children to explore nature
phys.org, 7 October 2014
Childhood today is a very different experience to what it was 50 years ago. Gone are the days of exploring the local creek and returning home for dinner at sunset. Parents' concerns about stranger danger and traffic are keeping children indoors, playing digital games during their free time. "Digital technology is often considered a barrier to independent outdoor play," says PhD candidate in the Institute for Sustainable Futures Bronwyn Cumbo, "but it could also be an important tool for change. Read full story

Sydney's new home boom triggers urgency in addressing transport, jobs and schools
Sydney Morning Herald, 7 October 2014
Sydney's market for new homes is at a 10-year high and the city is sprawling. But are the city's growth areas ready for new residents? The Herald has mapped federal government data showing where new homes have been approved for construction in Sydney over the past two years. Not all will be built, but the figures indicate where the development is focused and how it will change the face of the city…The trouble of travelling from western Sydney to the CBD has been Sydney's most obvious transport issue for decades. That is likely to be compounded by surging growth in Parramatta and Blacktown. "Parramatta and Blacktown are heavily reliant on the western Sydney rail line – the most overcrowded line during peak hours," said Michelle Zeibots from the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology, Sydney. Read full story

Ready, set, grow: Sydney home boom triggers urgency in planning
Sydney Morning Herald and The Age, 6 October 2014
Sydney's market for new homes is at a 10-year high and the city is sprawling. But are the city's growth areas ready for new residents? The Herald has mapped federal government data showing where new homes have been approved for construction in Sydney over the past two years. Not all will be built, but the figures indicate where the development is focused and how it will change the face of the city…The trouble of travelling from western Sydney to the CBD has been Sydney's most obvious transport issue for decades. That is likely to be compounded by surging growth in Parramatta and Blacktown. "Parramatta and Blacktown are heavily reliant on the western Sydney rail line – the most overcrowded line during peak hours," said Michelle Zeibots from the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology, Sydney.

Smart Grid Technology
Energy Source & Distribution, 1 October 2014
The four-year, $100 million government smart grid technology trial known as the Smart Grid, Smart City project, has released its cost-benefit analysis….  In its cost-benefit analysis, Arup and consortium partners Energeia, Frontier Economics and the Institute of Sustainable Futures (UTS) quantified the potential economic benefits from the mix of smart-grid devices, customer feedback technologies and dynamic electricity tariffs trialled in the project and developed a business case for implementing the most effective of these at a national level.  

How to repair almost anything
Green Villages, 25 September 2014
UTS Fix-it Workshops. This program of free, hands-on workshops is devoted to repair and the relearning of lost skills. There are two workshops on mending fashion items later this month. You can book into both of them here.  Read full story

Sydney students to learn food sustainability
Sustainabilitymatters.net.au, 19 September 2014
Researchers from the UTS Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF) have been awarded a grant from the NSW Government to introduce food sustainability into the curriculum for student chefs and event managers at Sydney TAFE.  The project will draw on resources from the NSW Environment Protection Authority’s (EPA) Love Food Haste Waste program that highlight how wasting food also wastes the energy, water and natural resources used to grow, package, transport and market that food.  Read full story

Why is equity so important in evaluation?
Better Evaluation, 19 September 2014
Equity in evaluation, for me, could have many dimensions. But first it’s probably good to think about what ‘equity’ can mean to different people. For those working in the area of human rights, normally ‘equality’ is the formal term used rather than ‘equity’ since it has a legal basis. It is used in relation to ideas around non-discrimination, the legal principle that prohibits the less favorable treatment of individuals or groups based on aspects such as ethnicity, sex, religion, or other status. Read full story

Tackling food wastage from the root
Dynamic Business, 19 September 2014
The NSW Government has awarded a grant to the UTS Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF) in order to make food sustainability part of the curriculum for those entering the food industry. The initiative, which will be drawing on the resources from the NSW Environment Protection Authority’s Love Food, Hate Waste program, will attempt to curve Australia’s food wastage by targeting those on their way into the industry, such as student chefs and aspiring event managers. Read full story

UTS spreads “Love food, hate waste” message
Hospitality Magazine, 18 September 2014
Researchers from the Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF) at the University of Technology, Sydney are encouraging the food industry to adopt “root-to-stalk” cooking. Read full story

‘We are burning our trust’: Abbott’s climate denials winning Australia no friends
crikey.com.au, 17 September 2014
Remove price on carbon. Check. Avoid international climate talks. Check. Deny fossil fuel subsidies. Check! This is your captain Tony Abbott speaking, and Australia is cleared for take-off, destination: last century…The issue has a fraught history in Australia. Academic Chris Reidy, then at the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology Sydney, estimated in 2007 that Australia has fossil fuel subsidies of roughly $9 billion to $10 billion a year, of which the majority was the diesel fuel rebate to miners and others, of some $5 billion a year. Read full story

Garden City' in name only
Eastern Suburbs Reporter, Perth, 16 September 2014
Despite being known as the "Garden City," the City of Bayswater has one of the lowest percentages of tree canopy coverage across Western Australia's metropolitan area. A 2014 University of Technology, Sydney report found that out of 29 local government areas the City had the fourth lowest tree canopy coverage with 13.2 per cent. Disappointed by the result, Councillor Chris Cornish moved a motion at the last council meeting for City officers to investigate options to increase tree canopy coverage to 20 per cent by 2025.

The winds of change
Sydney Morning Herald, 16 September 2014
Community energy is thriving overseas but Australians remain glued to the grid.  Denmark isn't the sunniest place on the continent. The Australian continent, that is. The tiny township clinging to Western Australia's southern coast is rainy for about a third of the year. So, it wasn't a big surprise when, in 2003, wind energy emerged as the most viable form of renewable energy for the local community. Read full story

Marine reserves ditched despite tide of research
Sydney Morning Herald, 13 September 2014
Over the past 18 months, both federal and NSW governments have abandoned protective marine zones or sanctuaries. Seemingly throwing aside decades of previous research and consultation, the federal government has just announced that it has appointed a new expert panel to review the "management plans and balance of zoning" of Commonwealth marine reserves. This is despite more than 95 per cent of the 750,000 public and stakeholder submissions to the federal government since 2011 supporting greater protection of the marine environment. Read full story

Based on what evidence? Ensuring aid works in ASEAN and elsewhere
The Conversation, 12 September 2014
Despite cuts to future aid spending since the Abbott government assumed office, the level of aid to Southeast Asia remains largely unchanged. What is in doubt is the space and the mechanisms for research and evidence to influence effective aid targeting. Read full story

More volunteers are needed to help with a kangaroo population study
WIN TV (Orange, Dubbo), 11 September 2014
More volunteers are needed to help with a kangaroo population study at Mount Panorama, which is a collaboration between the Bathurst Kangaroo Project and the University of Technology Sydney. Project organisers are calling for volunteers to help monitor darted Kangaroos until they recover from unconsciousness.

Bathurst Kangaroo Project begins in Mount Panorama precinct
Western Advocate, 10 September 2014
Day one of the Bathurst Kangaroo Project yesterday was a success, according to organisers, as two eastern grey kangaroos were darted and tagged. The project aims to dart and tag 30 macropods in the Mount Panorama precinct over the next few weeks, in preparation for the University of Technology (UTS) Sydney Bathurst kangaroo research program. Read full story

Tender to develop a pathway to Zero Net Energy towns
The Fifth Estate, 9 September 2014
A proposal to develop an open-source roadmap for how to finance and deliver a zero net energy town in a regional New South Wales area is currently out to tender. And among the finance options under consideration is the Environmental Upgrade Agreement model. The NSW Office of Environment and Heritage has provided $80,000 for the tender fee for the ZNET, with possible test cases, Moree, Uralla, Guyra and Quirindi…Partner organisations include the Institute of Sustainable Futures at UTS in Sydney, the University of New England, Community Mutual Group, the Environmental Defenders Office Northern Rivers, Total Environment Centre, and a range of funding partners including councils, NSW Government, Embark Australia and the Diversicon Environment Foundation. Read full story

Lessons from an industrial 'match-maker'
Waste Management & Environment, 1 September 2014
Founder of one of the most effective resource efficiency programs globally, Peter Laybourn will visit Australia to address an industrial ecology conference in Melbourne later this year… Work has started here to help business understand the value lost through failing to manage materials more efficiently, led by the Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF) at the University of Technology Sydney. Its initial research suggests that more than $2 billion is lost to the Australian economy every year from failure to recycle waste metals alone.

Albino wallaroos claim Mt Panorama
The Land, Sydney, 28 August 2014
A team of researchers from the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) have confirmed the presence of albino wallaroos living on Bathurst's iconic Mount Panorama.

Hobart tops tree canopy cover
Waste Management & Environment, 1 August 2014
Hobart is Australia's "greenest capital" with a 56% tree canopy, reveals a first of- its-kind analysis of urban tree cover. Sydney and Melbourne fare poorly. The 'Benchmarking Australia's Urban Tree Canopy' report by University of Technology, Sydney, and the 202020 Vision used open source i-Tree Canopy software to assess 139 local government areas, some single-LGA regional cities and others as multiple-LGA capital cities. "No one has ever before conducted a national analysis that has tracked and measured the number of trees in Australia's most dense urban areas," said the National Urban Forest Alliance's Anthony Kachenko. The Melbourne and Sydney CBDs had the least coverage, at less than 15%.

Designing consumer items that can be repaired, upgraded or reused is the future
Brink, Sydney Morning Herald, 19 August 2014
When the who's who of business and world leaders met this year at the World Economic Forum in Davos, a different industrial model was on the agenda: the circular economy. Many people might not have heard about it but the idea has gained sufficient traction in business, political and environmental circles to be the subject of a report released at the forum's annual meeting and to be the focus of an initiative supported by leading companies to encourage business to embrace its principles. Read full story

Find out the 13 places the community has put forward for more lighting on the peninsula
Daily Telegraph, Northern Beaches, 14 August 2014
Peninsula residents have contacted the Manly Daily in response to our Safer Streets campaign to share their concerns about paths and roads they don’t feel safe walking along at night due to a lack of lighting…University of Technology Sydney Institute for Sustainable Futures researcher Dr Michelle Zeibots said to get more people on public transport better lighting was needed. “Adequate lighting is a big part of feeling and travelling safe when the number of other users on the network is lower,” Dr Zeibots said. Read full story

Powering people in the city
The Guardian multimedia feature, 15 August 2014
The city of the future faces many and varied challenges, but as society tackles them through innovative technology, the benefits for all will be manifold… “Mobile devices, wireless connectivity and cloud computing, make your interactions seamless, wherever you work,” says Kerryn Wilmot, research principal of the institute for sustainable futures, University of Technology Sydney. “The advent of these three elements very recently has been a game changer.” Wilmot adds that “anywhere working” is already evidenced by people toiling on computers in cafes and on public transport. However she points out the likely development of “smart work centres” will formalise the trend for many larger businesses offering flexible working arrangements. Read full story.

Thriving communities get chance to shine
Manly Daily, Sydney, 15 August 2014
Street and path lighting is vital for everything from public transport to community wellbeing, experts say. The Manly Daily spoke to two academics about the importance of lighting in public places as part of our Safer Streets campaign…University of Technology Sydney Institute for Sustainable Futures researcher Dr Michelle Zeibots said to get more people on public transport better lighting was needed. "Adequate lighting is a big part of feeling and travelling safe when the number of other users on the network is lower," Dr Zeibots said.

Break consumerism chain
MX (Sydney), 5 August 2014
Your phone plays up, the toaster’s on the blink, you tear a hole in your favourite jeans. Sure, you could toss them out and buy another, or you could do what your grandparents did – learn how to fix them. The University of Technology, Sydney has introduced regular fix-it workshops to teach people how to breathe new life into their broken and damaged goods.

Where are all the trees?
Coffs Coast Advocate, Coffs Harbour, 2 August 2014
Last year the Australian Nursery Industry and Australian Horticulture Limited launched the 202020 Vision. Briefly the 202020 Vision is a collaborative plan to increase the amount of green space in our urban areas by 20% by 2020… Three researchers from the Institute for Sustainable Futures, University of Technology, Sydney, using a sophisticated piece of software from the United States called iTree, set about measuring the tree canopy area in 139 local government areas.

Fertile ground for research
Australian Financial Review, 2 August 2014
Dana Cordell has overcome scepticism to raise awareness internationally about the vital role of phosphorus in food production… Based at the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology, Sydney, as a chancellor's post-doctoral research fellow and research principal, Cordell has co-founded the Global Phosphorus Research Initiative and the Sustainable Phosphate Summit series.

Why urine could be the answer to food security
Australian Financial Review, 1 August 2014
Although she once tossed up between a career as an artist or an environmental engineer, Dr Dana Cordell says sustainability has always been a passion that underpins everything she does… Based at the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology, Sydney, as a chancellor’s post-doctoral research fellow and research principal, Cordell has co-founded the Global Phosphorus Research Initiative and the Sustainable Phosphate Summit series. Read full story

Proof trees facilitate our wellbeing
Daily Examiner, Grafton, 1 August 2014
Canberra is the most tree-covered city in Australia, experiencing less stress and sickness and benefiting from reduced household energy costs. The city’s status as the bush capital has been confirmed in a study by the institute for sustainable futures at UTS in Sydney, which found Canberra has the greatest proportion of metropolitan tree coverage, as high as 50% in north Canberra.

Interview with Damien Giurco about 'Treasure in Trash'
2SER FM, Sydney, 30 July 2014
Interview with Damien Giurco, Research Director at the Institute for Sustainable Futures at UTS. Britten says today's world is run by smartphones, laptops and fuel burning vehicles, and Australia is part of the new-age culture, throwing away things we no longer need and replacing them with newer, better models. Giurco says the raw materials are harder to come by now. He says Europe is looking at recycling the materials. He says Australia needs to step up in this area. He talks about the Treasure in Trash lecture tomorrow.

Smart-grid technologies trial identifies $28 billion for Australian economy
Sustainabilitymatters.net.au, 30 July 2014
A comprehensive cost-benefit analysis has identified up to $28 billion in net economic benefits that could flow to Australia if smart-grid technologies were to be implemented across the country’s electricity system…Analysis of the project was conducted by a consortium comprising Arup, Energeia, Frontier Economics and the UTS Institute of Sustainable Futures, which quantified the potential economic benefits from the mix of smart-grid devices, customer feedback technologies and dynamic electricity tariffs trialled in the project and developed a business case for implementing the most effective of these at a national level. Read full story

Still the bush capital
Canberra Weekly, 24 July 2014
Canberra's status as the bush capital has been reconfirmed in a recent study by the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS). The study assessed the proportion of land cover types for 16 Australian cities, and found the ACT had the highest proportion of tree cover with 56 per cent.

Corbell salutes trees
Canberra City News, 24 July 2014
Canberra has the nation's highest proportion of tree cover with 56 per cent, according to a recent study of urban land cover types by the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology Sydney.

Oran Park hub will provide work option
SouthWest Advertiser, 22 July 2014
It is the dream of many office workers to cut their commute and work closer to home. This dream is set to become a reality with the opening of a smart-work hub at Oran Park in October…A study from the University of Technology, Sydney Institute for Sustainable Futures found using smart work hubs could cut at least 30 minutes a day from the commute of more than 23,000 workers living near Liverpool. The study also found if just 6 per cent of those workers used a hub, it would save the public about $6.4 million a year. Read full story

Green city: trees benefit health and wealth
Canberra Times, 22 July 2014
Canberrans benefit every day from living in the most tree-covered city in Australia, experiencing less stress and sickness and benefiting from reduced household energy costs. The city's status as the bush capital has been confirmed in a study by the Institute for Sustainable Futures at UTS Sydney, which found Canberra has the greatest proportion of metropolitan tree coverage, as high as 50 per cent in North Canberra. Read full story

A new report by the University of Technology Sydney shows Hobart has the greenest CBD in the country
936 ABC Hobart 19:00 news, 21 July 2014
A new report by the University of Technology Sydney shows Hobart has the greenest CBD in the country, with its tree canopy covering 66%. It is also home to four of the top twenty local government areas in Australia for greenery.

Hobart top of tree for greenery
Tasmania Mercury, 21 July 2014
Hobart has been ranked Australia’s greenest capital city in a new report into urban tree canopy cover. The report, a first for the Institute for Sustainable Futures at Sydney’s University of Technology, revealed 59 per cent of the Hobart CBD was covered by tree canopies. Read full story

New 202020 Vision report asks 'where are all the trees?'
infolink, 21 July 2014
A new research report from the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS) has found Hobart, Brisbane and Darwin’s CBD councils performing better than Sydney and Melbourne in urban greening with the highest percentage of tree canopy cover among all Australian cities. Read full story

Study confirms importance of Canberra's urban trees
RiotAct: Canberra news, views & opinions, 21 July 2014
Canberra’s status as the bush capital has been reconfirmed by a recent study of urban tree cover in Australia. The study by the Institute for Sustainable Futures at University of Technology Sydney (UTS) assessed the proportion of land cover types (hard surface, tree, shrub and grass/bare ground) for 16 Australian cities. Read full

Fire risk fuels fear
Bay Post, Ulladulla, NSW, 20 July 2014
A former Eurobodalla Rural Fire Service (RFS) group captain fears the service may not have enough firefighters to cope with a serious bushfire emergency caused by the predicted mega El Nino weather cycle… It comes after University of Technology Sydney’s Brent Jacobs predicted that the Eurobodalla could be in for a catastrophic fire season due to a predicted mega El Nino weather cycle. Read full story

Hobart has been named Australia's greenest capital based on tree coverage
Southern Cross Tasmania, nightly news, 18 July 2014
Hobart has been named Australia's greenest capital based on tree coverage. The University of Technology Sydney research found that 59% of Hobart was green.

Report says Australia needs more trees
Eco News, 17 July 2014
Australia is in need of more trees, according to new research conducted by University of Technology, Sydney on behalf of a collaboration of community groups, businesses and governments… The report, conducted by UTS Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF), lead by Dr Brent Jacobs, used a software program called i-Tree Canopy to analyse the amount of tree canopy cover in 139 of Australia’s most urban LGAs, which are home to 68 per cent of the population. Read full story

Repair cafes lead change to throwaway culture
Dynamic Business, 17 July 2014
We live in an age where it’s not common to repair things when they break. Thanks to mass production and offshore cheap manufacturing, it’s seemingly easier, quicker, and cheaper to just replace the item, rather than seek a repair… Jade Herriman, Research Principal at the Institute for Sustainable Futures, University of Technology, Sydney, says that repair is a natural extension of understanding objects and materials, and a creative process that gives immense satisfaction. “Many of those who visit repair cafés become repairers,” she said. Read full story

Where are all the trees?
sustainabilitymatters.net.au, 17 July 2014
A new report from 202020Vision has analysed tree canopy cover in Australia’s most urban, dense, local government areas (LGAs), revealing the complexities and barriers in addressing increased greenery. 202020Vision is a collaborative initiative to increase green space in urban areas by 20% by 2020… The report, conducted by the UTS Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF), utilised a software program called i-Tree Canopy to analyse the amount of tree canopy cover in 139 of Australia’s most urban LGAs, which are home to 68% of our population. Read full story

Aussie Trees Declining - report
Pro Bono Australia news, 17 July 2014
Australia is losing its trees, according to new research conducted by University of Technology, Sydney on behalf of a collaboration of community groups, businesses and governments. The report, called Where Are All The Trees, reveals that urban green space throughout Australia is in decline. The report, conducted by UTS Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF), lead by Dr Brent Jacobs, used a software program called i-Tree Canopy to analyse the amount of tree canopy cover in 139 of Australia’s most urban LGAs, which are home to 68 per cent of the population. Read full story

Agriculture in Australia: growing more than our farming future
intellasia.net, 16 July 2014
How will science address the challenges of the future? In collaboration with Australia’s chief scientist Ian Chubb, we’re asking how each science discipline will contribute to Australia now and in the future… Dana Cordell, Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Research Fellow at University of Technology Sydney. A longer-term strategy based on genuine scientific inquiry is also needed to answer fundamental questions like where would the land, water, nutrients and farmers come from? The expert knowledge of agricultural scientists can help Australia “farm smarter, not harder”. Read full story

Let's chuck the throw-away culture
Brink, SMH, 15 July 2014
A wave of DIY enthusiasm has emerged to teach people how to repair things. Your smartphone screen smashes, your bike wheel buckles, your favourite boots develop a hole. You could buy a replacement or you could join a worldwide trend of taking your broken stuff to a "repair café".  Jade Herriman is a Research Principal at the Institute for Sustainable Futures, at the University of Technology, Sydney. A longer version of this article first appeared on The Conversation on May 16, 2014. Read full story

Hub work beckons
Camden Advertiser, Sydney, 9 July 2014
It is the dream of many office workers to cut their commute and work closer to home. This dream is set to become a reality with the opening of a smart-work hub at Oran Park in October…A study from the University of Technology, Sydney Institute for Sustainable Futures found using smart work hubs could cut at least 30 minutes a day from the commute of more than 23,000 workers living near Liverpool. The study also found if just 6 per cent of those workers used a hub, it would save the public about $6.4 million a year.

Hope for commuters
Campbelltown-Macarthur Advertiser, 9 July 2014
It is the dream of many office workers to cut their commute and work closer to home. This dream is set to become a reality with the opening of a smart-work hub at Oran Park in October…A study from the University of Technology, Sydney Institute for Sustainable Futures found using smart work hubs could cut at least 30 minutes a day from the commute of more than 23,000 workers living near Liverpool. The study also found if just 6 per cent of those workers used a hub, it would save the public about $6.4 million a year.

Nats float plans for new dams
The Land, 3 July 2014
A push for more dams in NSW is under way, almost three decades after the last new dam was built in the State… Dr Pierre Mukheibir, from the University of Technology Sydney's Institute for Sustainable Futures, said NSW had moved on from the days of building big dams. Dr Mukheibir said the high cost of building a huge piece of infrastructure like a dam meant all other options - such as recycling waste water, harvesting storm water or using more rain water tanks - should be investigated first. Read full story

Academic bodies look into recycling waste for wealth
Facility Management, National, 1 July 2014
There is five million tonnes of metals such as iron, aluminium and copper in landfills and discarded products in Australia which could be recovered, according to new research. UTS Institute for Sustainable Futures researcher Dr Damien Giurco, who will lead the research collaboration, says Australia has some catching up to do: "We are seeing products, supply chains and business models being redesigned in forward-thinking international centres to exploit the vast value in recycling metals reclaimed in waste."

The Liberal Party should be community energy's number one fan
The Canberra Times, Brisban Times, 17 June 2014
When Treasurer Joe Hockey proudly declared that wind turbines were ''utterly offensive'' on Macquarie Radio last month, it sounded the unofficial end of bipartisan support for renewable energy in Australia… Nicky Ison is a senior research consultant at the Institute for Sustainable Futures, University of Technology Sydney. She is an expert in the field of community energy, specialising in energy policy and governance, participatory training and energy options assessment. Nicky is leading the development of a national community energy strategy in collaboration with eight other organisations. Read full story

Rubies in the rubble
Brink, SMH, 17 June 2014
We have killed for it, enslaved others to mine for it, and even built a world currency based on it. Gold. Homer described it as the glory of the immortals. The Incas simply called it the tears of the sun… There are two main reasons we should recycle metal waste, says researcher Dr Damien Giurco from the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS).  "There is money in recycling and it is good for the environment," he says.
Read full story

Community energy in focus at Australian-first congress in Canberra
Prime 7, 16 June 2014
The growing number of community-led projects that generate their own power through renewable energy is the focus of Australia's first Community Energy Congress, being held in Canberra this week. Nicky Ison from the University of Technology Sydney's Institute of Sustainable Futures said self-sufficient energy projects in towns and small communities were becoming more popular as people looked to transition away from fossil fuels. Read full story

First Australian community energy congress gathers in Canberra
Medianet, 16 June 2014
More than 300 local community members, council and government stakeholders and energy industry representatives will gather in Canberra today for Australia’s first Community Energy Congress.  Community energy is an approach to renewable energy that involves the community in the development and ownership of energy generation.  Nicky Ison, a senior research consultant at the UTS Institute of Sustainable Futures and founding member of the Coalition for Community Energy, said there are already 10 community energy projects established in Australia, with more than 45 more in development. Read full story

Horror fire season predicted
Bay Post, Ulladulla, NSW, 13 June 2014
The Eurobodalla could be in for a catastrophic fire season due to a predicted very lengthy El Nino weather cycle. Sydney University of Technology researcher Brent Jacobs told ABC Radio that part of the problem was that Bega Valley and Eurobodalla had frequent small fires, but it has been a long time since a major blaze.

Interview with Chris Dunstan, Research Director at ISF
2SER FM, Sydney, 13 June 2014
The NSW Government has announced plans to sell up to 49% of the state's electricity poles and wires to raise funding for projects like the second harbour rail crossing. Dunstan comments on the regulation of the electricity industry.

Interview with Michelle Zeibots, Research Principal, Institute for Sustainable Futures
702 ABC Sydney, 11 June 2014
Interview with Michelle Zeibots, Research Principal, Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS, regarding the commuter race.

NSW government's electricity sale may help fund train station for Barangaroo
WA Today, 11 June 2014
A new train station at Barangaroo is on the cards as the Baird government moves to privatise electricity assets to fund massive infrastructure projects.  The government is considering a host of new train stations, including at Barangaroo, where there are fears current planning for public transport is inadequate.  Transport expert Garry Glazebrook, an adjunct professor at the University of Technology, Sydney, said it “makes sense” to connect the new harbour crossing to the western edge of central Sydney, under Kent or Sussex streets, to cater for a massive growth in floorspace in the next decade. Read full story

Emergency response to extreme weather events on the agenda
Cooma Monaro Express, 3 June 2014
Cooma residents were given the opportunity to shape future responses to extreme weather events, when the South East Local Land Services (LLS) held a community workshop on Friday at the Cooma Ex-Services Club. The LLS facilitated the forum to better understand how the community plan, prepare and respond to extreme events such as bushfire, drought, floods and damaging winds. The workshop was delivered by Dr Brent Jacobs, from the Institute of Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology in Sydney. He was joined by about 20 community members at the forefront of extreme weather events which impact upon the Monaro. Read full story

Experts predict NSW far south coast could be facing 'catastrophic' fire season
ABC News, 3 June 2014
Scientists say the New South Wales far south coast could face catastrophic fires over the coming year.  Weather forecasters say the region is in for a mega El Nino event later this year.  The region's Rural Fire Service and the Local Land Services have met to discuss plans to work together if the weather sparks major bushfires.  Brent Jacobs from Sydney's University of Technology says part of the problem is that the Bega Valley and Eurobodalla have had frequent small fires, but it has been a long time since a major blaze. Read full story

WestConnex Motorway not actually going to help Sydney's traffic congestion
Reportage online, 2 June 2014
The NSW Government’s $11.5 billion WestConnex Motorway could be set to make Sydney’s traffic worse, and cause massive urban development in Sydney’s West and Inner West… However, Dr Michelle Zeibots, Research Principal in Transport at the UTS Institute of Sustainable Futures said WestConnex will cause induced traffic growth on already congested routes. Read full story

Interview with Jade Herriman,about Repair Cafes
Radio New Zealand National, 1 June 2014
We live in a throwaway age, where it's often cheaper to buy a new product than repair old ones. The repair café movement, which started in Holland, is trying to change that. There are now more 400 repair cafes around the world where local residents meet face-to-face with skilled volunteers who show them how to mend everything from clothes to cell phones. Jade Herriman, a researcher at the University of Technology, Sydney, has been looking into the phenomenon.  Listen online.

How to create wealth from waste
Western Sydney Business Access, Parramatte, 1 June 2014
While Australia’s rich stocks of raw mineral resources have contributed to the nation’s wealth and given us a competitive advantage we are also one of the highest waste producing nations in the world (on a per capita basis). By understanding such economies and value of how this chain operates in Australia, we can begin to understand, at scale, the barriers and opportunities to more sustainable consumption and production in a resource limited future. Looking for a new solution That’s why CSIRO and its university partners led by University of Technology Sydney are launching the Wealth from Waste Research Collaboration Cluster to do just this.

Interview with Dr Brent Jacobs, Research Director at ISF
ABC South East NSW, Bega, 30 May 2014
nterview with Dr Brent Jacobs, Director of the Institute of Sustainable Futures, University of Technology Sydney, about South East Local Land Services workshops about protecting natural resources from extreme weather events.

Carbon offsets explained
Green Lifestyle Magazine, 30 May 2014
Check your mangoes. That’s the first lesson of carbon offsetting, and it comes courtesy of a famous British rock band. Martijn Wilder, head of Global and Environmental Markets practice at law firm Baker & McKenzie, argues that there has only been “a limited number” of such dodgy claims. “On the whole it’s been pretty solid.” Chris Riedy from the University of Technology, Sydney, who led a report assessing carbon offset retailers in 2008, says a lot of the so-called carbon cowboys have been weeded out since then. “There are fewer players in the market now, but most of them seem reliable. Read full story

Repair cafes are about fixing things including the economy
hijacked, 20 May 2014
Imagine your smartphone’s screen gets smashed or your bike wheel gets buckled or your favourite boots get a hole in them. What do you do? You could buy a replacement. Or you could join the worldwide trend of taking your broken stuff to a “repair cafe”. The Bower Reuse and Repair Centre has just launched Australia’s first repair cafe in Sydney’s inner west. The crowdfunded project will hold weekly repair sessions focusing on bikes, furniture and electrical items. Read full story

PM throws fuel on fire
Sydney Morning Herald, 9 May 2014
Motorists will pay more for fuel, and the price looks set to keep rising as Prime Minister Tony Abbott prepares to break his no ‘‘new taxes’’ promise for a second time, by taxing petrol at a higher rate…Associate Professor Chris Riedy, from the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS), said any increase needed to be accompanied by improvements in public transport and to income tax arrangements to avoid unfairly burdening poorer people reliant on car travel on city fringes.

Budget pain: tax on petrol set to rise
The Canberra Times, 9 May 2014
Motorists will pay more for fuel, and the price looks set to keep rising as Prime Minister Tony Abbott prepares to break his no ‘‘new taxes’’ promise for a second time, by taxing petrol at a higher rate…Associate Professor Chris Riedy, from the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS), said any increase needed to be accompanied by improvements in public transport and to income tax arrangements to avoid unfairly burdening poorer people reliant on car travel on city fringes.

Fuel levy tougher on car-dependent battlers
WA Today, 8 May 2014
Any increase in the fuel tax could hit people in the poorer city fringes harder than wealthier, inner-city residents with better access to public transport, jobs and services. The government takes 38.1c per litre, as it has for the past 13 years when the Howard government ceased indexing the tax to inflation. Associate Professor Chris Riedy, from the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS), said any increase needed to be accompanied by improvements in public transport and to income tax arrangements to avoid unfairly burdening poorer people reliant on car travel on city fringes.
Read full story http://www.watoday.com.au/breaking-news-national/fuel-levy-tougher-on-ca...

Interview with Michelle Zeibots, University of Technology Sydney
702 ABC Sydney, 8 May 2014
Interview with Michelle Zeibots, University of Technology Sydney Institute of Sustainable Futures, regarding the NSW Government's planned purchase of long-haul intercity trains, to be announced today by NSW Premier [Mike Baird] and Transport Minister Gladys Berejiklian.
Read full story

Big savings for taxpayers by curring the city commute
Sydney Morning Herald, 24 April 2014
After 14 years of commuting to the city from Kellyville, Raymund Manio now saves up to 2½ hours of travelling time each day by working at a "smart work centre" at Rouse Hill for two to three days a week…The Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology, Sydney, has identified potential demand for smart work centres for 1400 workers in Liverpool, 2050 in Blacktown and 1075 in Penrith, who spend up to 90 minutes travelling to work on any given day. Read full story

Sydney shows the way - communities can switch to clean renewable energy
Antinuclear, 24 April 2014
The City of Sydney has recognised the potential of community energy in its roadmap to move the city towards 100 per cent renewable energy by 2030… Community-owned renewable energy generation in towns and cities around the country can stimulate regional development, provide more resilient and inexpensive energy security and significantly contribute to Australia’s climate mitigation targets, UTS Institute for Sustainable Futures researcher Nicola Ison said. Read full story

Interview with Jade Herriman, Principal researcher at the Institute for Sustainable Futures
Radio National, Canberra, 9 April 2014
Mitchell says that Herriman has just completed a report on the food waste recycling programme

Bocking says the Forum on Doubling Energy Productivity in on today
2UE Sydney, Your Business Day, 4 April 2014
The USA has a great story to tell about making investments in energy productivity and not only is it good for households by driving energy costs down, the good news is that it also drives down carbon pollution

Healthy, sustainable and resilient cities—the topics at Making Cities Liveable Conference 2014
infolink, 4 April 2014
The seventh Making Cities Liveable Conference (MCLC) will call on keynote speakers and sector professionals to examine the challenges of planning for healthy, sustainable and resilient cities… Keynote speakers include Ms Kerryn Wilmot, Research Principal, Institute for Sustainable Futures, UTS.Read full story

Shift power use, save big on investment, US expert says
WA Today, 3 April 2014
Encouraging power users to shift their consumption during days of high demand could avoid major investments in networks while also fostering the use of solar energy… Dr Arvizu was speaking on Thursday at the 2XEP Forum at the University of Technology Sydney. Read full story

Wealth from Waste research collaboration launched
sustainabilitymatters.net.au, 2 April 2014
A new research collaboration, led by the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS), aims to determine the value of above-ground resources - the metals contained in discarded goods. The three-year research program will be led by UTS Institute for Sustainable Futures researcher Dr Damien Giurco. Read full story

Is your water network 'intelligent' enough?
WME Magazine, 1 April 2014
Despite interest in intelligent technologies from water businesses, a sound understanding of the business drivers, customer benefits and technologies is still being developed.. According to researchers the Institute for Sustainable Future (ISF) and Griffith University, unless tariff structures change or intelligible feedback mechanisms lead to customers becoming more aware of their usage and reducing it, the bill may stay the same (or perhaps even rise to cover the cost of the technology).

Smart work centres the solution for commuters, says Blacktown councillor
The Sun Parramatta Holroyd, 28 February 2014
A Blacktown councillor has called for the establishment of  ‘‘smart work centres’’ in western Sydney to enable thousands of workers to save commuting time... Cr Pendleton launched the “Smart Work Centres: An Analysis of Demand in Western Sydney” report last week, prepared by the Institute For Sustainable Futures at UTS. Read full story

Experts propose 'circular economy' to jumpstart global growth
ABC News, The World Today, 25 February 2014
A report by the management consultancy, McKinseys, among others, suggests there may be a way to jumpstart the global economy with a boost of $1 trillion immediately. The proposal involves what economists and technology experts call the "circular economy". Professor Giurco, you write that the circular economy - a different industrial model - could immediately inject $1 trillion into the global economy. Read full story

Energy gains lost with closure of Alcoa aluminium recycling plant
Melbourne Age and Sydney Morning Herald, 20 February 2014
The loss of the last aluminium recycling plant in NSW is a blow for sustainability as well as jobs, because the plant has the potential to save 95 per cent of the energy used to manufacture aluminium from scratch, according to environmental experts… Stuart White, director of the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology Sydney, said the decision to close the NSW recycling plant was disappointing for the state. Read full story

Smarter option
Liverpool Leader, 19 February 2014
More than 1400 people in Liverpool could save more than an hour in their daily commuting times if they had access to smart work centres, a new report prepared by the Institute For Sustainable Futures has found.

Around 500 residents turned up at the WestCon rally in Ashfield
2SER FM, Sydney, 17 February 2014
Dr Michelle Zeibots from the Institute for Sustainable Futures at the University of Technology Sydney says WestConnex's selling point is that it will reduce traffic congestion but other toll ways in the city haven't reduced congestion.

Climate change: opinions are affected by the weather
Sydney Morning Herald, 15 February 2014
Australians are so confused about climate change that their attitudes are affected as much by the daily weather as by the science…Eleanor Glenn’s doctorate at the University of Technology Sydney stems from her scepticism of the assertion that people’s differences over climate change would resolve if everyone was more “climate literate”. Read full story

Finding common ground in warming debate
The Canberra Times, 15 February 2014
Eleanor Glenn's doctorate at the University of Technology Sydney stems from her scepticism of the assertion that people's differences over climate change would resolve if everyone was more "climate literate". Differences of opinion are only superficially about the science, Glenn said. Rather, people tended to take their cue from day-to-day weather and the views of friends.

Savings from solar thermal
North Queensland Register, 13 February 2014
Research by the federal government’s Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA) has come down in support of solar thermal power generation as a cost-effective alternative. ARENA has announced the results of the study into solar thermal power integration with the National Electricity Market (NEM)… The study was a collaboration led by the Australian Solar Thermal Energy Association (AUSTELA) with research from the University of Technology Sydney’s Institute for Sustainable Futures, and support from the University of NSW, Ergon Energy and IT Power.

Your health is at steak, so maybe take a day off
Community Advocate, Gladstone Observer, 10 February 2014
Some of you may have heard of Meat Free Mondays. For those who haven’t, it is a campaign encouraging Australians to go meat free for one day of the week, for the good of their health and the good of the planet…The Meat Free Mondays campaign has been launched in Australia by not-for-profit organisation Do Something! and the Fry’s Family Foundation with research support provided by the University of Technology’s Sydney’s Institute for Sustainable Futures.

ARENA: Solar thermal cos-effective
EcoGeneration, 10 February 2014
ARENA has announced the results of an investigation into solar thermal power integration with the National Electricity Market… The University of Technology Sydney’s Institute for Sustainable Futures provided research for the study with support from the University of NSW, Ergon Energy and IT Power. Seven power network companies operating in the NEM also provided data. Read full story

Solar thermal a 'cost effective alternative'
Business Spectator, 6 February 2014
The Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA) today announced the results of an investigation, supported by $179,965 of ARENA funding, into solar thermal power integration with the National Electricity Market (NEM)… The study was a collaboration led by the Australian Solar Thermal Energy Association (AUSTELA) with research from the University of Technology Sydney’s Institute for Sustainable Futures and support from the University of NSW, Ergon Energy and IT Power. Seven power network companies operating in the NEM also provided essential data. Read full story

Interview with transport researcher Michelle Zeibots
3RRR FM Melbourne, 3 February 2014
Interview with Institute for Sustainable Futures Transport Researcher and Planner Dr Michelle Zeibots. Zeibots shares her perspective on transport planning

Solar thermal and storage could offer best value for money
Renew Economy, 30 January 2014
In late December 2013, I was in India and had the privilege to be given an in depth guided tour of the Godawari Green Energy 50MW Concentrating Solar Power plant. This trough concentrator based system is India’s first complete CSP plant, it was commissioned back in May 2013… In early February the Australian Solar Thermal Energy Association (AUSTELA), and the Institute for Sustainable Futures at UTS are organising a series of workshops to introduce new tools developed for evaluation of the potential network benefits of Concentrating Solar Power systems in the NEM. Read full story

Local jobs challenge
Western Weekender Penrith, 24 January 2014
One of the major benefits in the growth and evolution of communication technologies such as mobile devices and wireless and cloud computing is that workers particularly in the knowledge sectors can basically work from anywhere and do not necessarily have to turn up for work as we know it… Penrith Business Alliance has supported a study by the Institute for Sustainable Futures at UTS, which has looked at the potential for Smart Work Centres in Penrith, Blacktown and Liverpool.

The other solar solution to electricity gridlock
Business Spectator, 23 January 2014
Renewable energy is frequently characterised as a burden on our electricity networks. But what if some forms of solar power could provide important network services, and reduce network costs overall?  A project by the Australian Solar Thermal Energy Association – AUSTELA – and two universities examined the potential for concentrating solar thermal power to avoid the need for traditional network augmentation at grid constrained locations, and what this would do to the business case for CSP. Read full story

Water Environment Research Foundation Researching Cooperative Management of Water from All Sources
PR Web, 14 January 2014
WERF recently began research into the institutional issues and governance structures impacting established water, wastewater and stormwater management agencies...The contract for this research was awarded the University of Technology, Sydney, Institute for Sustainable Futures.
Read full story

Interview with Michelle Zeibots, Transport Researcher
702 ABC Sydney, 6 January 2014
Interview with Michelle Zeibots, Transport Researcher, Institute of Sustainable Futures, UTS about traffic. Zeibots says all cities go through cycles, and it has been the same in Sydney for 30 years around this time of year.
 

2013

Radio interview with Prof. White about decentralised energy

24 December 2013, Three D Radio, Adelaide, The Environment Show, 24 Dec 2013 7:50PM

We know who’s profiting from emissions – let’s bill them

Research published last month in the journal Climatic Change may provide an essential building block in proving corporate liability for current and future climate change damage. The Conversation, 18 December 2013, and reprinted in Renew Economy.

Adjournment speech: the myth of mining and employment

Senator Rhiannon (New South Wales) (20:47): The mining industry has created the myth that it is the backbone of the economy, creating jobs and providing a foundation of prosperity-particularly for rural and regional Australia. The slick campaigns that the mining industry run present this false picture.

Reports study the value of citizen committees

New research from the Australian Centre of Excellence for Local Government has explored the role of Citizens' Committees in Australian local government decision-making processes. Council Leader, National, 1 December 2013, p22.

Hybrids fail to make impact on car buyers

More than a decade after the first hybrid car went on sale in Australia, the fuel-saving technology remains a hard sell.

Sydney project will give rail land new life

New York’s High Line Park, built along a raised disused freight line on the city’s West Side, has become one of the city’s most visited attractions since its initial opening in 2009….Similar in style and with the potential to remake ­Sydney’s western fringe is the The Goods Line Project, which is set to open next year.

Australian Financial Review, 28 November 2013.

Why we should turn empty city roofs into gardens

At the recent launch of the 202020 Vision, Dr Sara Wilkinson from University of Technology Sydney’s School of Built Environment spoke of urban agriculture and the potential to grow food in our urban areas.

Australian Financial Review, 28 November 2013.

LJ Hooker’s quiet revolution taps a big sustainable resi market

LJ Hooker’s sustainability manager Cecille Weldon knew she was onto a winner in her sustainability education classes for agents, when the questions keptcoming and the classes were running over time.

The Fifth Estate, 26 November 2013.

Thousands will pay more with Opal card

Tens of thousands of public transport users will pay more for trains, buses and ferries once the Opal smartcard is rolled out across the city.

Sydney Morning Herald, 12 October 2013

Renting beds for cash

More and more Sydneysiders are renting out rooms to travellers to help make ends meet.

MX Sydney, 28 October 2013, p5.

Axe the carbon tax, keep the cap

When Parliament resumes, the first item of business will be abolishing the carbon tax.

21 October 2013

Radio interview with Chris Riedy about target for carbon emissions reduction

For some time Australian politics has enjoyed bipartisan support for a five percent reduction in carbon emissions by 2020, but a new report commissioned by the World Wildlife Fund says that a cut of that size isn't anywhere near what it necessary. 

28 October 2013

Central Park development in Sydney awarded three Green Star ratings

The $2 billion mixed-use development, Central Park in Chippendale, Sydney has received three Green Star ratings from the Green Building Council of Australia. 

4 November 2013

Stakeholder and citizen roles in public deliberation

This paper explores theoretical and practical distinctions between individual citizens (‘citizens’) and organized groups ('stakeholder representatives' or ‘stakeholders’ for short) in public participation processes convened by government as part of policy development.

25 October 2013

New green city initiative to turn concrete tide

A new national initiative, which aims to increase urban green space by 20% by 2020, launched on the same day as a newly released report showing concerns that our urban green spaces are under threat.

7 November 2013

Television interview with Stuart White about concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere

The concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere continues to rise to record levels. Australian scientists say this confirms urgent action is needed on climate change. 

SBS Sydney, World News Australia, 7 November 2013, 6.50pm.

Councillor wants to stop more brothels coming to Willoughby before it becomes Sydney's next red light district

According to Naremburn councillor Nic Wright it is well on its way and he is urging Willoughby Council to take action to prevent the number of brothels from increasing. 

Daily Telegraph, 12 November 2013.

20% more urban green space by 2020

A new national initiative, 202020 Vision aims to increase urban green space by 20 percent by 2020. 202020 Vision – a unique collaboration between government, academic and private sectors – has launched a new national initiative that aims to increase urban green space by  20 percent by 2020.

Australian Design Review, 12 November 2013.

Ecosave listed and growing on the strength of retrofit market

Energy and water efficiency services company Ecosave listed on the Australian Stock Exchange in January this year at $1.

The Fifth Estate, 18 November 2013.

The sharing economy spooking big business

Earlier this year, I travelled to Melbourne for a conference. Instead of paying to stay in a hotel like I normally would, I paid a local couple to stay in their spare room. 

The Conversation, 14 November 2013.

Radio interview with Garry Glazebrook about light rail

Interview with Garry Glazebrook, Research Director, University of Technology Sydney Institute for Sustainable Futures, regarding concerns that the planned Eastern Suburbs light rail system may force thousands to change from bus to tram during their commute.

702 ABC Sydney, Mornings, 20 November 2013, 8.36am

Gen Y embraces the vegetarian message

Weekend Australian, 23 November 2013, p7.

Revealed 100 achievers of distinction

Australian Financial Review, 10 October 2013.

Do Australians waste $8 billion worth of edible food each year?

ABC News fact check, 9 October 2013.

Frustration on the cards for Opal system commuters

Sydney Morning Herald, 28 September 2013.

Radio interview about a new study into wind farms

ABC Central West NSW, 18 September 2013, 7.30am.

Newcastle's light rail could go either way

Newcastle Herald, 18 September 2013,p11.

Gen Y makes a sharp turn away from driving

Sydney Morning Herald, 14 September 2013.

Water efficiency not new dams

The Land, 5 September 2013.

Driving gardeners up the wall

Western Advocate, Bathurst, 17 August 2013, p14.

State boost for climate change research

Sydney Morning Herald, 14 August 2013, p5.

$74,000 solar windfall

Parkes Champion Post, 12 August 2013

Clean energy uptake shocks power sector

West Australian, 12 August 2013, p16.

Michael Caton is coming to our Castle for Futures Day

Parkes Champion Post, 9 August 2013.

Horizon Solar

Midstate Observer, Orange, 8 August 2013, p4

Solar communities program

Central Western Daily, Orange, 7 August 2013, p5.

It was 2011

Australia's Mining Monthly, 1 August 2013

Greenhouse emissions stable over decade as GDP grew 31%

The Conversation and The Fifth Estate, 30 July 2013

Edible walls reduce household food waste

Bendigo Advertiser, 27 July 2013, p35.

So, does not commute

MX Sydney, 26 July 2013, p5.

No excuse not to grow own with 'edible' walls

Bankstown Canterbury Torch, Sydney, p19.