UTS site search
c3 banner
Featured video
Some species of algae produce marine toxins that enter the food chain and are harmful to human health

Keeping one step ahead of marine toxins

Due to the impacts of climate change and environmental degradation the incidence of marine toxin poisoning is on the rise worldwide and is no longer confined to tropical regions. Working with industry and government Shauna Murray is pioneering the development of a test kit that will detect the toxins before they enter the food chain.
Featured research
Storm events decrease water salinity, stressing corals and resulting in coral bleaching Credit: K.Petrou

Can corals weather the weather?

Measuring the anti-oxidant system responses in corals C3 researchers found differences in the tolerance and sensitivity of each species to lowered salinity, highlighting how storm events may be important drivers in future reef species composition.
C3 led research is leading to a better understanding of how some corals might survive increasing storm events that result in a decrease in salinity and cause coral stress.
A collaboration between UTS and the IRD in New Caledonia will investigate the genetic biodiversity of corals living in mangrove environments. The research will give new insight into how corals might keep pace with climate change.
A UTS:C3 led collaboration provides answers to basic questions about key biosynthetic pathways in marine toxin producing microbes opening up the possibility of new product discovery.
Nitrogen fixation is a fundamental process within the ocean, C3 led research gives first detailed description of nitrogen fixing bacterial communities in the region.