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ACEM Resources and Research

Conference and research papers

Conference proceedings

  • 2012 Australian Event Symposium Proceedings & Event Industry White Paper (Sydney, September 2012)
  • Proceedings of the 5th International Event Management Research Conference (Gold Coast, July  2009)
  • Proceedings of the 4th International Event Management Research Conference (Melbourne, July 2007)
  • Proceedings of the Third International Event Management Research Conference (Sydney, July 2005)
  • Events and Place Making – Conference Proceedings (Sydney, July 2002)
  • Events Beyond 2000: Setting the Agenda (Sydney, July 2000)

2012 Australian Event Symposium Proceedings & Event Industry White Paper (Sydney, September 2012)

Proceedings of the 2012 Australian Event Symposium are now available, along with the white paper emerging from the Event Industry Think Tank that preceded it. 

Proceedings of the 5th International Event Management Research Conference (Gold Coast, July 2009)

The theme of the Conference was Meeting the Challenge of Sustainable DevelopmentHow do public and corporate events engage with the global agenda? This theme was selected in recognition of the greatly expanded focus on the linkage between events and the broad area of sustainable development in recent years. Events also have the potential to act as agents for creating environmental awareness and knowledge, as well as attitude and behaviour change. This is reflected in the myriad of environment based festivals and other events that now take place within Australia and internationally. Conference Proceedings

Proceedings of the 4th International Event Management Research Conference (Melbourne, July 2007)

The theme of the conference was Re-eventing the City: Events as Catalysts for Change: Events have the potential to impact upon the cities in which they take place in a variety of ways. They can, for example, serve as: agents of environmental and cultural renewal; vehicles for economic growth and development; catalysts for tourism growth; vehicles for community education and development; and starting points for the process of re-imaging/re-imagining particular places. Events, particularly large scale events, also raise specific issues in urban contexts, such as those associated with opportunity and environmental costs and legacy management. It can also be observed that competition between cities to capture events of various types through the bidding process, or to attract visitors through the creation of new events, is growing dramatically.  Conference Proceedings

Proceedings of the Third International Event Management Research Conference (Sydney, July 2005)

The conference examined the impacts of events using a triple bottom line approach to evaluation. The Conference Proceedings include copies of all refereed papers, and abstracts of working papers accepted by the conference. These papers cover topics including Event Evaluation Studies and Techniques, Event Design, Crowd Safety and Security for Events, Community Perceptions and Engagement, Major Sports Events, Art Events and Government Event Strategies. Conference Proceedings

Events and Place Making - Conference Proceedings (Sydney, July 2002)

Conference Proceedings

Events Beyond 2000: Setting the Agenda (Sydney, July 2000)

Conference Proceedings

Research Papers

Educating communities for a sustainable future – Do large-scale sporting events have a role? (June 2010)

The extent to which large scale sporting events play a role in progressing efforts by their host communities to live in more environmentally sustainable ways is a little researched area. Dr Rob Harris, Director of the Australian Centre for Event Management, sought to explore this issue in his recent doctorial thesis. The thesis looked at the two largest Australian sporting events (the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games and the Melbourne 2006 Commonwealth Games) that have actively sought to progress an environmental sustainability agenda to see if indeed such events can leave a legacy in this area. 

Festivals and the environmental sustainability challenge (February 2013)

Festivals are fun activities - we go to meet up with friends and family, escape the hum drum of daily life, be exposed to new cultural forms or simply be entertained. Rarely do we consider the demands our attendance makes on our environment, yet like all human activities festivals require resources – water, energy, land, equipment, food and products of various types. Given that many festivals, even at the local level, can involve thousands of attendees these requirements bring with them the potential for negative environmental impacts. In this brief article Dr Rob Harris looks at the nature of such impacts, what represents best practice in dealing with them, and asks the questions as to whether festivals can be managed in a way that reduces or eliminates their environmental footprint. 

Designing accessible events (April 2010)

People with disabilities and older people have a right to access all areas of social participation. Yet, the way that the built and social environments are often constructed serves to restrict the access of these groups to a wide range of activities that unduly constrains their citizenship. From an organisational position, it makes sound business sense to be inclusive of all members of society in order to maximise business potential. Further, most nations now have human rights legislation that places the responsibility on organisations to address access issues for these groups. The Australian Centre for Event Management provides leadership to assist organizations of events to facilitate the involvement of people with disabilities and older people in conferences, festivals, sporting, and other events that they conduct. This leadership is based on an understanding of universal design principles to maximise participation of these groups through a detailed understanding of mobility, vision, hearing and cognitive access dimensions. ACEM staff have a long history of involvement in facilitating the involvement of people with access considerations in all event roles - participants, employees, performers, spectators, community members - and can provide expertise to strategically address access issues through an overall organisational approach. 

By Simon Darcy and Rob Harris, University of Technology, Sydney.