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News in Science

June 2017

UTS scientists are about to search the Great Barrier Reef for resilient corals that show adaptation to climate change and study their genetic hardware.
Using new techniques, that target bacterial genes, specialised nitrogen-fixing bacteria have been identified for the first time.
Nural Cokcetin’s Famelab journey came to an exciting conclusion this month, after she was named joint runner-up (second place) at the 2017 Famelab International final held at the Cheltenham Science Festival.
UTS Science has partnered with Concord Hospital to introduce acupuncture as a potential treatment option for oncology patients.
When most of us go for a trim, we don’t think much of what happens to our locks after they’ve been given the chop. They probably just get swept up and chucked in the bin, destined to take up precious landfill space.
Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Dr Noushin Nasiri has taken home first prize at the AMP Amplify Ignite competition held last week.

May 2017

Launched earlier this month, the STEAMpunk girls program comprises a series of workshops designed to introduce young women in high school to entrepreneurship in the fields of science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics (STEAM).
Dr Pawan Sharma from the School of Life Sciences at UTS has been awarded the 2017 Ann Woolcock Memorial Award from the Assembly on Respiratory Structure and Function of American Thoracic Society.
Three UTS Science lecturers have been recognised for their outstanding work in 2016 at the UTS Teaching and Learning Awards and Citations ceremony held this week.
A partnership between The Green Collar Group and Centre for Compassionate Conservation aims to manage the risks involved in achieving sustainable outcomes for carbon farming projects.
Electric or hybrid cars are one way to put a plug in greenhouse gas emissions, but how do they work? To understand this, you need to understand the batteries that power them.
Wagyu or Kangaroo? That is one of the meaty questions histology students could be answering in a proposed histology workshop that was recently awarded a 2017 UTS Vice-Chancellor Teaching and Learning grant.
Microbiologist and honey expert Dr Nural Cokcetin has been named the country’s best young science communicator at the Australian final of FameLab, an international competition sponsored by the British Council.
Liv Baker discusses the case for considering the individual animal in wildlife conservation.
At a time when mental health, and its effect on both individuals and their professional performance, is more understood than ever there are still some industries where the impact of mental illness is dangerously under-addressed.
The mismatch between public opinion and sustainability science is the subject of a new paper from Professor Graham Pyke at the UTS School of Life Sciences. A highly cited ecologist, Professor Pyke believes that environmental stewardship is everyone’s responsibility, but that, clearly, the message is not getting to the right people.

April 2017

Research has shown the stimulation of bitter taste receptors can relieve features of allergic asthma.
Algae can be used for everything from animal feed to cosmetics, displacing less environmentally friendly products. A team of researchers across science, business and economics are working on the way forward for this emerging industry
UTS Faculty of Science Distinguished Professor Dayong Jin is Australia’s nominee for the prestigious APEC Science Prize for Innovation, Research and Education (ASPIRE) for his work in optoelectronic engineering.
PhD candidate, Riti Mann, will present her research at the Australian Society for Microbiology’s (ASM) Annual Scientific Meeting in Hobart later this year, following her successful presentation at the NSW branch competition last month. 
Research student Melinda Cook from the UTS School of Life Sciences is currently researching the fascinating foraging behaviours of birds in Australian woodlands. Her research is revealing the complex ways in which Australian mistletoe plants and local woodland birds interact.
Do you wear runners, drink coffee or own a mobile phone? The chances are that these products cruised to you on a ship. In 2015, the global merchant fleet carried a record 10 billion tonnes of cargo, a 2.1% increase from the previous year.
The long-held vision of Climate Change Cluster (C3) Director Professor Peter Ralph to address energy and food security through algae-based industries is one step closer with the installation of a new rooftop facility atop the UTS Science Vicki Sara Building. The facility, a 600-litre Varicon PhycoFlow™ algal photobioreactor (PBR), is a first for Australia and is set to revolutionise the NSW bioeconomy.
UTS scientist Nural Cokcetin was named runner-up and received the audience choice prize for her presentation, The sweet treat(ment) for your microbiome, at this week’s FameLab semi-final.
Five women researchers from UTS are among 12 competitors preparing to face off in this week’s FameLab NSW semi-final. Each will have just three minutes to pitch complicated scientific concepts in a fun and enlightening way. Among other things, the judges will be looking for the three “Cs” – content, clarity and charisma.
Between 2008 and 2015, more than 600 new psychoactive substances were reported worldwide. Some, like ‘bath salts’, sound innocuous, while others, like ‘zombie drugs’, do not. However, all are dangerous and their numbers continue to rise.

March 2017

Researchers at the University of Technology Sydney warn that the broad-spectrum antimicrobial effectiveness of silver is being put at risk by the widespread and inappropriate expansion of nanosilver use in medical and consumer goods.
Today’s official launch of the Australian Facility for Taphonomic Experimental Research (AFTER) at the University of Technology Sydney marks a significant milestone for a facility that relies on death, generosity and partnership in equal measure.
A mass coral reef bleaching event at One Tree Island in the southern Great Barrier Reef has been described as “the worst ever seen” by UTS marine scientists.
Research by neuroscientists at UTS, the University of Sydney and the Garvan Institute has revealed a new insight into fear memories that might help to explain how disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) arise and why they are so difficult to treat.

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